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T

here was plenty of newness when it came to


color at the Maison & Objet trade fair in Paris.
The biggest change was one that favored pinks.
The pink color family was on a tear. Soft, warm
personalities made them feel cozy and inviting.
This was especially true for pastels, which had
roles in everything from upholstered seating
to ceramic vases, and were as likely to be
specied for contemporary products as for any
other style. Coral pink put down roots in middle
value saturations. Although mid-tone rose also
appeared, coral was the directional choice.
For any of these pinks, berry sometimes
appeared as a foil. But pink/pink combinations
were much less visible than pink/green ones.
With many new products positioned for spring
selling, pink/green was not a surprise. However,
given the fact that pink/green was also a big
story from Christmasworld (more from that
show in the next edition of The Trend Curve), the
potential for these two families going forward
holds more than springtime possibilities.
As a countertrend to warmth, fuchsia emerged.
Brighter and bluer than the other pinks, fuchsia
held its own among neutrals or earthier hues.
This color is recommended for 2015 (see Pixel
Pink in The Trend Curve Colors 2015).
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T H E I N T E R N A T I O N A L A U T H O R I T Y O N T R E N D F O R E C A S T I N G F O R H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S
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Pink led the way


to newness at Muuto
2 .
14
Tink Pink!
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February 2014
The surge of popularity that greens experienced in Paris came as a build on 2013s success.
Cool, minty greens could still be found, yet their advance had slowed considerably. Meanwhile,
newer greens that took to the warm side spread out.
For example, moss was new in multiple stands. So was olive. A lighter and less-saturated
version of apple was used where brights were called for. This less-intense green worked with
chartreuse, which did not either grow or decline. A dark value called hunter green was the most-
visible deep color in the market.
This movement toward warmth came along with a trend toward earthy colors, textures and
patterns that was emerging throughout the market. In addition to warm greens, it was also
reinforced via peach and terracotta. Oranges were still declining in Paris, so these two orange
personalities were not the biggest story out there. But they were the oranges with growth
potential going forward.
Browns also conveyed an earthy message as they established themselves as the go-to neutral.
Saturated beige and paper-bag browns were seen more often than chocolate. However,
chocolate was building, too. In some upholstery stands, there was a sense of looking over a sea
of browns. All those browns made declining grays look even more dated. Other color news:
While blues backed of generally, Mediterranean and turquoise were new
Yellow narrowed its scope signifcantly
Mustard and gold metallic were the yellows that mattered
Reds were shy
The newest reds had a scaled-back or worn character, suggesting pink
Black took a giant step back
So did white, continuing an earlier retreat at the September fair
Marble, Metal and More
A
t Maison & Objet, marble was on-trend in a big way. It was used for tabletops, lamp bases,
sculptures and candleholders. White made the strongest statement, although black was
not far behind. That said, the fairs emerging interest in earthy warmth suggested that brown
marble, which also appeared, will also be a factor in the coming year. Green marble, absent
since the late 1980s, popped up in an analog clock from style-setter Menu, and as the top of a
drinks table from upstairs maker Ginger & Jagger. No wonder green marble is on the watch list
for 2015.
Alabaster, with a marble-like appearance and a similar 80s
pedigree, will benet from marbles popularity. While just a few
companies used it this time, alabaster is an obvious choice to
rise on marbles coattails.
Concrete has been hinting as a broader role for about a year.
At the January fair, it fnally took of. The fact that it was always
shown in natural gray made this materials ascendency a
countertrend to the decline of gray neutrals.
Concrete, mixed with berglass to keep its weight manageable,
Warmer greens
were directional: Porada
New colors from Marie Daage
included fuchsia, turquoise
and Mediterranean blue
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February 2014
was formed into whimsical indoor/outdoor planters shaped like a top hat or a pair of shoes at
Seletti. DM Depot made modular concrete-composite honeycomb chambers for growing herbs,
called Hive. Other applications:
Mensch Mades damask motifs were made to hang in multiples as a screen or room divider
Dante Goods & Bads showed oversized elephant feet, topped with copper to become
whimsical tables
Menu liked the same combination, done in candleholders
Menu also paired concrete with glass
Baptized By Nature teamed concrete with wood in boxy tables
The preference for warmer metals and metallic nishes that was observed at last years fair just
kept on building. Golds penetration continued to nudge silver aside, even in contemporary/
modern applications. Brass was back, increasingly in unapologetically shiny looks that made
tabletops and lighting gleam. Gold leaf hinted at a return for luxury products.
Both brass and leaf looks moved gold -nish colors into yellower territory that would have been
considered dated, and even gaudy, just a few years ago. But by the time 2015 is over, distinctly
yellow-gold nishes will be used to indicate status.
Copper also took share away from silver. This copper was not too
orange. Instead, it had lightweight personalities that matched the rose-
gold tones coming from jewelry and watches. It was not uncommon
to see collections ofered only in warm-metal fnishes, with a choice
of copper or gold. Bronze appeared occasionally, ofering yet another
warm option. As browns advance, bronze will become more common.
While oak remained the top wood, oiled nishes that darkened the
look from blonde to mid-tone values, had a bit more exposure. At the
same time, many companies introduced, or expanded, their position
in warmly stained walnut, indicating requests for darker fnishes from
their customers.
Even though exotic woods, like ebony and various burls, had a small
role, it was notably larger than last time. While this could be the result
of an improving worldwide economy (since these species always push
up product cost), it is worth noting that highly gured woods advanced for the rst time in many
seasons at the October, 2013 High Point furniture market.
Organizing Principle
I
f just one word could be used to describe the personality of new designs at Showtime, the
hands-down choice would be layered. If two words were allowed, textured would have to
be next. When texture and layering worked together, as they did in the most-directional fabrics,
patterns became more complex than they have been in years.
Some companies took a straightforward approach, like spreading a large damask over a thin
stripe or a thin chevron over a blocky plaid. Other layered patterns were far more difcult to
describe.
Dorell Fabrics showed a woven fabric in which a pinstripe ground was packed with blocky
Chapeau, from Seletti,
in concrete composite
Mahogany, chestnut, lacquer,
hammered gold and marble in
Ginger & Jaggers Pebble lamp
Dorells layered
numerical camouflage
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February 2014
numbers of diferent colors. Every time one number overlapped part of another, not only did
the color change, so did the weave texture. While these shifts were intended to highlight the
overlap, a neutralized palette of grays/browns/blues made the contrast subtle, suggesting a
numeric-camouage.
A number of designs featured ombr efects that were equally subtle. But Showtimes top
vehicle for layering and texture was not limited to understatement. Companies like Textile
Creations used colored gradients to their fullest efect.
Basic ombrs in either approach produced a gradient color-shift across patterns. Newer and more-
complicated versions pushed the look forward by adding pattern within the meandering color, or
even adding that pattern its own texture (think watercolor), as it crossed over another design.
In a variation on the theme, Adesal Jacquard superimposed wispy, sketched fowers over
a simple plaid. (Sketching, including the look of pencil lines below watercolor motifs, was
incoming as part of the interest in all things artisanal). The
blossoms obscured the plaid ground to greater or lesser degrees,
so the plaid drifted in and out of view.
Layering vertical and horizontal patterns was in the earliest
emerging stages. Circa 1801 crossed a stripe and a zigzag, both
of which had a scraped texture. At American Silk, loose stripes
with uneven edges that suggested reverberation went in a
horizontal direction. Meanwhile thinner stripes with an irregular
and interrupted rhythm lined the pattern from top to bottom. Two
directions of stripes, both with watercolor texture, made Paras
print fabric fascinating. Other ways to layer:
Adding a phantom pattern, or even a shadow in the ground
Outlining a motif repeat over a textured, allover ground or a
fully-colored/textured design
Compositions in which degrees of boldness for each pattern created an illusion of layering
A number of different
layering methods took
up where the vintage-
industrial trend of
the recent past left
off. But instead of
layering songbirds,
indistinct script, retro
postage stamps and
crowns, subjects were
less predictable and
textures became more
pronounced.
Flowers mingled with
plaid at Adesal Jacquards
Contrasting directions with
lots of texture: Circa 1801
American Silks
reverberating layered stripes
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February 2014
Geometric Dominance
A
look at the pattern landscape conrmed geometrics as the undisputed
favorite at all price points. P. Kaufman called geometrics huge,
suggesting they ofer a safe way to do a print. Covington agreed that
geometrics are bestsellers, saying their extreme popularity is because
geometrics are so easy to decorate around. But dont expect geometrics of
the future to look the way they have in the past.
De Leo says geometrics are evolving from the basic, rigid forms we have
known into ones that feel artistic, organic or even digitally inspired. At
Showtime, that meant ikat-inuenced edges (Textile Creations), hand-drawn
looks (Kentex), puckered grounds (Valdese Weavers), tiny-texture lls
(Sunbury), watercolor/ brush-stroke techniques (Covington), woodcut efects (Circa 1801) and
pufy quilting (Home Fabrics).
Small boxes suggested a blurry, pixelated approach that was applied to basket-weave layouts,
Pac-Man-like mazes, diamonds, stripes, many chevrons and even a damask. Meanwhile,
crosshatch patterns alluded to the new geometric sensibility. Looking more like a doodle than
a grid, these loose designs were unevenly textured and sometimes looked randomly placed.
(See a gallery of new crosshatch layouts in the Members area at www.trendcurve.com)
This softer take on boxes, dots, honeycombs and lines makes them newly appealing to those
for whom hard-edged gures are too severe. It also takes them in a transitional direction,
reinforcing a re-emerging style that was spreading through Showtime textiles as it begins a
3-year growth cycle.
While geometrics caused lots of conversation, they were
not the only pattern direction of note. In a countertrend
highlighting traditional forms, paisleysand paisley-
inspired medallionscontinued to emerge. What
was interesting about these gures was how updated
techniques wrenched paisleys out of the past to give them
21st-century potential.
For example, Pemberley, which was new from Valdese
Weavers, featured horizontal lines of blue or green paisleys
woven over a ground of wide red or of-white diagonal
stripes for a complex, layered look that is directional.
Sunburys allover woven paisley foated over an of-white-
and-green stripe ground.
At Home Fabrics, an intricately woven paisley was updated
via a huge scale that ts with the incoming trend toward
larger furniture pieces that re-emerged about a year ago.
Motifs got somewhat smaller in P. Kaufmanns paisley
print, with a repeating ikat gure in the ground. Another P.
Kaufmann design took a trend-right watercolor approach,
softening both paisley motifs and the oral elements
printed in the ground.
De Leos Solera pieced-dyed velvet was printed with an
on-trend ombr efect. A foil-embossed paisley pattern
Tiny-textures fill
geometric figures at Sunbury
Home Fabrics took
paisley scale larger
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February 2014
applied via heat-transfer resulted in a vintage look. While this allover aged texture
came from layering processes, rather than texturing the motif itself, it did just as much
to soften the personality of the pattern as ikat-inuenced edges did for geometrics.
Other methods of alluding to age were also incoming and will continue to grow into
2016. These included the suggestion of fading or worn-away/scraped-of patterns
that is just getting a start now.
Give Me Some Skin
W
ild-game skin patterns are day-in/day-out basics that never leave some
collections. Product designers appreciate their versatility because they can
make a provocative, whimsical, luxury or global statement, depending on how they are used.
At the same time, consumers understand them. So, when these skin designs also jump into the
realm of trend, their ascent has few obstacles, and their potential is huge.
At the June Showtime market, nearly every company debuted fabrics with big-cat spots or tiger/
zebra stripes. By the time the December market rolled around, the need for big-cat spots and
tiger/zebra stripes had largely been satised, and the market turned in another direction. This
time, snakeskin made big strides.
At Home Accent Fabrics, a woven cobra-skin design favored light-brown and of-white neutrals.
In addition to a light-value neutral version, Ramtex paired graphite with yellow-cast plantation
green. Chenille gave snakeskin a fascinating texture at De Leo, while Sunburys glittery skin
design emphasized the importance of metallic inuences going forward.
Concerias embossed-leather Tilapia pattern took the scale in a smaller and more-regular
direction in bronze, copper or graphite metallic for a luxury statement. Then they shifted to sh-
skin embossing, overprinted with a broad plaid for a new approach to layering.
Fish-scale repeats ofered a less-expected skin texture that coordinated perfectly with the new
crop of Asian designs in the market. Ramtex used these emerging mid-scale scallop shapes as
colorful, allover repeats in hues like blue or hot pink, while Valdese Weavers preferred neturals.
De Leos sh scales had a multicolor ll utilizing blues/greens/white, and were woven with lots
of visual texture. Circa 1801 quilted their scallops to give them depth and texture (quilting will
build for another 12-14 months).
Home Accent Fabrics cobra-skin design Tilapia, from Conceria
A scraped-and-aged
appearance at Covington
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As the Asian trend gathers momentum in 2014, expect sh-scale designs to ramp up. They
wont have the same impact as big-cat and zebra stripes, or even snakeskin patterns, but they
will ofer an interesting alternative to less-structured repeats all the way through 2015. Other
design directions at Showtime:
Artists splatters and random brushstrokesa major incoming story
Pixelated patterns, especially stripes and zigzags, as a textural alternative to ikat-
inuenced edges
Jacobean forals, many incorporating paisley motifs, continued their ascent in both
printed and woven designs
Damasksstill building (see the blog post Everything Old is New Again in the
Members area online)
Greek keys in new applications and abstract interpretationsongoing
Deco-inspired geometrics and leaves
Mountain Chic
T
he global trend is vitally important to home interiors, even though it is rarely the sole style
in a room setting. Thats because pieces in this mode are generally the jewelry in the room.
They are the secret sauce that gives many vignettes a unique personality.
Recently, ikat motifs have been the vanguard of global style. But, at the Showtime textiles
market, momentum for ikats continued to slow. This was true, even though ikat inuences,
like uneven edges, found their way into a new crop of patterns. But the point of view on those
patterns was moving away from a Middle-Eastern perspective and toward one closer to home.
The freshest approach to global style integrated those ikat inuences into a broader urban-
lodge trend. The Trend Curve rst wrote about this look as one with incoming mainstream
potential a year ago. Now the style is starting to ll out, with debut designs and collection from
makers like Covington, Valdese Weavers, Circa 1801, Sunbury, Vision Fabrics and others that
go beyond ikats.
Directional patterns leverage First-Nation elements, including Aztec-inuenced geometrics,
Southwest-inspired color blocks and Navajo-blanket zigzags, diamonds, hooks, steps and
squash blossoms. While all these design types are familiar, the best debut patterns did not
repeat the same-old color stories and texture treatments of the last lodge trend. Instead, they
went in a more-adventuresome direction.
Textile Creations re-colored Indian Sunset, featuring geometric motifs over a ground dominated
by bright gradient blues and purples, rather than solid oranges and reds, as in the past. Circa
1801 added spa blues in two values to a neutralized geometric/stripe pattern, sidestepping
the more-expected turquoise option.
Valdese Weavers used apple green, yellow and pink with gray and brown, energizing a typical-
Southwest stripe. They brought blue and purple together in a bolder, wider stripe lled with
stepped triangles. This company also worked with stepped outlines around crosses, tiling
them into an allover design and playing with the simple, three-color weave to give them a
rhythm they have never had in the past.
For more on the Asian
trend, see the blog
post Making Asia
Major in the Members
area online.
Aqua update at Circa 1801
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February 2014
Texture also got an update. Home Fabrics thin, interrupted stripe was
really a series of long, colorful arrows. Valdese Weavers stripe suggested
a rug-inspired twill weave, but it was unexpectedly made of chenille.
Another Valdese fabric came with a zigzag design done in cord embroidery
for a modern twist.
Vision Fabrics showed what they characterized as a Western Kilim,
complete with jagged texture applied to an interesting mix of exotic
paisleys and Southwest diamonds in a single pattern. This design,
which will be instrumental in walking their customers from yesterdays
ikats to tomorrows First-Nation geometrics, was part of Visions new
Southwestern collection, which was inspired by the look and lifestyle of cowboys.
The Trend Curve believes in the potential of a Mountain Chic sensibility in 2014 that will continue
into 2015 (we created a trend called Best of The West in The Trend Curve Colors2014, released
in 2012). It will go beyond the materials and motifs discussed above to include:
Leather, hair-on-hide and suedeprinted, fringed, braided, embossed,
quilted and studded
Beadsdone in patterns or as a simulated texture
Feathersin print and pattern or real
Crossesas geometrics, rather than religious icons
Yet, we also see the possibility of a South American detour in 2015, infuenced by the upcoming
summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In addition to shared elements, like copper,
snakeskin and textured stripes, think about amping up the energy level by adding:
Undulating forms and/or edges that feel active
Vibrant and saturated hues
A riot of texture and detail
Rhythmic, almost vibrating repeats
Tropical woods
From toucans to tassels and from tropical owers to ounces, this trend will grab consumers
eyes and hold them. Prepare for Brazilian looks to be the hot accent to ongoing Mountain Chic.
Atlanta Rugs
T
he shift to casual style dened the freshest introductions at
the Rug Market in Atlanta this January. Patterns took on a more
loosely composed style, with designs that looked less stif and
traditional, and more hand drawn than ever. Inspiration came from
artists and designers outside the rug industry, making for a less-
formulaic approach to the surface design of a rug (Emma Gardner
at Couristan, Lotta Jansdotter at Surya, Kevin OBrien and Hable
Construction at Capel, Barclay Butera at Nourison).
Block prints, artists sketchpads and doodling while talking on
the phone all seemed to have an imprint on the casual movement.
Some patterns suggested that someone had taken a quick sketch
Covingtons red/off-
white/gray/taupe
geometrics appeared
to be printed off-
register, so ragged
edges revealed
a white ground
around each design
element. The result
was a rustic, worn
appearance.
Vision Fabrics Western Kilim
Kevin OBrien for Capel
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February 2014
done as a toss awaythen rescaled and reproduced it to create an entire rug
surface design. The directional embrace of imperfection made for a more
laid-back series of introductions.
Under this infuence, patterns became simpler and cleaner in defnition.
Geometric designs were softened and orals took on a fresh-picked-from-
the-garden sensibility. From earlier tribal derivations, including Moroccan,
the reduction of pattern complexity evolved further. Think of individual
Indian-block-print sections, stenciled textiles or wallpaper from the
founding of the U.S., or the studied plainness of Scandinavian fabrics.
Favoring less-than-perfect pattern emerged in another approach that felt
equally artistic. The concept: take one complete pattern and layer another
over it. Better yet, make sure the base pattern is mostly erased, and then superimpose the new
design over it. Show just enough of the previous design to make the mash-up obvious. This
look was variously called decomposed design and erased-and-drawn-over pattern. The most
erudite description was palimpsest, a term originally referring to Medieval manuscripts that
were erased so they could be reused as new documents.
In fact, there was increased interest throughout the show in reusing, repurposing and
refurbishing. While the layering concept was new, working with bers, yarns, textiles and old rugs
was less of a surprise. At this show, cotton selvedges called chindi, from Indian textile mills, were
used rag-rug style in multi-colored and very-bright designs. Denim scraps and strips were woven
into a variety of at rugs, mixing with roughly processed jute and leather strips.
All elements of leather remained on the edge. While leather strips and patch-worked leather
stayed strong, the addition of metallic cowhide in stitched-together collages popped up as new
for the US market.
Metallic was part of a luster trend that continued to build as a counterpoint to wool. Silk came
up sparingly, while more-moderately priced alternatives surged. Bamboo, banana silk, rayon
(faux silk) and viscose were the go-to bers for expressing luster.
Also of note in Atlanta:
Oushak weaves, with their naturally blocky confgurations, were modifed to work
in transitional jute constructions and in saturated palettes at Loloi; super-constructed
Oushaks, using ne-yet-nubby background yarns and nished with very low pile
height, were directional
Soumaks were freshened with linen grounds and tonal-chenille
accents
The sari-silk push from last year leveled of. Silk brights moved on
to mix with non-sari brights and neutrals. Pink stood out as the best
carry over.
Outdoor rugs have blossomed and gone beyond their category;
half of them are sold for interiors, and crisp, clean colors on neutral
grounds reected that use in Atlanta
Advancing juvenile rugs had a tongue-in-cheek wryness that belied
humor and sophistication
Diagonal elements got more attention via chevrons, fame stitches,
diamonds and even hexagons
Decostruced traditional
design at Harounian
Recycled selvedges called
chindi used as yarn at Couristan
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February 2014
Heimtextil 2014
T
hree-dimensional efects were among the top trends
at the Heimtextil trade fair in Frankfurt, Germany.
For example, relief and metallic threads showed up in
returning brocades. While traditional, these textiles were
surprisingly lightweight, distancing them from the
dense tapestries the textile-industry has known in
the past. At one booth, the Italian manufacturer
explained that lightweight brocades represent
an efort to update traditional looks with a more
modern spirit. And that was a recurring and refreshing refrain.
One new technique starring on pillows featured raised patterns shot with a bit of metallic and
textured with an almost-rubberized hand. Designs from makers like Christian Fischbacher were
applied with a liquid color, heat set, laid with foil and heat set yet again.
At the Finnish rm Into, woven textiles used layering to achieve complexity and dimension. For
example, some achingly soft wools had build-ups of yarn, piled up like spaghetti, or a delicate
sheer was made up of a single-yarn warp and a multiple-strand weft, and then crossed with
wide-woven stripespufs of golden organza alternating with chunkier yellow knitting.
Velvets came with a tricked-out sensibility. This updated look and feel was achieved through
worn surfaces that read like roughed-up pann (playing up matte/shine contrast) to quilted,
tufted and popcorn looks that recalled some of the stretchy textures used by trendsetting
European upholsterers.
Complex sheers stole the show, with textures like crinkling or puckering; patterns, like large-
scale orals or crosshatched geometric embroideries in retro designs. And nettingfrom wide-
grid fshnets to mosquito gauzes to knitted tullesseemed fresh. This was particularly true
when they were woven with metallic threads for a surprisingly glam look, or embellished with
dots that looked like modern crewel.
Really new were intriguing grids
that resembled passementerie:
lush fringes or woven tapes,
designed to add texture to
peekaboo draperies.
Towels also participated
in the dimensional trend.
Makers featured lush weaves,
like herringbones, stripes,
checkerboards, orals, dots,
some with 3-D embellishments.
Mve, for example, showed a
single sequin paisley. Other
towel companies eschewed
motifs in favor of textural tufts,
reminiscent of chenille blankets.
High relief in raised pattern, foiling and
heat-setting: Christian Fischbacher
Complex dimension from Into
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February 2014
In wallcoverings, a standout collection from Arte was based on
the ideas and polychrome architecture of Le Corbusier. The highly
tactile group included Dots (ink with relief and high gloss nish),
especially fetching in lime; Squares (inspired by the architects
fenestration), thermoformed for high relief and stunning in cobalt;
and Pavilion (a primitive pattern that resembles croc).
Feathers, beading and woven-wood veneers were eye candy at the
Taiwanese company ATT Rotex. So were recycled blue jeans that
took to the walls, as they already have in upholstery, adding depth
and texture in this more-recent application. Other dimensional
looks read like beefed up shagreen in silvery shades, while python
patterns ofered a fat alternative.
Finishes for the wall included slick patent-leather looks in brilliant
hues. Foil-embellishments intrigued when contrasting textures,
perhaps a Kraft-like paper, were glammed up with metallic ecks.
Another look with a twist: pixilated designs in gold relief. In fact,
metallics, however expressed, often teamed with more rustic
materials for contrast. Similarly, contrasts between matte and
luster were played up. For example, two-sided pillows at Christian Fishbacher came with one
side made of matte annel, and the other glazed linen.
Buzz about digital printing dominated the fair, as did
digital-technology companies, like Hewlett-Packard.
Topics for photorealistic imagery ran the gamut,
from urban street scenes to beach-themed pebbles,
rippling water and mega-scale tropical foliage. In some
directional instances, designs intentionally lost focus.
But this technology was really at its best at the hand
of artists. For example, one Finnish artist at Studio
Kelkka began with a drippy painting. She used scanning
to scale and play with the images, which were nally
digitally printed. Plage, a company from France, showed
of lifelike garden scenes, as well as big blooms, that
were hand drawn, then
digitally printed. Also of note at Heimtextil:
Studio Lines Opulent
collection shows rich relief
Is it cross-stitch or batik?
Its a little of both at Esprit
Digitally printed starfish from Pichler
Asian styles embraced a new modernity, with blown-up
toiles in bright pastels (Enchantment, from Thibaut),
dragon motifs in allover patterns (at the Spanish company
Vilber) and single, at images (in red-on-white at Telas de Lona)
Hints of Southwest style emerged in characteristic geometric
patterns, stylized feathers and Santa Fe colors

Printed cross stitch, often combined with other patterns, some
with a pixilated look
Mega-scale hounds-tooth checks, some departing from typical
black-and-white combinations.
2014 MARKETING DIRECTIONS, INC. ANY REPRODUCTION OF THIS PUBLICATION IS A DIRECT VIOLATION OF FEDERAL COPYRIGHT LAW. THIS INCLUDES,
BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO, COLOR COPYING, ANY OTHER PHOTOCOPYING OR FAXING, E-MAIL DISTRIBUTION OF COPY OR POSTING CONTENT ON THE INTERNET.
Michelle Lamb
is the founder and chairman of
Marketing Directions, Inc.,
publishers of The Trend Curve and
numerous special reports covering
major markets.
Marketing Directions, Inc.
informs national and international
manufacturers and retailers on
industry trends.
The Trend Curve is published by
Marketing Directions, Inc. six times
yearly with information from major
markets and trade shows important
to the home furnishings industry. A
Digital subscription is available at
$199.00 per year, $369.00 for two
years. Back issues ($30 each) and
custom publications are available.
Corporate and site-license subscrip-
tions available.
Marketing Directions, Inc.
PO Box 44475
Eden Prairie, MN 55344 USA
(952) 893-1245
or call toll-free (800) 531-6614
Fax (952) 893-1264
E-mail: info@trendcurve.com
http://www.trendcurve.com
The Trend Curve - ISSN#1080-1324
Michelle Lamb
Editorial Director
Editorial Correspondents:
For Atlanta Rugs:
Arthur Douglas Thayer
For Heimtextil:
Elaine Markoutsas
While every effort has been made
to provide accurate information,
Marketing Directions, Inc. cannot
be held accountable for any error or
omission and there is no warranty or
representation, express or implied,
that the information provided in this
publication is denitive. Marketing
Directions, Inc. is not responsible
for any costs, expenses or damages,
actual or consequential, resulting
from the use of this information.
the last word
A
s most of our readers know, I have been in
the home furnishings industry for many
years. Working for Target, Room & Board and
Rubbermaid before co-founding Marketing
Directions (parent company of The Trend Curve)
gave me many opportunities to attend markets
and work with product-development teams as
a buyer, trend merchant, merchandise manager
and national accounts manager.
Thats how I know rsthand that home-dcor
product development has embraced myriad
inuences over the years. And thats why I
felt so bemused at Showtime, when many
companies told me that their sole source of
inspiration was the runway. It seemed clear,
judging from the amount of repetition from
one line to another, that the same apparel
collections were behind a number of debut
textile patterns. Perhaps people were
simplifying when it came to naming their
resourcesbut perhaps not.
I have heard the runway credited for a new
color, nish or material too many times in the
past six monthsand not just from textiles
designers, but also from those in every
category. It seems as though apparel has not
only become the best source of home-dcor
product development inspiration, but lately,
the only one.
I cannot help but think about the impact that
world afairs, archeology, architecture and art
exhibits have had on collections of the past
for example, Egyptian excavations in the 1920s
or the major exhibit of Georgia OKeefes work
in the mid-1980s. If these kinds of events are
not also coming into play, the market is missing
some profound opportunitiesnot only for
design, but also for product diferentiation.
It is easy to get caught up in the everyday
rhythm of meetings and projects, and the
chaos of trade fairs and previews. Breaking
out of that cycle, even if just long enough to
take in a museum or stroll through a local art
fair, will feed your creativity in amazing ways! I
encourage everyone to plan a eld trip at least
once each quarter. Need a few ideas?
Sial, Paris, the worlds largest food
innovation marketplace at Parc des
Expositions de Paris-Nord Villepinte (same
venue as Maison & Objet) 10/19 10/23/14.
The next big food trend could drive new prep
items in kitchen assortments, the shape of
tableware or motifs in surface designs. Closer
to home, the Fancy Food Show takes place in
NYC 6/29 7/1/14.
Vikings: Life and Legend is on tap at the
British Museum (3/6/14 6/22/14). The rising
interest in Scandinavian trends may be fueled
by this show.
The advance of super-heroes in dcor that
began in 2013 will certainly continue into
2014 and beyond (see our Comic Art trend in
The Trend Curve Colors 2015). Comic-Con
International, held in San Diego from 7/24-
7/27, is a hot ticket to get, but a great source of
inspiration and amazement.
Sochi 2014 may not be on your travel list,
but you can watch the games online and think
about the host country and its history. Todays
emerging brocades ofer just one connection to
the elaborate elements of monarchist Russia.
This is just the tip of the iceberg. Shopping in a
trendy area, heading to a ski slope or tracking
new technologies can all inspire palettes and
patterns.
There is nothing wrong with paying attention
to apparel trends. But to diferentiate your
assortment, its time to look beyond the
runway, too.
School children on
a eld trip to the
MosqueCathedral of
Crdoba, a medieval
Islamic mosque that
was converted into
a Catholic Christian
cathedral in the
Spanish city of Cr-
doba, Andalusia. The
mosque is regarded
as the one of the most
accomplished monu-
ments of Moorish
architecture.