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CHECK SIX

THE FAST PLAY GAME


OF
AIR-TO-AIR COMBAT
First Blood Games 2006
Check Six, Copyright 2006, First Blood Games
This document may be freely copied and distributed.
Version p.0.02
12 DAMAGED AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10 MISSILES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9 GUNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9 ANGLE MODIFIER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9 COMBAT
7 SAMPLE MANEUVERING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 COMBAT FUEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 TAILING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6 SPIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6 LOADED AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 AIRCRAFT SPEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 AIRCRAFT ALTITUDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 MANEUVERING
3 GAME CHART SHEET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 AIRCRAFT DATA CHART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 AIRCRAFT & PILOT RECORD SHEET . . . . . . . . . . .
2 CHARTS & TABLES
1 INTRODUCTION
19 SURGICAL STRIKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18 THE SWEEP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18 INTERNATIONAL INCIDENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18 INTERCEPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18 SCENARIOS
17 ENDING THE CAMPAIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17 PILOTS & AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17 CAMPAIGNS
16 VICTORY CONDITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16 ENDING A GAME
15 LANDING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14 EJECTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14 PILOT SKILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14 TERRAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14 OTHER RULES
13 COMBAT EXAMPLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
Check Six is a game of fast playing modern air combat.
The game has been designed to be played on a hex
board, using aircraft miniatures, or counters. The
optimal playing surface should be about 3 x 3 if 1
hexes are used. If miniatures are used the most
suitable scales seem to be from 1:144, to 1:700.
Although 1:144 is more common the smaller scales will
allow a game to be played on a much smaller surface
using standard hex map boards.
The object of Check Six is to shoot down your
opponent using a array of weapons and tactics. Many
of the components of the game have been abstracted,
and simplified to speed up game play, after all it is a
game of dog fighting.
Aircraft movement in Check Six is a matter of selecting
maneuvers from an Aircraft Maneuver sheet designed
for each type of aircraft. Once players have selected
their maneuvers the planes are then moved in
accordance with the movement indicated on the
maneuver sheet. If a pilot is not careful he can lose
control, or stall his plane.
In order to keep the game play fast and exciting, many
elements of the game have been abstracted, and
combined. For instance missiles have been divided into
2 categories, Infra red, and Radar guided, will all
missiles using the same Missile Firing Zone. All Guns
have been simplified as well using a common Gun
Firing Zone.
The greatest amount of detail has been put into the
individual Aircraft Data Sheets, one for each type of
combat aircraft.
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CHARTS AND
TABLES
Check Six uses three different sheets in the game. The
first is the Aircraft & Pilot Record sheet, used to record
aircraft and pilot data during the course of a game. The
second is the Aircraft maneuver sheet, used to record
the basic data for the different combat aircraft used in
the game. The last is the Game Chart sheet used to
resolve combat and other game functions.
AIRCRAFT & PILOT RECORD SHEET
The Aircraft/Pilot record sheet is how a player keeps
track of planes and pilots under his control. Each sheet
has room for recording aircraft and pilot data for three
planes, and includes sections for basic information,
armaments and countermeasures, fuel, maneuvering,
and damage.
Filling out the Record Sheet
The first section is for basic information about the
plane and pilot are located at the top of the sheet. This
section contains areas to record aircraft type, aircraft
identifier, pilot skill, pilot call sign, and pilot
experience.
The second section is for keeping track of armament
and countermeasures carried by the aircraft. Armament
and countermeasure data from the applicable aircraft
data sheets are recorded in this section.
Weapons and countermeasures listed with boxes next
to them have a limited quantity available. Unused
boxes should be filled in leaving an amount of open
boxes equal the number of each weapon or
countermeasure available from the aircraft data chart.
For ECM, and Lock-on fill in the values as listed on the
Aircraft Maneuver chart. As weapons are fired, and
countermeasures are used boxes are filled in. When no
boxes remain for a specific weapon or countermeasure
the aircraft is out of that weapon or countermeasure.
In the above example the Tomcat starts with 6 Gun
shots, 4 IR missiles, RG missiles, 2 Flares, 2 Chaff. I RG
missile has been fired, and 1 set of Chaff has been
dispensed.
The third section is used to record a planes starting
Combat Fuel, and fuel usage during the game. To
better keep track of the amount of Combat Fuel used
record the used fuel on a turn by turn basis as shown
below. At the start of each game, players roll to
determine how much combat Fuel their planes start
the game with.
In the above example the plane has started with a
Combat Fuel load of 60, and has used another 13
points of fuel for the first four turns of a game.
The fourth section is used to record damage to the
plane, and includes sections for engine, fuel, control,
and avionics damage. Once a box has been filled in the
plane may no longer perform that action, or must
suffer the indicated penalty.
For example the Tomcat has had its Thrust reduced by
2 due to damage taken during combat
The last section is for recording aircraft maneuvers.
This section provides boxes for recording speed,
altitude, specific maneuvers, thrust and braking, and
climbing and diving. The maneuver sections contains
enough boxes for a game lasting 20 turns.
The example above shows the maneuvers performed
by the Tomcat through the first four turns of a game.
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AIRCRAFT DATA CHART
Each aircraft will have its own unique data chart that
lists maneuvers, restrictions, heat zones, line of sight
zones, armament, countermeasures, and performance
data.
Aircraft Data Sheet for the F-14 Tomcat
The Maneuver Table
This is the large table that shows all available
maneuvers the plane is able to perform. Each
maneuver listed on the table has a unique number that
is used to indicate the maneuver on the Aircraft/Pilot
Record Sheet. The maneuvers are divided into speed
bands, and Special Maneuvers.
Heat Zone
This is the heat signature of the aircraft, and the zones
that an opponents IR missiles can track. The narrow
heat zone is the area that a narrow aspect IR missile
can track. The wide heat zone is the area a wide aspect
IR missile can track. The wide heat zone includes the
area in the narrow zone. The heat zone will vary from
plane to plane, for example a twin engine plane with
an afterburner will provide a bigger heat signature to
the enemy than a single engine, non afterburning
plane.
Line of Sight Zone
This is the area of visibility for an aircraft. In order to
have a chance at tailing another plane it must be in
your Line of Sight Zone. Aircraft will have different
vision zones depending on the number of crew, and
type of canopy.
Tailing Zone
Enemy planes in this zone will be able to tail you as
long as you are in their Line of Sight Zone.
Armaments/Countermeasures
This section lists the weapons and countermeasures
the plane is equipped with, along with any information
that goes along with them. The numbers listed in the
boxes next to the weapons and countermeasures are
the quantities available.
Performance
This section lists any performance data not covered in
other areas, and includes the maximum thrust, brake,
climb, and dive rates the plane is capable of.
GAME CHART SHEET
This sheet contains all tables and charts for resolving
missile combat, gun combat, out of control aircraft,
ejection, turn sequence, landings, and pilot skill.
Check Six Game Chart Sheet.
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MANEUVERING
Movement is accomplished by picking a maneuver
from the Aircraft Maneuver Chart and moving the
planes on the hex map corresponding to the chosen
maneuver. For simplicity, climbing and diving will not
effect the number of hexes moved by a plane in a given
turn.
PLOTTING MOVES
A player must pick either a Special Maneuver, or a
maneuver listed in the speed band in which the plane
is currently traveling, then record it on the Aircraft &
Pilot Record Sheet, along with any speed and altitude
changes.
A planes current speed is the speed recorded in the
previous turn, or the listed starting speed for the first
turn of a game. For example, a plane that starts the
game going speed 4, will have to choose either a
Special maneuver, or a maneuver listed in the Speed 4
band for the first turn of the game, the speed recorded
after maneuvering will be the current speed for the
second turn, and so on.
BASIC MANEUVERS
Each maneuver shows the starting and ending position
of the aircraft, and any speed changes caused by the
maneuver. The aircraft facing and position at the start
of a maneuver is shown as a black aircraft silhouette,
the end facing and position as a gray silhouette.
A pilot may choose to face his plane toward one of
three hexes at the end of a maneuver: the one where
the shaded silhouette points, facing the T, or facing
the W hexsides. The W means the plane is
performing a wide turn or in some cases a slide. The
T marking means the plane is performing a tight
turn, Yo-Yo, or a quick snap at the end of a turn.
When performing straight maneuvers, the L or R
indicate a left or right turn made at the and of the
move. The L and R do not count as a turn, and may
be performed even when a plane is not allowed to turn
because of control damage.
SPECIAL MANEUVERS
In addition to the basic maneuvers, planes may
perform special maneuvers listed on the maneuver
chart. Special maneuvers will be limited by aircraft
damage, and pilot skill.
All Special Maneuvers are considered hard turns and
may not be performed if the plane is unable to perform
hard turns due to damage.
Immelmann
The Immelmann is a climbing maneuver that will turn
the plane around after it moves one hex forward. An
Immelmann may be performed at speed 2 or higher. A
plane performing an Immelmann will gain 1 altitude
level, and burn off 2 in speed. A pilot may apply thrust
to counter the speed loss.
Split S
The Split S is a diving maneuver that will turn a plane
around after it moves one hex forward. A Split S may
be performed at speed 1 or higher. A plane performing
a Split S will lose 1 altitude level, and gain 2 in speed.
A pilot may counter the speed gain by braking.
Lateral Rudder Roll (left and Right)
The Lateral Rudder Roll moves a plane in a total lateral
direction, and may be performed at speed 3 to 5. The
Lateral Rudder Roll will drop a planes speed by 2
unless the pilot applies thrust to counter the speed
loss.
Scissors (Left and Right)
The scissors is a very tight weaving turn normally used
to burn off speed causing an enemy plane to
overshoot. Scissors may be performed at any speed of
2 to 5, and will reduce speed by 2. A pilot may apply
thrust to counter the speed loss.
PERFORMANCE
A planes performance is its ability to apply thrust,
brake, climb, and dive. Each plane will have a rating for
each of the above listed on the Aircraft Maneuver sheet.
Thrust
Thrust is a planes ability to apply power to increase
speed, and counter the speed penalties for climbing
and performing maneuvers.
Every speed band on a planes aircraft data sheet will
have a listed thrust value, this is the amount of power
available to the pilot at the current speed.
As a plane increases speed its available thrust will
decrease due to the fact that more power is required to
maintain the plane at higher speed.
For example the Tomcat has a thrust rating of 2 at
speed 4, this means the pilot has 2 thrust points
available for speed increases, or countering speed
reductions due to turning or climbing. If the Tomcat
was moving at a speed of 6, where the thrust rating is
0, the pilot would be unable to increase speed, or
counter any speed reductions due to turning, or
climbing.
Thrust is represented by a positive number in the
Thrust/Brake box in the Maneuver section of the
Aircraft & Pilot record sheet
Thrust will be reduced by taking engine damage during
combat. The reduction in thrust is subtracted from the
thrust value of the aircraft in each of the speed bands.
This may reduce the thrust rating in a speed band
4
below zero. When this occurs the negative thrust must
be applied, in effect will become braking.
For example the Tomcat with the thrust rating of 2 at
speed 4 takes a missile hit that reduces its thrust by 3,
in the next turn the player would subtract the -3 thrust
damage from the 2 thrust rating resulting in a -1 thrust,
the plane would be forced to reduce speed, unless it
chooses to dive.
Thrust will increase a planes Combat Fuel
consumption during a game turn by 1 for every point
of thrust used.
Brake
Braking is a planes ability to reduce speed, and
counter speed increases from diving. Every plane has a
maximum brake value listed on its Maneuver sheet.
This value is the maximum amount of braking the
plane is capable of regardless of speed.
For example the Tomcat has a brake value of 3, the
plane is moving at speed 6. The player wishes to
reduce the speed of the plane by 3 while maintaining
his current altitude, so the player would apply 3 brake
points.
Braking is represented by a negative number in the
Thrust/Brake box in the Maneuver section of the
Aircraft & Pilot record sheet.
Braking will reduce the amount of fuel used by a plane
in a single turn by 1 regardless of how many brake
points were used. This reduction will never reduce fuel
consumption below 1 point.
Climb
The climb value represents a planes ability to gain
altitude. The value listed on a planes Maneuver sheet is
the maximum number of levels the plane may climb in
a single turn. Each level a plane climbs reduces the
planes speed by one. This speed loss can be countered
by applying 1 point of thrust for each level climbed by
the plane.
Climbing is represented by a positive number in the
Climb/Dive box in the Maneuver section of the Aircraft
& Pilot Record sheet
Dive
The dive value represents a planes ability to lose
altitude. The value listed on a planes Maneuver sheet is
the maximum number of levels the plane may dive in a
single turn. Every level a plane dives will increase its
speed by 1. This speed gain can be countered by
applying 1 point of braking for each level the plane
dives.
Diving is represented by a negative number in the
Climb/Dive box in the Maneuver section of the Aircraft
& Pilot Record sheet
AIRCRAFT ALTITUDE
Check Six uses 6 altitude levels, with 1 being the
lowest, and 6 being the highest. Planes can climb or
dive while performing any maneuver. If a plane
descends below altitude level 1 (level 0) through
maneuvers or damage it has crashed and is removed
from the game, however the pilot does get a chance to
eject. The number of levels a plane may climb or dive
is determined by its Climb and Dive values listed on
the Aircraft Data Chart
No plane may exceed altitude level of 6. If a planes
maneuvering would normally take it above level 6, it is
still considered at level 6.
VECTORED THRUST
Some of the newest combat aircraft are equipped with
a vectored thrust exhaust allowing the plane to rotate
in flight without changing its direction of movement.
The effect of a vectored thrust system is to allow a
plane to rotate horizontally or vertically to take a shot
at an opposing aircraft. For simplicity planes with both
horizontal, and vertical thrust vectoring may only
rotate horizontally, or vertical in a single turn, not
both.
Horizontal Thrust Vectoring
After movement a plane with horizontal vectored
thrust may adjust its Gun, and Missile Firing Zone one
hexside to the left or right in order to take a shot. This
is to show the planes ability to laterally slip its fuselage,
take a shot, then rotate back without changing its line
of flight. The plane itself is not rotated. In the case of
missiles, the plane must lock on before adjusting the
Missile Firing Zone, this will require the target to be in
the attackers Missile Firing Zone before the plane uses
vectoring. The target must still be in the attackers
Firing Zone after applying thrust vectoring. A planes
Line of Sight, Tailing Zone, and Heat Zones do not
change when vectoring.
Vertical Thrust Vectoring
After movement a plane with vertical vectored thrust
may consider itself as climbing, diving, or flying level in
order to take shot at a target. For instance a plane with
vertical thrust vectoring, flying level may fire at a target
one level above with no modifiers for altitude
difference. In the case of missiles, the plane must lock
on before adjusting the Missile Firing Zone, this will
require the target to be in the attackers Missile Firing
Zone before the plane uses vectoring. In order to fire,
the target must still be in the attackers Firing Zone
after applying thrust vectoring. A planes Line of Sight,
Tailing Zone, and heat Zones do not change when
vectoring.
AIRCRAFT SPEED
Check Six uses six speed bands, listed as 1 to 6, with 1
being the slowest, and 6 being the fastest. If a planes
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speed is reduced to 0 through maneuvers or damage it
has stalled and the pilot must pass a Spin Check to
retain control of the plane, otherwise the plane has
stalled and goes into a spin.
A planes speed will vary during the course of a game
due to applying thrust, braking, turning, Climbing,
diving, and damage.
Increasing Speed
A plane will increase its speed by applying thrust,
diving, or a combination of both.
For a plane to gain speed using thrust, it must spend 1
point of available thrust to increase the aircrafts speed
by 1.
In order for a plane to increase speed by diving, the
plane must dive one altitude level for a speed increase
of one, up to the planes maximum dive rating.
Thrust and diving can be combined to increase a
planes acceleration.
A simple Example of a plane increasing speed could be
a plane that starts a turn with a speed of 3 for instance,
the player then applies 2 thrust points. The plane
would end the turn with a speed of 5. If the plane had
dove 1 elevation level it would have a ending speed of
6. (this example assumes the plane did not execute any
hard, T, or special maneuvers)
Decreasing Speed
A plane will normally decrease speed by breaking, and
climbing, or using a combination of both.
In order for a plane to decrease speed using braking, it
must spend 1 point of braking to decrease the aircrafts
speed by 1.
For a plane to decrease speed by climbing, the plane
must climb 1 altitude level for a speed decrease of 1,
up to the aircrafts maximum climb rate.
Braking and climbing can be can be combined to
increase a planes deceleration. Using this combination
a plane has the capability of going from any speed to a
speed of 1, or less.
LOADED AIRCRAFT
A plane carrying a load of air to ground ordinance is
considered to be loaded. A loaded aircraft may not
perform any T, or hard maneuvers while loaded. In
addition a loaded aircraft has its available thrust points
reduced by one for each speed band. For example a
F/A-18 with a load of bombs moving at speed 4 may not
perform any T, or hard maneuvers at any speed, and
would only have 1 thrust point available instead of the
normal 2 thrust points for going at speed 4.
Once a plane drops its load of ordinance it is no longer
considered loaded, and may perform all maneuvers as
normal.
SPIN
A plane in a spin represents a pilot that has lost control
of his aircraft due to stalling, taking damage, or trying
to perform a tricky maneuver. A plane that is in a spin
may not perform any maneuvers, fire weapons, or
engage in combat. The only concern of the pilot is
trying to regain control of the plane.
Spin Check
Whenever a spin check is required, the controlling
player rolls 2d6 against the pilot skill of the aircraft
requiring the spin check. If the roll is equal, or higher
than the number needed the pilot has managed to
maintain control of the aircraft, and may perform
movement and combat as normal.
An Ace pilot attempts a third Special maneuver in a
row.
An aircraft takes damage from combat.
A Green pilot attempts a T, Hard, or special
maneuver.
SPIN CHECKS TRIGGERS
3+ Ace
4+ Veteran
4+ Average
5+ Green
Base Number Pilot Skill
BASE NUMBER FOR SPIN/SPIN RECOVERY
Engine or Control damage +1
SPIN CHECK MODIFIERS
If this roll is failed the aircraft has begun a spin. The
planes altitude is dropped by 2, and the plane will be
turned to a random facing by rolling 1d6 and
consulting the Spin Facing Diagram below (and on the
Game Charts sheet). The indicated facing is the final
facing from the direction the plane was facing at the
start of the spin.
Aircraft that stall during movement are still moved to
the final position of the maneuver before taking any
required Spin Checks. A plane that fails a spin check
due to damage must take the check as soon as the
current attack is resolved.
No attacks may be made against a plane while it is in a
spin, this includes any further attacks in the current
that might have been used against the plane.
Regaining Control of a Spinning Aircraft
To regain control of a spinning plane, a player must
again roll 2d6 at the start of the next movement phase.
The same procedure explained above is used to see if
the pilot recovers his plane from the spin. If the spin
check fails the plane again will drop 2 altitude levels,
and must again roll for facing. A player should record
the failed recovery in the maneuver section of the
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Aircraft & Pilot Record sheet in order to keep proper
track of the game turn.
A pilot that regains control of his craft may resume
normal flight in the current turn. To determine the
speed at which plane recovers at, roll 2d6 and consult
the Recovery Speed table below. This speed is
recorded as the speed for the current turn.
3 10-12
2 5-9
1 2-4
Recovery Speed 2d6 Roll*
SPIN RECOVERY SPEED TABLE
* An Ace pilot may adjust the roll by one in either
direction.
TAILING
The pilots that are victorious in air to air combat are
the ones able to acquire a target and keep on it until it
is destroyed. The best way to accomplish this is to get
on an opponents tail and stay there. A tailing pilot is
better able to see what his opponent is doing and then
anticipate his maneuvers.
To tail an enemy plane, a pilot must have the target
plane in his Line of Sight Zone, and be within the
enemy's Tailing Zone listed on the Aircraft Data sheets.
While a plane is being tailed, a player must reveal the
general type of maneuver being performed in the
current turn This is done before the tailing plane
chooses a maneuver. The tailed plane must announce
whether he is turning left or right, climbing or diving,
and accelerating or decelerating. Tailing information is
given after all other planes have plotted their
maneuvers. The tailing plane determines its maneuver,
then the player gives the details to the tailing player
who then plots movement for the tailing plane.
A plane may only tail one plane at a time.
When multiple planes are tailing each other, the plane
that is not tailing another plane plots first, this
continues until all tailed planes have plotted, with the
plane not being tailed plotting last. For example plane
A is tailing plane B, who in turn is tailing plane C.
Plane C would have to plot first, then announce
movement details to plane B, who in turn would have
to plot and announce movement details to plane A.
In the rare chance that the planes end up in a circle
where they are all tailing the plane in front, determine
who goes first randomly.
COMBAT FUEL
Each plane will expend an amount of fuel every turn
based on the planes speed and amount of thrust used.
A plane will use an amount of Combat Fuel each turn
equal to the Fuel amount listed on the Maneuver Chart
plus 1 point of fuel for each thrust point used. For
example a Tomcat that is traveling at speed 4, and
applies 3 point of thrust will expend 5 points of
combat fuel, 2 for going speed 4, and three for using 3
thrust points.
* to a minimum of 1 point of fuel
-1* Aircraft brakes.
1-4 Aircraft Fuel listed on Maneuver Chart.
+1 Each thrust point used in the current
turn.
Fuel used Condition
COMBAT FUEL
When a planes Combat Fuel reaches 0 the plane has
reached the point where it must return home. The turn
after a planes Combat Fuel track reaches 0, the plane
must disengage from combat and return to its starting
map edge.
A plane may perform maneuvers that will send the
Combat Fuel track below 0, but must disengage on the
following turn.
In a campaign game, or where players wish to keep
track of pilots, when a plane takes its Combat Fuel
below 0 a Landing Roll must be taken at the end of the
game to see if the plane was able to return to its base
and land.
Starting Combat Fuel
At the start of the game players will determine how
much Combat Fuel their planes will have for the entire
engagement. Each player rolls 1d6 and consults the
Starting Fuel Table on the Aircraft Data sheets for the
planes involved in the current engagement to
determine how mush fuel his planes will start the game
with. This is a single roll to determine the starting fuel
for all aircraft. If a player has more than one type of
plane, the roll is still made only once. The players
should mark off all extra boxes on the Combat Fuel
tracks.
SAMPLE MANEUVERING
Our sample pilot Bubba the Tomcat pilot is in a
dogfight with Bogey a Mig-29 Fulcrum pilot from an
unnamed third world country. Buddas current speed
is 3, his altitude is 4. Bogeys speed is 4, and his
altitude is 4 also.
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At the beginning of the turn the planes are in the
following positions on the game board.
Since neither plane is tailing both pilots plot their
maneuvers, then reveal their moves to each other. Lets
start with Bubbas maneuvering.
Bubba decides to announce his intentions first. Since
he has a starting speed of 3 he must select a Special
Maneuver, or a maneuver from the Speed 3 band.
Bubba selects the 3-6 maneuver, a tight turn to the left.
In addition Bubba wishes to increase both his altitude
and speed by 1. In order to do this Bubba must use
three thrust points, 1 to maintain his speed in the tight
turn, one to increase his speed to 4, and 1 to counter
the climb of 1 level. Bubba will end the turn with a
speed of 4, and an altitude of 5. Bubba next marks off
4 points of fuel, 1 for going speed 3, and 3 for the 3
points of thrust he used for his maneuvers.
Bogey next announces his intentions
Bogey has a starting speed of 4 he must select a Special
Maneuver, or a maneuver from the Speed 4 band.
Bogey selects the 4-8 maneuver, a tight turn to the left.
In addition Bogey wishes to increase his speed by 1,
while maintaining his current altitude. In order to do
this Bogey uses two thrust points, 1 to maintain his
speed in the tight turn, and one to increase his speed
to 5. Bogey will end the turn with a speed of 5, and an
altitude of 4. Bogey next marks off 4 points of fuel, 2
for going speed 4, and 2 for the 2 points of thrust he
used for his maneuvers.
The planes will end their movement as shown below.
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COMBAT
During the combat phase, each plane may fire at a
single target that is in within its Missile or Gun Firing
Zone. Weapons cannot be fired at targets in the same
hex as the firing aircraft
Combat aircraft carry a wide variety of weapons, in
order to increase speed of play these weapons have
been simplified into three types: Guns, Radar-Guided
Missiles, and Infra Red missiles. Each plane may fire
one of the three weapons in a turn.
ANGLE MODIFIER
The Angle Modifier determines the targets aspect to the
attacking aircraft. The head on attack is the most
difficult, the tailing attack the easiest. This table is used
in all attacks whether they be from missiles or guns.
To determine the angle modifier, take the aspect angle
from the firing aircraft to the target aircraft, then apply
the modifier listed on the Angle Modifier to the To-Hit
number of the attack. For example a plane attacking a
target that is coming head on will have a +4 added to
the To-Hit roll.
GUNS
For modern combat this means cannons from 20 to
30mm, but for simplicity these have been combined
into a single Gun rating and firing zone chart or all
aircraft.
After each firing of guns one box must be filled in on
the Aircraft & Pilot Record Chart. When all the boxes
are filled in the gun is out of ammo and cannot be
used again.
Large Caliber
Aircraft with guns rated as Large Caliber have a better
chance of doing catastrophic damage to a target.
Instead of the normal roll of 2 or 12 doing catastrophic
damage on the Gun Damage Table, large caliber guns
will do catastrophic damage on a roll of 2-3 or 11-12
on the Gun Damage Table.
Small Caliber
If a plane is equipped with guns smaller than 20mm it
will have a slight modifier on the Gun Damage Table.
When a gun damage roll equals 2, and the attack was
with guns smaller than a 20mm gun, roll 1d6, if the roll
is a 4-6 the target takes damage as if a 3 had been
rolled on the Gun Damage Table. If the roll is a 1-3
apply damage as normal. The same effect is applied for
rolling a 12 on the Gun Damage Table, with a 4-6
equaling a damage result of 11, and a 1-3 as normal
damage for rolling a 2.
Rapid Fire
This represents guns with multiple barrels, or multiple
guns mounted on a plane. Planes with guns rated as
Rapid Fire gain a -1 To-Hit modifier. Examples of rapid
fire capabilities are the M6lA1 Vulcan rotary cannon, or
the MiG-19 with its three 30mm cannons.
Gun Firing Zone
In order to fire at a target it must be within the Gun
Firing Zone of the attacking aircraft, and at the right
altitude.
A guns firing zone is limited by altitude differences
between the attacking and target aircraft. An attacking
aircraft that is in level flight may only fire at a target
aircraft that is the same altitude. An attacker in a dive
may only fire at a target aircraft that is 1 altitude level
below. A climbing attacker may only fire at a target
aircraft that is one altitude level above.
To-Hit
The Gun Firing Zone on the Game Charts sheet has the
To-Hit numbers listed in each target hex. This number,
or greater must be rolled on 2d6 in order to hit the
target. The modifiers on the To-Hit table must be
applied to the roll. If the To-Hit roll was successful, the
attacking player has hit his target, the player then rolls
on the Gun Damage Table to determine the actual
damage to the target aircraft.
Gun To-Hit Modifiers
In addition to the Angle Modifier other To-Hit
modifiers will be applied to the shot, in many instances
the total modifiers will make the shot impossible.
+2 Target pilot is Ace
+1 Target pilot is Veteran
-2 Attacking pilot is Ace
-1 Attacking pilot is Veteran
-1 High ROF Gun
base Sustained Fire:
Modifier Condition
GUN TO-HIT MODIFIER TABLE
9
Gun Damage
After a successful attack with guns the attacking player
rolls 2d6 on the Gun Damage Table. The damage is
then applied to the target of the attack.
* Small caliber guns roll 1d6, on a roll of 1-3 , a 12
becomes an 11, a 2 becomes a 3.
Catastrophic: Plane Explodes* 12
Engine: -3 to thrust. Large cal: Plane explodes 11
Engine: -2 to thrust 10
Engine: -1 to thrust 9
System: Countermeasures 8
Fuel: +2 fuel burn. 7
System: Lock-on 6
Control: -1 to turning 5
Control: -2 to turning 4
Control: -3 to turning Large cal: Pilot killed 3
Catastrophic: Pilot Killed* 2
Damage Roll
GUN DAMAGE TABLE
MISSILES
Combat aircraft use two type of missiles, the first is the
infra red, or heat-seeking missile, the second is the
Radar-Guided missile.
The number needed to hit the target is listed in each
target hex on the Missile Firing Zone. This number, or
greater must be rolled on 2d6 in order to hit the target.
The base To-Hit number will be modified by combat
conditions, all modifiers need to be added to the base
To-Hit number before making the. The base To-Hit
numbers are the same for both IR and RG missiles, but
the modifiers may vary.
INFRA RED MISSILES (IR)
Intra red missiles track the heat signature of a planes
exhaust. In order to fire an IR missile the target plane
must be in the attacking aircrafts Missile Firing Zone,
and be within the targets Heat Zone for the aspect of
the IR missile used.
IR missiles are divided into three categories, All Aspect,
Wide Aspect, and Narrow Aspect.
All Aspect
All aspect IR missiles may fire at a target that is in the
attackers Missile Firing Zone, regardless of the aspect
of the target plane. If an attacking aircraft fires an All
aspect missile while in the Wide Heat Zone of the
target a -1 modifier is applied to the To-Hit number. If
the attacker fires from the Narrow Heat Zone of the
target plane, the base To-Hit is halved for the attack.
Wide Aspect
Wide aspect IR missiles may only be fired when an
attacking aircraft has a target in its Missile Firing Zone,
and is within the Wide Heat Zone of the target aircraft.
If the missile is fired from the Narrow Heat Zone of the
target, the base To-Hit number is reduced by one.
Narrow Aspect
Narrow aspect IR missiles may only be fires when an
attacking aircraft has a target in its Missile Firing Zone,
and is in the Narrow Heat Zone of the target plane.
RADAR GUIDED MISSILES (RG)
Radar guided missiles require the attacking plane to
acquire a radar lock-on in order to fire. To achieve
radar lock-on, the target plane must be within the
attacking plane's Missile Firing Zone at the end of
movement.
Large Warheads
Some radar guided missiles will have large warheads
listed on the Aircraft Maneuver sheet. These missiles
have a chance of doing increased damage to a target.
When a 6, or 8 is rolled on the Missile Damage table,
instead of doing the normal damage the plane will
explode instead.
Active Homing
Some RG missiles will have an active homing system
located in the missile. These are the fire and forget
missiles. Once fired, these missiles do not depend on
the aircrafts radar system to track a target. An Active
missile halves the base To-Hit number when fired.
MISSILE FIRING ZONE
In order to fire an missile at a target it must be within
the Missile Firing Zone of the attacking aircraft, and at
the right altitude.
A aircrafts Missile Firing Zone is limited by altitude
differences between the attacking and target aircraft
An attacking aircraft that is in level flight may only fire
at a target aircraft that is the same altitude, one below,
or one above. If the target aircraft is one level above or
below the attacking suffers a +1 To-Hit modifier.
An attacking aircraft that is in a dive may fire at a target
that is at the same level, or one or two level below. If
the target plane is at the same level, or two levels
below the attacker suffers a +1 To-Hit modifier.
An attacking aircraft that is in a climb may fire at a
target that is at the same level, or one or two levels
above. If the target plane is at the same level, or two
levels above the attacker suffers a +1 To-Hit modifier.
IR missiles will have either a wide aspect, or a narrow
aspect. IR missiles with a wide aspect use the wide
aspect indicated on the target aircraft heat zone. IR
missiles with a narrow aspect must be within the
targets narrow aspect IR zone. Wide aspect missiles
fired from a hex located in the targets Narrow Aspect
Zone will gain a -1 To-Hit modifier.
10
MISSILE LOCK ON
In order for a plane to achieve a lock-on take the
Lock-on value of the firing aircraft, total all modifiers
then roll 2d6. If the roll is equal to, or greater than the
number needed the plane has achieved a lock-on and
may fire a RG missile at the target.
An attacking plane may attempt a lock-on, and still fire
guns (at the same or a different target) in the same
turn, as long as all targets are in the attacking planes
firing zone.
A lock-on may last for several turns, but must be
maintained by attempting the lock-on roll each turn.
The number of targets a plane can lock-on to is
indicated on a planes Data chart. A plane that can
lock-on to multiple targets must still maintain a lock-on
to each target separately. For example an F-14 Tomcat
may lock-on to two different planes at a time, but must
maintain a lock-on to each target. The Plane may still
may only fire one missile per turn.
MISSILE DEFENSES
There are three types of defenses against missile
attacks: ECM, chaff, and flares. Planes will carry a
limited number of flares and chaff. Chaff is used
against RG missiles, and flares are used against IR
missiles. If the attacker fires an IR missile at his target
and the target dropped a flare, there is a +2 To-Hit
modifier. Chaff gains the same bonus if dropped
against RG missiles.
ECM, or Electronic Counter Measures are electronic
jamming systems used to confuse RG missiles. A planes
ECM rating is applied against the lock-on value of all
planes attempting to lock-on to the aircraft. ECM is a
system and is considered automatic, and therefor does
not worry about quantity. A plane will only lose its
ECM system through combat damage.
MISSILE ATTACKS
After a player announces he will fire a missile at a
target the firing aircraft must decide which type of
missile to use, whereas the target aircraft must decide
what type of counter measures to use. Both players
uses one die each to make their choices using the table
below, this is kept secret until both players have made
their choices, then both players reveal their choices at
the same time. Remember that a player never
announces ECM, it is automatic.

Chaff & Flares 6
Flares 5
Chaff 4
No Defense 3
RG Missile 2
IR Missile 1
Missile Attack/Missile Defense D6
Missile To-Hit Modifiers
In addition to the Target Angle Modifier other To-Hit
modifiers will be applied to the shot, in many instances
the total modifiers will make the shot impossible.
+1 Target aircraft with Veteran/Ace pilot
base RG missile with Active homing
+2 RG missile & Target drops chaff
-1 Wide aspect fired from Narrow Heat Zone
-1 IR missile & target used 3 or more thrust
points.
base All Aspect IR fired from target Narrow Heat
Zone
-1 All Aspect IR fired from target Wide Heat Zone
+2 IR missile, target drops flares +2
+1 Climbing & target same level or two above
+1 Diving & target same level or 2 levels below
+1 Level flight & target above or below 1 level
+0-4 Angle Modifier
To-Hit Condition
MISSILE TO-HIT MODIFIERS
Missile Damage
After a successful missile attack the attacking player
rolls 2d6 on the Missile Damage table. The damage is
then applied to the target aircraft.
System: Lock-on 12
Engine: -1 to thrust 11
Engine: -2 to thrust 10
Engine: -3 to thrust 9
Fuel: +2 fuel burn. Large warhead: Plane explodes 8
Catastrophic: Plane Explodes 7
Fuel: +2 fuel burn. Large warhead: Plane explodes 6
Control: -3 to turning 5
Control: -2 to turning 4
Control: -1 to turning 3
System: Countermeasures 2
Damage Roll
MISSILE DAMAGE TABLE
MULTIPLE MISSILE TARGETS (Optional)
There may arise cases where more than one plane ends
up in the same hex as the target plane, or where
another plane is in between the attacker and his
intended target. In these cases the attacking player will
have to roll to see which plane the missile targets. Both
friendly, and enemy planes are effected.
When more than one other plane may be the targeted,
the target of the missile attack is determined randomly.
If the roll is successful the attack is resolved against the
original target as normal. If the missile tracks another
plane, resolve the attack against that aircraft instead of
the original target plane, whether friend or foe.
11
Targets in Same Hex
When more than one plane ends up in the same hex,
and at the same altitude, and an attacker fires a missile
at one of the planes in that hex, the attacking player
must roll to see which plane the missile targets. After
the missile has been fired, but before calculating the
To-Hit modifiers, roll 1d6 and consult the Multiple
Target Table Below.
Missile tracks another plane in the hex 5-6
Missile tracks intended target 1-4
Effect Roll
MULTIPLE TARGET TABLE
Targets in Closer Hex
When one or more planes ends up in a closer adjacent
hex, and at the same altitude than the intended target
of a missile attack, the attacking player must roll to see
which plane the missile targets. After the missile has
been fired, but before calculating the To-Hit modifiers,
roll 1d6 and consult the Multiple Target table Below.
Missile tracks closer plane 6
Missile tracks intended target 1-5
Effect Roll
CLOSER TARGET TABLE
DAMAGED AIRCRAFT
As a game progresses planes are likely to take damage
which will degrade the flight performance and
effectiveness of the plane.
Engine Damage
Engine damage will reduce a planes ability to use
thrust, which reduces the planes acceleration and
speed. All engine damage to a plane is cumulative. For
example a plane takes a engine hit that reduces its
thrust by 1, later it again takes engine damage that
again reduces thrust by 1, the plane now has lost 2
points to its thrust value.
As a plane takes engine damage, the boxes under the
Engine/Thrust heading in the damage section of the
Aircraft & Pilot record sheet are filled in.
As an added note, once a plane takes more hits than its
maximum thrust rating the plane will be forced to
decrease speed or dive every turn until it reaches a
speed or altitude level of 0 and crashes, dont worry
about the Spin Check in this case.
If a plane takes a Engine hit after all Engine damage
boxes have been filled in, the planes engines will
decentagrate, destroying the plane. Remove the plane
from play. The pilot may still check to see is he can
successfully eject.
Control Damage
Control damage effects a planes ability to turn and
execute maneuvers. Like damage to the engines,
control damage is cumulative. For example when a
plane takes its first Control hit the T box is filled in
the Damage section of the Aircraft & Pilot Record
sheet. The next time the plane takes Control damage
the damage will start at the Hard box, and so on.
When the T box has been marked off, the plane is
prevented from performing any T maneuvers. When
the Hard box is marked off, the plane may no longer
perform any Hard, or special maneuvers. When the
Left or Right box is marked off, the plane may no
longer perform either left, or right turns. The
defending player rolls 1d6 to determine which box to
fill in. A roll of 1-3 means the plane may no longer
perform any left turns, a 4-6 means the plane may no
longer perform any right turns. Only one of these
boxes will get filled in.
When the All box is filled in, the plane is prevented
from making any turns at all.
A plane will always be able to execute the L, and R
turn while the plane is performing a straight maneuver.
If a plane takes additional hits to the Controls after all
boxes have been filled in the, plane will break up, and
is destroyed. Remove the plane from play. The pilot
may still check to see is he can successfully eject.
Fuel Damage
Fuel damage represents damage to a planes fuel system
either by puncturing fuel cells or cutting fuel lines.
Damage to the fuel system is cumulative each time a
plane takes a hit to the fuel system an additional box is
marked off in the damage section of the Aircraft & Pilot
Record sheet. Each hit to the fuel system will cause the
plane to burn 2 extra points of fuel each turn. If a
plane takes any additional hits to the fuel system after
all Fuel Damage boxes have been marked off the plane
erupts into a spectacular fireball. Remove the plane
from play. The pilot may still check to see is he can
successfully eject.
System Damage
System damage will degrade the planes ability to use
ECM, deploy chaff and flares, and lock-on to targets.
Damage to the avionics is treated a little differently
than Engine, Fuel, and Control damage in that it is not
cumulative. The box for the specific system listed on
the Damage Chart is filled in. If that system is again hit,
no further damage is inflicted, the damage roll is
ignored. A plane will not be destroyed by damage to
the avionics systems.
When a plane takes a Countermeasure hit, the
defending player rolls 1d6 to determine which
countermeasure system has been hit, either the planes
ECM, or Chaff and Flares. A roll of 1-3 means the plane
no longer has the ability to use ECM, a 4-6 means the
plane can no longer deploy Chaff or Flares.
12
Catastrophic Damage
Catastrophic damage will either kill a pilot, or cause
the plane to explode. Once a plane has taken
catastrophic damage it is removed from play.
If the catastrophic damage causes a plane to explode,
the pilot will have a chance to eject
COMBAT EXAMPLE
Using the ending positions of the aircraft from the
maneuver example above, Bogey ends up two hexes
behind Bubba, and one altitude level lower.
The ending positions prevent Bubba from using any
weapons as Bogey is not in Bubbas Missile, or Gun
Firing Zones.
Bogey cannot fire his guns at Bubba as they are at
different altitudes, but may attempt to fire a missile.
Bogey attempts to lock on to Bubbas plane. He needs
to roll a 6 or better on 2d6, (4+ for the MiG-29 radar
rating, and +2 for Bubbas ECM rating) he rolls a 7,
Bogey has a locked on to the Tomcat, and can fire an
RG missile if he wants.
Next Bogey will decide whether to fire a IR, or RG
missile. Bogey calculates the To-Hit numbers for both
to figure out which will be the better shot.
If he decides to use a RG missile he would have a base
To-Hit of 6+, (Bogey does not have Active homing
missiles, which would give a base To-Hit of 3+) +0 for
target aspect, +1 for altitude difference (level flight),
+1 since Bubba is an Ace pilot, for a total To-Hit of 8+,
or 10+ if Bubba drops chaff.
If Bogey decides to fire an All aspect IR missile he
would have a base To-Hit of 3+ (1/2 base for firing a
All aspect IR missile in Bubbas Narrow heat Zone) +1
for the altitude difference (level flight), +0 for aspect,
-1 for Bubba using 3 Thrust points in the current turn,
+1 for Bubba being an Ace. Bogeys total To-Hit for an
IR missile would be a 4+, or a 6+ if Bubba drops
flares.
Bogey announces he is firing a missile and uses a
covered die to select which type of missile he is firing.
Bubba now must decide what countermeasures he is
using, if any. Like Bogey he uses a covered die to select
his countermeasures.
Bogey reveals a 1 on his die, an IR missile has been
fired. Bubba reveals a 4 on his die, he has dropped
flares, Bogie will need a 6 or better to hit the Tomcat.
Bogey rolls 2d6 and gets an 9, he has scored a hit
against the Tomcat. He now must roll 2d6 to see what
damage he has done to the tomcat.
He rolls a 9 on 2d6, and consults the Missile Damage
Table. The Tomcat has taken an Engine hit that
reduces its available thrust by 2. Bubba records this
damage on his Aircraft & Pilot record Sheet, and
immediately takes a Spin Check to see if he retains
control of his plane.

13
OTHER RULES
TERRAIN
Players may wish to run scenarios that include low
level bombing runs, or other conditions that would
bring terrain into the game. Only planes flying at level
1 need worry about terrain, and then only against
mountains on the map.
When a plane plots a path that runs through any
terrain feature designated as a level 1 feature, the plane
has been destroyed and is removed from play. The
pilot gets a chance to eject using the exploding aircraft
number for success (10+). In addition terrain features
will block vision and weapon zones. Planes will not be
able to tail, or fire weapons through level one terrain
features.
PILOT SKILL
Players may wish to assign a starting Pilot Skill based
on a specific scenario, for example a scenario that
involves 2 Veteran pilots against 5 Green pilots. Players
may also wish to assign pilots a certain amount of Skill
Points at the start of a campaign based on nationality
and training.
Green (0-10 points)
The Green pilots are the ones with little training in air
combat tactics. Many of the Third World pilots will
start as Green. Green pilots must take a Spin check
when performing, Hard, T, Special Maneuvers.
Average Pilots (11-20 points)
Pilots with good training but little or no combat
experience. Pilots from most of the developed
countries will start as Average. Average pilots may
perform one Special Maneuver in a row.
Veteran (21-35 points)
Veteran pilots have a great amount of advanced combat
training, or combat experience. Many of the pilots
from NATO countries, and Israel will start as Veterans.
Veteran pilots may perform 2 Special Maneuvers in a
row, have a -1 To-Hit when firing guns, a +1 when
fired on by guns or missiles, and a -1 to Lock on rolls.
Ace Pilots (36+ points)
The best of the best, the most skilled pilots of any
nation. Ace pilots may perform three consecutive
Special Maneuvers in a row, they have a -2 To-Hit when
firing guns, a +2 when fired on by guns, a +1 when
fired on by missiles, and a -1 when attempting to Lock
on rolls.
STARTING PILOT SKILL
For most games the majority of pilots should be
Average. But if players want to simulate a specific
scenario they may choose pilots of different skill level
from the table below. As a guideline each flight should
have at least 2 pilots of one skill level for each pilot of
the next higher skill level.
For simplicity players may decide to have all pilots start
a game as Average, as these are the Basic pilots with
the least amount of game modifiers and special rules.
Veteran Israeli Pilots
Average NATO pilots, and some countries
Average Most countries
Green Some third world countries
Skill Level Pilot
STARTING PILOT SKILL LEVEL TABLE
Instead of selecting pilots of a specific skill level,
players that want to keep track of their pilots may
instead wish assign each pilot a specific amount of Pilot
Skill points at the start of a game or campaign.
20 Israeli Pilots
15 NATO pilots, and some countries
10 Most countries
5 Some third world countries
Skill Points Pilot
STARTING PILOT SKILL POINTS TABLE
Increasing Pilot Skill
Pilot skill represents a pilots skill and training. As a
pilot engages in air to air combat, and manages to
survive, his Piloting Skills will increase.
In order for a pilot on increase Piloting Skill he must
survive combat, either by flying off the map edge in
which he started the game on, or by successfully
ejecting from an aircraft. The following table shows the
skill points awarded to pilots that are able to live
through combat.
3 points Per opponent shot down.
2 points Survive with undamaged plane
1 point Survive with damaged plane
Skill Points Action
SKILL POINT TABLE
When a pilots skill points reach the minimum number
for the next higher Skill Level, the pilot is advanced to
that level and gains all applicable bonuses.
EJECTING
A pilot will have a chance to bail out of a plane with
low fuel, that is spinning, damaged, or exploding. This
is called ejecting, or more commonly, bailing out.
A pilot has the option of ejecting when a missile has
been fired at him, before the missile actually hits.
When a pilot chooses this option he does not have to
worry about ejecting from a destroyed, or exploding
aircraft. A pilot does not have this option when fired
on with guns.
14
In order for a pilot to successfully eject from a plane,
the player rolls 2d6 and consults the table below.
Rolling the indicated number or above means the pilot
has successfully ejected, or bailed out.
10+ Destroyed/Exploding Plane
5+ Damaged Plane
3+ Undamaged Plane
Success Condition
EJECTION TABLE
A pilot that successfully ejects or bails out may return
for later missions.
LANDING
Planes that take damage, or run out of fuel must pass a
Landing roll at the end of all games. To land
successfully, roll 2D6, if the total of both dice is equal
to or greater than the base number plus modifiers the
plane has successfully returned to its base and landed.
A pilot may eject before making a landing roll using to
normal success number based on the condition of the
aircraft. If the pilot attempts the landing, and fails, the
pilot can still attempt to eject as if he was making the
attempt from a destroyed aircraft
There are several modifiers to the Landing Roll. The
most common will be aircraft damage. Some like night
landings and severe weather landings will only be used
when a scenario dictates their use. The following table
shows these landing modifiers.
+1 Improvised air strip:
+2 Carrier landing
+1 Night landing
+3 Severe weather
+2 Storm
+1 Rain
+1 System damage
+1 Each box of Fuel damage
+1 Each box of Engine damage
+1 Each box of control damage
-2 Ace pilot
-1 Veteran pilot
+1 Green pilot
+1 Per point of Combat Fuel below 0
2 Base number
Modifier Condition
LANDING
15
ENDING A GAME
A game will end when all aircraft break off , all planes
from one side leave the board from the same edge the
started on, all planes one side have been shot down or
have crashed. If none of these conditions have been
met the game will end after 20 turns.
VICTORY CONDITIONS
A player wins if his victory conditions have been met,
this might be to remove any aggressors from your
section (the map sheet), escorting a bomber across the
map sheet, or any other conditions the players agree
on.
If neither side accomplishes its goals, the winner is
determined using the tables below. First both sides
total their victory points, then the difference in points
are compared to determine the winner of the game.
Damaged planes that manage to leave the board, but
would be unable to make it home count as destroyed
for Victory Point conditions. A damaged plane that has
a chance of returning to base must pass a Landing Roll
or count as destroyed. A plane that used too much
Combat Fuel must also pass a Landing Roll, or count as
destroyed.
5 Each enemy Ace shot down
3 Each enemy Veteran shot down
2 Each destroyed enemy plane
1 Each damaged enemy plane
Points Condition
VICTORY POINTS
Major victory 7
Victory 4-6
Minor Victory 2-3
Draw 0-1
Victory Point Difference
WHO WON
16
CAMPAIGNS
A campaign represents a series of linked battles, where
one battle leads to the next. For example a campaign
could reflect the British and Argentineans in the
Falklands, or perhaps a series of what if conflicts
between two opponents. In a campaign game the
players need to keep track of things like the skill of the
pilots, condition of aircraft, and many other
considerations that will effect the outcome of the
campaign.
PILOTS & AIRCRAFT
At the start of a campaign a player will need to equip
his squadron with pilots and aircraft.
A squadron will normally contain 10-12 non damaged
aircraft of the same type. These conditions may vary
based on the campaign.
A player should select 10-12 pilots from the Starting
Pilot Skill table based on the nationality the player
choose to run for the campaign.
Each squadron may advance two of its pilots to one
skill level higher, or the squadron may advance one
pilot by two skill level instead. These pilots will start
the campaign with the minimum Skill Points for that
level. For example a player that is playing a Third
World country has pilots that start as Green, the player
may advance two of his pilot to Average with 11 Pilot
Skill Points. The player could instead decide to
advance one of his pilots to Veteran with 21 Pilot Skill
Points.
The above is only a guide line for starting a campaign,
players may agree on a different may of starting pilot
skill and aircraft condition depending on the
campaign. For example campaigns that start during a
war may be begin with more experienced pilots, and
some damaged aircraft.
Squadron Roster
Provided with the game is a Squadron Roster to aid a
player in keeping track of his squadron personnel and
aircraft.
The roster provides enough space to keep track of
each pilot and plane in a squadron.
Repairing Damaged Planes
A damaged plane that survives battle, and has
successfully landed at its base has a chance to have its
damage repaired before returning to combat. A roll is
made for each category of damage to a plane, Engine,
Control, System, and Fuel. The roll is made on 2d6, if
the roll is equal to or greater than the number needed
the plane has been repaired. If a roll is successful for a
specific system, all damage to that system is considered
to be repaired, if the roll is failed, none of the damage
has been repaired. Repair rolls are made on all
damaged aircraft after each engagement. Planes that
failed repair rolls may try again after the next
engagement involving the squadron they are attached
to.
The base numbers below reflect the parts availability,
and ground crew training of the different nationalities.
4+ Most Third World
3+ Some Third World/ Most other countries
2+ NATO/Israel
BASE REPAIR NUMBER
+2 Remote Location
+1 System damage
+1 Each box of Fuel damage
+2 Each box of Engine damage
+2 Each box of control damage
MODIFIERS TO BASE NUMBER
Replacement Pilots
During the course of a campaign a squadron will most
likely lose pilots. These pilots can be replaced using
the following table. As with repairing aircraft, a roll on
2d6 is made for each pilot lost in combat to see if a
replacement has arrived.
6+ Most Third World
4+ Some Third World
3+ NATO/Israel
BASE REPLACEMENT NUMBER
+2 Remote Location
MODIFIERS TO BASE NUMBER
Replacement pilots will use the value listed on the
Starting Pilot Skill Table for their nationality.
ENDING THE CAMPAIGN
A campaign will end after a number of engagements as
set by the players has been played, or after a number of
goals has been achieved by one or more players. The
winner of the campaign will be the player with the
most Victory Points, or the first player to accomplish
his goals.
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SCENARIOS
The following are a few basic scenarios to allow players
to get used to Check Six, and use in campaigns. The
following scenarios have been designed as a series of
engagements between NATO pilots, and the pilots of
an undisclosed Aggressor country. The NATO pilots
have planes available from any of the existing NATO
countries, the Aggressor, any Russian made aircraft.
Players may instead wish to represent any two
countries of their choice. Or perhaps put the aggressor
pilots in commonly exported aircraft like F-16s, and
Mirage F-1s.
INTERCEPT
NATO ground based fighters have been scrambled to
intercept unidentified intruding aircraft picked up by
ground radar.
This is a classic scenario used by the Aggressor county
to test NATO air defenses.
This scenario is designed to familiarize players with the
maneuvering rules of Check Six.
NATO goals
The NATO pilots must engage the intruding aircraft,
and acquire lock-on against the Aggressor pilots. The
NATO pilots are not allowed to fire on the Aggressors
unless they are fired upon first.
Aggressor Goals
As the Aggressor pilots your goal is to simply harass the
NATO pilots by acquiring radar lock-ons against them.
Setup
Both sides setup on opposite on sides of the board,
within 8 hexes of their edge. The NATO player starts
with 2 NATO Air Superiority aircraft of their choosing.
The Aggressor player starts with 2 Russian built Air
Superiority aircraft. The NATO planes start the game
with a speed of 5, and an altitude of 3. The Aggressor
planes start with a speed of 5, and an altitude of 5. All
pilots are considered Average.
Victory Conditions
The goal of this scenario is to drive off your opponents
planes, not shoot them down and start an international
incident.
Once a plane has been locked-on by the enemy for 2
consecutive turns it must attempt to exit the board
from its starting edge as fast as possible. The winner is
the player that drives off the most opposing aircraft at
the end of the game.
INTERNATIONAL INCIDENT
NATO ground based fighters have been scrambled to
intercept unidentified intruding aircraft picked up by
ground radar.
This appears to be the classic scenario an Aggressor
country uses to test NATO air defenses, but it has a
twist
This scenario is designed to introduce players with the
Check Six air combat rules.
NATO goals
The NATO pilots must engage the intruding aircraft,
and acquire lock-on against the Aggressors. The NATO
pilots are not allowed to fire on the Aggressors unless
they are fired upon first.
Aggressor Goals
As the Aggressor pilots your goal is to fire at a NATO
aircraft to create an international incident and make
the world aware of your plight.
Setup
Both sides setup on opposite on sides of the board,
within 8 hexes of their edge. The NATO player starts
with 2 NATO Air Superiority aircraft of their choosing.
The Aggressor player starts with 2 Russian built Air
Superiority aircraft. The NATO planes start the game
with a speed of 5, and an altitude of 3. The Aggressor
planes start with a speed of 5, and an altitude of 5. All
pilots are considered Average.
Victory Conditions
The NATO goal is to drive off the Aggressor aircraft,
not shoot them down and start an international
incident.
The goal for the Aggressor is to shoot down at least
one NATO aircraft to create an international incident.
The NATO player wins if no aircraft are shot down. The
Aggressor player wins if at least one NATO plane is
shot down.
If an Aggressor plane is shot down it is considered a
marginal victory for the Aggressor, as it will still
become an international incident, just not in the
intended way.
THE SWEEP
NATO ground based fighters have been ordered to
sweep a sector in advance of a ground operation
against an Aggressor country.
This is the classic scenario to establish air superiority
in a sector.
This scenario is designed to introduce players to
experienced pilots.
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NATO goals
As the NATO player you are to engage any Aggressor
aircraft in the sector (the map board) and drive them
from the sector in an attempt to establish air
superiority. The NATO pilots are authorized to fire on
any Aggressor aircraft found in the sector.
Aggressor Goals
As the Aggressor you are to engage all NATO aircraft
and drive them from the sector in an attempt to retain
air superiority.
Setup
Both sides setup on opposite on sides of the board,
within 8 hexes of their edge. The NATO player starts
with 4 NATO Air Superiority aircraft of their choosing.
The Aggressor player starts with 4 Russian built Air
Superiority aircraft. The NATO planes start the game
with a speed of 4, and an altitude of 4. The Aggressor
planes start with a speed of 4, and an altitude of 3.
Each side starts with 2 Average pilots, and 1 Veteran
pilot, and 1 Ace.
Victory Conditions
The NATO goal is to drive off all Aggressor aircraft, by
any means.
The goal for the Aggressor is to drive off all NATO
aircraft.
The NATO player wins if all Aggressor planes are shot
down, or have exited the board by the end of the
game. The Aggressor player wins if all NATO planes
have been shot down or have exited the game board.
For any other result consult the Victory Conditions
tables to see who won the game.
SURGICAL STRIKE
NATO pilots have been tasked with performing a
surgical strike against an Aggressor HQ compound.
This scenario is designed to execute a surgical strike
against an enemy target, and introduce players to
terrain. The map sheets need to have terrain features
like hills and low mountains marked with an altitude
level of 1 for this scenario. Make sure to have enough
features that will not allow the attacking planes a
straight shot at the HQ.
NATO goals
As the NATO player you are to execute a bombing run
against an Aggressor HQ compound while providing
air cover for the attacking aircraft.
Aggressor Goals
As the aggressor you are to engage NATO planes
performing a strike, and prevent them from hitting
your HQ.
Setup
A hex on the map sheets is designated as the Aggressor
HQ. This hex needs to be at least 30 hexes from the
NATO players map edge. This may require the map
sheets to be placed end to end.
The NATO player starts with 4 NATO Air Superiority
aircraft and 2 ground attack aircraft. The planes may be
of the same type as long as they are capable of
performing both air superiority and ground attack
rolls. All NATO planes start on the first row of hexes on
their side of the board.
The planes performing the strike start the game at
speed 4, and altitude 1. The NATO planes providing air
cover start the game with a speed of 4, and an altitude
of 4. The NATO side starts with 4 Average pilots, and 2
Veteran pilots. These pilots are divided among the
planes as the player sees fit.
The two planes performing the bomb run are
considered loaded, and must remain at level 1 when
possible, they may pop up to avoid terrain features.
The Aggressor player starts with 4 Russian built Air
Superiority aircraft. These planes are piloted by 2
Average pilots, 1 Veteran pilot, and 1 Ace pilot. The
aggressor planes start with a speed of 4, and an
altitude of 3, all Aggressor planes must start the game
within 6 hexes of the target hex.
Victory Conditions
The NATO goal is to destroy the Aggressor HQ. After
performing the bombing run, all NATO aircraft must
attempt to exit the map from the edge they started
from.
The goal for the Aggressor is to drive off all NATO
aircraft and prevent them from delivering their
ordinance on their HQ.
The NATO player gains 5 Victory points for each
attacking plane that is able to bomb the Aggressor HQ.
The HQ is considered bombed if the NATO player is
able to move a loaded aircraft across the target hex at
an altitude of 1 (the plane must start the turn at
altitude 1). The HQ is destroyed if both attacking
planes are able to bomb the HQ.
The Aggressor player gains 5 Victory points for each
attacking plane that is unable to bomb the HQ hex.
Use the Victory Point Table to determine the overall
victor of the scenario.
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