PW Show Daily, May 30, Day 2 | E Reader | E Books

Day

2

Friday
May 30, 2014
Publishers Weekly’s Show Daily is produced each day during the 2012 BookExpo in New York.
The Show Daily press office is in room 4A1. PW’s booth is #1252.

T H E

B U Z Z

O N

B O O K E X P O

Strong Traffic, Talk of
Amazon-Hachette
By Clare Swanson
“This has been the most
active, popular show,” said
John Murphy, newly named
v-p, publishing strategy, at
St. Martin’s. Among the
highlights, said Murphy,
were the tributes to Maya
Angelou at Thursday’s
author breakfast, which
featured Anjelica Huston,
Tavis Smiley, SMP author
Lisa Scottoline, and Neil
Patrick Harris as emcee. In
particular, hearing Huston
read Angelou’s poem “A
Brave and Startling Truth”
was, said Murphy, “extraordinary.”
Seta Zink, publicity manager at Perseus Books
Group, also spoke in superlatives about traffic and
energy at BEA thus far. In
the seven years that she’s
been with the company, it’s
the “most exciting” show
she’s seen, and Perseus has
more events lined up at this
year’s show than ever
(three well-attended signings yesterday, with “long
lines that moved quickly”)
and giveaways. Perseus’s
most buzzed about book
this year is Accidental
Billionaires author Ben
Mezrich’s foray into fiction,
Seven Wonders. Film rights
to the novel have been
optioned by 20th Century
Fox.
Tracy van Straaten at
Scholastic said that more
than 200 people crowded
into their booth yesterday
morning to get a copy of
Maggie Stiefvater’s Sinner,
which is a companion book
to her bestselling Shiver
trilogy. Van Straaten said it
was exciting to see people
interested in the “wide
range” of titles on the pub-

lisher’s list.
Michael McKenzie at
HarperCollins’s Ecco
imprint said the booth was
busy with lots of traffic as
they gave away galleys of
two books acquired by
soon-to-depart editor Lee
Boudreaux (who is leaving
to run her own imprint at
Little, Brown). The first was
The Miniaturist, which
Boudreaux plugged on
Wednesday’s buzz panel.
The second novel in high
demand, another of
Boudreaux’s books, is
Lauren Oliver’s adult
debut, Rooms.
Jacques Glénat, owner of
Glénat, one of France’s biggest comics and manga
publishers, noted that

A M E R I C A

fewer of the publishers he
wants to meet with are
attending the show. Still, he
said, interest in their titles
from U.S. publishers is
growing.
A subtext to the show, of
course, is the showdown
between Amazon and
Hachette. At the Hachette
booth, everyone was predictably mum on the subject of the ongoing terms
dispute. Sonya Cheuse,
Grand Central’s director of
publicity, was happy,
though, to discuss some of
the house’s books that were
drawing attention. Noting
that both Jeffery Deaver
and David Baldacci were at
the show for signings and
pulling in crowds, Cheuse
said Hachette had a “really
robust list of authors here.”
Cheuse also pointed to The
Secret Wisdom of the Earth, a
debut novel by Christopher

Pulse-pounding
psychological
suspense,
coming
7.29.2014.
Pick up a copy of the
summer’s hottest thriller,

and meet Mary Kubica
at the Harlequin booth,
#3038, today at 10:00 a.m.

© stevekagan.com

A L L

Crowded aisles and overloaded totebags were the hallmarks of a busy Day One.

Scotton, acquired by Deb
Futter, and special BEA edition galleys were given out.
 Although the major
houses were reticent about
the public battle between
the publisher and the
online retail giant, other
attendees had a few choice
words about the situation.
The industry conflict was
very much in the open at

the ABA Celebration of
Bookselling & Author
Awards Lunch, where
James Patterson received
the Indie Champion
Award.
When Patterson was
announced for the award,
he received a standing ovation for the support he has
shown independents with
his million-dollar grants. A
second ovation at the end of
his talk came for his
remarks, which opened
with, “Hi, I’m Jeff Bezos.”
He added, “All we can ask
of people is that they try to
do the right thing, the best
thing.”
But according to
Patterson, it also means
taking a stand. “There is an
evolution, revolution going
on and it affects everybody,” he noted. “Every
publisher is feeling a great
deal of pain and stress. I’d
like the press to think
about this: publishers are
not terribly profitable.” If
publishers don’t make
money, he said, they won’t
be able to support good literature.
As Patterson sees it,
readers and the bookselling community must step
up in order to safeguard
the future of our literature.
He spoke about how this
“economic war” will affect
grocery stores, libraries,
continued on page 6

PROVOCATIVE.
PULSE-POUNDING.
A SHOCKING

presents America’s premier
author of provocative fiction!

TWIST YOU WON’T
SEE COMING….
Addictively suspenseful
and tautly written,

Meet Sylvia Day at 3:30 p.m.
today in Booth #3038 where she will be
signing copies of Afterburn/Aftershock!

reveals that, even in
the perfect family,
nothing is as it seems.

On sale July 29.

Visit Harlequin at Booth #3038 to meet
Mary Kubica and other favorite authors!
Friday, May 30 • Booth #3038
IN-BOOTH SIGNINGS
Time

Event

Harlequin Fresh Fiction

Mary Kubica
Kimberly Belle
Tiffany Reisz
Pia Padukone
Anne Girard
Sarah Beth Durst

Author

Title

11:30 a.m.—12:30 p.m.

Cosmo Red-Hot Reads
from Harlequin

Lauren Dane
Megan Hart &
Tiffany Reisz
Maisey Yates

Cake
Captivated

Avenge Me & Take Me
The Real Thing & Bachelor Unleashed
A Not-So-Innocent Seduction
Claiming the Doctor’s Heart
Yield to the Highlander
Rescue at Cardwell Ranch & Wanted Woman
The Chatsfield: Engaged at the Chatsfield

10:00 a.m.—11:00 a.m.

The Good Girl
The Last Breath
The Saint
Where Earth Meets Water
Madame Picasso
The Lost

Crazy, Stupid Sex

1:00 p.m.—2:00 p.m.

Harlequin Series

Maisey Yates
Brenda Jackson
Janice Maynard
Renee Ryan
Terri Brisbin
B.J. Daniels
Melanie Milburne

2:30 p.m.—3:30 p.m.

Harlequin Nonfiction

Susie Brooks with
The Life of Corgnelius and Stumphrey
Corgnelius and Stumphrey

3:30 p.m.—4:30 p.m.

Sylvia Day

Sylvia Day

Afterburn/Aftershock

OFFICIAL BEA AUTHOR AUTOGRAPH SESSIONS
Time

9:30 a.m.—10:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.—11:30 a.m.

Table
19
16

Author

Heather Gudenkauf
Robyn Carr

Title

Little Mercies
Four Friends

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COME MEET OUR AUTHORS
RANDOM HOUSE
TODAY’S SIGNINGS
FRIDAY, MAY 30
ON SALE 9. 2 .14

Ballantine Books

SATURDAY’S SIGNING

ON SALE 10.14.14

Signing
2:00 PM
Table 1
Random House

Signing
2:30 PM
Table 2
© ADAM BOUSKA

Signing
11:30 AM
Table 2
© PAUL STUART

Bantam Books

ON SALE 7. 29.14

© KATE CARCATERRA

Signing
10:30 AM
Table 2

Ballantine Books

BUZZ-WORTHY PANELS

MAY 31

FRIDAY, MAY 30
1:30–2:30 PM
Downtown Stage

ON SALE 6 . 3.14

Hear AMY BLOOM, bestselling
author of Lucky Us, on the
Women of Contemporary Fiction panel
SATU RDAY, MAY 31
11:00–12 NOON
Room 1E15
Panel discussion with bestselling authors
JODI PICOULT, KATHY REICHS,
and RUTH REICHL
Moderated by Bob Minzesheimer from USA Today

© RAINER HOSCH

© MARIE-REINE MATTERA

ON SALE 9. 23.14

Signing
10:00 AM
Table 1

SATU RDAY, MAY 31
12:00–12:30 PM
Room 1E15

Random House

A conversation between
bestselling author DAVID MITCHELL
and his editor David Ebershoff

RANDOM HOUSE

BOOTH #2839

www.AtRandom.com

THERE ARE THREE RULES IN

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2:00 PM

Don’t miss Printz Award-winning
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3:00 PM

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FRIDAY,
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6

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Telling Stories at Breakfast
The spirit of Maya Angelou
call on those in the
and Martin Luther King Jr.,
audience to publish
along with a bit of Doogie
diverse books. “It’s not
Howser, hovered over the
enough for us just to
opening breakfast of BEA,
celebrate the life and
which began with a tribute to
legacy of Maya
Angelou by PW co-editorial
Angelou,” he said. “[We
director Jim Milliot. He also
need] to recognize that
presented the PW Sales Rep of
every one of us has a
the Year Award to Teresa Rolfe
voice, a unique thumbKravtin, and gave the PW
print on our throats,
Bookstore of the Year Award to
and each of us has a
Pete Mulvihill on behalf of
story. I want to encourGreen Apple Books in San
age all of us in the book
Francisco. But spirit doesn’t
publishing world to
necessarily imply somberness, Breaking bread with Anjelica Huston, Neil Patrick Harris, Lisa Scotto- work a little bit harder
lini, and Tavis Smiley.
especially with stage and
to get the stories of peoscreen performer Neil Patrick
ple of color told.”
Harris acting as host. He carefully
her childhood in Ireland and how
In his new book, Death of a King
delineated the difference between
she went on to become an award(Little, Brown, Sept.), written with
moderating the BEA breakfast and
winning actress; hers is the only
David Ritz, Smiley warns of the trihosting the Tony Awards (which
family with three generations of
ple threat of racism, poverty, and
Harris has done four times) or the
Oscar winners. She spoke about
militarism—a message that Martin
Emmys (which he’s hosted twice):
the influence of her father, director
Luther King Jr. tried to spread durno music.
John Huston, and her beloved
ing his final year. At the BEA breakHarris is best known for playing
mother, who died in a car crash
fast, Smiley spoke about there
Barney Stinson on TV’s How I Met
when Huston was a teenager, and
being more to King than one senYour Mother, and as the title charher on-again, off-again relationtence in one speech, and opened
acter on Doogie Howser, M.D., but
ship with Jack Nicholson. Huston
and ended his talk with this quote,
his first job was doing bookstore
also discussed a car crash of her
also from King: “Cowardice asks
inventory at age 10. That job influown that made her realize, “I’d
enced the format of his memoir,
been marginally wasting my life.”
Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your
Afterward, she applied herself to
Own Autobiography (Crown, Oct.),
her acting career with renewed
which was inspired by his favorite
vigor, and has gone on to appear in
children’s book series. “I wanted
more than 70 movies and television
there to be that kind of magical
series.
quality that draws the reader in,”
Tavis Smiley, host of PBS’s Tavis
Harris said.
Smiley and PRI’s The Tavis Smiley
Before discussing her own memShow, spoke about how he was
oirs, A Story Lately Told and the
influenced as an African-American
forthcoming Watch Me (Scribner),
boy, growing up in a large family
Anjelica Huston read Angelou’s
among the cornfields of Indiana, by
poem “A Brave and Startling
Angelou’s poem “Still I Rise.”
Truth.” From there, she segued into
Smiley used the poet’s passing to

On the whole, publishers were
excited about the rebranded consumer day, BookCon, to be held

www.bookexpoamerica.com

With additional reporting by Rachel
Deahl, Claire Kirch, Judith Rosen,
and Heidi MacDonald

Billy Idol brought his patented sneer to
the Javits Center, where he signed galleys
of his memoir Dancing with Myself
(S&S/Touchstone, Oct.).

© stevekagan.com

Looking to Saturday

tomorrow. It’s a “great development,” said Murphy, one that, per
Perseus’s Zink, will make the whole
event friendlier.
“If I was not in the industry, I
would totally want to be there,” said
Zink. “Anybody who loves books
will be there, or should be.”
Anmiryam Budner, a buyer at
Main Point Books in Bryn Mawr,
Pa., said, “This feels like BookCon
already: there are so many young
women here who are so excited
about what they’re reading. There
are all these enormous lines.
There’s a lot of energy here and
there’s going to be even more on
Saturday. The names they attracted
to it are huge. Anything that gets
people in the door is a good thing.”
Speaking of BookCon, Scholastic’s
van Straaten said she was “excited
and interested to see what it’s going
to be like.” She added, “We’ll see how
many people come.”

the question, ‘Is it safe?’
Expediency asks the question, ‘Is it
politic?’ But conscience asks the
question, ‘Is it right?’ And there
comes a time when one must take a
position that is neither safe, nor
politic, nor popular, but because
conscience tells one it is right.”
“Welcome to my own personal
nightmare,” quipped New York
Times bestselling author Lisa
Scottoline (Betrayed, St. Martin’s
Press, Nov.), speaking about following Smiley, Huston, and Harris.
She needn’t have worried. She
kept the audience laughing with
her tales of her ostracized Aunt
Lena, who brought a gun to a wedding, or possibly a communion
party, and of a rain storm that
caused the cheap red rug on the
top of her white car to bleed, turning it into a “blood mobile.” These
events inspired her books The
Vendetta Defense and Look Again.
She quoted director Francis Ford
Coppola, who said, “Nothing in my
movies ever happened, but all of it
is true.” Scottoline added, “It only
connects if it’s true.” It’s that truth,
she continued, that speaks to readers, “soul to soul.” 

—Judith Rosen

Book Expo Challenge whittled down 19 new ventures
to six finalists, and yesterday it issued the top prize
of $10,000 to the most promising startup. Pictured:
David Roland, chief venture capital officer for Ingram,
with the winner, Alexander White, CEO, Next Big
Book, New York City.

Tenor of the Show continued from page 1

and bookstores. “Ultimately it will
put thousands of mom-and-pops
out of business. If Amazon’s not a
monopoly, it’s the beginning of one.
If this is to be the new American
way, this has to be changed, by law
if necessary.” He wanted the media
and authors groups to take up this
topic. “It’s a worthy subject of this
BEA.”
Patrick Hughes, Fulcrum’s marketing and sales director, was also
vocal on the subject of Amazon, and
completely unsympathetic toward
Hachette. “I can’t complain, there’s
nothing better out there,” he said.
“Amazon is our largest customer.”
He continued: “One international
corporate behemoth complaining
about another international corporate behemoth—I have absolutely
no sympathy.”

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Michael Coffey, who steps down this
week as PW’s co-editorial director, spoke
at the Uptown Stage and signed galleys
of his forthcoming book of stories, The
Business of Naming Things, coming next
January from Bellevue Literary Press.

An original signed print by the late Kurt Vonnegut was
awarded by Seven Stories Press publisher Dan Simon to
bookseller Ruth Love of Aaron’s Books in Lititz, Pa., for the
store’s winning window display.

Why DRM Is the Problem
The subject of DRM and e-books
has been a hot topic in recent years,
and in an afternoon talk at the
opening International Digital
Publishing Forum at BEA, Tor
Books founder Tom Doherty discussed the publisher’s 2012 decision to dump DRM from its e-books.
“After discussing it with authors
and readers, it became pretty clear
that DRM was not much of a problem for the sophisticated pirate, but
it was a meaningful problem and an
annoyance to many of our readers,”
Doherty told the audience. “So we
went all in.”
Although piracy continues to be
an issue for Tor, and the publishing
industry in general, Doherty
acknowledged, dumping DRM on
its entire list has paid off.
“So far, the lack of DRM has not
increased the number of Tor
e-books online illegally nor has it
visibly hurt our sales,” Doherty
said. “We decided that if we play
fair with [our customers], they will
play fair with us. And you know, it is
working.”
While those looking for numbers

Pete Mulvihill (r.), co-owner of Green Apple Books,
accepts the award for PW Bookstore of the Year from
PW co-editorial Jim Milliot.

or more concrete evidence about
Doherty and Tor’s DRM experience
were likely disappointed, Doherty’s
broader message about DRM was
much needed, and well timed.
Good publishing, he stressed, is
about fostering a community, and
not just a community of publishers
and booksellers, but librarians,
authors, readers, teachers, fans,
and critics.
“Books create the conversations
we hear and are part of,” Doherty
said. “So it is important that we
make these conversations critical
to any decision we make in our publishing programs.”
Doherty said the sci-fi community has always talked in the physical space and shared books and
ideas, and now that the conversation also takes place digitally, how
DRM throttles that conversation
had become a “central concern” at
Tor. “Authors need to connect,” he
said, “and barriers, whether DRM
or something else, disrupt these
connections.”
The “community” approach has
continued on page 76

Random House’s Jon Meacham swapped
his editor’s badge for an author badge, and
signed copies of his Thomas Jefferson:
President & Philosopher (Crown, Sept.), a
young readers’ adaptation of his bestselling biography for adults.
Italian-Americans
in publishing gathered to preview the
forthcoming history
from Norton, “The
Italian Americans,”
a PBS companion,
by Maria Laurino.
Editor Alane
Salierno Mason is
seated to the left
of Laurino, both
seated at the left
side of the table.

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

7

Buzzing About
Multicultural, Fantasy,
and History
The books dished about during the YA Editors’ Buzz Panel included some
with multicultural characters, some that unfold in vibrant fantasy worlds,
and some that capture pivotal moments of history. The panelists were
Karen Chaplin, editor, HarperTeen; T.S.
Ferguson, associate
editor, Harlequin
Teen; Alvina Ling,
executive editorial
director, Little,
Brown Books for
Young Readers;
Daniel Ehrenhaft,
editorial director,
Soho Teen; and Krista
Marino, executive
editor, Delacorte
Press. The panel was At Thursday’s Young Adult Editors Buzz Panel (l. to r.): Daniel
moderated by Valerie Ehrenhaft, Soho Teen; Krista Marino, Delacorte; T.S. Ferguson,
Harlequin Teen; Alvina Ling, Little, Brown; Karen Chaplin,
Koehler of Blue
HarperTeen; and moderator Valerie Koehler, Blue Willow Bookshop,
Willow Bookshop in
Houston, Tex.
Houston.
Chaplin discussed The Jewel (HarperTeen, Sept.), the first in a planned
fantasy trilogy by debut author Amy Ewing. The novel takes place in a world
called the Lone City, whose territories are sharply divided by social class.
Violet is meant to serve as a surrogate in the Jewel, the wealthiest quadrant
of the Lone City. With fantasy elements and a dusting of feminist polemic,
the book may draw comparisons to Kiera Cass’s The Selection (2012).
Lies We Tell Ourselves (Harlequin Teen, Sept.) by debut author Robin
Talley, takes place in 1959 Virginia, during the beginnings of the civil rights
movement. The story features a protagonist who confronts her deeply
embedded racial prejudices when she becomes emotionally involved with a
black student. Calling the novel “fearlessly realistic,” Ferguson described
how Talley cogently parallels the struggle for equal rights for AfricanAmericans and the fight for gay rights today.
Graudin’s The Walled City (Little, Brown, Nov.) is set in a fictional version
of a densely populated settlement that existed in Hong Kong until 1994. It
follows a cast of teenage characters living within a brutal and lawless society. Calling the book “genre bending and gender bending,” Ling noted that
despite its edgy themes of human trafficking, drugs, and survival, the novel
is fundamentally “a moving and powerful book about sisterly and brotherly
love.” Ling jokingly suggested that, with its integration of historical and dystopian elements, the book might fall into a new genre category: “Hystopian?
Dystory?” She also praised the book’s multicultural cast and its ability to
“walk the lines between reality and fantasy.”
From the squalid maze of the Walled City, the panel shifted focus to the
1960s New York City music scene. Songwriter Cynthia Weil (her credits
include “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling”) draws from her own experiences
writing music at the Brill Building in her historical YA mystery, I’m Glad I
Did (Soho, Jan.). Ehrenhaft commented on Weil’s “acuity in remembering
those days” and the way she weaves social commentary about segregation
and other issues into the book, as she did into her songs.
Merino introduced author and musician Frank Portman’s King Dork
Approximately (Delacorte, Dec.), a sequel to his 2006 novel, King Dork,
which Merino purchased based on the character-driven appeal of a small
sample (“I bought 50 pages of voice and it was 100% worth it,” she said). The
story of high school student Tom Henderson, whose ambitions include playing in a rock band, getting a girlfriend, and discovering why adults love The
Catcher in the Rye so much, continues in King Dork Approximately. Merino
revealed little about the second book, saying only that Portman “pulls the
carpet out from under his readers.” 
—Matia Burnett

PW at BEA

PW will be at booth 1252 on the main floor, at BookCon at booth 3063, and
at uPublishU at Table 19. And get to know more about BookLife, PW’s new
program for indie authors, at booth 1249. Keep up with all the BEA news
with PW Show Daily, available in print at the Javits Center during the
expo, and also as a digital edition in PW’s app and on Scribd. Don’t have
our app yet? Just visit publishersweekly.com/app for info on how to get
it. You can also catch show news at publishersweekly.com/bea.

© stevekagan.com

PUBL I SHERS

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

8

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Meet
Philip
Gulley
Philip Gulley’s
loveable Pastor
Sam Gardner
returns in a
witty new series!

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Highlights
of the day

MEETINGS AND EVENTS
8–9:30 a.m.: Children’s Author Breakfast: Carl Hiaasen, Mem Fox, Jeff
Kinney, with Jason Segal as emcee.

9 a.m.–5 p.m.: BEA Exhibit Hall open
9 a.m.–5 p.m.: International Rights and Business Center
11–11:50 a.m.: “Middle-Grade Editors Buzz”: Life of Zarf, Pennyroyal
Academy, The Truth About Twinkie Pie, The Witch’s Boy, and Zoo at the Edge of
the World (Room 1E12)
11–11:50 a.m.: “Let Common Core Power Your Publishing Strategies” (1E15)
1:30–2:30 p.m.: “The Women of Contemporary Fiction,” featuring Amy
Bloom, Susan Jane Gilman, Randy Susan Meyers, Liane Moriarty, with Elin
Hilderbrand as moderator (Downtown Stage)
4–5 p.m.: APA Author Tea: Jodi Picoult, Dick Cavett, Ruth Reichl, with Pat
O’Brien as emcee.

AUTOGRAPHS
9:30 a.m.–5 p.m.: Authors will be signing at appointed hours all day
at tables in the Autographing Area or at publishers’ booths. The list
includes Mark Nielsen, Josh Sundquist, Heather Gudenkauf, Valeri
Gorbachev, Robyn Carr, Kailin Gow, Amy Ewing, Camille Battaglia,
Diane Lawson, Lincoln Pierce, M.J. Rose, Amy Zhang, Ilyasah
Shabbazz, Lori St. John, David Kirkpatrick, and many more.

© melissa lucier

Correction: In yesterday’s PW Show Daily, some of the signing times for
Random House children’s authors were incorrect. Check out the RH ad in this
issue, page 11, for the right time.

Workman opens up the BEA floor with a bunny rabbit flash dance to celebrate Sandra Boynton’s
forthcoming “The Bunny Rabbit Show.”
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daisy Maryles
MANAGING EDITORS Michael Coffey, Sonia Jaffe Robbins
ART DIRECTOR Clive Chiu
PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Kagan
STAFF REPORTERS Andrew Albanese, Adam Boretz, Matia Burnett, Jessamine Chan,
Photo: Matt Griffith

Rachel Deahl, Louisa Ermelino, Rose Fox, Lynn Garrett, Gabe Habash, Carolyn Juris,

SIGNING: A Place Called Hope
®

Friday, May 30th
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Booth #2917
®

CENTER
STREET
®

centerstreet.com
Center Street is a division
of Hachette Book Group

Jim Milliot, Marcia Z. Nelson, Calvin Reid, Diane Roback, Mark Rotella, Judith Rosen,
Jonathan Segura, John A. Sellers
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ann Byle, Nicholas Clee, Ruby Cutolo, Paige Crutcher,
Dick Donahue, Lucinda Dyer, Liz Hartman, Brian Heater, Karen Jones, Hilary S. Kayle,
Bridget Kinsella, Claire Kirch, Sally Lodge, Suzanne Mantell, Shannon Maughan,
Diane Patrick, Beth Scorzato, Clare Swanson, Teri Tan, Genevieve Valentine,
Wendy Werris, Kimberly Winston
COPY EDITOR Daniel Berchenko
DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL Craig Morgan Teicher
PRODUCTION MANAGER Catherine Fick, Kady Francesconi
TECHNOLOGY MANAGER Karthik Chinnasamy
PUBLISHER Cevin Bryerman
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SHOW DAILY Joseph Murray
BookExpo America is owned by Reed Exhibitions and any of its marks used herein are used
under license from Reed Exhibitions.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

®

Meet New York Times Bestselling
Author and Iconic Photographer

Giveaway and

Author Signing*
Sourcebooks
Booth #921
Friday, May 30 at 10:00 a.m.
*While supplies last.

Anne Geddes Little Blessings Available Now!
978-1-4022-9818-9 • $14.99 • HC

10

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Kicking off this year’s BookExpo, the
Adult Editors Buzz Panel featured
a number of boldface editorial
names, and a few titles that have
already drawn attention for landing
their authors major advances.
One title where the advance
became an early story is Matthew
Thomas’s We Are Not Ourselves.
Simon & Schuster’s Marysue Rucci
plugged the debut novel, which she
had acquired for a rumored seven
figures at the 2013 London Book Fair.
While Rucci did discuss the author’s
appealing rags-to-riches backstory—he worked on the novel for a

decade and was living in a one-bedroom apartment with his wife and
twins when he sold the book in a
splashy deal—she focused on the
work itself, calling the novel, about
three generations of an IrishAmerican family, “transcendent”
and “one of the most beautiful and
moving” books she has “ever read.”
Lee Boudreaux, who recently
decamped Ecco to launch her own
imprint at Hachette, was touting a
book that will be published by her
soon-to-be-former employer. Jessie
Burton’s The Miniaturist is yet
another debut novel, and highly

sought after; Boudreaux
reportedly bought U.S.
rights for high six figures last year, in a
“feverish” auction in
which multiple bidders
were vying for the work.
The novel, which she
said reminded her of
Elizabeth Gilbert’s latest
novel, The Signature of
Pictured (l. to r.) are moderator Robert Sindelar; Jennifer
All Things, is set in the
Jackson; Lee Boudreaux; Amy Einhorn; Jeffrey Shotts;
1700s and opens with a
Marysue Rucci; Josh Kendall; and Colin Harrison.
young woman knocking
on the door of the older, wealthier
The title refers to a doll house the
man to whom she has been betrothed.
heroine’s husband gives her, thinking it will be a source of entertainment. Boudreaux said the book is a
novel of “secrets and hypocrisies,”
detailing how our private lives so
often differ from our public ones.
Knopf’s Jennifer Jackson kicked
off the panel touting Emily St. John
Mandel’s Station Eleven, set in a
postapocalyptic America and follows a traveling Shakespeare company. The novel, which marks the
author’s fourth effort, is, according
to Jackson, a “departure” for the
author. “I finished this book feeling
utterly homesick for my life right
now.... I felt grateful for electricity
and running water, for what Emily
Stage
calls ‘the sweetness of life on Earth.’
It changed the way I thought about
the world. And what more can we
ask for in fiction?”
One of the two nonfiction books on
the panel is Eula Biss’s On Immunity:
An Inoculation. Graywolf’s Jeff
Shotts said the book, Biss’s sophoMEET AMANDA!
more effort, “hits a cultural nerve”
as it explores the history of inoculaSigning
tion. Joking that he was destined to
TEASE
edit the book, given his last name,
Shotts called out a reference Salon
Friday, 1:00–1:30 PM
made about Biss’s first book, the
Table 12
essay collection Notes from No
Man’s Land, calling her “Joan
Didion’s heiress apparent.” Shotts
said, “This book is in line with Susan
Sontag.” On Immunity, Shotts said,
explores the “myths and metaphors
that govern our ideas about immunization and each other.”
Amy Einhorn, whose departure
from her eponymous imprint was
recently announced, was touting
M.O. Walsh’s debut novel, My
MEET AMY!
Sunshine Away. The book, which
kicks off with the narrator’s comSigning
pelling statement that he was one
FALLING
of four suspects in a rape case, is,
INTO PLACE
she explained, not a book about a
rape. A “very Southern novel,” as
Friday, 1:30–2:00 PM
bookseller moderator Robert
Table 12
Sindelar called it, My Sunshine
Away is set in Baton Rouge, La., in
the summer of 1989 and is, as
Einhorn put it, “a meditation on
memory” and a “love letter” to this
www.epicreads.com
Southern city.
Championing an author with a
longer résumé was Mulholland
Books’ Josh Kendall. The author is

DON’T MISS TWO OF THIS YEAR’S

MOST TALKED ABOUT
DEBUT AUTHORS!
It’s Not Easy Being Teen
Stage Panel

Friday 11:00–11:30 AM | Uptown

AMANDA MACIEL

Photo by Abby McAden

Available
Now

An Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers

Available
September

Photo by Alvida Groom

AMY ZHANG

continued on page 74

www.bookexpoamerica.com

© stevekagan.com

Big Debuts, Breakouts Dominate

Meet the Authors
That Have BEA Buzzing!
BOOTH 2839 | Friday, May 30

#1 New York Times
Bestselling Author

CARL HIAASEN
10:30–11:30 AM

Award-Winning Author

E. LOCKHART
1:00–2:00 PM
#wewereliars

#whatwouldskinkdo

Multitalented Actor,
Writer, and Musician

JASON SEGEL

and Bestselling Author

KIRSTEN MILLER
1:30–2:30 PM

#nightmaresnovels

EXCLUSIVE DAILY GIVEAWAY
9:00–10:00 AM Wonder Limited Edition Tote Bag
12:00–1:00 PM Must-Read Middle-Grade ARCs 

randomhousekids

Critically Acclaimed
Author and Musician

FRANK PORTMAN
3:30–4:30 PM
#kingdork

12

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

Measuring the E-book Market
When e-books first began to make
meaningful inroads in publishing in
2009–2010, a number of executives
predicted they would become
another format within the industry.
In 2013 e-books had become part of
the “normal” book market.
In 2013, Nielsen’s Books &
Consumers survey shows that
among U.S. buyers of adult fiction
and nonfiction, 25% of book buyers
bought an e-book; 31% of new books
purchased in adult fiction and nonfiction were e-books; and 15% of the
dollars spent on these books were
for e-books.
Adult fiction is the category most
affected by the move to digital, and
the format accounted for about 40%
of e-book purchases in 2013. The
increase in e-books’ share of book
spending showed smaller growth
than in unit terms, mainly because
of the increase in self-publishing.
It’s now estimated that around 10%
of fiction e-books bought are selfpublished—and they are most commonly bought for under $3, whereas
mainstream fiction e-books average $4.77 per new unit sold. Overall,
the average price paid for a fiction
e-book dropped to around 57% of

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

UNITS AND DOLLARS IN 2013 BY FORMAT
1%

that paid for mass market paperback fiction and approximately
37% of that paid for trade paperback fiction in 2013.
Internet-only retailers continued
to dominate the e-book market in
the U.S. and represented more
than 9 in 10 adult fiction purchases
in digital formats; furthermore, 1 in
4 new print books in 2013 were purchased online. But there is little
evidence that bookstores are no
longer relevant. In 2013, while
e-commerce book buyers reported
that they “trust this site” and may
stay loyal because they are a “member of (a) frequent shopper program,” sentiment toward “delivery
terms,” “ease of purchase,” and
“book selection offered” dropped
year on year. The reverse can be
said of chain bookstores: factors
such as “ease of purchase” and
“book selection offered” held
strong in 2013, although “special
offers” and “sales” were less influential. Similar reasons are cited for
independent bookstores, though
being “conveniently located” holds
sway, and increasingly “staff knowledge” is a vital aspect of why consumers prefer an indie store.

1%
E-book

12%

10%

Paperback

25%

Mass Market

12%

35%

27%

Hardcover

10%
7%

26%

32%

Audio
Other

source: nielsen market research

Much of the growth in the e-book
market is, of course, driven by
device ownership, with the numbers of owners increasing when
new devices become available,
especially after the holidays.
Access to suitable devices rose
among American book buyers in
2013, although mainly through
increased ownership of tablets and
smartphones rather than dedicated e-readers. By the end of last
year, more than half of book buyers
(60%) were in a household with a
tablet device, and nearly threequarters owned a smartphone. In
January 2014, tablet ownership was
more than double that of dedicated
e-reading devices, having overtaken the latter in popularity in the
fall of 2012.

In the U.S., around 1 in 4 of all
book-buyers purchased at least one
e-book each month. Although this
proportion did not grow significantly in 2013 after an uptick in the
first quarter, initial data on the 2014
market seems to indicate that
Christmas gifts of devices has
resulted in a similar uptick this
year, too.
Despite the increase in tablet
ownership, at least 40% of e-books
in the U.S. were bought to read on a
dedicated e-reader device rather
than a multifunction device in 2013.
More than one third (35%) of the
books bought by tablet owners were
digital in 2013: 56% of their book
purchases were printed books.
While we noted earlier that the
continued on page 74

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D o n oT M I S S o u r PA n e l D I S c u S S I o n

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Aligning content Strategy
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Today: May 30, 2014

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distribution

Stand DZ1961
sales@qbend.com | +1 (563) 690-9555 | www.qbend.com
www.bookexpoamerica.com

11:30 AM

Midtown Stage

Discussions among publishing industry thought-leaders on
how customer needs and usage of content define unbundling,
customization, and distribution.
PAnelISTS

Todd Ware
Abby Zidle
David Wilk
Kaushik Sampath

Elsevier
Simon & Schuster
Frederator Books
Qbend

MoDerATor

Kathy Wiess

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OT 27
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Beaufort Books

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Booth #1427
Table #15
Booth #1427
Booth #1427
Table #15
Table #15
Table #15

May 30 author signings

11:30 am - 12:00 pm
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
3:30 pm - 4:00 pm
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Steve Shukis
J. Cheney Mason, Esquire
Daniel I. Nuchovich, MD
Patrice Cheviot
Benjamin W. DeHaven
J. F. Riordan
Webb Hubbell

Poisoned
Justice in America
The Palm Beach Pain Relief System
Twice Blessed
Confessions of a Self-Help Writer
North of the Tension Line
When Men Betray

14

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

You asked for it!

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Diamonds Are a
Bakers’ Best Friend

Shadow Mountain is excited to announce

DRAGONWATCH
the sequel to

By Brandon Mull

Family ties at Baker: (l. to r.) Dan Baker, Dawn Baker Faasse, Rich Baker, Dave Baker,
and Dwight Baker.

Stop by Booth 2338 to meet
Brandon and receive an exclusive
autographed DRAGONWATCH poster
for your school, library, or bookstore!

Friday, May 30 at 12:30 PM
And don’t miss your opportunity to meet some
of our other fantasy authors and receive an ARC.
Tyler Whitesides, author of the
bestselling JANITORS series.
Friday at 11:45 AM
Saturday at 10:30 AM
Be the first to discover
a new writer of YA fantasy,
Jacob Gowans!
Friday at 1:30 PM
Saturday at 10:45 AM

BOOTH 2338

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Baker Publishing Group celebrates its 75th anniversary at BEA and for the occasion is offering free copies
of The Baker Book House Story, the recently released
history of the company, and another gift, while supplies
last at booth 1031.
The Grand Rapids, Mich., company began as a used
bookstore in 1939, when Herman Baker opened his
rented shop with 500 of his own books, homemade
shelves, and two desks and a typewriter bought at the
Salvation Army. Baker quickly moved into publishing
with the release in 1940 of More Than Conquerors: An
Interpretation of the Book of Revelation by William
Hendriksen, a professor at nearby Calvin College. The
book is still in print today.
By 1942, orders for used books were coming in from
around the world and as close as the next block. Baker
stocked his small store with the best reference works,
commentaries, teaching aids, and history books, drawing world-renowned preachers and theologians to his
doorstep. He also began reissuing such reference works
as Barnes’ Notes and the New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia
of Religious Knowledge, soon making a name as one of
the largest distributors of new and used religion books
in the U.S. and abroad.
The 1960s saw expansion of the publishing division and building of the current offices in nearby Ada, Mich. The company began purchasing smaller
publishing houses, including Canon Press and W.A. Wilde Company, and
expanding its retail base, owning half a dozen retail stores at one point, under
the leadership of Herman Baker’s son Peter. His other son, Richard, became
president of the company in 1987, though Herman continued working until
his death in 1991. Richard Baker oversaw the purchase of the Fleming H.
Revell Company and Chosen Books in 1992, a move that brought Baker out
of the academic/classics market and squarely into the trade book market.
Dwight Baker, Richard’s son, became president of the company in 1997, overseeing the addition of Brazos Press in 1999 and the purchase of Bethany
House Publishers in 2003, followed by the acquisition of Regal Books as well.
Dwight Baker sees only benefit in the purchase.
“We will concentrate on incorporating Regal books and authors into our
lines, with a goal to maintain the publishing process as effectively as possible,” he says. “In every conversation I’ve held so far, the community of publishers, agents, and authors has expressed a common impression that this
transition will serve the church well over the long term.”
Among Baker Publishing Group’s top sellers: 90 Minutes in Heaven by
Don Piper, has sold more than five million copies; Beverly Lewis books have
sold more than 15 million; and Janette Oke has more than 25 million of her
books sold.
“In 10 years I would prefer to be just where we are, but surrounded by emerging young leaders who bring a passion and talent for Christian book publishing that makes me feel like a novice,” says Baker. “Ten years down the road, I
hope to be standing on the curb and cheering the racers.” 
—Ann Byle

The Perseus Books Group
Author Signings | Booth #1406
~ Thursday ~
9:30am

11:00am

LIDIA BASTIANICH

BEN MEZRICH

Lidia’s Family Kitchen:
Nonna’s Birthday
Surprise
Running
Press Kids

Seven Wonders
Running Press

1:00pm

3:00pm

TARA ALTABRANDO

MARLENE KOCH

The Battle of Darcy Lane
Running Press Kids

Eat What You Love
Everyday
Running Press

~ Friday ~
10:00am

11:00am

KWASI KWARTENG

TIM FEDERLE

War and Gold
PublicAffairs

Hickory Daiquiri Dock
Running Press

3:00pm

DAVID SAX

2:00pm

ERIC DEVINE
Press Play
Running Press
Kids

The Tastemakers
PublicAffairs

The Perseus Books Group

Ten e
Ten c ditors.
at
Ten ti egories.
t
Visit o les each
.
u
oppor r booth fo
r an
tun
of ten ity to win o
ne
cu
of bac rated sets
klist t
itles!

16

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Signing with Lassie
As the “official” biographer of Lassie,
bestselling author Ace Collins
understands the inherent potential
of canine companions. Lassie’s onscreen heroics are symbolic of the
innate ability of dogs, from highly
trained professionals to backyard
pooches, to perform acts of courage
and service, says Collins.
In a special treat for both Collins
and fans, the current “official” Lassie
joins the author today to help him
promote his new title, Man’s Best Hero:
True Stories of Great American Dogs
(Abingdon, June).
The book explores both the strength

of the human/canine bond and the
potential of all dogs to channel their
inner Lassie, who is also represented
in one of the 13 stories. Canine heroes
of all shapes and sizes are included,
says Collins, from rescue dogs that
race into burning buildings to save
lives to “little stories” like the shepherd/collie mix who made it her
business each day to help a local
crossing guard guide school children
safely across a street.
“I think every dog is looking for a
calling... they want to serve,” says
Collins, and that includes family pets.
“My goal is to have people take a

W E E K LY

second look at their own
dogs to see the potential
there, if they will just
take time to unlock it.” To
help facilitate that process, the book includes
resources on assistance
dogs, shelter rescues,
organizations, and programs.
As to what people can
learn from canine friends, he offers,
“Dogs can teach us how to be a better human being. They have the
unique ability to be all the things we
should be. If you are looking for a
role model, make it a guide dog.”
With more than 60 books in his

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

canon, including Lassie:
A Dog’s Life—The First
Fifty Years and Music for
Your Heart: Reflections
from Your Favorite Songs,
Collins is taking a short
break from a four-bookper-year schedule to
attend his first BEA. “I will
get to meet fans and
observe what other
authors are doing and talk to them
about the process of writing.”
Lassie will be joining Ace Collins
as he signs copies of Man’s Best
Hero today, at 2 p.m., in the
Abingdon Press booth (1064). 

—Karen Jones

APAC Is 20
Years Young
The 20th Audio Publishers
Association Conference kicked off
with a State of the Union address
from APA President Michelle Lee
Cobb on Wednesday morning.
“We’re pleased to say that the
Audio Publishers Association is
doing well,” Cobb tells Show Daily.
“All of our volunteers are contributing heavily. And both financially
and in a marketing capacity, we’re
doing big, great things.”
The presentation—titled “APA
2014 and Beyond,” and meant to
review all things audio for the coming year—was just the start of a
busy day of programming at APAC
featuring dozens of sessions and
networking breaks.
Among some of the day’s highlights were the keynote address—
“Thinking in New Boxes”—from
Alan Iny of the Boston Consulting
Group, as well as two program
tracks: one targeting business and
the other, performance.
Iny, the author of Thinking in New
Boxes: A New Paradigm for Business
Creativity, aims to break down
assumptions and constraints that
hold people back. Cobb pointed to
Iny’s keynote, the APA membership
meeting, and increased attendance
as highlights of the show, noting,
“We actually sold out this year.”
Programming on the business
track included a publishers’ roundtable, as well as panels on advanced
social media tools, useful apps, and
a session focusing on children’s
audio. On the performance track,
sessions dealt with home-studio
workflow and how publishers and
narrators can collaborate on promotion; a narrator roundtable;
“speed dating” networking between
narrators and publishers; and the
ever-popular Listening Lounge. 
“It’s a great opportunity to hook
up with your colleagues,” says
award-winning narrator Xe Sands.
“There’s been a lot of change in
audiobook publishing this year... so
it’s a great time to check in with
everybody.”
—Adam Boretz

www.bookexpoamerica.com

PUBL I SHERS

Reach More Readers
More Titles, More Locations

The Future of eBook Distribution

State of the Art Digital Platform
thousands of locations and growing!
powered by

Booth #1239

Join the BEA discussion
The Untapped Retail
Channel: Public Libraries

Friday, May 30th 11:30-12:20 RM: 1E14

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

SONpotlight
CHILDRE N
A Breakfast of Champions
Humor is very likely on the menu at today’s Children’s Book and Author
Breakfast, which is highlighted by three lively veteran children’s book authors
and one debut author whose specialty is comedy. New to the book world but
familiar to film and TV viewers, Jason Segel will host this morning’s event.
Joining him on the podium are Mem Fox, Carl Hiaasen, and Jeff Kinney.
Jason Segel, whose writing credits include movie
scripts and songs, teamed up with Kirsten Miller,
author of the Kiki Strike and the Eternal Ones
series, to write Nightmares! (Delacorte, Sept.), the
debut book in a middle-grade trilogy introducing a
boy whose worst nightmares start to come true.
The story is based on the first movie script that
Segel, now 34, wrote when he was in his early 20s.
“I had terrible nightmares as a child, and I found
that films like The Goonies and Labyrinth really
helped remind me that there’s still magic in the
world,” he says. “I hope my book helps kids realize Jason Segel
that as well. I think when kids reach the age of eight
or 10, the fact that they have responsibilities—and will for the rest of their
lives—suddenly hits them, and that can be scary. I want to let kids know that
you can use nightmares to learn to cope with fears, and can work through
nightmares to make them your dreams.”
Segel was anxious to shape his original nightmares-themed script into a
novel. “One thing I’ve learned through my work [as writer] on The Muppets
movies is that a child’s imagination is more powerful than anything you can
put on a screen,” he observes. “So I really wanted to put this story into book
form.”
He reports that his collaboration with Miller was a smooth one. “I’ve found
in my career that collaboration is the key to success for me, and I was grateful to be able to work with Kirsten,” he notes.
Segel, who will sign copies of Nightmares! at the Random House booth
(2839) at 1:30 p.m. today, is “very excited” to be making his first visit to BEA
and to “be around people who really love books.” Still, he admits to a few butterflies anticipating his breakfast gig this morning: “In general, I am terrified of hosting things, but it was comforting to learn about the context of the
breakfast and that I’ll be introducing my fellow authors. But I’m still trying
to pick out a really good sweater to wear—maybe something Christmassy or
something with elbow patches? I’m wading through lots of choices.”
Mem Fox is delighted to speak at today’s breakfast,
and recalls her reaction to being asked to do so: “I
live in Australia, by the sea, and when the invitation
arrived I felt like running along the beach screaming, even though I’m an asthmatic in my late 60s. I
was not only honored, I was shocked. My fevered
excitement and gratitude know no bounds.” Fox
will sign copies of her latest book, Baby Bedtime,
(S&S/Beach Lane Books, Aug.) at 1 p.m. today at
Table 8 in the Autographing Area.
The author notes that this picture book, which is
illustrated by Emma Quay, started very differently
Mem Fox
from any of her earlier picture books. In early 2010,
her first grandchild, Theo, was born 10 weeks prematurely, and Fox spent a
good deal of time visiting him in the neonatal ward. “I read, sang, and talked
to him daily,” she says. “One day I noticed Theo’s ears don’t stick out. Mine
do, so I was so happy for him. I loved his ears—and his nose, fingers, and toes.
So I whispered, ‘I could eat your little ears. I could nibble on your nose.’ I
kept on going, and realized I’d accidentally written the first verse of a love
poem to a baby. Over the next couple of days, I finished the poem, which
eventually became the text of Baby Bedtime.”
A devoted literacy advocate who believes in the importance of reading
aloud to very young children, Fox consciously shapes the verse of her books
so it is especially effective when read aloud. “I’m passionate about children
being read to long before they go to kindergarten, so they’ll learn to read
easily, happily, and quickly when they finally make it into school,” she says.
“And it’s not only verse that I consciously shape for read-aloud perfection,
it’s prose as well. My editor and I were recently working intensively on a
new book, and I wrote 39 drafts in five days. The final story will be a meager

© michael muller

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

© kinga balent

18

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

19

the power to
choose comes
with a price.

Available
September
2014

An enchanting story full of riches, rivalries,
and riveting twists . . . perfect for fans of
THE SELECTION series

Don’t miss debut author

AMY EWING
on the “YA Author Buzz Panel”
Today from 10:00-10:30 am
at the Uptown Stage

Photo by Navdeep Singh Dhillon

450 words, but each one will be the right word in the right place.”
Because she loves speaking about her work, Fox expects today’s breakfast
to be “a highlight” of BEA for her, adding, “I hope booksellers will take from
my presentation a greater understanding of the agony of writing for very
young children. I also hope they will find it deliciously easy to sell until kingdom come.”
Carl Hiaasen arrives at BEA with a new feather in his cap: with the release
of Skink—No Surrender (Knopf, Sept.) he will add YA author to his long list
of writing credits. In his new book, the Newbery
Honor author (for Hoot) brings back Skink, the
hermit ex-governor of Florida he first introduced
more than 25 years ago in a novel for adults, Double
Whammy. Here, Skink and a teen named Richard
embark on a search for the boy’s missing cousin,
undaunted by blinding storms, crazed pigs, flying
bullets, and giant gators.
Both Skink’s sketchy character and the story
line—the missing girl runs away with a guy she
meets online—skewed the novel to young adults,
observes Hiaasen. “The world has obviously
Carl Hiaasen
changed with the Internet, and it brings a host of new
threats, like cyber predators, that kids and adults have to worry about,” he
says. “This story is obviously a bit heavier than what goes on in my middlegrade books, so it naturally fell into the YA category—though my books are
so peculiar that they don’t really fit into any category.”
And of course there’s the roguish Skink, whom Hiaasen describes as
“probably the most adult character in any of my books, so it made sense to
bring him into a book aimed at teens rather than younger readers.” In addition, the author’s teen readers appear to be ardent fans of Skink. “A lot of
teens who read Hoot when it first came out and now read my adult novels
have told me that Skink is their favorite character,” he adds.
Asked if he felt the need to tone down Skink’s character for the YA audience, Hiaasen replies that he decided to tell the story in Richard’s voice,
which “gave me the chance to filter Skink’s dialogue. Richard became somewhat of a built-in editor. At one point he remarks that Skink is cussing, but
he refuses to tell the reader what he’s hearing. Skink is a character who
needs some supervision, even in an adult book.”
Not surprisingly. Hiaasen, who signs ARCs of Skink—No Surrender at 11
a.m. this morning at the Random House booth (2839), doesn’t keep a straight
face as he describes his reaction to being asked to speak at the breakfast: “I
immediately thought, ‘What are they thinking—are they out of their minds?’
I’m always flattered and also surprised when asked to appear at a dignified
function like this. My fan base and audience are a little more ragged—which
I love—but here I may have to dress up and behave.”
Jeff Kinney’s ninth Diary of a Wimpy Kid novel, The Long Haul (Amulet,
Nov.), marks several departures from his earlier books in this bestselling
series. For starters, Greg Heffley and his family leave home for the first time
to embark on a road trip. Kinney notes that though “taking the characters
out of their element is freeing, it’s a little
risky for me creatively. Normally, I don’t
figure out the novel’s theme until I’ve
written all the jokes for the book, but
this time the road-trip structure was
already there. I was intent on writing
the book cinematically, in three acts,
where I ordinarily build the story
around scattershot jokes that the plot
strings together. Here, I feel a bit as
though I’m writing right-side-up rather
than my usual upside-down.”
Jeff Kinney
Changing the setting by taking the
Heffleys out of their home turf also
brought new problems. “With the family in one car together, I have to have
them all doing something, moving toward some kind of goal, which is a different approach for me,” he remarks. “I thought it might be limiting, but it was
very liberating, because all the characters had to have some sort of character
development, which I don’t usually focus on.”
Citing an additional creative departure, Kinney adds that he also tweaked
his approach to the humor in The Long Haul. “With this book, the humor has
to be a bit more observational and the jokes more action-driven,” he says.
“When characters are in a car, you need flat tires, chases, and things to go
wrong. It’s all a little more madcap.”
Speaking of humor, Kinney says he is honored to be a breakfast speaker
this morning, but a tad anxious as well. “I’m a bit nervous about having to
deliver laughs, since that can be tough at that time of the morning,” he says.
“In one lifetime, I can only collect so many funny stories, so I pray if I tell one
that booksellers have already heard they won’t call me out on it.”
After the breakfast today, Kinney heads to the Abrams booth (2727) at
10:30 a.m. to autograph copies of the Wimpy Kid School Planner, and will

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

© tim chapman

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Jewel_BEA_PWshowdaily_AD_final.indd 1

Meet Amy at
her signing
11:00-11:30 am
Table 12
www.epicreads.com

4/30/14 1:24 PM

20

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Browsing the Children’s Booths, Chapter 2
For those navigating the booths of
children’s publishers today, here’s
a preview of new books on display,
author signings, and giveaways to
pick up.
At booth C1681, NorthSouth is
featuring two new picture books,
both starring animal protagonists.
Author-illustrator Torben
Kuhlmann has traveled to BEA
from his native Germany to introduce booksellers to Lindberg: The
Tale of a Flying Mouse. The publisher is giving away “Let Your
Imagination Soar” posters to promote the book. Also on display is
Two Parrots, based on a tale from
Rumi, the 13th-century Persian
poet. The story, which centers on a
parrot in a golden cage that has
everything he wants—except his
freedom—is illustrated by Persian
artist Rashin, who is attending BEA.
Pathfinder Equine Publications,
in Reading, Pa., is celebrating the
publication of Quincy and Buck, the
third book in the Quincy the Horse
series by Camille Matthews, illustrated by Michelle Black. In this
picture book, released in March in
hardcover and e-book editions,
Quincy must contend with a bully

when he ventures beyond the corGuests can
mote the
ral and takes his first trail ride in
sample the hot
novel. Fans of
the desert. Books in the Quincy the
chocolate bar
Sammy
Horse series, inspired by a young,
and other
Spider—and
real-life horse that is now 24 and
goodies while
chicken soup—
still works as a therapy horse, have
watching the movie play in the
can pick up a recipe card based on
been named Mom’s Choice Award
booth.
Sammy the Spider’s First Mitzvah,
winners and will be displayed at the
Those stopping by Kar-Ben’s
the arachnid’s 15th picture book
Mom’s Choice booth (2767, 2768)
booth (1847) will have a chance to
adventure (Sept.). Written by Sylvia
during the show. Matthews, a cliniview some of the publishers’ latest
A. Rouss and Illustrated by
cal social worker and equineofferings. These include The
Katherine Janus Kahn, the series
assisted learning specialist, will be
Whispering Town, a story about a
has more than 300,000 copies in
at that booth to sign copies of her
family who hides a Jewish woman
print.
three books this afternoon, 2 p.m.
and her son in their cellar in 1943
Also on display at the booth are
Pathfinder Equine Publications’
Nazi-occupied Denmark. Author
four new Jewish-themed science
books are distributed by Small
Jennifer Elvgren
Press United/IPG.
is at BEA to proBooksellers eager to
get into the holiday spirit
on the early side will
want to visit the Silver
Dolphin Books booth
(2020) today, 3–4 p.m.,
when the publisher is
throwing a Christmas
party to celebrate
Rudolph the Red Nose
Reindeer Pop-Up Book,
an October release based
on the stop-motion animation TV special, which Check out these new fall titles from (l. to r.) Silver Dolphin Books, Scholastic/Graphix, and Houghton Mifflin
first aired 50 years ago.
Harcourt.

Spotlight

on children

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22

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

books: Netta and
middle-grade
Her Plant by Ellie B.
adventure involving
Gellman, Seder in
feuding kingdoms, a
the Desert by Rabbi
cursed boy, a cunJamie Korngold,
ning girl, and an
Stork’s Landing by
enchanted forest.
Tami LehmanNext up is William
Wilzig, and New
Ritter, who will
Month, New Moon by
autograph (against
Allison Ofanasky
a backdrop of
and photographer
scenes from his
Eliyahu Alpern.
novel) ARCs of
Algonquin Young
Jackaby, a story set
Mara Rockliff will be visiting the
Readers is hosting
in 1892 that centers
Peachtree booth.
two author autoon a girl who partgraphings this afternoon at booth
ners with an investigator with
839. From 2 to 3 p.m., Kelly Barnhill
extraordinary powers to track
will sign ARCs of The Witch’s Boy, a
down a serial killer. Also featured

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Spotlight

at the booth is
Winifred
Conkling’s
Passenger on
the Pearl, a YA
nonfiction title about a girl and 70
other slaves who made an unsuccessful attempt to escape north by
ship from Washington, D.C., in 1848.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt welcomes a literary luminary to booth
1657 today, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.,
when Lois Lowry signs hardcover
copies of the classic edition of her
Newbery-winning novel The Giver.
In July, the publisher will release a
new hardcover edition to tie in to
the Weinstein film based on the

on children

JOIN THREE TOP TEEN AUTHORS FOR A MODERATED DISCUSSION ON

THE

CRAFT WRITING
OF

AND

WORLD-BUILDING
FRIDAY, MAY 30 • 2:00–2:30 pm • UPTOWN STAGE

Available Now!

Available October 2014

MICHAEL GRANT

Photo credit: Sonya Sones

HEATHER DEMETRIOS

Photo by Zach Fehst

Photo by Robbie Poff

KIERA CASS

Available September 2014

DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO MEET KIERA, HEATHER, AND MICHAEL!
KIERA CASS
Signing THE ONE
Friday, May 30 • 3:00–4:00 pm
Harper Booth #2039*

HEATHER DEMETRIOS
Signing ARCs of EXQUISITE CAPTIVE
Friday, May 30 • 3:00–3:30 pm
Autographing Area • Table 11

novel, which is
due in August
and stars Jeff
Bridges, Meryl
Streep, and
Katie Holmes. HMH is giving away
The Giver–themed cloth tote bags,
as well as totes promoting Ivan: The
Remarkable True Story of the
Shopping Mall Gorilla, an August
Clarion title by Katherine
Applegate, based on her Newbery
winner, The One and Only Ivan.
Up for grabs at the booth are
these HMH ARCs: His Fair
Assassin, Book 3: Mortal Heart by
Robin LaFevers; Vivian Apple at the
End of the World by Katie Coyle;
Zac and Mia by A.J. Betts; Robots
Rule, Book 1: The Junkyard Bot by
C.J. Richards, illustrated by Goro
Fujita; The Woodcutter Sisters, Book
3: Dearest by Alethea Kontis; The
Chronicles of Kazam, Book 3: The
Eye of Zoltar by Jasper Fforde; The
Question of Miracles by Elana K.
Arnold; and A Plague of Bogles by
Catherine Jinks. Also available are
two Clarion ARCs: The Perfect Place
by Teresa E. Harris and Where I
Belong by Mary Downing Hahn.
Soho Teen hosts two YA author
autographings at its booth (2946)
today, including debut novelist
Cynthia Weil, who is celebrated for
her writing skills in another medium.
A member of the Rock and Roll and
the Songwriters Halls of Fame, winner of multiple Grammy Awards,
and co-writer of such classic songs
as “On Broadway” and “You’ve Lost
That Lovin’ Feeling,” Weil will be at
the booth this morning, 11–11:30 a.m.,
to sign ARCs of her novel, I’m Glad
I Did, which centers on a young
songwriter starting out in 1963
Manhattan. She will also autograph
posters featuring lyrics to “I’m Glad
I Did,” one of four original songs she
wrote based on the novel’s plot. At 3
p.m., Adele Griffin will be on hand
to sign ARCs of The Unfinished Life
of Addison Stone, an illustrated
“docu-novel” exploring what drove
a teenage art prodigy to take her
own life—if indeed she did.
At Perseus’ booth 1406, the folks
from Weinstein Books are spreading
their enthusiasm for a spring 2015
novel, The Haunting of Sunshine
Girl, Book 1 by Paige McKenzie with
Alyssa Sheinmel. The novel launches
a series based on the YouTube YA
Web series about a teen living in a
haunted house, which boasts more
than 52 million total views and
averages five million views per
month. The book series will offer
the backstory about characters featured in the YouTube videos, and
the YouTube and book properties
have been optioned by the Weinstein
Company for development for film
or television. The publisher is giving away chapter samplers at the
booth, which features a large light
box booth poster.
Staffers at the Peachtree booth
(2813) are in town from Atlanta to

MICHAEL GRANT
Signing ARCs of MESSENGER OF FEAR
Friday, May 30 • 1:00–1:30 pm
Autographing Area • Table 10

*Kiera Cass signing will be ticketed to 125 people. Tickets to be distributed starting at 10:00 am.

www.epicreads.com

24

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

share news of some of the house’s
new releases—with the help of several authors and an illustrator.
Carmen Agra Deedy, coauthor with
Randall Wright of The Cheshire
Cheese Cat: A Dickens of a Tale, and
illustrator Barry Moser will be at
the booth this afternoon, 2–2:30 p.m.,
signing their novel about a cat and
his mouse friends living in the
London tavern frequented by
Charles Dickens. The book will be
released in paperback in September.
Also at BEA are Mara Rockliff,
author of The Grudge Keeper, a picture book illustrated by Eliza
Wheeler that reveals what happens
when the wind scatters the villagers’

grudges that one resident has kept
tucked away in his cottage. And Fred
Bowen is at the show promoting
Double Reverse, a middle-grade
football novel that joins his Sports
Stories series.
At booth 1439, Scholastic has an
array of giveaways tying into forthcoming books. Star Wars fans can
pick up galleys of Star Wars: Jedi
Academy: Return of the Padawan
by Jeffrey Brown, as well as buttons
touting this title. Galleys and posters
are available for Sisters, a graphic
novel by Raina Telgemeier from
Scholastic/Graphix; and galleys are
on hand for Maggie Stiefvater’s
Sinner, a novel set in the same world
as her Shiver trilogy. Double-sided
tote bags promote Dav Pilkey’s
Captain
Underpants and
Ricky Ricotta
series, and other
Ricky Ricotta–
themed giveaways include
posters, bookmarks, and tattoos. And for
thirsty YA devotees, there are
“This Is Teen: I
Read YA” tumAlgonquin hosts Ritter this afternoon at 3 p.m.; and Pathfinder will have
blers up for
Matthews at 2 p.m.

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Spotlight

grabs.
Making its
BEA debut is
Pine Tree
Publishing
(1644), a Grove City, Pa., company
with a three-fold mission: “developing good stories, encouraging family traditions, and ensuring quality
keepsakes.” In the spirit of those
goals, the publisher’s initial titles
spotlight the wonders of the holidays and of building a snowman.
Released in July 2013, these are The
Magic Christmas Key by Leann
Smith, illustrated by Kip Richmond,
and Smith’s My Snowman and Me,
illustrated by Kacey Schwartz. Both
are available as individual hardcovers and as boxed novelty gift sets.
Smith will be at the booth tomorrow,
10 a.m.–noon, to sign copies of The
Magic Christmas Key, which won a
Mom’s Choice Award Gold Medal.
At BEA, Pine Tree is also previewing upcoming books by company
founder Smith, due in August: The
Hope Tree and The Winning Garden,
both illustrated by Richmond.
At booths 1513 and 1613, the Italian
Trade Agency is featuring several
children’s book published by
Corraini Edizioni, winner of this
year’s BOP–—Bologna Prize for the
Best Children’s Publisher of the Year

in Europe. On
display from
that publisher
are Taro
Miura’s
Workman Stencil, which invites
readers to use an accompanying
stencil to draw helpers at a work
site; Blind Mice and Other Numbers
by Ivan Chermayeff, a pun-filled
counting book; and This Is the
Cheese by Andy Goodman, a rhyming tale of a mouse who might set off
a chain of mishaps if he snaps a
mousetrap holding cheese. Other
children’s publishers exhibiting at
the booth are 24 ORE Cultura,
Atlantyca, ATS Italia Editrice,
Carthusia Edizioni, Giunti Editore,
La Coccinella, and Secop Edizioni.
The Macmillan Children’s
Publishing Group is hosting two
author signings at booth 1738. Today,
10–10:30 a.m., Brandon Stanton,
blogger and bestselling author of
Humans of New York, will sign Little
Humans (Farrar, Straus and Giroux),
an October title that offers photos
and anecdotes focusing on young
New Yorkers. Tomorrow, 1–2 a.m.,
Obert Skye will be on hand to sign
Katfish (Holt/Ottaviano), the latest
addition to his middle-grade
Creature from My Closet series.
Other new titles featured at the

on children

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Switch Press connects with the
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Stop by Booth

10:00 AM >>

#1469 for signings and giveaways:

2:00 PM >>

10:00 PM >>
10.AM

AUTHOR ISOBEL HARROP

signing the illustrated memoir
The Isobel Journal
WWW.SWITCHPRESS.COM

AUTHOR ERIN JOHNSON
signing the Western thriller
Grace and the Guiltless

BOOTH # 2233

Magination Press

®

Self-Help Books for Kids...and the Adults in Their Lives

APA LifeTools

®

Resources for Self-Knowledge and Better Living

This Day in June

Parenting Children With ADHD

Hardcover: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1658-1
Paperback: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1659-8

List: $16.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1571-3

Gayle E. Pitman, PhD
Illustrated by Kristyna Litten
A wildly whimsical, validating, and exuberant
reflection of the LGBT community, This Day in June
welcomes kids to experience a pride celebration and
share in a day when we are all united. 32 pages.
10” x 8”. Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.

Not Every Princess

Jeffrey Bone, PsyD, and Lisa Bone, PhD
Illustrated by Valeria Docampo
“The authors keep their messaging to a minimum; coupled
with the emotion and humor in Docampo’s artwork, it goes
a long way to helping the book feel like a book and not just
a resource.”
– Publishers Weekly
32 pages. 9 3/8" x 9 3/8". Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.
Hardcover: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1647-5
Paperback: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1648-2

Friends Always

Tanja Wenisch
Illustrated by Tanja Wenisch
This fun, colorfully illustrated story about the ups and
downs of childhood friendship gently teaches kids about
appropriate social behavior and conflict resolution.
32 pages. 9 3/8" x 9 3/8". Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.
Hardcover: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1639-0
Paperback: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1640-6

10 Lessons That Medicine Cannot Teach
SECOND EDITION
Vincent J. Monastra, PhD
This guidebook synthesizes medical, nutritional, educational,
and psychological research on ADHD and shows how
parenting techniques can significantly reduce ADHD
symptoms. 2014. 252 pages. Paperback.

Taking Control of Anxiety

Small Steps for Getting the Best
of Worry, Stress, and Fear
Bret A. Moore, PsyD
This is a “self-help book” in the best sense of the term—
conversational in tone, supportive, and filled with simple
tips and suggestions that can help people reduce their own
anxieties. 2014. 248 pages. Paperback.
List: $16.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1747-2

APA Books

®

Clinical Neuropsychology

A Pocket Handbook for Assessment
THIRD EDITION
Edited by Michael W. Parsons
and Thomas E. Hammeke
This pocket handbook leads users through the complicated
process of assessing, diagnosing, and treating an enormous
range of neurologic, neuropsychological, psychiatric, and
behavioral disorders and syndromes. 2014. 704 pages.
Paperback.
List: $59.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1687-1

Upside Down and Backwards

A Sibling’s Journey Through Childhood Cancer
Julie Greves, CCLS, Katy Tenhulzen, CCLS,
and Fred Wilkinson, LICSW
With the help of his family, friends, and support group,
Bryce gets through the ups, downs, twists, and flips of
having a sister living with cancer. 112 pages.
5 1/2" x 8 1/2". Ages 8-13.
Hardcover: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1637-6
Paperback: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1638-3

APA Style

®

Publication Manual of the
American Psychological Association®

SIXTH EDITION
The Publication Manual of the American Psychological
Association provides invaluable guidance on all aspects of the
writing process, from the ethics of authorship to the word
choice that best reduces bias in language. 2010. 272 pages.
Paperback: $29.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0561-5
Lay-Flat Spiral Binding: $36.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0562-2
Hardcover: $39.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0559-2

FREE GIVEAWAy TODAy!
Visit us at Booth #2233
Friday, May 30, 10:00 – 11:00, for a
free advance copy of My Sister Beth’s
Pink Birthday. While supplies last.

My Sister Beth’s Pink Birthday

A Story About Sibling Relationships
Marlene L. Szymona, PhD, Illustrated by Christine Battuz
In this charming, adorably illustrated story Jen is envious of the attention and gifts her little
sister is getting for her third birthday celebration. In the end, Jen comes to realize that a
sister’s love is the best gift of all. 32 pages. 8”x 10”. Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.
Hardcover: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1654-3 | Paperback: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1655-0

SALES REPRESENTATIVE SHOW SPECIAL:

45% discount and free freight on orders placed at APA’s booth (certain exclusions apply – see booth staff for details).
www.apa.org/pubs/books • www.apa.org/pubs/magination

26

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

booth include Kid Sheriff and
the Terrible Toads by Bob Shea
and Lane Smith (Roaring
Brook), an Old West tale–cum–
dinosaurs; Rain Reign by Ann
M. Martin (Feiwel and Friends),
centering on a girl with Asperger’s
syndrome who sets out to find her
missing dog; Starry Night by Isabel
Gillies (FSG), a YA novel exploring
first love and first heartbreak; and
Mike Curato’s Little Elliot, Big City
(Henry Holt), a series launch starring an elephant living in New York
City, for which the publisher is
handing out promotional tote bags.
BEA attendees will find a lot to
chuckle over at booth 2657,
where AMP! Comics for Kids
hosts a quartet of celebrated
cartoonists who will sign
their new books today and
tomorrow. Here’s the lineup:
Mark Tatulli, Desmond
Pucket and the Mountain Full
of Monsters, today and tomorrow, 10–11 a.m.; Stephan
Pastis, The Croc Ate My
Homework, today, 11 a.m.–
noon; Patrick McDonnell,
The MUTTS Diaries (today,
12:30–1:30 p.m.); and Lincoln Peirce,
Big Nate: Great Minds Think Alike
(Apr.), whose Big Nate: The Crowd
Goes Wild is due in October (today,
1:30–2:30 p.m., and tomorrow, 11
a.m.–noon).
Giveaways at the booth include
galleys of The Ice Cream Kid: Brain
Freeze! by Todd Clark; Dragon Girl:
The Secret Valley by Jeff Weigel;
and Muddy Max: the Mystery of
Marsh Creek by Elizabeth Rusch,
illustrated by Mike Lawrence. Also
available are samplers for Reading
with Pictures: Comics That Make
Kids Smarter by Josh Elder, a
graphic anthology due in August.
At Firefly Books’ booth (1549),
Annick Press is giving out galleys
for spoken-word artist Shane
Koyczan’s antibullying poem, To This
Day: For the Bullied and Beautiful,
illustrated by 30 artists from around
the world. This laminated hardcover
edition is due in September.
Random House (2839) has a trio of
in-booth author signings scheduled
for tomorrow.
From 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., three-time
Newbery Honor author Jennifer L.
Holm signs The Fourteenth Goldfish,
a middle-grade novel about a girl
who begins to believe in the impossible when a mysterious boy appears.
Bob Staake autographs My Pet Book,
a picture book about a boy whose
beloved pet (a book) goes missing,
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. And Matt de la
Peña signs The Living (Delacorte), a
YA novel about a teen whose summer cruise ship job turns into a fight
for survival when an earthquake
hits, noon–1 p.m.
At the Tuttle booth (2744), staffers
are spreading word of the publisher’s expanding children’s and YA
fiction lines, which focus on multicultural Asian books. Picture book

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Spotlight

on children

offerings include All About China,
the latest installment in the All
About series; Korean Folk Songs,
packaged with a CD; and Mei-Mei’s
Lucky Birthday Noodles. Also featured are My First Book of Japanese
Words and two Chinese tales: The
Horse and the Mysterious Drawing
and Ming’s Adventures with the
Terracotta Army. For middle-graders, My Awesome Japan Adventure
by Rebecca Otowa is the story of a

Look for King Sheriff books at the Macmillan
booth.

fifth grader’s trip to Japan as an
exchange student.
On the YA side, the publisher has
a limited supply of ARCs on hand
for three new titles: Revenge of the
Akuma Clan, the second volume in
Benjamin Martin’s shape-shifter
saga; Jet Black and the Ninja Wind,
the launch title of a trilogy about the
last living female ninja by Leza
Lowitz; and In Real Life by
Lawrence Tabak, a debut novel
introducing a boy whose dreams
come true when he qualifies to play
on the Korean online gaming team.
Tuttle is also featuring titles with its
new publishing partner, China
Institute (In the Forbidden City and
This Is the Greatest Place), and books
with Shanghai Press, an ongoing
partner (The Sheep Beauty and Ming’s
Adventure on China’s Great Wall).
For those craving an afternoon
snack, sample treats from Tuttle’s
adult cookbooks will be available
each day at 2 p.m.
Visitors to Carson-Dellosa
Publishing’s booth (C1575) will find
a sprawling display introducing the
company’s newly relaunched
Spectrum series of workbooks,
updated with new content that aligns
with current state and Common
Core standards. Due in August, the
revised 62-volume series covers a
range of subjects (including math,
reading, writing, language arts, science, and vocabulary), with separate
workbooks for each discipline and
each grade level, k–8. The workbooks
aim to prepare children for the next
grade level, reinforce classroom
learning, offer enrichment opportunities for advanced learners requiring an extra challenge, and build
students’ confidence.  —Sally Lodge

Visit Booth

#1031

Inspire

TRUE STORIES That Will
Your Readers

Prepared for a Purpose

Lost and Found

Out of the Depths

by Antoinette Tuff with Alex Tresniowski

by Sarah Jakes

by Edgar Harrell, USMC, with David Harrell

The incredible true story of how one woman talked a
school shooter back from the brink, and the amazing
journey of how God prepared her for that moment.
ISBN: 978-0-7642-1272-7 • $15.99
• SEPTEMBER 2014 •

With heartbreaking vulnerability, Sarah Jakes, daughter of Bishop T.D. Jakes, shares her inspiring personal
story of overcoming past mistakes and finding her
faith and purpose again.
ISBN: 978-0-7642-1209-3 • $24.99

A WWII hero’s courageous, inspiring true story
of survival against all odds after the sinking of the
USS Indianapolis.
ISBN: 978-0-7642-1260-4 • $16.99
• MAY 2014 •

• APRIL 2014 •

90 Minutes in Heaven,
10th Anniversary edition

The Reason

Steel Will

by Lacy Sturm

by Shilo Harris with Robin Overby Cox

The mega bestselling true story of Don Piper’s visit
to heaven celebrates its tenth anniversary with this
special edition.

Once a suicidal atheist, now a Christ-following rock
star, Lacey tells her story of finding purpose behind
the pain, sharing the many reasons for her hope and
helping readers see how valuable they are to God.

ISBN: 978-0-8007-2323-1 • $14.99

ISBN: 978-0-8010-1673-8 • $15.99

by Don Piper with Cecil Murphey

• JULY 2014 •

• OCTOBER 2014 •

The incredible memoir of a soldier who survived an
IED explosion, spent 48 days in a coma, underwent
50 skin graft surgeries, and battled PTSD to emerge
with a renewed confidence in the goodness of God
and a deeper love for his wife who stood beside him
through it all.
ISBN: 978-0-8010-1655-4 • $21.99
• SEPTEMBER 2014 •

Please help us celebrate Baker Publishing Group’s 75th Anniversary today at Booth #1031.
A free book, The Baker Book House Story, and a gift will be given away while supplies last.

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28

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

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W E E K LY

Acclaim to
Pannell
Winners

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Spotlight

on children

At today’s Children’s Book and
Author Breakfast, two booksellers will be on hand to
accept this year’s WNBA
Pannell Award, given annually
since 1983 by the Woman’s
National Book Association to
two bookstores—one general
Kenny Brechner, owner of DDG Booksellers, with two
happy customers, Lydie and Byrnne Robbins.
and one children’s specialty
store—that enhance their communities by bringing exceptional creativity to foster a love of reading in
their young patrons. This year’s winners are Devaney Doak & Garrett
Booksellers in Framingham, Maine, in the general bookstore category, and
4 Kids Books & Toys in Zionsville, Ind., for a children’s specialty store.
A jury of five book industry professionals deliberated for weeks before
selecting the winners based on creativity, responsiveness to community
needs, and an understanding of young readers. Each recipient of the award,
which is co-sponsored by Penguin Young Readers Group, receives a $1,000
check and a piece of original art by a children’s book illustrator.
“It was really hard to choose this year, as there were so many impressive
stores that do so much to support their community, not only through reading but philanthropy as well,” wrote Pannell Award juror Kelli Chipponeri,
executive editor of children’s books at Chronicle Books. “The outreach that
these booksellers do, with little resources and support, makes them not
only cultural touch points for the people who shop at their stores but also
promotes reading, art, and education in communities.”
That is a fitting description for longtime Devaney Doak & Garrett owner
Kenny Brechner, who notes that “children’s book buying, reviewing, literacy
outreach, and creative event programming is the area of bookselling to
which I have given my greatest emphasis and taken the greatest satisfaction and pride.”
Noting that his store’s location in rural central Maine has greatly influenced its programs, he explains, “Framingham has a population of more
than one million—pine trees. Since we are not near any urban center and
are not on the way to any, our tradition of creative marketing and direct outreach to publishers and authors is a necessity in terms of luring resources
up here to enrich all the programming we bring to young readers.”
The seeds of one of Brechner’s exemplary—and ongoing—outreach programs were planted more than a decade ago, when he visited a classroom
and asked students for their feedback on some blads and ARCs he’d
received from Penguin. “Their fascination and enthusiasm were an epiphany for me,” he says. “I called my Penguin sales rep and arranged to receive
an ARC of The Heroic Adventures of Hercules Amsterdam for every student
in the class to read and review. This project led to a whole new style of classroom outreach for DDG. I started ‘ARC Review Projects in several other
classrooms that have become annual traditions.”
DDG works year-round with nine area school districts that cover hundreds of square miles and encompass more than 30 schools. “These partnerships are built around the principle of sharing knowledge and resources
to bring the power of engaged reading into the lives of young readers, lighting a flame here and stoking a flame there,” says Brechner. “If one wants to
stimulate reading, there is one ingredient that is truly essential: modeling a
passion for reading. That is the heart of everything we do.”
In 2003, owner Cynthia Compton opened 4 Kids
Books and Toys (so named for her own four children,
now ages 1321) as a neighborhood children’s bookstore. The bookseller and her staff organize a busy,
year-round schedule of in-store events and activities,
partnerships with community organizations, and
strong relationships with schools, with the goal, says
Compton, of “encouraging a love of reading and promoting the power of literacy to grow imaginations
and create a community of readers.”
At its core, 4 Kids is what Compton calls a “very
hands-on, fun place where everyone is invited to
play, read, see, and make friends. This is an extended
community family.” To foster that spirit, the bookCynthia Compton, owner
seller offers programs for children of all ages, includ- of 4 Kids Books.

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Spotlight

ing art activities and story times
for the very young, book discussion and writing groups, summer reading programs, and
even a parent book club. “It’s
very important for us to get kids at every reading level involved,” says
Compton.
Her store also has a wider-reaching mission. Located in an affluent suburb of Indianapolis, where parents are committed to providing books for
their children, 4 Kids works to “extend that commitment to the greater metropolitan community where children do not have access to books easily. To
make this happen, we have developed a network of community partnerships, allowing us to spread these resources, most specifically to public
schools in the urban Indianapolis district.”
Over the years, Compton has developed school outreach programs to
provide books and visiting authors to urban schools, which in many cases,
she says, “require matchmaking between community organizations to provide resources and funding for the schools needing assistance.” The roster
of sponsoring companies and local groups 4 Books has partnered with
include the Indiana Pacers, the Indianapolis Colts, Boys and Girls Clubs,
Rotary clubs, and the Chamber of Commerce. “It’s all aimed at getting more
books in the hands of kids,” adds Compton. “In 2013, for example, 4 Kids
Books participated in the donation of over 4,500 books through partnership
programs, adding to the thousands of volumes distributed in the 10 previous years.”
—Sally Lodge

on children

Tapping the YA Market Digitally

One of the basic tenets of marketing is to go to where your customers are.
And when the customers are YA readers, these days they can likely be
found using social media. But though authors, publishers, booksellers, and
librarians know that the digital space is an important destination, they may
need some help finding the best way to get there and reach their intended
audience. Today’s panel “A Conversation on Digital Strategies for Tapping
the YA Market,” in Room 1E07, 3:30–4:20 p.m., aims to provide a road map.
A lineup of industry experts will share their insights on the effectiveness of
various digital strategies as well as provide examples of successful online
campaigns. The growth of online communities and how they influence publishers and readers will also be discussed. Participants include authors Alaya
Dawn Johnson and Carolyn Mackler; Arthur A. Levine, v-p and publisher of
Scholastic’s Arthur A. Levine Books; Cheryl B. Klein, executive editor at
Arthur A. Levine Books; Jeffrey Yamaguchi, director of digital marketing at
Abrams Books; and Jennifer Hubert Swan, middle school librarian and library
department chair at the Little Red School House and Elizabeth Irwin High
School in Manhattan. Manuela Soares, lecturer and director of the graduate
seminar in publishing at Pace University, will moderate the panel.
“We’re facing the first generation that has grown up online,” says Klein.
“As a result, we’ve had to adapt and change our entire way of marketing.” As
director of digital marketing, Yamaguchi is enthusiastic about embracing
this new world. He describes the digital space as “an amazingly alive and
creative place” and notes that there is a lot happening with both creators
and readers of books. “Lots of authors are pretty savvy about social media,”
he says. “Readers are owning social media right now. They determine how
we talk there, what we talk about. They determine trends, and there’s
incredible energy and excitement around that.”
One of Yamaguchi’s key points for authors: “stay focused and not get
overwhelmed” when trying to optimize their online impact. “The platforms are endless and always changing. You could spend all your time trying to manage that,” he says. “But I tell authors to find one they like. If you
like it, you’ll be authentic. If it’s forced, you’re not going to connect with
your readers.”
As an example, Klein points to author Trent Reedy’s Tumblr, created for his
speculative novel Divided We Fall (Scholastic/Levine, Jan.), which features
some military elements. “It’s been a great venue for him to talk about his service in Afghanistan,” says Klein. Reedy has also used his Facebook page to
forge connections with military buddies and other writers. “He’s been really
crafting an online space for himself,” she says. Additionally, Klein will highlight the This Is Teen (www.thisisteen.com) online community of readers and
its I Read YA campaign running from May 19 to July 4: “It taps into the way the
YA category has blown up, and the pride that YA readers feel.”
During today’s discussion, he will cite other success stories as well, but
Yamaguchi says that no matter the author or book, “What will make a campaign fly is the creativity that goes into it. You want it to resonate and make a
little bit of noise. And you should feel a little uncomfortable. You want to be a
little nervous about it because you’re trying something new and you’re not
sure it will work.” The bottom line, he notes, “If you’re not trying something
new, you’re not getting attention.” 
—Shannon Maughan

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32

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

The Kids Take Over Uptown Stage Spotlight
For the second year in a row, children’s authors will grab the spotlight for an entire day at BEA. Backto-back kids programming is scheduled today for the Uptown Stage,
where an array of authors will take
part in panel discussions ranging
from creating fantasy worlds to writing true-to-life fiction authentically.
Booksellers and other industry professionals will have the opportunity
to hear fresh voices—those of promising new authors whose books
were selected for this year’s Young
Adult and Middle-Grade Buzz ses-

YE

sions—as well as the voices of wellestablished writers.
For months, education director
Sally Dedecker, a digital and print
publishing consultant and owner of
Sally Dedecker Enterprises, worked
with many publishers to assemble
the stage programming. The decision to repeat 2013’s first-ever daylong kids’ stage appearances
stemmed from last year’s success.
“The kids-only programming was
very popular with booksellers and
librarians, and publishers and
authors loved the attention and ded-

icated space,” reports Dedecker.
Dedecker was very impressed
with the dedication of children’s
publishers and authors, noting “the
passion for building strong children’s
programming to share with attendees was the focus of every discussion
we had. Honestly, the one problem
we had this year is that there were
more authors’ and publishers’ ideas
than time on the stage schedule.”
For those planning their stage
itineraries, here’s the lineup of
events on the Uptown Stage today:
10–10:30 a.m.: Meet BEA Young

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Adult Buzz Authors 2014. Susannah
Greenberg, president of Susannah
Greenberg Public Relations, moderates a panel discussion among
authors spotlighted in this year’s
Young Adult Editors’ Buzz Panel.
Participants are Cynthia Weil (I’m
Glad I Did), Robin Talley (Lies We Tell
Ourselves), Amy Ewing (The Jewel),
and Ryan Graudin (The Walled City).
11–11:30 a.m.: It’s Not Easy Being
Teen. How do writers believably and
authentically get into the mindset of
a teen? It’s simple to skew a voice too
young or too old, or to underestimate
the breadth of a high schooler’s experience. In a panel discussion moderated by Aubry Parks-Fried, a digital
marketing manager at HarperTeen,
these authors will address this challenge: Amy Zhang (Falling into Place),
Kresley Cole (Dead of Winter), Becca
Fitzpatrick (Black Ice), and Amanda
Maciel (Tease).
1–1:30 p.m.: Meet BEA MiddleGrade Buzz Authors 2014. Jennifer
Brown, children’s editor of Shelf
Awareness and director of the
Center for Children’s Literature at
the Bank Street College of Education,
moderates a panel of novelists whose
work was featured on this morning’s
Middle-Grade Editors’ Buzz Panel.
They are Eric Kahn Gale (Zoo at the
Edge of the World), M.A. Larson
(Pennyroyal Academy), Kelly
Barnhill (The Witch’s Boy), Kat Yeh
(The Truth About Twinkie Pie), and
Rob Harrell (Life of Zarf
2–2:30 p.m.: The Craft of Writing
and World Building. The world an
author creates is more than just a
background or a piece of descriptive
writing. It becomes the arena in
which characters’ stories play out,
dictating decisions, emotional histories, and beyond—yet fictional
worlds are rarely born as a fully
formed idea. Five masters of the
craft will discuss the promise and
pitfalls of constructing a world from
scratch. Participating are Brandon
Mull (the Five Kingdoms Series),
Scott Westerfeld (Afterworlds), Kiera
Cass (The One), Heather Demetrios
(Exquisite Captive), and Michael
Grant (Messenger of Fear). Margot
Wood of Epic Reads moderates.
3–3:30 p.m.: Real YA. These bestselling, award-winning authors put
their teens through out-of-this world
struggles that are firmly planted in
reality, whether it’s grappling with
family drama, coping with the loss of
a family member, or healing from a
past trauma. The following YA novelists talk about delivering high-stakes
stories that readers can relate to: E.
Lockhart (We Were Liars), Meg
Wolitzer (Belzhar), Gayle Forman (If
I Stay), and Jandy Nelson (I’ll Give
You the Sun). Moderator is Cristin
Stickles, bookseller at Manhattan’s
McNally Jackson. 
—Sally Lodge

COMMON CORE
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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Authors
AT THE S H OW

Jonathan
Tropper
Screenwriting Is His New Gig
In his second novel, The Book of Joe (2004),
Jonathan Tropper wrote about a novelist who
fears the “sophomore slump” after his debut
book becomes a huge bestseller and is adapted
into a film.Fast forward a decade, and Tropper’s
fiction becomes reality. He returns to BEA on a
high-profile panel this afternoon that kick offs
Bookcon. With director Shawn Levy and actors Tina Fey and Jason Bateman,
Tropper will discuss the movie adaptation of his fifth novel, This Is Where I Leave
You (Dutton, 2009). and attendees will be privy to sneak peeks of the film.
“It’s a tremendous sense of completion,” says Tropper, who explained that
he has spent the past five years trying to get the movie made. In the book, the
protagonist, Judd Foxman—whose wife’s affair with his shock-jock boss has
just gone very public—reunites with his dysfunctional family for the first time
in years to sit shiva for a week following the death of its patriarch, his father.
Character-driven plots like This Is Where I Leave You are not always easy to
sell to Hollywood, Tropper points out, but he was happy to write the screenplay for Levy (director of Night at the Museum and The Internship), with
whom he had worked before and developed a “shorthand.”
“People—writers, actors—just want to work with him,” says Tropper about

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Levy, who directed Fey in Date Night. On their panel of “big guns,” Tropper
says Levy will show some clips from the film, and the actors, writer, and director will talk about the differences between the movie and the book.
Tropper expects the panel will be “fun for all of us.” But as much as Tropper
enjoys his work in Hollywood (he just completed a script adaptation for his
novel One Last Thing Before I Go [Orion, 2013]), he says novel writing remains
his first creative love.
“Screenwriting and the movie stuff could all disappear tomorrow,” says
Tropper, “but to sit down with my laptop and still tell stories is my day job. I
didn’t believe I’d actually get to do it for a living.”
One thing Tropper likes about writing novels over working on a film is that
he does not have to keep rewriting. “I’ve probably written 40 different drafts
for the movie,” he says. “You never have to change a book for budget.”
While Tropper has started writing a new novel, he will not share any
details yet, because he knows it will change as he writes it. “I’m just very
excited to finally be writing prose again,” he says. “There’s a satisfaction I get
from writing fiction that I will never get from screenwriting.”
The panel, 4–5 p.m., is open to both BEA and Bookcon pass holders, but a
$10 ticket is required. Earlier in the day, at 2 p.m., Tropper is signing books at
the Penguin truck, which will be parked in the Crystal Palace of the Javits. 

—Bridget Kinsella

Walter
Isaacson
SmartThinkers
Ten years ago, after completing his critically
acclaimed Ben Franklin biography, Walter
Isaacson was struck by Franklin’s creation of
the postal and publishing networks. “I then
wondered, how did the Internet begin? I
thought I’d write the history of the Internet.

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© patrice gilbert

34

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Meet our authors!
Today in booth #1124:







BEA Friday.indd 1

Steve Alten, author of Sharkman, will be signing copies
of his new novel at 10am.
Morgan Rielly, author of Neighborhood Heroes, chronicles
ordinary people in extraordinary situations at 11:30am.
John Wiley, author of Scarlett Letters, with original stories about
Margaret Mitchell and the making of an epic at 1pm.
Mark Greenblatt, author of Valor, will share stories
of wartime heroism at 2:30pm.

www.rowman.com | 800-462-6420

5/13/14 2:42 PM

36

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Authors
AT THE SH OW

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Then I talked to
Bill Gates, who
said, ‘No, the history of the
Internet and the
personal computer are inter-

twined, you should do a history about both of them.”
At the same time, Isaacson’s daughter was applying to college and
wouldn’t allow her parents to read her college essay about who in history
inspired her. He tells Show Daily, “Once she turned it in, I said, ‘You’ve got to
let me read it. What’s it on?’ She said, ‘Ada Lovelace.’ I said, ‘Who’s Ada
Lovelace?’ And she said, ‘Lord Byron’s daughter; she invented the computer
algorithm.’ I started researching Ada Lovelace, who created the idea of a
general purpose computer that could be programmed, back in the 1830s. I
became interested in her, and then Steve Jobs called so I put it aside. But
writing about Steve Jobs made me even more interested in who were the
people who made Steve possible.” Hence, his latest book, The Innovators:
How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital
Revolution (Simon & Schuster, Oct.). “This is a book about how true creativity
comes from being able to collaborate and work as a team,” Isaacson says. “If
you learn one thing from the book, you’re going to learn how innovation
really happens.”
Some of the big names Isaacson showcases include Alan Turing, the first
computer theorist, who broke the German codes for the British during WWII;
Robert Noyce, who invented the microchip; Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the
World Wide Web; and Larry Page, cofounder of Google. Asked if there were
surprises in his research, Isaacson says, “How art and the humanities and
imagination played such a big role. We think it’s all engineers and technology.”
But many of the people behind the digital revolution had big egos. Show
Daily wanted to know how that fit in with his concept of teamwork.
“Sometimes you can be strong willed, but still know that you have to build
teams. That was Steve Job’s secret sauce. He had the best engineers and
designers. And the same with Bill Gates—he was really smart, but he knew
he needed a team. If you look at both of them, they [each] started with a partner. Steve Jobs had Steve Wozniak, and Bill Gates had Paul Allen.”
The prolific writer, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, is happy to
be back at BEA. “Book Expo to me is a little slice of heaven,” says Isaacson.
He will be in a one-on-one discussion about his book with author Jacob
Weisberg, chairman and editor-in-chief of the Slate Group, today in room
1E10/1E11, E Hallway (lower level), 10–11 a.m. 
—Hilary S. Kayle

Pat O’Brien
Back After AllThat

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“I have great honor,” The Giver said. “So will you. But you will
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Life in the community where Jonas lives is idyllic. Designated birth-

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choice.
Everyone is the same.
Except Jonas.
At the Ceremony of Twelve, the community’s twelve-year-olds eagerly
accept their predetermined Life Assignments. But Jonas is chosen for something special. He begins instruction in his life’s work with a mysterious old
man known only as The Giver. Gradually Jonas learns that power lies in
feelings. But when his own power is put to the test—when he must try to
save someone he loves—he may not be ready. Is it too soon? Or too late?

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Jacket art © 2014 the Weinstein Company, LLC,
and Walden Media, LLC. All rights reserved.
Jacket design by Sheila Smallwood

NOW A MAJOR
MOTION PICTURE!
Release Date
August 15

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Even though this is the first time Pat O’Brien
has attended BEA, he’s not intimidated at the
prospect of being surrounded by booksellers
he’s never met before to talk about the highs
and lows of his 35-year career as a sportscaster
for radio and television and a celebrity journalist. “I’ve faced Charles Manson. I’ve faced
depression. I’ve faced death,” he says. “I survived all that. Standing in front of people I don’t
know is what I do for a living. Booksellers are
going to read I’ll Be Back Right After This and
they’re going to like it.”
I’ll Be Back Right After This (St. Martin’s,
Aug.) is, O’Brien says, “a textbook on how to land a charmed career, how to
keep a charmed career, and how to get through a scandal.” In 2005, voice
recordings of O’Brien drunk-dialing a woman who has never been identified
and leaving sexually explicit messages for her were widely circulated and
written about in the tabloids, which provided fodder for late night television
comedians. It was, he says now, “a minor sex scandal compared to what’s
going on now,” but it temporarily sidelined his career.
O’Brien says that he wrote his memoirs, which he describes as “Forrest
Gump Meets Days of Wine and Roses,” to set the record straight about his
“rise and fall and rise again,” after going into rehab for alcoholism in 2005 and
again in 2008. “I’ve been blessed with a charmed career; I’ve had a career no
one else had had,” O’Brien says of his professional life, which expanded
beyond covering sports for CBS for 16 years to anchoring celebrity news programs for about a decade before joining Fox Sports Radio for three years.
“I’ve met literally everybody. I met the Beatles.” He also, according to I’ll Be
Back Right After This, did acid with Timothy Leary, drank with Mickey Mantle,
and hung out in Bobby Kennedy’s living room with Muhammad Ali.
O’Brien currently hosts a podcast, on which he interviews celebrities.
Disclosing that he is embarking on a new venture in the fall about which he
cannot yet provide specifics, O’Brien, who describes himself as being in

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38

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Authors
AT THE S H OW

recovery, currently spends “a lot of time” counseling others. “When people,
when celebrities, are in trouble,” O’Brien says, “they call me.”
The book, O’Brien says, is more than just another memoir by somebody
rehashing a colorful past: it’s also a “playbook” for life. While “if you like
celebrities, it’s all in there,” O’Brien says, “In 35 years in sports and entertainment, I’m going to meet people.” Rubbing shoulders with famous people
is heady stuff, O’Brien admits, but he adds, “What really matters is what you
think of yourself, not what other people think of you.”
Today, O’Brien emcees the APA Author Tea in Room 1E10/1E11, 4–5 p.m. 

—Claire Kirch

Avery Corman
Dads Vs. Moms
Avery Corman penned Kramer vs. Kramer back
in 1977 and had no idea that it would totally
change the landscape of divorce in America. He
learned later that the book was cited more in
divorce proceedings than actual legal precedent. “More men asked for custody, but that
wasn’t the only thing the book did. It made men
more likely to ask for more active visitation
rights, and it made women more likely to say
yes to that. It gave permission to both sides to
have men be more active.” Nearly 40 years later,
the book still holds up, and the author is at BEA signing the first trade paperback edition of the groundbreaking book (Barricade Books, May).

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Corman tells Show Daily, “The stimulus for all this is the hardcover publication of my first nonfiction book, which is, My Old Neighborhood
Remembered (Barricade Books, June). It’s a memoir of my growing up years
in the Bronx in the 1940s and the 1950s. I’m of that generation of people who
remember what it was like to be on the home front during WWII. The publisher thought it would be nice to go back and publish my novels in trade
paperback, which they had not been before.”
Kramer vs. Kramer, his third novel, was written in the ’70s during a politically heated time between the sexes. Corman says, “It was prompted by what
was the most important thing in my life, which was having become a father. We
were right in the middle of all the rhetoric connected to the women’s movement, with men being called out for not being productive in households and
just being concerned with their own work and careers. Quite honestly, I didn’t
see the world through the eyes of some of the more radical feminists. I was a
freelance writer, and I was around all the time. My kids’ daddy was never anywhere but home. I wanted to right the balance of fatherhood vs. motherhood. I
thought if I wrote a book that showed an active father, I’d be able to make the
point that men could be good parents, too.” The movie rights were sold before
the book was published, and it ended up being sold to 50 countries.
Corman reread the book when it was reset in this new version. “But for the
dollars mentioned in the book—the salaries, costs of housekeepers, baby sitters, things in the store—it didn’t seem dated. There’s a dynamic between
the characters that I don’t think has changed. People still get married and
bring expectations into those marriages that aren’t fulfilled. People still have
anger about their situation. They still get divorced and still have to relate to
their children. I didn’t know it at the time, but it’s turned out to be a timeless
predicament for people.”
Today, at 11:30 a.m., the author is at Table 10 in the Autographing Area. 

—Hilary S. Kayle

I didn’t see the world through the eyes
“of the
more radical feminists.

—Avery Corman

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Authors

Booth # 2139

AT THE SH OW

Get Your
Big Red Bag

Jacqueline Woodson

and so much more!
Thursday, May 29
9:30 Big Red Bag giveaway*
10:00 Signed book giveaway:
MONEY by Steve Forbes

10:45 Big Red Bag giveaway*
11:00 Author signing: Ken Blanchard,
Legendary Service
12:15 Big Red Bag giveaway*
12:30 Author signing: Tamara Monosoff,
The Mom Inventors Handbook
1:45 Big Red Bag giveaway*
2:00 Author signing: Josh Brown & Jeff Macke,
Clash of the Financial Pundits
3:15 Big Red Bag giveaway*
3:30 Author signing: Don Norris,
Build Your Own Quadcopter

Friday, May 30
9:30 Signed book giveaway:
MONEY by Steve Forbes

9:45 Big Red Bag giveaway*
10:00 Author signing: Jeremey Donovan,
How to Give a TED Talk
11:45 Big Red Bag giveaway*
12:00 Author signing: Thomas Willeford,
The Steampunk Adventurer’s Guide
1:45 Big Red Bag giveaway*
2:00 Author signing: Jessica Gioglio,
The Power of Visual Storytelling
Take a “Selfie” with our author!
3:00 Big Red Bag giveaway*
3:15 Giveaway: Wes Moss,
You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think
4:15 Big Red Bag giveaway*
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* While supplies last.

Even though Jacqueline Woodson’s latest
release, Brown Girl Dreaming (Penguin/
Paulsen, Aug.), is set during the 1960s and ’70s,
its themes are still relevant today, especially
after a controversy erupted last month over the
lack of diversity in BookCon’s initial lineup of
authors. “The civil rights movement was about
access to public space. We had to fight for public space,” she says. “BookCon is about private
space. It’s about commerce, about business,
about the fact that people believe books by
[African-Americans and people of color] won’t
sell or won’t be of interest to people.”
Brown Girl Dreaming, she points out, “is about
the civil rights movement and my coming-ofage and understanding how powerful our voices
are in the world. And then to turn around and see how much more we have
to do.” Thus, Woodson is putting her words into action by pulling triple duty
at BEA: she is autographing ARCs of Brown Girl Dreaming today, 2–3 p.m., at
Table 18 in the Autographing Area; participating in the Tea with Children’s
Authors this afternoon; and returning to Javits tomorrow to take part in a
BookCon panel discussion on the “We Need Diverse Books” campaign.
“Diversity is about all of us, and about us having to figure out how to walk
through this world together,” Woodson says. “It blows my mind that this dialogue continues to happen.”
Woodson, 51, has written 10 picture books, seven middle-grade novels, and
10 YA novels that all contain elements of her childhood experiences, yet
Brown Girl Dreaming is her first official foray into autobiography. She notes
also that while her 1995 novel, Autobiography of a Family Photo, is “emotionally autobiographical,” much of it was fiction. She adds that her new book
marks “the first time I’ve looked back on my life, year by year, and person by
person.” Brown Girl Dreaming explores Woodson’s childhood and youth,
when she split her time between Brooklyn and South Carolina during the
civil rights era, while the South was still grappling with the aftermath of Jim
Crow. She says that she lived in both places, but felt as if she didn’t belong in
either.
While Brown Girl Dreaming was initially sparked by Woodson’s desire to
explain her origins as a writer, it was also prompted by a period of introspection that followed the deaths of her mother and grandmother. “I realized,”
Woodson says, “if I didn’t start talking to my relatives, asking questions,
thinking back to my own beginnings, there would come a time when those
people wouldn’t be around to help me look back and remember.”
Woodson wrote this memoir in a poetry format, she says, because she
wanted to capture the essence of those “small moments” of her childhood
that, in retrospect, loom so large. “That’s the way memories happen,” she
observes, “in those small moments. It’s more lyrical and wondrous than a
straight narrative.” 
—Claire Kirch

© marty umans

Remembering a Brown Girl’s Childhood

Ben Lerner
The Way We Live Now
A first novel with glowing endorsements from
such literary lights as Jonathan Franzen, Paul
Auster, Geoff Dyer, and John Ashbery—what
more could a young writer want? Perhaps
some work in the New Yorker? Done! Perhaps a
second novel published by a larger house?
Done! Perhaps some attention at BEA? Done!
Ben Lerner’s 10:04 (Faber & Faber, Sept.) is as
different from Leaving the Atocha Station
(2011) as that book was from the poetry Lerner
wrote that preceded it. A professor of English
at Brooklyn College and the recipient of honors
ranging from National Book Award finalist,
Fulbright scholar, and Guggenheim fellow,
Lerner says his first ambition, whether with
poetry or fiction, “has always been to make art

© matt lerner

40

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

PUBL I SHERS

out of words.” What he loves about the novel, he says, is that it can “absorb
everything—poetry, art criticism, whatever.”
10:04 has at its center a friendship between the narrator, a writer recently
diagnosed with a serious medical condition, and a friend who wants his help
getting pregnant. The narrator gets a book advance in part to help pay for
fertility treatments, and so the future of his art and the possibility of fatherhood overlap.
“It’s a book about making art and children at a time of great uncertainty,”
Lerner says. “My ambition was to capture something about what it’s like to be
alive now, when the difficulty of imagining a future changes all of our relationships.”
Lerner says the biggest challenge was how to make the book both very
serious and very funny. “Luckily my inspiration often involves my own misadventures, and since I’m good at making a fool of myself, I never lack for
comic scenes.”
10:04 is a more emotionally open and more formally daring book than
Atocha, though it shares many of the same concerns. “Instead of being in the
head of one neurotic narrator,” as Atocha was, “it’s more of a choral portrait.
Instead of being about a young artist’s concerns with fraudulence, it’s interested in social and collective possibilities in an era of increasing instability. I
hope what both books have in common is a mixture of humor and pathos.
10:04 is ultimately the more ambitious book. I hope it finds its readers.”
Lerner was a featured author at the BEA Bloggers Conference this past
Wednesday. Today, at 9:30 a.m., he will be signing ARCs at the Macmillan
booth (1739).
—Suzanne Mantel

a book about making art and children
“at aIt’stime
of great uncertainty.

—Ben Lerner

Desiree Zamorano
Quells Hispanic Stereotyping
In The Amado Women (Cinco Puntos Press,
June), Desiree Zamorano’s first trade-published novel, the strong family ties that bind a
mother and her three daughters is the centerpiece of a story that dispels many of the
media-fueled stereotyping of Hispanics living
in America.
“There are no gardeners, maids, or gang
members in my book,” says Zamorano, a
playwright, a Pushcart Prize nominee, and
director of the Community Literacy Center at
Occidental College in Los Angeles.
“Hispanics in this country are wildly misrepresented. The media presents a snapshot of
who we are that enrages me, but then I take a
deep breath and get writing.”
The Amado Women explores the lives of four very different Latinas, each
with her own struggles, successes, and secrets. “These women are professionals: a teacher, a financial adviser, and an artist,” Zamorano says. Her
characters represent what she refers to as true-to-life middle-class Latinas
invisible in the fabric of American culture. The book is not a polemic, however, but a riveting family drama for Latina women that could easily cross
the borders of interest for women of all backgrounds. The Amado Women
also has the potential to bring attention to and enhance the market for
Latina fiction.
Zamorano, who received a B.A. from UC Irvine, takes her job as an educator seriously. “Diversity in literature is so important,” she says. “I have students of all ethnic backgrounds at the literacy center, including Asian,
African-American, and Hispanic, and I always find books for them that
reflect this diversity.”
Zamorano’s previous books, Modern Cons and Human Cargo, were published digitally by Lucky Bat Books. They are both mysteries that feature PI
Inez Leon and represent Zamorano’s penchant for the genre; among her
favorite authors are Lee Child and Naomi Hirahara. “A mystery is the only
place on this Earth where we really find justice,” she says from her Pasadena
home. Noting that with the exception of Cuban and Puerto Rican authors,
there are almost no Hispanic mystery writers in contemporary literature,
Zamorano hopes to help fill that gap by continuing to write mysteries. There
will also be a sequel to The Amado Women.
“Attending BEA as an author was a dream I would never allow myself,”
Zamorano says happily. “It’s quite an accomplishment, and I’m thrilled.”
She looks forward to signing copies of her new book today, 2:30–3 p.m., at
—Wendy Werris
Table 9 in the Autographing Area. 

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

41

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Authors
AT THE SH OW

“Launch is a must read for everyone
trying to influence and change people’s
lives in a positive way. It’s a GREAT
business book, but it’s also much more
than a business book. I plan to get a
copy for every Hay House author.”
—Reid Tracy, CEO, Hay House, Inc

Danni Pettrey
Promoting Family Adventure
Danni Pettrey grew up canoeing, scuba diving,
wind surfing, and sailing. After she married,
she added rock climbing and family hikes.
“From the time our daughters were little, we
put them in a carrier and took them hiking, and
we’ve already taken our 10-week-old grandson
hiking with us.” So it’s not surprising that her
bestselling Alaskan Courage series (Bethany
House) features the five adventure-loving
McKenna siblings, who own a company that
leads rock-climbing expeditions and air tours
of the Alaska wilderness. The series has produced multimonth CBA bestsellers, and
Submerged was both a 2013 Christy Award and
Christian Book of the Year finalist. Each book in
the series focuses on a different extreme sport
and sibling. In the fourth book, Silenced, it’s free climbing and middle child
Kayden McKenna, whose climbing route brings her literally face-to-face with
a dead climber. Is it an accident or something more sinister?
Pettrey began writing 10 years ago, “on the side,” while raising and homeschooling her daughters. “I started out playing with story ideas and writing
short stories, and I’d written two manuscripts before writing what became
the Alaskan Courage series.” Her initial inspiration came from a very unAlaskan source—a movie about cave diving. “I snorkel, but cave diving is
really extreme. I thought, how great it would be to write a series about a family who pursues adventure.” She sold the first book when she was 38, after
meeting her now editor at an American Christian Fiction Writers conference.
With the final book in the Alaskan Courage series almost finished, Pet trey
is looking ahead to beginning work on a new series of four books set in the
Chesapeake Bay area. “They’ll still be romantic suspense, but this time
adventure will be a hobby, not a profession.” She hopes that her stories of the
McKenna family will inspire readers “to step out and try new adventures of
their own, whether it be attending a cooking class, taking up knitting, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, or giving scuba diving a try. Life is so full of possibilities,
and I hope the way the McKenna’s live will encourage them to try new things
and dream big.”
Pet trey will be signing copies of Silenced today, 1–1:30 p.m., at Table 9 in
the Autographing Area. 
—Lucinda Dyer

Ann Hood
A Family Century

Expect big things from the man known as

THE $400 MILLION DOLLAR MAN

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing
Distributor: Ingram Publisher Services
Pub Date: 06/24/2014
Price: $17.95
ISBN: 9781630470173
Trim: 6 x 9
Format: Trade Paper
Pages: 215
Genre: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Marketing

Ann Hood’s bibliography is full of families both
fictional and real. Family tragedy was the
source of two memoirs, Do Not Go Gentle (2000)
and Comfort (2008), and have informed her
novels, including The Knitting Circle (2007) and
The Red Thread (2010). In Hood’s work, family is
a world unto itself: the particular ecosystems
within them, the complicated love that grows
there, and their lingering power. Hood says her
childhood was similarly influential. “My grandmother and great-grandmother, aunts and
uncles spoke only Italian, did not ever learn
English, we were very superstitious, we were—
well, an Italian-American family. And I both loved and wanted to reject that
when I was in my teens. And about 13 years ago I started thinking about how
lucky I was to have had that experience, and how lucky I was to know stories
from my grandmother and even my great-grandmother.”
The idea of those connections passing through generations is at the heart of
her newest novel, An Italian Wife, a family story that spans nearly a century
and features a literary homecoming to New York for Hood. It required long
contemplation, though she didn’t realize it at the time. “In a way I’ve been
writing that book for 13 years,” she says. It began as short stories about a single family—working on them was often “the guilty pleasure” while writing
something else. “I just continued to write these sort of stories... and last year I
wrote one and dropped it in the file, and I looked [later] and said, ‘300 pages?’”

© catherine sebastian

42

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Sarah Lotz
A Crash, andThree More

AT THE S H OW

Connecting the stories meant research into 1930s Italy, WWI, and Coney
Island, though the legwork was part of the appeal: “I was that kid who loved
writing term papers.”
An Italian Wife isn’t Hood’s family story, though some real-life details sneak
onto the page. But besides the novel being a homecoming of sorts, Hood
thinks her family’s influence began much sooner: her earliest storytelling lesson was sitting at the family table, trading tales. “You have to—number one,
talk loudly—and number two, if the story’s not told well, you lost the floor.”
The experience has been invaluable in a life that’s had its share of public
speaking; Hood worked as a flight attendant, is faculty at NYU’s M.F.A. in
Creative Writing program, and travels for speaking engagements. She’s
grateful for the hours in the air that rid her of any lingering stage fright: “For
years I stood up there and said, ‘Welcome to Flight 872!’ I was up at that microphone... I’m up for almost anything, and I think a lot of that has to do with
being a flight attendant.” So even though BEA was called ABA the last time
Hood attended, she’s ready to premiere The Italian Wife in one of its hometowns, meet new readers, and share a family saga close to her heart: “I’m
really excited about it.”
Hood signs today at the Norton booth (1921) at 10:30 a.m. 

—Genevieve Valentine

I was the kid who loved writing term
“papers.

—Ann Hood

Meet debut author-and-illustrator

KELLY LIGHT
Photo by Sophie Spinelle

Louise loves art. It’s her
imagination on the outside.

The chills in The Three (Little, Brown, May),
Sarah Lotz’s debut novel written on her own
and under her own name, begin with the scary
description of a plane crash in Japan. Three
more crashes of commuter planes around the
world occur in quick succession, and in three of
the crashes a child survives. Soon, speculation
is rampant about the significance of “the
three,” especially as the children begin to show
increasingly disturbing behavior. Are they harbingers of the apocalypse, as one character insists?
“My career was made because Stephen King read the book and wrote a
blurb for it,” says Lotz, “He’s my writing hero.”
The Three plies its eeriness using multiple voices and varied formats. As
Lotz describes it, the main narrative is presented in the form of a book within
a book—a nonfiction work by a sensationalist journalist who presents interview transcripts, first-person accounts, blog posts, and editorials that progressively reveal the ongoing investigation into the four air disasters, as well
as the daily lives of those caring for the child survivors and the growing paranoia of those involved in the “conspiracies” that spring up in the wake of the
catastrophes.
Getting the different voices to ring true proved the most challenging
aspect of the novel. “There’s nothing worse than if they don’t sound right,”
Lotz says. “I got people to read and double check that I wasn’t making
mistakes.”Lotz says she’s always wanted to write about plane crashes and
the media’s obsession with them. The 1985 crash of JAL 123, among the most
devastating in history, was one of her inspirations. “People had enough time
to write messages while the plane was going down,” she says. “It was incredibly tragic.”Lotz has written many books before, but always in collaboration

This fall, prepare to explore
the last blank space
on the map . . .
Middle Grade
Editors Buzz
Panel with
Jordan Brown

Children’s Speed
Dating Lunch

Friday
11:00–11:50 am
Room 1E12/1E13

Friday
12:15–1:45 PM
Room 1E10/11

Middle Grade
Author Buzz
Panel with
Eric Kahn Gale

Broadside Signing
Friday
2:30–3:00 PM
Table 11
Celebrate the
brilliant artist in you!

Friday
1:00–1:30 pm
Uptown Stage

Available
August

FREE doodlepad
giveaway
in booth #2039!*

www.harpercollinschildrens.com
*Limited quantity; while supplies last.

Meet Eric Kahn Gale!
Advance Copy Signing
Friday, 2:00–2:30 pm • Table 12

An Imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers
www.harpercollinschildrens.com

Photo by Aaron Gang

Available September 2014

© christine fourie

44

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

and using a pseudonym: young adult fiction with her daughter, who is 22;
horror thrillers with Louis Greenberg, who writes under the name S.L. Grey;
and erotic fiction with a few other women. The experience of going it solo
was exhilarating, she says, and she has just finished a second novel. But collaborating is wonderful and she will definitely continue. “You can talk for
hours about plot and characters with your collaborators and you don’t have
to worry about boring them.”
Lotz, who calls herself “flight phobic,” braved the flight from her home in
Cape Town, South Africa, to participate in BEA. She will be signing her book
at Table #TK in the autographing area today at 1 p.m. 
—Suzanne Mantell

Icebound in Siberia

© gary oakley

Andrea Davis
Pinkney
Shedding Light on a
Dark Subject
The gift of a simple red pencil gives a girl in warravaged Sudan the opportunity to express her
feelings and overcome her grief. This is the story
Andrea Davis Pinkney tells in The Red Pencil: A
Novel Told in Poems, Pictures, and Possibilities

Exclusive BEA advance photo booklet
signing with author Janko Puls
Meet the author
at Booth 1170: 
Friday, May 30, 1–3 p.m.
and
Saturday, May 31,
10 a.m.–12 p.m.
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook,
Pinterest, and Tumblr.

Point of View New York City by Janko Puls
978-1-62774-088-3

DISTRIBUTED TO THE TRADE BY

CN Times Books • New York

45

the day, the theory of the “open polar sea,” but the ship got stuck in the polar
ice, sank, and left its marooned passengers in a two-year ordeal in the
world’s coldest and most remote spot.
“I was traveling in Norway for National Geographic magazine, and I met a
man who was trying to recreate the voyage of the Jeannette,” says Sides.
“Over the years as an editor of Outside magazine I would hear about a lot of
adventures, but I had never heard of the Jeannette.” His ignorance activated
his radar and set him off on three years of researching and writing, including
a three-week stint in Siberia.
“It’s hard to understand now how desperate people then were to know
what’s up there in the Arctic. Now we know it’s just a bunch of ice shifting
around. We are not that interested. Back then it drove people crazy, the
gnawing obsession to know what was there.”
Sides says what makes him most proud about the book is simply having
finished it. “When I learn of what these men went through, the extent of their
suffering and their travails, I thought, this was a story that should be known.”
Sides says he is not yet thinking about his next project. “I’m in that wonderful period between books when I’m not doing anything. I felt I was stuck
in the ice myself for the past three years, so I’m enjoying being unstuck.”
He will be signing galleys at the Random House booth (2839) today, 9–10 a.m. 

—Suzanne Mantell

Hampton Sides
His name, his publisher proudly announces, is
“nearly synonymous with high-velocity narratives” that “perfectly capture pivotal moments
in history,” making what Hampton Sides does
sound really easy. To hear Sides tell it, perfectly
capturing anything is not easy, not ever. His historical narratives—among them Ghost Soldiers,
Blood and Thunder, and, now, The Kingdom of
Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the
USS Jeannette (Doubleday, Aug.), have all
required massive amounts of research along
with a synchrony of other circumstances: collective historical amnesia, a cast of colorful
characters, a shift in the political winds, and, of
course, much hard work.
“I’m always trying to find something that was consequential in its day that
is not very well-known now,” Sides says, “Getting that sweet spot is hard, but
it does happen.”
The Kingdom of Ice tells the story of a 19th-century Arctic exploration gone
horribly wrong. The Jeannette expedition set out to prove a popular idea of

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

cntimesbooks.com/povnyc
pointofviewnyc.com

© christine simmons

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

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FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Authors

(Little, Brown,
Sept.), which features illustrations
by Shane W. Evans.
Relayed in verse,
the narrative
offers a composite portrait of children coping with the devastating effects of a war that has
shattered their lives.
“As I watched the struggles in Darfur and Sudan unfold, I felt compelled to
present the horrific side of war to young readers in a way that they could
understand,” explains the author. “I felt as though children in this country
cannot understand a lot about what is happening, and I felt a desire to contextualize that for them.”
Though The Red Pencil centers on a fictional 12-year-old girl, Pinkney
emphasizes that “this is not just her one story, but it is many children’s stories,” gleaned from news accounts of young people growing up amid the turmoil of war and from interviews with rescue workers. “I learned about workers who go into refugee camps and give these children writing and drawing
implements to let them express themselves,” she continues. “That creative
outlet really helps those living in such a dark situation.”
The author hopes that her novel will not only inform middle-grade readers
but will encourage them to similarly express themselves creatively. “Part of
my thinking was that a child will see that if he or she is struggling with any
darkness, any sad or tragic situation, it helps to use creative expression as a
healing tool. So many children do that anyway, and my hope was to validate
the use of that process.”
Calling The Red Pencil “part novel, part historical narrative, and part
sketchbook,” Pinkney emphasizes the importance of Evans’s contribution to
the book. “Shane did a wonderful job channeling the story,” she says. “My role
as author is to create the voice of this character, and his role is to create her
visual voice, which he did so effectively.”
A children’s book editor and publisher as well as author, Pinkney is a seasoned BEA attendee, and a grateful one. “I know this sounds corny, but I come
to BEA to meet my heroes, those booksellers who place books in the hands of
readers every day,” she says. “I think we cannot overestimate what they do,
and I love having the chance to sing their praises to their faces.”
Booksellers will find Pinkney signing ARCs of The Red Pencil this afternoon, 1:30–2:30 p.m., at Table 11 in the Autographing Area.
—Sally Lodge

AT THE SH OW

Come visit us at booth 1738!
Friday, May 30th
9:30 AM

In-Booth Signing

BEN LERNER, 10:04: A Novel (Faber and Faber, Inc.)

Galley Giveaway

The Boy Who Drew Monsters,
Keith Donohue (Picador)

10:00 AM Galley Giveaway
You Might Remember Me: The Life
and Times of Phil Hartman, Mike Thomas
(St. Martin’s Press)

10:30 AM In-Booth Poster Signing
BRANDON STANTON,
Little Humans (Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR))

Galley Giveaway

My Real Children, Jo Walton (Tor Books)
11:00 AM Galley & Advance Listening Copy Giveaway
Landline, Rainbow Rowell
(St. Martin’s Press / Macmillan Audio)

11:30 AM In-Booth Signing
ANDY COHEN, The Andy Cohen Diaries
(Henry Holt and Co.)

Galley Giveaway

The Furies, Natalie Haynes (St. Martin’s Press)
2:00 PM

In-Booth Signing

JOHN SCALZI, Lock In (Tor Books)

Galley Giveaway

Murder at the Brightwell,
Ashley Weaver (Minotaur Books / Thomas Dunne Books)
2:30 PM

Galley Giveaway

Sway, Kat Spears (St. Martin’s Griffin)
3:00 PM

In-Booth Signing

SANDY HALL,
A Little Something Different (Swoon Reads)

Galley Giveaway

Trial by Fire, Josephine Angelini (Feiwel & Friends)
3:30 PM

Galley Giveaway

The Vault of Dreamers,
Caragh M. O’Brien (Roaring Brook Press)
4:00 PM

Galley Giveaway

Full Measure, T. Jefferson Parker (St. Martin’s Press)

Want to hear more from us?
Sign up for our newsletters at:
www.CheckOutMacmillan.com
Please note: Only a limited quantity of galleys are available for giveaways and will be distributed
on a first-come, first-served basis. Author signings are ticketed (starting 30 minutes before times listed)
will last thirty minutes (or until galleys run out).

PW BEA show daily 5_30_14.indd 1

Morgan Rielly
Teenager on a History Mission
Morgan Rielly was only 14 years old when he
interviewed his first WWII veteran. Empowered
by the experience and the African proverb,
“When an old man dies, a library burns down,”
he spent the next three years locating and
interviewing surviving members of Maine’s
greatest generation. “WWII vets are dying fast
and I wanted to save as many libraries as I
could,” Rielly says.
The result is his first book, Neighborhood
Heroes: Life Lessons From Maine’s Greatest
Generation, from Down East Books (May),
which includes the stories of 25 veterans—both
men and women.
Rielly, now 18, is his high school class president and salutatorian. A history enthusiast, he
also served as a volunteer archivist at the Maine Historical Society and
Museum. Knowing his way around a historical society proved invaluable in
helping locate veterans across the state. Though he initially thought many
would be cautious, particularly because of his youth, he says they were “welcoming and open.” He adds that many had never spoken in-depth about
their WWII service until now.
Rielly sent his manuscript to a number of publishing companies before
hearing from Down East. His passion for the subject was evident, says
Michael Steere, editorial director of Down East. “I was impressed with him
and thought there was a book there.” A few months later the teenage author
had an offer.
Steele says he saw a devotion and maturity in Rielly not often present in
teenagers—and it showed on the page. “I think his youth allowed him to be
completely open with vets and record their stories unhindered by the jadedness of someone older.” He adds, “We hope Morgan’s youth will inspire young
people to pick up this book and learn something about their grandfathers
and grandmothers.”
Preserving stories is more than a passion, says Rielly, it is a necessity. “All
of us have witnessed, taken part in, or have been affected by historic events,

5/12/14 10:56 AM

© photo credit

In-Booth Signings & Giveaways

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

PUBL I SHERS

and it is up to us to record and share this with future generations in order for
there to be a better understanding of not just the times we live in but human
society as a whole.”
Rielly signs copies of Neighborhood Heroes today at 11:30 a.m. in the Taylor
Trade/Down East booth (1124). 
—Karen Jones

Michael Pitre
In His Own Words
Michael Pitre comes to BEA from Louisiana to promote his first novel, Fives and
Twenty-Fives (Bloomsbury, Aug.). Pitre’s
editor, Kathy Belden, will be presenting the
book at the Hot Fall Titles panel today at 10
p.m. at the Downtown Stage. At 11 a.m., he
will be signing in the Bloomsbury booth
(1749).
He talks here about his life and the book’s
inspiration with PW’s Ruby Cutolo.
“I’m from Louisiana originally and was
at LSU when I was moved by great
national events to join the Marine Corps. I
was a communications officer; I was the guy listening to the infantry on
the radio most of the time: It was boring, it was terrifying, it was funny, it
was heartbreaking; it was all of life, amplified. I also dealt with the
Iraqis, so I had a different perspective than a lot of the other guys.
“When I came back home, I did all the stereotypical stuff: school, marriage. I gained weight, bought a motorcycle. Creative writing was one of
my majors in college, but it was a lark, it was for fun. When I was in Iraq,
I wrote a column about sports in Iraq for a Chicago weekly, which is how
I met my wife. My sister gave Erin a copy of one of my features, and she
became my pen pal for seven months. When I came home and met her, I
thought, ‘Well, this is happening.’
“My wife made me start writing. She lets me know when I’m off track.
It was better for me to write than to go out to the bars for hours and
hours. I started the book right after I left active duty, early 2010.
“The book takes place at the beginning of the Arab spring in early
2010, and simultaneously in 2006. There are three narrators: a former
Marine lieutenant living in New Orleans, who in Iraq was responsible
for filling highway potholes, which is a dangerous job. There’s a former
medic, and an Iraqi interpreter. They were all in the same platoon in
Iraq, and their lives start to reconnect after the war.
“It’s fiction informed by my experiences. There were two things that
Iraqis would never believe: the first was that Americans landed on the
moon, and I don’t blame them. We couldn’t even make the water run or
get the power on. The second is the notion that you can move to America and become an American.
“This book was very personal. I knew what was going to happen and
how it was going to end. What was difficult was being anxious all the time
about doing justice to the subject. I’m happy with the way it turned out.
“As far as BEA, I’m nervous! I don’t know what to expect. I’m a real
babe in the woods.”

Greer Macallister
Truth or Illusion?
While most people watching a magician sawing
a woman in half during a performance typically
wonder how it’s done, Greer Macallister’s curiosity extended far beyond such a prosaic concern: instead, she wondered why she had never
seen or even read of a female magician sawing
a man in half. “Who would such a woman be?”
she recalls wondering about five years ago, before
coming up with her answer: “The Amazing
Arden,” the lead character in The Magician’s
Lie (Sourcebooks, Jan. 2015).
Her publisher is touting the debut novel as
“Water for Elephants meets Night Circus.” As it
opens in 1905, Holt, a young policeman in
smalltown Iowa, is using multiple sets of handcuffs to lock “The Amazing Arden” to a chair so that he can interrogate the
illusionist about the body of a man found beneath the stage after her act.
Macallister explains, “She has one night to convince him that she is innocent of the crime,” prompting Arden to lead Holt through the twists and

W E E K LY

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Authors

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Malcolm
Brooks

AT THE S H OW

Renaissance Cowboy

turns of her life all the way back to her early teens, when an older male
cousin broke her leg so that she could not enter ballet school and become a
dancer.
“The question is, do you believe the story being told?” Macallister asks.
“What is the truth and what is an illusion?” The Magician’s Lie is as much
about “the magic that happens in the real world as it is about the magic that
happens in front of an audience,” she says. It’s also “a love story of sorts.”
Macallister says that she set The Magician’s Lie at the turn of the 20th century as “it was not impossible” during the golden age of vaudeville for a woman
to gain popularity as a magician, “although it was unlikely.” In fact, she adds,
while “The Amazing Arden” is a completely fictional character, because “I
wanted to tell the story of a woman magician who cuts a man in half and I
didn’t have a historical precedent,” a secondary character, Adelaide Herrmann,
is an actual historical figure. Billing herself as the “Queen of Magic,” Herrmann
was a noted magician and vaudeville performer at the time in which The
Magician’s Lie is set.
While Macallister confesses that she is quite adept when it comes to writing about magic tricks, she is “terrible” when actually trying her hand at performing them. But, she points out, “Writing is a kind of magic. You’re asking
your reader to believe in a world that doesn’t exist. That’s what magic is. You
know while you’re reading that you’re not really in a police station in 1905,
just like you know while watching a magician perform that someone isn’t
really being cut in half. My goal is to have you completely swept away to that
world, while telling a fascinating story.”
Speaking of being swept away into Macallister’s world, booksellers are
invited to Sourcebooks’ booth (921) today, 1–2 p.m., where she will be signing
galley copies.
—Claire Kirch

How does a Montana horseman and carpenter
by trade write a first novel that is getting the
kind of advance press garnered by Cold
Mountain? To start with, Malcolm Brooks’s
eighth-grade English teacher gave him a copy
of Lonesome Dove for a graduation present. “It
was the first adult literary novel I was aware of,
and it literally changed the arc of my life.” He
then read everything Larry McMurtry wrote
and fell in love with tales about the American
West. “I was 14 years old, and I knew I wanted to be a writer. But I didn’t know
what kind of writer I wanted to be, so I went through this long learning curve
of mimicking whatever writer was my hero du jour.”
As a teenager, he actually wrote a first novel in the style of McMurtry, and in
his 20s wrote another imitating the likes of Tom McGuane and Jim Harrison.
Then he read All The Pretty Horses and The English Patient. “Right after that I
thought, God, I should write an epic. I finally started to piece together all the
various components of what became Painted Horses (Grove Press, Aug.).”
His first published novel is a sweeping tale tying together Catherine
Lemay, a young archeologist charged with determining whether a 1950s dam
project might destroy a potentially sacred canyon in Montana, and John H., a
horseman and WWII vet who served in the last mounted cavalry campaign in
Europe. Brooks serendipitously met a war veteran on a house-remodeling
job, who told him he was involved in the last U.S. horse-mounted cavalry in
WWII. “We invaded Sicily, and the terrain was so rough we couldn’t use
mechanized vehicles, so we just reinvented the U.S. horse cavalry.”
That story stuck in his mind when he embarked on writing his epic. Says
Brooks, “I knew I wanted to write about the American West, and I wanted to
have the U.S. cavalry in there. And I’ve always been interested in archeology

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48

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

and the Basque experience in the American West. They carved symbols and
names and dates into the bark of aspen trees, and that put me in mind of the
painted caves in the Basque region in Europe, the Pleistocene cave art. I just
threw all of these aspects into a blender to see how I could connect the dots,
and wound up with this novel.”
Brooks remarks about being at BEA for the first time, “Mainly I feel very fortunate to take part in such a significant event in the book world, and pretty
amazed that my own work led to it.” Brooks is signing galleys at the Grove
booth (1321) today, 11 a.m., and in the Autograph Area on Saturday, 9:30 a.m.  

—Hilary S. Kayle

49

tic. Indeed, Blackwood based the novel on an actual 1991 case in Austin, Tex.,
where four girls were killed, their murders still unsolved. “It took 20 years of
being haunted by this story for me to begin writing See How Small, and
another two to figure out the voices of all the characters,” Blackwood says. “I
was living in Austin when the murders happened, and remember how the
story ended up being told through the media. The girls lost their identities
because of this, and I wanted to get at their essence in my book.”
Some might find See How Small reminiscent of Alice Sebold’s The Lovely
Bones because of the use of the dead as characters in the story; they serve as
onlookers and interpreters of the narrative. But similarities cease there.
“There are elements of comfort in The Lovely Bones,” Blackwood says, “but
my book has discomfort instead. Violence is always right behind things in
life, and in this book.” But there is also a kind of peacefulness as Blackwood
delves into the aftermath of the girls’ murders, and characters such as
Hollis, a war veteran suffering from “a perceptual disorder,” adds a spiritual dimension to the story. “Hollis speaks like one of the old prophets,”
Blackwood says. “He has visions” of the dead girls, and memories of the
murders that cast a kind of beauty over the narrative of See How Small.
Meet Blackwood today at 3 p.m. at Table 8 in the Autographing Area. 

—Wendy Werris

Scott Blackwood
Inspired by a Multiple Murder

Bruce Degen
Lessons on Friendship
© brian cox

Scott Blackwood’s evocative novel See How
Small (Little, Brown, Dec.), in which three teenage girls are murdered in a small Texas town,
achieves such a multilayered narrative effect
that even its author has a tough time pigeonholing the book’s genre.
“It’s a mystery in that there’s a crime to be
solved, but also in uncovering how to deal with
such a loss,” says Blackwood, who teaches writing in the M.F.A. program at Southern Illinois
University in Chicago. “It’s also a detective
novel, and it’s a ghost story, too, where the dead
girls are more alive than the living.” Perhaps
above all, See How Small is a striking example
of Blackwood’s deep strength as a literary novelist. His previous books have received praise
from Richard Ford, Andre Dubus, and Rick DeMarinis, among others, and he
is a recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award.
As described in See How Small, the murders, which take place in an ice
cream parlor in a small Texas town, and their aftermath, are chillingly authen-

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

For more than 35 years, Bruce Degen has successfully explored an impressive range of
children’s book turf. The picture books that
he’s written and illustrated include Shirley’s
Wonderful Baby, Daddy Is a Doodlebug, and
Jamberry. He is also illustrator of the Magic
School Bus series by Joanna Cole, Nancy
White Carlstrom’s Jesse Bear books, and the
Commander Toad series by Jane Yolen. Degen
is at BEA to promote his newest solo effort,

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Authors
AT THE SH OW

Snow Joke: An I Like to Read Book (Holiday House, Oct.), which tells of two
animal pals working through their differences while playing in the snow.
This easy reader delivers a message that will serve any child well. In the
story, one critter relentlessly teases the other with a string of jokes, justifying
his annoying behavior by saying, “It’s just a joke.” Degen explains, “I wanted
to do a story about a young character who wants to be a friend, but doesn’t
really know how to be one. When he tries, he ends up being a pain in the neck,
and he doesn’t get that pulling pranks that are not funny is not the way to
gain a friend.” The jokester learns his lesson, of course—and readers receive
a double message about friendship and forgiveness.
Weighing the challenges of creating his own books and of collaborating
with others, Degen concludes that the latter is less difficult. “I find it’s actually easier to illustrate other people’s work,” he says. “When I both write a
book and do the pictures, I sometimes wonder if I should change the words
along the way. It’s simpler when I’m just illustrating, because I obviously
can’t do that. I try to work with authors I respect and whose language I
respond to, and I have been very lucky to illustrate books by people who have
clear voices that I can easily hear.”
Degen signs copies of Snow Joke today, 1:30–2 p.m., at Table 8 in the
Autographing Area. He’s happy to be at BEA to reconnect with booksellers,
to whom (along with publishers’ sales reps) he gives kudos: “As an author, all
you really think about is, ‘How can I make a good book?’ And then that book
goes out into the world, and it’s important to think about what it takes to get
it out there, to reach readers, and it’s very important to appreciate the people who do that.” 
—Sally Lodge

Meg Wolitzer
Venturing into YATerritory
Author of The Interestings, The Uncoupling,
The Ten-Year Nap, and other acclaimed adult
novels, as well as The Fingertips of Duncan
Dorfman for middle-graders, Meg Wolitzer
makes her initial foray into YA fiction with
Belzhar (Dutton, Sept.), which is set at a
Vermont boarding school for emotionally fragile and highly intelligent teenagers. At its center is Jam, a girl grieving the loss of a boy she
loved, who learns that the journals given to her
and other students enrolled in a course on
Sylvia Plath transport them to a world where
they can relive a traumatic part of their past.
Playing on the title of Plath’s celebrated autobiographical novel, Wolitzer names that world
Belzhar.
A longtime fan of The Bell Jar, Wolitzer notes that her debut novel,
Sleepwalkers, which she wrote while a senior at Brown, was also inspired by
Plath. “Belzhar is about a lost girl who has to find a way to look ahead and
not be stuck where she is, and it was important to me to write a frankly
emotional novel about teenagers’ feelings without backing away from
them,” she says. “Remembering being so moved by The Bell Jar, I think I
naturally returned to Sylvia Plath. This is her turf, though the plot is completely made up.”
For more than one reason, Wolitzer views writing YA an unsurprising trajectory for her. “My son Charlie, who is now 19, started reading a lot of young
adult books when he was 14 or so, so YA books were totally in the air in our
house for years,” she explains. “I started looking at the writing that interested him, and found that much of it was very affecting.” Wolitzer adds, “YA
was definitely also in the air and in my mind, because I often write about adolescence in my adult novels. It’s such an intense time of things happening for
the first time.”
Wolitzer approached the writing of Belzhar a bit differently from that of
her past novels, opting to tell the story from Jam’s perspective. “Writing in
the first person is unusual for me—in recent years my only other first-person
novel was The Wife—but I felt that Jam’s story required more immediacy, and
it needed to be told by her. I didn’t want to rush it and go into everyone’s
point of view. Hers was the one I wanted to get.”
Wolitzer will sign galleys of Belzhar this afternoon, 1–2 p.m., at Table 3 in
the Autographing Area, and will then participate in the “Real YA” panel on
the Uptown Stage, 3–3:30 p.m. 

—Sally Lodge

© nina subin

50

PUBL I SHERS

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Dick Cavett

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

StorieS
to Quack
kidS up!

Reveals His Brief
Encounters

An Emmy Award winner and talk show host
pioneer, Dick Cavett is back with his fourth
book, Brief Encounters: Conversations,
Magic Moments, and Assorted Hijinks
(Random House, Nov.). Drawn from his
online opinion pieces in the New York Times,
the book is a delightful peek behind the
curtain at celebrities, complex characters,
and the nuances of everyday life—all told
with his singular wit and style. Jimmy Fallon, who wrote the foreword,
calls Cavett “a legend and an inspiration.” Cavett talks to Show Daily
about the continued fascination with celebrity culture and responding
to fan mail, good and bad.
Cavett is a speaker at the APA Author Tea, 4–5 p.m., in Room 1E10/1E11.
Brief Encounters is culled from your series of New York Times pieces.
Why did you feel the time was right to compile them in another book?
I suppose because I realized to my total astonishment that I had actually written enough to do a second book. People had enjoyed the first
collection... called Talk Show, so much, the words “second book”
popped into my mind. I could not marshal a strong argument against it.
Since your book contains a good amount of biographical material, is
there something about yourself that might surprise readers?
I’m not sure I’m the one to answer this question, not knowing which
readers have which capacity for surprise. Or what they already know
about me. I’d prefer to think the reader might well be surprised by reactions in himself. If I tried this sort of cowardly answer in front of an audience, I think I’d be wise to duck. There might be someone out front with
the other Hillary Clinton shoe.
What sort of “fan mail” do you get about the Times columns? Do readers
tell you the specific sorts of things they like or don’t like?
They seem to enjoy learning about things and people I’ve had the good
fortune to meet and to hear about, and some quite dramatic happenings
I’ve experienced for which they would have no other source. As in, “Your
column on James Gandolfini’s death. It made me weep.” Or, “Thanks
millions for taking us along to your meeting with Stan Laurel.”
The angry reader letters always include, “And all my friends agree.” And/
or “Good-bye forever, Mr. Cavett.” For that one, I send a printed “thank
you” card. On the back, “And don’t let the door bat you in the a...” etc.
Brief Encounters is filled with insider stories of such big personalities as
Marlene Dietrich, Orson Welles, and the Burtons, Liz and Dick. Any
thoughts as to why people remain intrigued by celebrity?
I think my father may have been one of the rare people who gave not a
tinker’s damn about celebrities. Perhaps he was not unique, and there
are a few more. I can’t explain it except to say that some celebrities are
infinitely fascinating and entertaining. Most are not. If you just love
celebrity no matter who has it, it is irrefutable proof that you’re certifiably a dimwit. (I was such a dimwit for seven and possibly eight years.) 

—Karen Jones

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Willie’s Redneck Time Machine.

beyourownduckcommander.com
© kambriel

It was a circuitous and unexpected road that
led Amanda Palmer to become an author. Best
known as one-half of the punk duo the Dresden
Dolls, Palmer had already expanded her creative world to include songwriter, playwright,
and blogger. Her million-plus Twitter followers
and 250,000 Facebook fans had earned her the
title of “Social Media Queen of Rock-N-Roll.”
Then, in May 2012, she raised nearly $1.2 million
on Kickstarter for her new album, Theatre Is Evil.
The album went on to debut in the “Billboard
Top 10” when it was released that September.
Palmer’s success on Kickstarter led to an
invitation to present a TED talk at TED’s 2013
conference. That talk, “The Art of Asking,” has
since been viewed more than 10 million times
worldwide. “It’s about the shame people feel around the art of asking for
money and help,” says Palmer, who still remembers the days she spent touring

cOm

97 8- 1- 41

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

TYNDALE and Tyndale’s quill logo are registered trademarks of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.
Duck Commander is a registered trademark of Duck Commander, Inc.

51

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors

PUBL I SHERS

Europe with a
punk cabaret
band and reaching out on Twitter
each night to find
a place to sleep.
“I think culture
has instilled in us this fallacy that we can do everything ourselves. But asking
is not a weakness but a gift, and that’s hard headspace to get into.”
Her Ted talk brought her to the attention of Grand Central senior editor
Emily Griffin, who called asking if Palmer had ever thought about writing a
book. She had, but “I always thought when I finally wrote a book it would be
about street performing or social media, maybe a memoir.” Instead, it would
be The Art of Asking (Nov.), in which Palmer expands upon her TED talk to
reveal how ordinary people, those of us without thousands of Twitter followers and adoring fans, can use the same principles in our own lives to learn
how to ask for what we need without feelings of shame.
Even though she’s been a blogger for 14 years, Palmer found writing The

AT THE S H OW

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Art of Asking, which she calls “part memoir and part manifesto,” a completely
different discipline. “It exercises an entirely different part of my brain. It’s
been a totally new challenge, but one I’ve really embraced.”
Palmer will be doing an in-booth signing today, 11 a.m.–noon, at the Grand
Central booth (2819). 
—Lucinda Dyer

Philip Gulley
New Series, New Publisher

Philip Gulley writes about what he knows: a smalltown Quaker pastor who serves and loves imperfectly,
but who always points others to God. Sam Gardner,
the protagonist in Gulley’s popular Harmony novel
series, is back again after a brief hiatus, and with a
new publisher. This time he’s making folks mad and
moving to a new Friends meeting in Hope, Ind.
“Center Street approached us about continuing the
Harmony
series,” said
Gulley. “I had
finished several books on theological issues
which I enjoyed, but I continued to
get mail from folks wondering what
happened to Sam.”
Gulley wanted to move Sam and
his wife, Barbara, to a new place for
the new series, so he needed to get
the beloved pastor fired from the
Harmony Friends Meeting. Having
him participate in a same-sex marriage ceremony did the trick.
“I hope I get some flack about it so
I can engage people and talk to
them about the topic,” he says. “The
church’s stance on marriage equality has been abysmal. I hope A Place
Called Hope is a doorway through
which the topic can be discussed.”
Gulley says the discussion is
important for the church today.
“Throughout history it has been
common for a religion to single out a
group of people and accord them a
lesser amount of rights. As soon as we
do that to any group, we are doing
great damage to them and their
well-being, and we are perpetuating
an evil that hardens us. Whenever
religions do that, they need to be
called on it,” he says.
Gulley calls himself a bi-vocational
pastor, which is to say that he is both
pastor and writer. He’s been a Quaker
pastor for 31 years, and his first book
came out in 1996. “I can direct my
energy elsewhere, which is part of
my longevity as a pastor,” he says.
He’s working on the second book in
the Hope series, with a third contracted. Additional books in the
series are a possibility.
“Every book allows me to speak
my mind on issues; Sam Gardner is
a great cover,” Gulley says with a
laugh. “I want readers to think
deeply about what kind of life our
Winners will be announced at ALA Annual Conference, June 28, 2014.
faith calls us to. Frankly, if that life is
one that leaves others out, is dismissive of millions of people, I want my
More information at ala.org/carnegieadult.
books to challenge that.”
The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction
recognize the best books for adult readers published in the U.S. in the
Gulley will sign copies of A Place
previous year, reflecting the expert judgment and insight of library
Called Hope (Center Street, Sept.)
professionals. Co-sponsored by Booklist and RUSA (ALA’s Reference and
at the Hachette Book Group booth
User Services Association), the awards are funded through a grant from
(2819) on today, 3–4 p.m. Tomorrow,
Carnegie Corporation of New York.
11 a.m.–noon at the booth, Charles
Martin will sign advance copies of A
—Ann Byle
Life Interrupted. 

2014 Medals for Excellence
in Fiction and Nonfiction

Congratulations to the six outstanding shortlist titles!

Reference and User Services Association

© matt gruffith

52

PUBL I SHERS

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

A Toast to 50 Years
To celebrate its 50th anniversary,
Cameron + Company will be pouring martinis today, 3–4 p.m., at its
booth (1223A) in the PGW section.
The party also celebrates the 50th
Anniversary Edition of The
Drinking Man’s Diet, originally published in 1964 by the company’s
founder, Robert Cameron.
“It was a huge cultural phenomenon,” says publisher Chris Gruener,
“selling 2.4 million copies in 13 different languages. We’ve kept the
book in its original format for the past
49 years and felt this was an opportunity to celebrate the book’s, and

A More Colorful
Arcadia
Arcadia Publishing wants booksellers
to know that it’s not just their
grandparents’ publishing company.
The Charleston, S.C., company, which
is best known for its
flagship series,
Images of America,
featuring old-fashioned sepia-toned
book jackets and,
inside, vintage black
and white images of
small towns and cities, is changing with
the times. While
Arcadia is celebrating the 20th
anniversary of its debut title in 1994—
Old York Beach (Maine), it’s spicing
up its 9,372-title list with the launch
of its Images of Modern America
series. “We’ve got color: the creative
juices of the team are flowing,” marketing manager P.J. Norlander
says, explaining that Arcadia’s
demographic has always been 40–55
year olds; since today’s boomers had
a lot of Kodak moments growing up,
color photographs resonate just as
much as black and white.
Not only is Arcade experimenting with color, it’s also mixing the
nostalgic yearnings of its customer
base with high-tech gadgets that
make fulfilling those yearnings
instantaneous. Arcade has partnered with Google on the Field Trip
app, which enables users to pull up
on their electronic devices content
relating to the user’s physical location. And now that Google has
incorporated Field Trip into its
Google Glass wearable headset, all
that Google Glass wearers have to
say is “Search nearby,” and vintage
images and capsule histories of
nearby buildings and other landmarks will, literally, pop up in front
of the user’s eyes. Arcadia will have
Google Glass headsets in booth
1502 throughout the show for booksellers wanting demonstrations. 

—Claire Kirch

the company’s success by publishing a
new edition that’s a bit
more on the suave,
cocktail, Mad Men–
esque style of things.”
Gruener and his
wife, Nina, purchased
the company in 2009
from her grandfather,
Robert Cameron. “It seemed a natural fit since I worked in publishing as
a sales rep, we were in the family,
and Robert was turning 98.” While
best known for its books of aerial
photography, including Above San

W E E K LY

Francisco, the
Grueners have grown
the list while determined to keep
Cameron’s legacy
alive. “We still put an
emphasis on art and
photography, but now
include food and wine
titles, children’s
books, and publications of regional interest.”
Recent successes include such
children’s titles as Kiki & Coco in
Paris, an oversized picture book
now in its third printing, and the follow-up book, Lulu & Pip, as well as
Bay Area sports titles like Never.

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

53

Say. Die., a photo book celebrating
the 2012 World Series Champion
San Francisco Giants.
Not surprisingly, owning a familyrun publishing house has both difficulties and rewards. “The obvious
challenges are time and money,”
says Gruener. “It’s not the type of
thing we leave at the office, and it’s a
constant juggle trying to grow a
small business while also raising
two small kids who can often be
found tearing apart the office or
making photocopies of their hands.
But there are very few vocations
anymore where you get to touch
and feel a finished product that
you’ve been working on for years.
It’s very gratifying.”—Lucinda Dyer

54

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

UPNE Launches ForeEdge
Taking its name from the printing
term, fore edge— which refers to the
part of a book that faces inward when
the book is shelved, opposite the
spine—a new imprint for national
trade titles from University Press of
New England is launching. ForeEdge’s
tagline is “where the book opens up.”
“A book’s front edge is the perfect
symbol of modern publishing’s
meeting point between tradition
and the central need to look forward
beyond the book itself,” says David
Corey, UPNE’s director of sales and
marketing.

The University Press of New
England is supported by a consortium of universities comprising
Dartmouth, Brandeis, the University
of New Hampshire, and
Northeastern, and dates back to
1970. In recent years, Corey notes,
the press has found that its trade
books were hampered in distribution by its regional name. Corey
says that as the press began to
reach a critical mass of national
titles, it was time for a national
imprint, which will focus on nonfiction in the areas of history, politics,

true crime, music, and
other popular topics.
Corey points to two
titles on the fall list as
examples of the trade
books suited to the
imprint: Dog Whistles,
Walk Backs &
Washington
Handshakes: Decoding
the Jargon, Slang and
Bluster of American Political Speech
and Winning Marriage: The Inside
Story of How Same-Sex Couples
Took on the Politicians and

Pundits—and Won.
Dog Whistles, by Chuck
McCutcheon (coauthor of National
Journal’s Almanac of American
Politics) and David Mark (former
senior editor of Politico), with a
foreword by Jeff Greenfield, will be
released in September—just in time
for the November elections and a
new season of House of Cards on
Netflix. Winning Marriage, by Marc
Solomon, who has been at the forefront of the Freedom to Marry
movement, has a foreword by Gov.
Deval Patrick of Massachusetts.
“Massachusetts was the first state to
have same-sex marriage, and now it
has passed up and down the Eastern
Seaboard and is spreading westward,” says Corey.
UPNE invites BEA attendees to
drop by its booth (2438) today, at 3
p.m., to toast ForeEdge and all of
UPNE’s other titles. 

—Bridget Kinsella

A Photographic
Musical Tribute
Not every book opens with a page
featuring a scrawled handwritten
blurb from Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
“Plug into this jukebox and see the
faces and figures behind the greatest American music,” writes the
poet, of photographer Christopher
Felver’s American Jukebox: A
Photographic Journey (Indiana
University
Press). A collection of 240
photographs
taken by Felver
over the past 25
years, the black
and white
images catch
musicians and
composers both
on the stage
and posed in
their musical
element, revealing the faces behind
the rhythms, beats, and melodies of
American musical history.
His subjects represent musical
genres from rock to country and
bluegrass, from experimental to
folk and jazz. Among them are Joan
Baez, John Cage, Cab Calloway,
Roseanne Cash, Dizzy Gillespie,
Phillip Glass, Arlo Guthrie, BB

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Loving Laughter
Even though Best to Laugh (Univ. of
Minnesota Press, Sept.) is set in Los
Angeles rather than in smalltown
Minnesota, like Lorna Landvik’s
eight other novels, she says it’s her
most autobiographical work yet.
Best to Laugh is the story of Candy
Pekkala, a Midwestern teenager,
who travels to L.A. to try to break
into show business as a standup
comedian.
Pursuing her
dream,
Candy sublets her cousin’s place in
an apartment complex on
Hollywood
Boulevard, a
few blocks

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

very much like the one Candy lives
in. Confessing to having had recurrent dreams over the years about
Peyton Hall, which she remembers
from Grauman’s Chinese Theatre.
as “just fabulous,” Landvik says that
There, she connects with the kinds
she wrote Best to Laugh to “pay
of characters one encounters only
homage” to that period in her life. “I
in L.A.: a bodybuilder whose mother
don’t know if I’ll ever write my
is a famous actress of yesteryear; a
memoirs,” she says. “I don’t have
substitute teacher who wins televithe kind of mind that remembers a
sion game shows because of his
lot of details. But I have such vivid
immense knowledge of trivia; a
memories of when I was in my 20s
ruined nightclub impresario; a welland lived on Hollywood Boulevard.”
connected Romanian fortune-teller.
Like Candy, Landvik worked
Landvik, 59, says that when she
temp jobs that can only be
and her husband were young and
described as unusual: a stint at a
foolish, they moved from Minnesota
record company, another at the
to California, first to San Francisco
Playboy Mansion—a clerical job
and then to L.A., where they lived in
that she
Peyton
Hall,
an
apartment
complex
Pre-BEA Day 2_Layout 1 5/16/14 4:42 PM Page
1 swears did not require any

disrobing. And Landvik was also a
television game show contestant,
even winning $4,000 and a trip to
Tahiti on The $25,000 Pyramid.
While Landvik left L.A. 30 years
ago, she never gave up on show
business. Once a year, she performs
an improv comedy routine at LynLake Bowl in Minneapolis, which
always includes making margaritas
for some of the audience members.
“I like to be a good hostess and
make something for my guests,” she
explains.
Today, 3:30–4 p.m., she signs copies of Best to Laugh at Table 20 in the
Autographing Area. No word on
whether she’ll be making margaritas as well.
—Claire Kirch

Wisdom Publications

BOOTH
2746

Classic and Contemporary Buddhist Works
Brave Parenting
A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Raising
Emotionally Resilient Children
Krissy Pozatek, LICSW
9781614290896 | 200 pages
$17.95 | Available Now

Browse our new
and upcoming titles!

Zen Cancer Wisdom
Tips for Making Each
Day Better

Lorna Landvik

King, Cyndi Lauper, Bobby Short,
Patti Smith, and Townes Van Zandt.
Scattered throughout the book are
playlists, autographed lyrics, and
record sleeves contributed by the
artists. Among the articles written
by Felver’s subjects are “The
Founding of the Fugs” by Ed
Sanders, an original member of the
’60s satirical rock band, and a
touching tribute to Woody Guthrie,
“Woody’s Last Ramble,” by Ramblin’
Jack Elliott. “[Felver’s] diverse photographs,” says music, film, and
humanities editor, Raina Polivka,
“reveal the talent and compassion
behind the major faces of our sonic
landscape. The handwritten music,
lyrics, drawings, and notes from his
subjects illustrate the intimate
relationships Felver shares with
many of these musicians.”
Felver has published seven previous books of photography, most
recently Beat (Last Gasp). His photographs have been featured in
exhibitions at the Center Georges
Pompidou in Paris, the Whitney
Museum in New York, the National
Theatre in London, the National
Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.,
and the Torino Biennale
Internazionale.
You can meet Felver and pick up
a copy of American Jukebox today,
between 3 and 3:30 p.m., at Table 20
in the Autographing Area. 

—Lucinda Dyer

Meet Krissy Pozatek!
Saturday, May 31
10:30 am–11:30 am
Booth 2746

“Gently but firmly guides parents toward enabling their children’s
independence. Pozatek’s compassionate, mature way of examining
contemporary parental behaviors should ease parents’ concerns and
help them master ‘brave parenting.’”
—ForeWord Reviews

55

Daju Suzanne Friedman
9781614291237 | 320 pages
$16.95 | September 2014

“One of my most valuable resources. A rich and
comprehensive guide to opening our minds to our lives
as they are.”
—Toni Bernhard, author of How to Be Sick

Wisdom is distributed to the trade by Simon & Schuster.
wisdompubs.org

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

WE
GOT

GAME

BOOTH #2527
25

25 YEARS OF INSPIRED LEADERSHIP
IN SPORTS PUBLISHING

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Pamela Paul

Does Her Own ‘By the Book’
Every Sunday in the New York Times
Book Review, Pamela Paul does a q&a
interview with an author in the popular
“By the Book” feature. In her
eponymous new book (Henry Holt, Oct.
28), she has edited and collected 65 of
what she considers her “most
intriguing and fascinating exchanges.”
Show Daily’s Daisy Maryles thought it
would be fun to turn the table and invite
Paul to a “By the Book” interview.
Today, at 11 a.m., Paul is on a
Women’s Media Group panel, “Girl
Books, Boy Books, Gender Hooks:
Packaging, Positioning, and Reviewing
in the Fiction Marketplace,” taking
place in room 1E16.
What books are currently on your nightstand?
I’ve got two shelves on it, two piles, and I shuffle them constantly. As
of this moment: The Swerve by Stephen Greenblatt, which is what I
would actually name if asked what I were reading.
Near the top of the
pile, The Shallows by Nicholas Carr, which was my subway book for a
while. There’s Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offil, which I keep
thinking I will read in one especially intense evening since it is short.
What are your favorite novels of all time?
I’ve got a long list, even though I’m just going to stick to the classics.
First, the Russians: Anna Karenina, War and Peace, The Brothers
Karamazov. Short stories: “The Nose,” “The Double.” Another favorite
story: The Secret Sharer by Joseph Conrad—I’ve always wanted to
make it into a movie. I generally love stories at sea even though I don’t
particularly like being at sea. The best book that made me cry was The
Portrait of a Lady, and the books that have made me laugh more than
any others were and still are Catch-22 and Slaughterhouse-Five.
What do you like to read when procrastinating?
Twitter.
What do you like to read right before bed?
Something just a tiny bit tiring. I don’t get enough sleep on page
turners.
If you had to name one book that made you who you are today, what
would it be?
Cheaper by the Dozen. My recollection is that the protagonist was
always calculating the most efficient solution to everything, beginning
with getting out of the door each morning. The book led to a lifetime of
aspirational efficiency. Also, the book was about a family with 12
children, and I am drawn to stories about large families. I stopped at
three children in my own, but even with that number, efficiency comes
in handy.
You’re hosting a literary dinner party. Which three writers are invited?
Dorothy Parker, H. L. Mencken, and Mark Twain. It would be feisty
and fierce—something would get spilled and someone might actually
get hurt—but I could just lean back and listen, and wonder what each
would write about it the next day.
Which three books do you bring to a desert island?
The Bible, because I never got past Cain and Abel in my children’s
edition, too violent and male-centric. War and Peace, because I’ve been
meaning to reread it, and this would give me a chance. The Golden
Bowl, because it was the one assigned book in college that I never got
around to reading.
Disappointing, overrated, just not good. What books did you feel like
you were supposed to like but didn’t?
I actually hate a lot of books that other people passionately love. I
really disliked The Great Gatsby and, honestly, all of Fitzgerald leaves
me cold. (Though I adored Nancy Milford’s Zelda biography.) I gritted
my teeth with disgust through The Fountainhead, which contains some
of the worst prose I’ve ever read. I dislike the Beats and couldn’t stand
On the Road. I wanted to throttle Holden Caulfield—what a
complainer!
What books are you embarrassed not to have read yet?
I’m seriously behind on my midcentury men. With the exception of
Seize the Day, I haven’t read any Saul Bellow. Haven’t read Updike or
Nabokov. I’ve only read three Philip Roth novels.
What do you plan to read next?
Maybe one of those. Or I could chip away at my nightstand cache.

© earl wilson-the new york times

56

How are these connected...

Johnnie Cochran, Don King, and 13 Billion Dollars?

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58

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Smitten with Scarlett
At the tender age of 10, John Wiley
Jr. was taken by his mother to see
Gone with the Wind. “To this day I
remember coming out of that theater. I grew up in Lynchburg, a small
town in Virginia, and I just felt like I
had known these people. Those
characters, they’re living, breathing
people, and they just grabbed me.”
He insisted on reading the book, and
took out a copy of Margaret Mitchell’s
inimitable tale of the South from the
local bookmobile in 1968. “I had to
get special permission, because it
was an adult book. It took me about
a month to read and it was the best
thing I’d ever read.” Then he was
hooked and had to get his own paperback copy of the book, and then his
own hardcover version. “In my teenage years I discovered that there
were foreign editions of the book,
and that absolutely fascinated me.”
Over the years, thanks to antiquarian booksellers, personal connections, and eBay and the like, Wiley
has put together a collection of Gone
with the Wind memorabilia that
legions of book and movie fans would
envy. Among the 10,000-plus items

he’s amassed over the
years , which includes
800 editions of the
book from around the
world, are items like
the following.
• The printing
plate for the original
dust jacket of the book. “I bought it
from a book dealer in New Jersey. He
got it from an estate auction of a former
traveler [salesman] for Macmillan.
• One of the bound presentation
scripts of GWTW that producer David
O. Selznick gave to people associated with the movie. Says Wiley, “I
have the one he inscribed to John
Hertz [of Hertz Rent-a-car], who was
an original investor in Selznick
International Pictures. I purchased
it at auction.”
• A ticket stub from the movie
premiere at Loew’s Grand Theatre
in Atlanta on December 15, 1939.
The collector notes, “More than
80,000 requests were received for
the 2,031 tickets available to the
premiere.”
• A woman’s girdle, which came
out in 1940, that has a pink “Scarlett

O Hara” tag on it. “After an
article appeared about my
collection, a woman called and told
me she had found a “Scarlett O’Hara”
girdle in a box of things she had
bought at a yard sale, so I purchased
it from her.”
Wiley is at BEA to promote his
second Gone with the Wind book. The
first, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with
the Wind: A Bestseller Odyssey from
Atlanta to Hollywood, (Taylor Trade,
2012) co-authored with rare book
dealer Ellen Brown, was published to
coincide with the 75th anniversary
of the publication of the book. His
latest , The Scarlett Letters: The
Making of the Film Gone with the
Wind (Taylor Trade , Oct.) features a
collection of letters written by
Margaret Mitchell that showcases
her view of the making of the film
based on her book, and honors the
75th anniversary of the release of

ECW is CULTURE

the film. Wiley tells Show
Daily, “She was such a
great letter writer, and I
thought, let’s give her perspective of the movie.”
Wiley adds, “Throughout
her life she kept telling
people, ‘I have nothing to
do with the movie, don’t
bother me. I can’t help you get the
part of Scarlett’—that type of thing.
But when you read her letters, she
was as fascinated as everybody else
with what was going on. She’d get
little gossipy tidbits, even though
she took this hands-off approach;
she really was as much a fan as anybody else.”
The author is signing galleys
today at the Taylor booth (1124A) at
1 p.m. The publisher is also holding
a drawing: the winner will get a
copy of Wiley’s first book, Margaret
Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind, and
from Wiley’s collection a motion picture edition of the novel that was
published in December of 1939 that
features 12 color plates from the
movie and a 2-disc DVD of the movie.
As an added bonus, BEA attendees
can stop by the booth at any time to
get their picture taken with Scarlett
—Hilary S. Kayle
O’Hara.

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The final installment in
New York Times bestselling author
Catherine Gildiner’s witty and
spirited memoir series

ecwpress.com

978-1-62616-067-5, paper, $29.95
978-1-62616-139-9, cloth, $49.95

entertainment culture writing

FOLLOW US @GUPRESS

JOIN US AT BOOTH #1544

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14-05-14 2:20 PM

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60

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

A High 10 for Trinity

MEET OUR

AUTHORS
Friday, May 30
BOOTH C1685

11AM–12PM

Gary Urey

Super Schnoz and the
Invasion of the Snore Snatchers
author of

1:30PM–2:30PM

Ellis Paul

author of

The Hero in You

2:30PM–3:30PM

Mike Litwin

Crown of the Cowibbean
(Welcome to Bermooda! Book 2)
author of

www.albertwhitman.com
f Albert Whitman & Company
l @AlbertWhitman

“A small press with a big reach” is how founder and publisher Barbara Ras
describes Trinity University Press, the San Antonio, Tex., house that is celebrating its 10th publishing anniversary this year. “It’s been exhilarating to
have started something from scratch that in 10 years has grown to a significant publishing program.”
Among other successes, the house started out of the
gate in 2004 with Peter Turchi’s Maps of the
Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer, which the
New York Times Magazine cited as one of the 100 best
nonfiction books ever. Turchi’s long-awaited follow-up,
A Muse and a Maze: Writing as Puzzle, Mystery, and
Magic (Nov.), explores the similarities between writing
and puzzle-making and its flip side, puzzle-solving.
Galleys are available at the Trinity booth (1230).
“We were lucky to have the Ewing Halsell Foundation,
a local philanthropy, give us startup funds and an
endowment to support operations,” Ras says, explaining the original Trinity blueprint. “We’ve also been
ambitious in pursuing funds for books that would otherwise be beyond the capacity of a small press.” Barry
Lopez, W.S. Merwin, Bob Shacocchis, and Rebecca
Solnit are among their nationally recognized authors.
The press is not, despite its name, a channel for academic or scholarly work, but sticks strictly to trade-oriented books that will appeal to a smart readership,
such as Solnit’s The Encyclopedia of Trouble and
Spaciousness (Nov.), in which the author brings
together the vast world of political observation, art
commentary, and observations on social justice (samplers available at the booth); and Nobody Home: Writing, Buddhism, and
Living in Place by Gary Snyder in conversation with Julia Martin (Nov.), featuring three interviews and a correspondence during a 30-year friendship.
Associate director Thomas Payton, who acquires books along with Ras, is
building the list to encompass books on architecture, urban design, and city
planning. He is excited to announce the launch in fall 2015 of a new—and
unique—series about architecture, the Best Architecture Writing, a gathering of the best in the English language from around the world, with noted
architectural critic and writer Edward Lifson overseeing the series annually.
The young press now has more than 150 books in print, a staff of six fulltimers, and a huge amount of pride in itself. All of the press’s titles are published simultaneously in print and electronically, with some done in e-book
format only, including, just released this month, 48 titles in the WPA Guides
to America series, individual guides to each of the states commissioned
originally in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration.  

—Suzanne Mantell

Mighty Bright, Mighty Light
Since introducing its first incandescent book light in 1995, Mighty Bright has
been the company that helped save relationships, as its tiny lights made it
possible for one person to read while another sleeps. Now, with the introduction at BEA of its newest product, Recharge—a sleek silicon rechargeable light—Mighty Bright allows readers to help save the environment.
“If someone’s looking for something, we’ve got the light that’s right for
any situation,” says Barbara Burke, company sales manager. Mighty Bright
has 11 models of LED book lights ranging in price from $9.99 to $29.99. “We
shipped 1.5 million book lights last year,” says Burke.
Aside from its eco-friendly 16-hour rechargeable battery, Recharge features two energy-efficient LEDs for high and low output, a duel flex neck
that bends in just about any direction, and a sturdy clip that affixes easily to
book pages. And Recharge is the first Mighty Bright light made of matte silicone instead of plastic.
Burke says the company’s portable lights have always been a hit, and she
thinks Recharge—with battery replacement not an issue—will make them
even more useful. Burke describes letters the company has received from
customers who survived hurricanes with their Mighty Brights the only illumination they had for days. “They send pictures of them,” she says.
Mighty Bright lights are sold worldwide in both chain and independent
retail stores. “But we’ve always, always, always had a very special spot for
the independent bookstores,” says Burke. The company has been selling to
the trade through the same independent book rep groups since the mid1990s and makes a point to support independent booksellers by exhibiting
at BookExpo and at the regional trade shows. At the booth (1706), it is offering a baker’s dozen deal: buy 12, get one free. 
—Bridget Kinsella

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

PUBL I SHERS

Baen Beams at 30
With integrity and vision as its publishing cornerstones since 1984, Baen Books, the second largest
publisher of science fiction and fantasy and #1 in
space opera and military science fiction, is pleased
to be celebrating its 30th anniversary with special
events, author signings, and giveaways at BEA.
The company was founded by Jim Baen, editor
of Galaxy and If magazines before expanding his
talents into book publishing. Says Toni Weisskopf,
publisher of the press since Baen died in 2006,
“From early on, Jim and I tried to build Baen as a brand, which is a way of
saying we were a publisher that could be relied on to deliver a good story.”
“Whether the book was urban fantasy, military science fiction, or sword and
sorcery, you knew they would all be satisfying.” Readers believe in this confident guarantee, and Baen has sold more than 60 million copies of its books
and has over 500 backlist titles in print.
Corinda Carfora, Baen’s director of sales and marketing, has been with
the Wake Forest, N.C., company for 13 years. “It’s important to remember that
Jim Baen was the first to create and sell digital books, in 1999,” Carfora says.
“This was years before the word ‘e-book’ had become part of the publishing
lexicon. Jim named it the ‘Webscription’ program. He was also an advocate of
non-DRM (digital rights management), which almost all publishers have
adopted today.” E-book sales have been significant for Baen, although they’ve
leveled off in the last year or so. “Fans of our genres want real books. They’re
tried and true, die-hard fans.” Three years ago Baen launched its original
trade paperback line, priced at $15, which became a customer favorite almost
immediately. “We’ve found that people are willing to try something new, and
the series has broadened our audience for new authors,” Carfora says.
Bestselling writers like David Weber, John Ringo, Lois McMaster Bujold,
and Larry Correia have long been published by Baen, and to great success.
This year Hugo Award nominees for best novel include Correia for Warbound;
Brad Torgerson’s The Chaplain’s Legacy (available from Baen in e-edition) is
nominated for best novella. Since 1984, Baen Books has had 40 New York
Times bestsellers.
To celebrate its 30 years, Baen is hosting a meet and greet today, 4–6 p.m.,
on the fourth floor, at 4B Terrace, where there will be anniversary tote bags.
Among the authors attending will be Eric Flint and Charles E. Gannon, who
have collaborated on the novel 1636: Commander Cantrell in the West Indies,
the latest in their alternate history Ring of Fire series. They sign today at
—Wendy Werris
10:30 a.m. at the Simon & Schuster booth (2639). 

A Flamboyant Lawyer
“There has never been a lawyer quite like Fred Levin,” says Josh Young, the
New York Times bestselling author of And Give Up Showbiz? How Fred Levin
Beat Big Tobacco, Avoided Two Murder Prosecutions, Became a Chief of
Ghana, Earned Boxing Manager of the Year, and Transformed American Law
(BenBella Books, Sept.). “He helped push large corporations to make sweeping safety changes that have benefited every single person in this country.
Yet his self-absorbed and flamboyant actions and statements leave you wondering whether he’s a hero or a villain, a devoted seeker of justice or an
ambulance chaser, a cockroach or a humanitarian.”
The son of a pawnbroker and dog track manager, Levin began practicing
as a personal injury attorney in the days when those cases where handled by
lawyers on the very lowest rungs of the profession. But Levin persevered,
grew his law firm from a two-man operation in a small Southern swamp
town into one of the largest and most successful mass torts firm in the country and helped turn civil litigation into a multibillion-dollar business. Levin’s
most high-profile victory came in his landmark case against “Big Tobacco.”
He orchestrated and says he helped secretly to push through a Florida law
that led to the biggest legal settlement in U.S. history against the tobacco
companies. He’s won more than 100 jury verdicts and settlements worth at
least $1 million, been named top civil litigator by the National Law Journal,
listed in every edition of Best Lawyers in America, and inducted into the
Trial Lawyers Hall of Fame. He’s also been investigated twice for murder and
investigated by the Florida Bar on three occasions.
Not surprisingly, the book will have an equally larger than life marketing
campaign. “The marketing and PR push behind this book is one of the biggest I have ever seen,” says Brian Feinblum, head of marketing for Media
Connect. “I have been promoting authors for 25 years and this book is lined
up for success—a fascinating subject, a five-time New York Times bestselling
author, and a $250,000 marketing and PR campaign.” Media Connect’s eightmonth campaign will include four satellite radio tours, a satellite TV tour, a
national and local TV campaign, a national print campaign, and online
media. 
—Lucinda Dyer

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

61

62

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Specializing in Security Studies
Georgetown University Press celebrates its 50th anniversary this year
by offering visitors to its booth
(1544) two books that reflect the
press’s emphasis on what it calls
security studies—books on diplomacy, spies, international affairs,
intelligence, history, and related
topics.
“We’re an academic publisher,
but we’ve done a good job bridging
the gap between the practical and
the academic,” says Jackie
Beilhart, publicist for Georgetown
University Press. “Lots of our
authors are former practitioners of
what they write about, or are currently working in the field.”
The publisher will give away copies of Story of a Secret State by Jan
Karski, a book that holds a special
place in Georgetown’s history. It
was originally published in 1944 by
Karski, a Polish Catholic underground fighter who witnessed the
Warsaw Ghetto, transit camps, and
the horrors of the Holocaust. He
toured Europe and the United
States trying to convince leaders of
what was really going on during

Featured at the Georgetown
booth; Karski and Daigler
books will be given away.

WWII. Karski eventually immigrated to the United States, where
he became a professor at
Georgetown for 40 years before his
death in 2000. Georgetown bought
U.S. rights (the book had gone out
of print) and released, first, a hardcover edition and then a paperback
edition earlier this year to mark the
100th anniversary of Karski’s birth.
BEA guests will also be able to
pick up a copy of Kenneth A.
Daigler’s May release, Spies,
Patriots, and Traitors: American

Intelligence in the
Revolutionary War.
Beilhart points to the popularity of
recent television shows such as
Sleepy Hollow and Turn, which feature Revolutionary War spies. “The
book concentrates on the spy ring
that George Washington put
together,” says Beilhart. The author
is a retired CIA intelligence officer.
One of the house’s bestsellers is
the Al-Kitaab: A Textbook for
Beginning Arabic series originally
published in 1995 and now in its
third edition. That series, notes
Beilhart, mirrors a lot of the

MEET THE AUTHOR
in booth #2939

changes in the publishing world. It started as a
traditional textbook
with exercises on
audiotape. Now the
third edition has a website, online interactive
exercises, MP3 files,
and a vocabulary flashcard app, the first app
for the press.
To commemorate its anniversary
throughout 2014, each Friday on its
Tumblr blog Georgetown
University Press features a book
that had been a bestseller during
the past 50 years. “It’s been fun to go
back to those old titles. Many were
rather esoteric, but there was also
Chow for Now, a spiral-bound book
for college undergrads with recipes
for making meals.”
The press is also give away tote
bags with the anniversary logo at its
—Ann Byle
booth. 

Meet SHARON LECHTER
at BEA Booth 1506!
Friday, 11 a.m.–12 p.m.
The co-author of the original Rich Dad, Poor Dad
will sign her new book

THINK and GROW RICH for Women
“Can you improve on a masterpiece? Yes, and this book is proof.”
—HARVEYMACKAY
“A wonderful change from the male-dominated voice in similar titles.”
—PUBLISHERSWEEKLY
“This is the book for you. I loved it.”
—ADRIANATRIGIANI

GETYOURCOPYTODAY!

OTHER PRESS

otherpress.com

© Stevenson’s Studio LLC

EDGARD TELLES RIBEIRO
Friday 11–11:30 am

SEE US AT BOOTH 1268
1970 Broad Street, East Petersburg, PA 17520
Ray Wolf, VP of Sales 717-715-8614 | Wolf@FoxChapelPublishing.com
Alan Giagnocavo, Publisher 717-560-4703 | Alan@FoxChapelPublishing.com
www.FoxChapelPublishing.com | Tel: 1-800-457-9112 | Fax: 1-888-369-2885

800,000
Copies
in Print

New Holland Publishers UK titles now sold
worldwide by Fox Chapel Publishing
• Over 1000 high-quality titles acquired from New Holland UK. Sold under the new IMM Lifestyle Books imprint.
• Best-selling cookbooks, health titles, craft, reference, sports and Cadogan travel titles from a trusted editorial source.

64

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

‘PW’ Reviewer Picks
Looking for a good book this summer? Here’s a selection
from those in the know
Roberto Bolaño’s Fiction: An Expanding Universe by
Chris Andrews (Columbia Univ., July). Few authors cause
such brain-itching mania in readers as Roberto Bolaño—
and who better to answer all the questions you’ll surely
have upon finishing 2666 (such as, what is the secret of the
universe?) than Chris Andrews, the translator of 10 of the
Chilean writer’s books. This first big book of Bolaño criticism sets a very high bar. —Gabe Habash, deputy reviews
editor

Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique
(Riverhead, July). I’ve been hearing great things about
Tiphanie Yanique’s debut novel, which is set in the
Virgin Islands and covers three generations of love, loss,
magic, and drama in the Bradshaw family. Summer
always makes me want to travel, and even if I’ll be staying close to home this year, I can still take an emotional
and mental trip via this beautiful book. —Jessamine
Chan, reviews editor

Qur’an in Conversation by Michael Birkel (Baylor Univ.,
Aug.). My Muslim friends and colleagues have been able
to explain a lot to me about Islam, but I confess to being
puzzled by the Qur’an because its literary form and references are unfamiliar. So I look forward to the friendly
guidance of Michael Birkel, who is a Friend (that is, a
member of the Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers)
and teacher of religion at Earlham College. Birkel allows
readers to overhear the conversations about Islam’s
sacred text among North American religion scholars and other influential
Muslims. Many of the contributors are young and come from a variety of disciplines and cultural backgrounds. Sacred texts fascinate me in the way
they compel attention and shape cultures. Nope, it’s not a beach read, but
fiction will have to take a back seat to this one on my summer reading list. —
Marcia Z. Nelson, religion reviews editor

Angelica’s Smile by Andrea Camilleri, trans. from the
Italian by Stephen Sartarelli (Penguin, June). Each
Montalbano mystery from Camilleri signals summer’s
arrival for me, as it’s my ideal vacation read. Whether the
aging, hard-edged inspector is on the case solving murders in remote mountain caves or along the Mafiacontrolled ports, he always has time in his seaside town
of Vigàta to duck into a restaurant for a meal of squid ink
pasta or caponata di melanzane. He’s dedicated to his
girlfriend in Rome, but finds temptation close by—and in this 17th installment, it’s the charming smile of an angelic woman, the victim of a burglary.
—Mark Rotella, senior reviews editor

Half a King by Joe Abercrombie (Del Ray, July). I’d been
saving up this morsel until I had time to properly savor it,
and then I opened it just to take a taste and couldn’t stop
reading. Abercrombie’s greatest gift is for description
that brings you fully into his gritty, bloody fantasy world of
battle and intrigue. A ship captain’s cabin is “cramped
and garish, gloomy.... The place smelled of tar, salt and
incense, stale sweat and stale wine.” Abercrombie takes
the time to immerse the reader, making everything—
including the action, which is fast-paced and violent—feel more real. Even
with all the description, Half a King has about half the page count of
Abercrombie’s previous fantasy novels, but it still contains plenty of his
trademark wry wit and appealing characters, so it’s a terrific introduction
to his work. —Rose Fox, reviews editor
Agostino by Alberto Moravia, trans. from the Italian by
Michael F. Moore (NYRB Classic, (July). Moravia is one of
the great post-WWII Italian writers, and this is one of his
masterpieces; censored by the Fascists in 1941 and not
published until 1944, it made Moravia’s reputation. A
young boy on the edge of adolescence is spending the
summer at the beach with his young, beautiful, widowed
mother. Agostino adores his mother until the intrusion of
a young suitor sends him reeling and into a love-hate
relationship with a crude gang of boys who humiliate him and initiate him
into the ugliness of poverty and adulthood. This new translation is brilliant,
as is the story, told in only 100 perfect pages. You’ll wish you were on that
Mediterranean beach, and then again, maybe not, but you will never forget
Agostino’s summer. 
—Louisa Ermelino, reviews director

66

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Sharing Family Secrets
have an intact specimen of the disappearing American bison. He
organized a hunt in Montana, killing 25 of them so that the nearly
extinct animal could be preserved
in a panorama he created for the
museum.
Enger tells Show Daily: “I wanted Lin Enger
to write a book about a man who
buffalo.”
leaves his family, the family is left
The High Divide (Algonquin Books,
wondering what happened to him,
Sept.) opens in 1886, in western
and they’re in a situation where
Minnesota, not far from where
they have to go off and find him. One
Enger, an English professor, lives
day it occurred to me that I could
with his family. The author took
use that with my knowledge about
great pleasure in writing about the
the near extinction of the American
19th century. “That time is very real
© hope larson

Part of family legend for Lin Enger
was how his paternal great-grandfather, a Norwegian immigrant who
homesteaded 160 acres in the
Dakota Territory, shot one of the last
wild buffalo east of the James River
when the animal drank from the
precious stock tank behind his sod
barn. That story haunted Enger, who
became obsessed with the history
of the American bison. He learned
about William Temple Hornaday,
curator for what is now the
Smithsonian, who, back in the late
1880s, realized that the National
Museum, as it was then called, didn’t

®

to me. My grandparents, who I
felt very close to, were 19thcentury people, so I didn’t feel
like I was making it up as far as
the characters were concerned. I felt like I knew them,
how they talked and how they
thought.”
His book also focuses on the
horrors committed against
Native Americans in the West.
Enger says, “I realized that the
destruction of the bison went handin-hand with the decimation of the
Plains Indian tribes. Their culture
was completely undermined by the
loss of the bison, and then they had
no food source. I hope that readers
will understand the degree to which
the bison is both a factor and symbol of what happened in the West.”
Algonquin senior editor Kathy
Pories adds, “What I really love
about this book is that I don’t think
of myself as a reader of historical
fiction, but this book felt emotionally immediate and very accessible.
You connect with these characters.
I think many people know what it’s
like to carry a secret, something
about which you feel guilty. Also
compelling is to be a woman and
realize that you don’t really know
your husband.”
Enger signs galleys at the
Algonquin booth (839) today, 11
a.m.–noon, and he will participate
in ALA’s United for Libraries panel,
“From Writer to Reader,” in Room
1E16, 1–1:50 p.m.  —Hilary S. Kayle

New Beginnings fo

© kelly geddes

Anne Geddes is used to breathing new life
into her work. After all, the Australian
author, photographer, and designer is best
known for her stylized depictions of babies
dressed as flowers, fairies, and small animals. But these past weeks, the notion of
breathing new life into what she does has
taken on a whole new meaning for Geddes.
Not only has
she just
moved from
Down Under
to the Big
Apple with
her husband
and manager,
Kel, but she is
also launching a new
series of gift books published by
Sourcebooks. The first book in the series,
Little Blessings, is a compilation of her classic photographs, plus never-before-published images complemented by quotations
and blessings celebrating the joys of becoming a mother. Little Blessings was released
on May 6, in time, appropriately enough, for
Mother’s Day. And for the first time,
Geddes’s images are being made available
in an e-book format, as well as print.
“It’s the content that is the most precious
thing,” explains Geddes, who will sign 150
finished copies of Little Blessings at

www.bookexpoamerica.com

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

At Qbend: E-tailing, Enterprise, and E-book
Selling direct continues to be
Qbend’s focus at BEA 2014. “The
publishing industry is now realizing
the importance of selling direct, or
D2C [direct-to-consumer]—something that we have been emphasizing since 2008. Our goal is to give
publishers control of their e-book
strategy and let them connect with
their end consumers while we work
on providing them with the best
infrastructure and tools to achieve
that,” says CEO Kris Srinaath, adding that, through Qbend, publishers
can have their own e-stores with
features such as chapter-selling,
rentals, custom publishing, and
subscription. “These features are
offered to clients without upfront
cost, thus eliminating any D2C
entry barrier.”
Currently, publishers from more
than 15 countries use Qbend’s
e-store platform, with most localizing the language, currency, and
payment methods. “Publishers can
have multiple e-stores—at no extra
cost—that offer different prices
based on geographical zones, thus
expanding their reach across the
globe. In fact, over the past 12 months,
consumers from over 50 countries
have visited Qbend-powered
e-stores,” adds Srinaath.
The strengths of Qbend platform,
explains COO Kaushik Sampath,
are its ability to unbundle, custom-

gs for Geddes
Sourcebooks’ booth (921), today, at 10 a.m.
“You can’t change creativity, but you can
make it as convenient as you can.”
Geddes says she has attended about half
a dozen BEAs, but the first one she went to,
in Chicago in 1996, changed her life. She
recalls signing posters promoting her first
book of photographs, Down in the Garden,
and being discovered there
by Oprah.
Oprah invited
Geddes onto
her television
talk show, held
up Down in the
Garden, and
proclaimed
that it was the
“best coffeetable book” that
she had ever seen. “It got me launched into
a world in which I had confidence to continue with my work and to create new
work,” Geddes recalls.
This year’s BEA promises to be just as
memorable. “BEA has always involved getting on planes,” she says, describing a twoday journey from her former home in Oz to
the U.S. “It’s going to be great to just jump
into a cab this time to get to BEA. I got so
tired of all those long-haul flights.”  

—Claire Kirch

ize, and deliver content to suit different needs. “We fortify this with
real-time consumer analytics
directly available to publishers or
content owners. Additionally, our
patent-pending S.N.A.P. [Search,
Navigate, Assemble, and Publish]
engine enables creation of customized and multiformatted content in
a highly efficient manner.”
Recent months have also seen the
team venturing into the enterprise
space. “By using advanced integration options, Qbend Enterprise ties
into various applications such as

the content management system
and learning management system
within an organization. It leverages
the power of Qbend platform and
its various features such as e-tailing
and analytics, and is a great solution
for medium to large organizations,”
adds Sampath.
Meanwhile, its upgraded S.N.A.P.
engine now ties up with Dazzle, a
new product from Qbend’s parent
company, S4Carlisle Publishing
Services. “Dazzle, a content authoring system, allows writers to use the
familiar Word interface to author

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

67

their content while a powerful content processing engine in the background structures the content to
make it XML-ready. So the S.N.A.P.Dazzle workflow combination provides end-to-end content processing
right from authoring to publishing,”
adds Srinaath, who will be at booth
DZ1961 with his team to provide
demos of the company’s products.
A Qbend-organized panel discussion, “Aligning Content Strategy with
Customer Needs,” will be held today
at the Midtown stage, at 11:30 a.m.,
to discuss how customer needs and
use of content define unbundling,
customization, and distribution. 

—Teri Tan

Congratulations to the Winner of the

2014 Read Russia Prize

Autobiography of a Corpse
By Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky
Translated by Joanne Turnbull
Published by New York Review Books
and the 2014 shortlisted nominees

The Death of Ivan Ilyich & A Confession
By Leo Tolstoy
Translated by Peter Carson
Published by W. W. Norton

An Armenian Sketchbook
By Vassily Grossman
Translated by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler
Published by New York Review Books
Read deep • Read SmaRt • Read RuSSia

68

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Changing the Dialogue
As the author of Think
and Grow Rich for Women
(Penguin/Tarcher, June),
Sharon Lechter is
uniquely qualified not
only to advise women on
their financial lives but to
impart the message that
wealth, once achieved,
must be used to generate a positive impact in
the world.
“I want to replace the ‘work-life
balance’ guilt trip that so many
women struggle over with the desire
to live one big life filled with love,
family, success, and significance,”
says Lechter, who is coauthor, with
Robert Kiyosaki, of the Nook e-book
summaries of the bestselling Rich
Dad, Poor Dad series. “I want to
change the dialogue, from women
complaining about the glass ceiling
and gender-age gap to that of women
celebrating the accomplishments
they have, and still are, making in
education, business, and as economic leaders.”
Officially authorized by the
Napoleon Hill Foundation, Think
BEA_quarterpagead copy.pdf

1

and Grow Rich for
Women, which was
inspired by the “13 Steps
to Success” outlined in
Hill’s 1937 classic Think
and Grow Rich, provides
women with real-life
advice on how to overcome obstacles and
seize opportunities.
Lechter’s book reframes
Hill’s “13 Steps” so they speak directly
to modern women’s beliefs, attitudes, and strengths. The issues of
family, job advancement, and business ownership, based on Lechter’s
own experiences, are addressed
with the intention of inspiring
women to embrace their potential
for success without self-judgment.
Think and Grow Rich for Women
includes surprising statistics. In
education, for instance, 140 women
graduate for every 100 men. Women
today hold more than 50% of management and professional positions.
Also, not only do women start two
out of every three businesses, they
account for 46% of all U.S. companies, generate $2.7 trillion in reve-

5/12/14

10:53 AM

The Asia Foundation’s
Books for Asia program congratulates

C

M

Y

CM

MY

DR. THANT THAW KAUNG

K

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

nues, and employ nearly 16 million
people. Lechter began her professional life as a CPA after graduating
from Florida State University in the
mid-1970s. “There were few women
in my field when I started my career
in accounting, so most of my early
mentors were men,” she says. “They
were instrumental in guiding me
through the man’s world of accounting with grace and dignity. In fact, I
found that many women in positions
of power in those days were not very
kind to other women, a fact that has
changed in the last few years.”

But Lechter knows there is still
much work to be done in the area of
equality for businesswomen. “We
have a harder time introducing
ourselves as experts than men do,”
she says. “While men standing up
for themselves may be labeled confident and assertive, women are
often called pushy and aggressive.”
Lechter believes women are at a
positive tipping point in the workplace today
Lechter signs at the Napoleon
Hill Foundation booth (1506) today,
11 a.m.–noon.
—Wendy Werris

Big Data at Rule14

Big Data is the backbone
behind content creation,
aggregation, and distribution systems of the future, says Shao-Shao Cheng, manager for scalable cloud systems at Rule14, sister company of Texas-based SourceHOV. “We can already see
patterns of change in content consumption in the music and movie publishing
industries, where consumers expect a level of personalization and flexibility that
can only be achieved using new thought processes—which includes Big Data mining, analytics, and execution.”
For publishers, understanding patterns in consumer data marks the first step in
Big Data. Next, they can begin to analyze and formulate how best to use their existing content in new and dynamic delivery mechanisms or highly targeted marketing
campaigns. The beauty of Big Data analytics lies in its potential for a concrete rationale behind every business decision.
Adds Cheng, “One would then be able to optimize marketing and delivery spending, to ensure that every dollar spent goes toward the goal of getting content to the
right consumer. And if each consumer has a fulfilling experience time and again,

It’s a Book!
Come help us
celebrate the healthy
birth of ForeEdge,
the University Press
of New England’s new
national trade imprint

Founder and CEO

MYANMAR BOOK CENTRE

CY

CMY

W E E K LY

on receiving the 2014 Jeri Laber
International Freedom to Publish Award

05•30•14

Friday, May 30th @ 3:00 pm in booth #2438

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PUBL I SHERS

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Coffee with Nixon & Elvis
Admit it, you’ve always wanted a
coffee mug sporting that famous
photograph of Elvis and Richard
Nixon in the Oval Office. Today’s
your lucky day, as the University of
Virginia Press (booth 1545) will be
giving out a limited number of
those coveted mugs today to celebrate the publication of Chasing
Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the
Chennault Affair, and the Origins of
Watergate by Ken Hughes (July).

While it may seem that
there’s little left to discover about the break-in
at Watergate and the subsequent coverup that
brought about the resignation of Richard Nixon,
Chasing Shadows reveals
that in all the thousands of
hours of declassified White House
tapes, Nixon ordered only a single
break-in—and it wasn’t at the

they will keep coming back.” .
Publishers should embrace Big Data in the same way that Netflix has to revolutionize video content use, according to Cheng. “For instance, there is no reason for
students to carry around multiple big textbooks. Even compiled e-books may be
unnecessary, though that is definitely a step forward. Students should be able to
access needed content on-demand, or as the instructor deems appropriate. It
comes down to just taking only what will help the student learn at that moment.”
At Rule14, the focus is on utilizing Big Data methods for business automation. “We
offer call-to-action, system-to-system, or direct communication via email or SMS
alerts modules, for instance, based on mined data. We also offer an end-to-end solution that covers configuring data to be pulled to visualization to taking actions based
on information found,” says Cheng, whose team has completely automated a legal
document-abstraction process with 80% out-of-the-box accuracy. “Each document
now takes milliseconds to process, and we were able to build on the accuracy using
machine-learning techniques.”
For more information and case studies, go to www.rule14.com, or contact
shao­shao.cheng@rule14.com for a demo during BEA.
—Teri Tan

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W E E K LY

Watergate. Hughes’s
examination of this
earlier break-in provides a new perspective on a long history of
illegal activity that prolonged the Vietnam
War and was only
partly exposed by the
Watergate scandal.
Hughes, a journalist
whose work has
appeared in the New York Times
Magazine, Washington Post, Boston
Globe Magazine, and Salon had
unparalleled access to the presidential tapes as a researcher at the
Presidential Recordings Program
of the University of Virginia’s Miller
Center of Public Affairs. The
decade Hughes spent mining the
largest extant collection of transcribed tapes from the Johnson and
Nixon White Houses allowed him to
unearth a pattern of actions by
Nixon going back to the final
months of the Johnson administration. “The seeds of Watergate,” says
director and editor-in-chief Mark
H. Saunders, “lay in his fear of
exposure of a pattern of illegal
activity that began during the 1968
election and was interwoven from

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

69

the start with the Vietnam War,
which his actions prolonged, taking
the lives of thousands of Americans
and Vietnamese.”
Timed to coincide with the 40th
anniversary of Nixon’s resignation
on August 8, Chasing Shadows will
also be available as a multimedia
e-book with audio. “Besides what
we see as a history-changing argument on the nature of his presidency and Vietnam,” says
Saunders, “the most exciting thing
about this project for us is the
opportunity to present that argument in digital form using the primary source—the secret White
House tapes.” Readers of the
e-book will be able to click through
from the conversations quoted in
Hughes’s book to Rotunda, the electronic imprint of the University of
Virginia Press, where they can
browse the transcription of the
complete conversation—with
expert editorial annotations—and
listen to the actual audio. “Reading
about Watergate is fascinating, but
listening to Nixon, Kissinger, and
Haldeman talking about the
Pentagon Papers will really make
your hair stand on end.” 
—Lucinda Dyer

70

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Bookstores in Manhattan
Publishers Weekly’s pre-BEA issue
(Apr. 28) had a roundup of bookstores that out of town and international visitors might make some
time to visit. We noted that each
store had its own style and personality, reflected in the books they
carry and the art showcased on the
walls. To choose among the dozens
of bookstores in the city, we asked
several authors and booksellers to
be our guide. Here it is again for
those who might have missed the
feature and want to check out some
of these fabulous stores.
For those coming into Grand
Central Station or staying at the
Grand Hyatt New York, this year’s

ABA bookseller hotel, the best
place to start is Posman Books. Its
Grand Central store (9 Grand
Central Terminal in Grand Central
Station) carries a selection of 30,000
titles. It has two additional stores,
one in Rockefeller Center (30
Rockefeller Plaza) and the other in
Chelsea Market (75 Ninth Ave.).
Near the Chelsea store is 11-yearold 192 Books (192 10th Ave.), a general bookstore with new, rare, and
out-of-print titles. Owned by the
Paula Cooper Gallery owners and
located near “gallery row,” 192
Books has an especially strong
selection of art books and often displays art by artists shown by the
gallery, like the
current exhibit
of photographs
by Eliot Porter.
The bookstore
is also one of
three small
New York City
favorites of
Ann Patchett,
author and
Muralist Stephen Powers (see PW Show Daily Day 1, p. 84) painted this
five-panel mural outside the Strand and is making art inside as well.
Parnassus

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Books co-owner. Her other picks
are Crawford Doyle Booksellers
(1082 Madison Ave.) on the Upper
East Side and Three Lives &
Company (154 W. 10th St.) in
Greenwich Village.
“I love [them] all for the same reason,” says Patchett (This Is the Story
of a Happy Marriage). “They show
that a great bookstore can be made
out of very few square feet if you
have a brilliant buyer who really
understands what their customers
want, a warm staff that make you
feel welcome in their home—
because going into a small store is
very much like going into someone’s small apartment—and a
deeply creative use of space so that
the books are well displayed without feeling crammed in.”
Three Lives is an Anne Rice
favorite as well. “I had some of the
most memorable signings there.
Marvelous people. The crowds
attending had a distinct personality, like no other in Manhattan.”
For children’s books, visit one or
both New York City institutions,
44-year-old Bank Street Books, part
of Bank Street College (2879
Broadway), or Books of Wonder (18
W. 18th St.), founded in 1980. Author

V.E. Schwab (The Unbound) calls
the latter “an incredible store. It
has a wonderful selection, much of
it signed, and they host spectacular
events, from debuts to blockbuster
names. Ever since I first started
writing, it’s been a dream of mine to
be shelved there, and I still get
worked up when I see my books in
their stock.”
Books of Wonder is also among
the picks for Tim Federle (Five, Six,
Seven, Nate!). “I love Books of
Wonder, because it’s like a magic
old-timey candy shop full of no-calorie stories,” he says, while adding
two other favorites: “Housing
Works in SoHo boasts amazing
events and deals, and there’s no
place like The Strand (828
Broadway) to get yourself lost, and
get a good book found.”
What distinguishes the Strand,
with its “miles of books,” from other
bookstores, according to marketing
manager Brianne Sperber, is “its
ability to maintain a smalltown,
local feel, despite the store’s size
and vast collection.”
Unlike the Strand, or any other
bookstore in the city, for that matter, Housing Works Bookstore Cafe
(126 Crosby St.) is a nonprofit with a

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FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

volunteer staff, and all its books are
donated, including some from PW.
The proceeds go to Housing Works
Inc., which provides services for
homeless New Yorkers living with
HIV/AIDS. “We’re often told,” says
Amanda Bullock, director of public
programming, “that it feels like a
hidden treasure and a sanctuary in
the craziness of SoHo.”
McNally Jackson Books in Nolita
(52 Prince St.) is another sanctuary
for visitors and locals alike, which
includes a separate upscale “office
supply” store. The Strand’s Sperber
singles it out as one of the independents that reflect the “quirks and
charms” of its neighborhood.
Chris Doeblin, owner of Book
Culture (526 W. 112th St. and 2915
Broadway), also tries to carry
inventory reflective of his community at both his stores in
Morningside Heights, next to
Columbia University. “Our neighborhood defines us to a great
extent,” he says, “and we reflect
that in our stock. I think we are a
little different from other bookshops, in our small size and in our
nonbook merchandise. We have
chosen to embrace selling merchandise that is not books and we
pay particular care to that part of
our business.”

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

71

Shifting Trends at Newgen
The equation that e = p, or that the
e-book should match the print version—which has been the corollary
of XML-first workflow and backlist
conversion programs for academic
publishing—is breaking down, says
president Maran Elancheran of
Newgen KnowledgeWorks. “We are
now seeing academic e-books
enhanced with supplementary
data or additional textual content
that does not make it into print,
and publishers are adopting more
rapid revision cycles for e-books
than physically reprinting would
allow. The adaptation of print for
e-publication is, of course,
already a core component of the
education market.”
Increased experimentation in
formats and publication models for
academic and professional books
is another noticeable trend. “In
large measure, these experiments
were enabled by the near-ubiquity
of XML-first production workflows
and multiple e-delivery formats,”
Elancheran says, adding that many
reference works, for instance, have
adopted a journal-like model in
which each chapter is published
online as soon as it is copyedited.

Many monograph publishers
have also begun to make individual
chapters available online to
researchers or as e-books. For
backlists, the metadata for each
chapter may need to be derived by
manually splitting reference lists
or indexes, or by taking the first
few sentences of each chapter to
create an abstract. For new titles,
authors are often asked to submit
abstracts, and references and
index terms are assigned to the
relevant chapters on the basis of
links in the XML.
Such experimentation with formats and publication models has
resulted in significant changes in
authoring processes at Newgen.
One particular project involves
books whose length is between that
of journal articles and monographs, ranging from 25,000 to
50,000 words. Two years ago, it
would take nine weeks to turn such
a manuscript into final files. Last
year, Newgen’s team reduced the
turnaround time to four weeks
using new ways of working with
authors and new production tools.
Earlier involvement of the team
in full-service manuscript-to-print

projects—as early as the manuscript acquisition stage—also
prompted the call for new programs. Elancheran explains: “One
client asked us how we could
jointly make life easier for authors,
and the result is the Author
Experience interface. Authors see
a simple responsive Web interface,
which is backed by a powerful project management system that
focuses their attention on what
they need to do next. It even ensures
that project managers prioritize
daily activities to coincide with
their authors’ time zones.”
Meanwhile, Newgen’s Silk
reflowable ePub tool now has a
Web-based fixed-layout counterpart, Steel, which converts PDFs
to HTML pages that are then optimized for major reading devices.
“This optimization has required
extensive research into often
undocumented device specifications, which put us in a good position last year to join the IDPF
BISG working group set up to
compile the ePub 3 Support Grid,”
Drop by booth DZ2171C for
demos and more information or
visit www.newgen.co.
—Teri Tan

Hong Kong Location

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Opening Tuesday 3rd June

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Tel: +852 2742 8988 Fax: +852 2742 8773

YEAR OF
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15/05/2014 14:32

72

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Woodland’s New Location
Woodland Media, an arm of the
U.K.-based Woodland Group,
which provides logistics and supply chain products for publishers,
announced that it will open a new
office in Hong Kong on June 3. The
new effort, which will be headed
by China logistics veteran Sabrina
Au Yeung, will, according to
Woodland, strengthen its ties with
publishers in China.
“Despite the rise of electronic
devices, the demand for Englishlanguage books, magazines, and

printed matter in China is as
strong as ever,” says Yeung, who
was managing director at
Activair Global Freight
Management and Logistics for 33
years. “Opening a dedicated
Woodland Media office in Hong
Kong is an exciting opportunity,
and I am delighted to be joining the
team.”
Under its previous name,
Brookbridge, Woodland has operated within the industry for 20
years. It now, according to

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Woodland, exports more magazines from the U.K. than any other
logistics company. On the book
side, it moves roughly 100,000 copies per week in and out of Hong
Kong and the U.K., and 20,000 copies per week in and out of the Hong
Kong and the U.S. The company
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The new operation will join

Woodland’s existing network of
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“Hong Kong remains an important hub of international business
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notes. “I have no doubt Sabrina and
her team will make a success of the
new venture, formed in the fortunate Year of the Horse.” 

—Clare Swanson

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74

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Buzz panel continued from page 10

Laird Hunt, and Kendall was singing
the praises of his fifth novel,
Neverhome, noting that his author
was “not a new guy” on the panel.
Kendall proclaimed: “I believe in
this book, and I can’t wait to talk
about it.” Set during the Civil War, it
tells the story of Ash Thompson, a
farmer’s wife, who leaves her husband to fight for the Union. Likening
the work to the novels of Ron Rash
and Winter’s Bone, Kendall said the
book is “not just a novel of love or
war” but a work about “deception.”
Presenting last, Scribner’s Colin
Harrison talked up the other nonfiction title, Jeff Hobbs’s The Short

and Tragic Life of Robert Peace. The
book is subtitled A Brilliant Young
Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy
League but Did Not Survive, and
Harrison said the book is one that
early readers say “staggered”
them. In introducing the book,
Sindelar said that “literally” and
“tragedy” are two overused words,
but that this book was “literally a
tragedy” on the level of the classic
Greek works. Hobbs, who was
Peace’s roommate for two years at
Yale, began exploring his friend’s
life after he got word of his murder
less than 10 years later. Harrison
called it “a reportorial tour-de—Rachel Deahl
force.”

Author Book Signing
Ivan Eland

Author of
Recarving Rushmore
Ranking the Presidents on
Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty

Friday, May 30
3:00 –3:30 p.m.

William J. Watkins, Jr.
Author of
Patent Trolls
Predatory Litigation and the
Smothering of Innovation

Friday, May 30
3:30–4:00 p.m.

www.independent.org

------------

SATURDAY:

would they want to give something that can’t be wrapped up to
put under the Christmas tree,
even if they know how to give
them an e-book in the first place?
Is it harder to know what people
have already read when the evidence of their reading is on a
device, not a bookshelf? This
drop in gift books is one of the
most important trends for the
industry to consider as we
monitor book purchasing in 2014.
The 2013 Books & Consumers
Annual Report will be available
shortly; for further details, contact
mo.siewcharran@nielsen.com.

overall book market has grown,
albeit slightly, on a unit basis, one
notable trend was the decline of
people buying books as gifts. The
gift percentage has been declining
fairly steadily since 2009 when
we first started tracking this
information.
As book buyers become more
engaged with new devices and
digital reading, there is less certainty about the appeal of books.
Are device hungry kids still into
books? Are consumers as confident about buying physical books
for someone who usually reads
on a device these days? And if not,

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istorical fiction for the Young Adult and Adult
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Two Worlds

Born of pioneer parents, prairie orphaned at three, he was
adopted by a Sioux warrior. Among the Sioux he was known as
Prairie Cub. The name Michael was all he had of his ancestry. He
lived the life of a Sioux warrior’s son until his twelfth summer.
When the course of history doomed the Indian’s way of life, his
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him a chance for a future, sent his son back into the white man’s
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Mom’s Choice
Awards Booth
#2767 #2768
Summer of Two Worlds is the story of that summer.

Moore

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E-book Market continued from page 12

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BEA AFTER PARTY
"BOOKS & BOOZE"

31

W E E K LY

Written by:

J. Arthur Moore

Get one.

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INDIE AUTHORS
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booklife.com

76

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

FRIDAY, MAY 30 , 2014

Wider Sales for Christian Children’s Books
At yesterday morning’s “Trends in
the Christian Children’s Market”
panel, publishers agreed that the
historic obstacles to getting their
books into ABA stores matter less
these days. Consumers “are buying
them everywhere—mass market
stores, chains,” said Laura Minchew,
publisher of Tommy Nelson, now a
part of HarperCollins Christian
Publishing. The panel, moderated
by Mary Manz-Simon, a children’s
book author and a specialist in the
market, also included Annette
Bourland, group publisher of
Zonderkidz (and part of HCCP);
Dan Lynch, publisher of B&H Kids;
and Dave Nawrocki, executive v-p
of Big Idea Studio and co-creator of
Veggie Tales.
Manz-Simon reviewed newly
released data on the children’s
market from Nielsen. Some results
were unsurprising: Bible Belt states
lead in sales of Christian books for
children and most buyers are
women (though more seem to be
grandparents than in the past). But
she also noted that price seems to
be less a factor than in the past,
even though buyers of the books
are overall less wealthy than buy-

ers of children’s books in general.
Rising developments noted by
the panelists included more middle-grade books for boys, and books
for older kids that are more graphically oriented for readers used to
the visual media and “sound bite”
content they see on their smartphone and tablet screens.
Bourland cited bookseller comments as the inspiration for Blink,
the new YA imprint from
Zondervan: “Many of them were
concerned that YA books have
become increasingly violent and
sexually graphic, and that they
were reluctant to recommend them
for their teen customers.” Blink,
she said, offers “clean reads” in the
category. Lynch said that in keeping
with B&H’s publishing program
overall, B&H Kids is focusing on
books with movie and TV tie-ins.
For Tommy Nelson, improving
biblical literacy among kids is a
major emphasis. “Christians are
concerned about that for both children and adults,” Minchew said,
citing Nelson’s Joshua Code series,
first done for adults and now in a
children’s version, Joshua Code for
Kids. She also noted success with

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brand-name authors and books,
such as Heaven Is for Real for Kids.
Along with branding, more
graphics, and lots of book and
movie tie-ins, another sign of the
times is the new deal struck by Big

Ideas to produce unique Veggie
Tales content for Netflix. Though
Nawrocki declined to provide
details, he said they were already
in production with the debut offer—Lynn Garrett
ings.

DRM continued from page 7

worked well for Tor, Doherty said, taking the
opportunity to announce a new DRM-free
imprint—Tor.com—which will be dedicated to
publishing novellas, shorter novels, and serializations. Doherty said he sees digital as a way to
“reclaim the length of the novella, a format that I
have always felt is a natural form to science fiction” and was once “very important when magazines were dominant in sci-fi readership, but
which has almost disappeared as that market declined.”
But in perhaps his most cogent observations, Doherty spoke of “the bigger
issue” with DRM: the dangerous “lock-ins” that it can impose. “Many of our
customers have seen what can happen when vendors control proprietary
DRM formats,” he said. “It hasn’t happened much in the world of books, but
it has happened in gaming, music, and video, when a business went belly up
or simply stopped supporting DRM formats, leaving customers with big
stacks of content they had paid for, but which only runs on devices now
orphaned.”
Of course, it is not just consumers who can suffer. The lock-ins can have a
powerful effect on publishers. In fact, DRM plays a part in the current
Amazon/Hachette battle. After all, Amazon is not just a retailer, it’s a DRMprotected platform. Kindle owners are, in effect, Amazon customers first—
customers who cannot walk away from Amazon and take their purchased
Kindle books with them to a competing platform.
—Andrew Albanese

78
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