S u l l i v a n ’ s I s l a n d • I s l e o f P a l m s • G o a t I s l a n d • D e w e e s I s l a n d

Since May 2005
May 23, 2014 Volume 10 Issue 2 FREE
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PROTECTING
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INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
ISLAND
HISTORY
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SALTWATER
LIFESTYLE
PG 23
Turtle continues on page 7
Trial continues on page 10
I
t seems like the perfect
outcome. Both sides in the
ongoing dispute over the
building of Sullivan’s Island
Elementary school left the
Charleston County Courthouse
Friday clutching feelings of
victory.
“We are very happy with
today's ruling,” said Sullivan's
Island resident Karen Coste, a
representative of Islanders for a
Smaller School, said. “While we
will not get the chance to vote,
at least we heard a judge tell our
elected offcials that what they
did was illegal. We hope other
towns will not try what our town
council did.”
“We welcome the court’s
decision that Sullivan’s Island
Town Council acted correctly and
lawfully in response to the Petition
for Initiative and Referendum on
the Sullivan’s Island Elementary
School,” said Mayor Pro Tem
Jerry Kaynard on behalf of the
Town of Sullivan’s Island.
“Huh?” said the rest of the
island.
It appears that both sides took
away different interpretations of
the oral rulings handed down by
Judge Dennis on Friday, May 16.
Both agree the judge ruled the
Town did not deprive the plaintiffs
of their constitutional rights to
vote, and that he declared the
petition the citizens presented the
Town Council in 2011 was legally
invalid - the two main complaints
in the lawsuit. But they disagree
on whether the judge ruled the
Town acted illegally in declaring
H
untington, a juvenile loggerhead sea turtle,
was returned to the ocean on May 5 after
an extended stay at the South Carolina
Aquarium Sea Turtle Hospital.
Last May Peter Gerace and his son Cullen were
boating in the area and saw Huntington foating
and unable to dive in the waters off Huntington
Beach State Park. Recognizing that the large
loggerhead was in trouble, they brought the turtle
aboard the boat and contacted SCDNR.
Upon admittance to the Aquarium's Sea Turtle
Hospital, it was determined that Huntington was
anemic and had abnormally low levels of protein
in the blood. Radiographs revealed an intestinal
impaction and excessive gas in the intestines
which caused the buoyancy disorder. Treatment
included vibrational therapy, enemas, fuids
and tube feeding of mineral oils to break up the
impaction, which passed approximately four
Huntington
heads home
F I R S T P U B L I C S E A T U R T L E R E L E A S E O F T H E S E A S O N
T O O K P L A C E O N I O P, MAY 5
BY KATE DITLOFF
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
'We won,' say
both sides in
SIES lawsuit
S C H O O L WI L L O P E N
A S P L A N N E D
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
PHOTO BY BARBARA BERGWERF
Cullen Gerace waves goodbye to Huntington.
2 May 23, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
CIVIC
Fire Dept. kept busy as beachgoers fock to island
1 D R O WN S , 2 R E S C U E D O N I O P B E A C H E S
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
T
he Isle of Palms fre department
kicked off the summer season
with a busy week or two rescuing
people from the water. Unfortunately,
despite an incredibly prompt response,
22-year-old Jermaine Choice from North
Charleston drowned on Wednesday, May
7 near 22nd Avenue.
Choice was pulled from the water by
bystanders who then administered CPR.
“It was a witnessed event,” Chief
Graham of the IOP fre department said
in an interview with Island Eye News.
“He was pulled out without delay, CPR
was started without delay and he was
transported without delay.”
He was later pronounced dead at the
hospital.
“Based on the info we gained on scene
we believe it may not have been a rip
current,” she said “We believe the person
may have stepped off the ledge of a sand
bar.”
The next day the department
responded to another water rescue,
this time at the pier. Two young males
were swimming close to the pier and
got caught in the current. They suffered
scrapes and cuts from hanging on to the
pilings on the pier, but were otherwise
recovered safely.
“We’ve responded to several water
rescues so far this year,” Graham
said. “A couple of weeks ago we had a
paddleboard wash up on shore which
prompted a search that cost mega
money. It turned out the guy was fne.
If he had just called someone it would
have saved a lot of resources.”
Letting someone know where you are
at all times is an important safety factor.
It is also essential people be aware of
the dangers inherent to ocean-based
activities.
Cynthia Wilson at the County Park
offce explained to the Island Eye News
that swimmers should not swim within
500 feet of the pier. Additionally, “the rip
currents we are experiencing between
14th and 22nd avenues are particularly
bad,” she said.
Rip currents are channels of water
that fow out into the ocean. They can
be very strong and move very fast—up to
8 miles an hour. Rips pull people away
from shore, but will not pull a person
under. They may be narrow, or up to
over 100 yards wide. An estimated 80
percent of all surf rescues are due to rip
currents.
Swimming near a lifeguard is highly
recommended. Currently, lifeguards
are on duty at County beach parks
(Isle of Palms, Folly Beach and Kiawah
Beachwalker) on weekends only from 9
a.m. – 7 p.m. beginning Memorial Day
the beach parks will have lifeguards on
duty every day through mid-August.
What Does a Rip Current Look Like?
• Churning, choppy water
• Different water color
• Foam or seaweed moving seaward
• Break in the wave pattern
What To Do If You Get Caught In a Rip Current:
• Don’t panic
• Do not try to swim against the current
• Swim along the shoreline to get out of the rip
• Swim back to the shore diagonally (away from
the rip)
• Wave for help if you are in trouble
The aftermath of two swimmers at IOP pier on May 8.
May 23, 2014
3
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executives
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer

Contributors:
Delores Schweitzer
Carol Antman
Kathryn Casey
Bob Hooper
Colt Harrison
Mary Alice Monroe
Vernon Smith
Sarah Diaz
Meredith Nelson
Kate Ditloff
Jason Mengal
Anne Harris
Connie Darling
Dawn Caldwell
Karen Bacot
Eric Adams

Published by:
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
Future deadline: May 14 for
our May 23 issue
LUCKY DOG PUBLI SHI NG
OF SC, LLC
Publisher of the Island Eye News
and the Island Connection
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
independent newspaper published every two
weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms,
Sullivan’s Island, Goat Island and Dewees Island.
Copies are mailed free of charge to every active
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All advertising rates are listed at:
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM under “advertising”.
Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net
Tuesday, May 27
City Council Meeting
7 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Monday, June 2
Public Safety Committee
10 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Recreation Committee
5 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, June 3
Personnel Committee
10 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Board of Zoning Appeals
5:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wedneday, June 4
Public Works Committee
5:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Thursday, June 5
Livability Court
5 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com
Wednesday, May 28
Coffee with the Chief!
Stop by for a chat about SI with
Police Chief Howard at Cafe Medley.
8:30 a.m.
2213 Middle Street.
Monday, June 2
PUBLIC HEARING:
FY15 Municipal Budget
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Council Workshop
Council workshop will begin
immediately after public hearing.
2050 Middle Street
Tuesday, June 3
Municipal Court*
5 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Wednesday, June 4
Coffee with the Chief!
See Wednesday, May 28.
CIVIC
* Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith Park
(2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments or questions.
Civic Calendar
 
Recycle - THURSDAY, MAY 29 - Recycle
T
he Isle of Palms is
considering adopting a
parking permit system next
summer to monitor the amount
of people on the beach and make
sure there is a safe amount of
people on the Island at all times.
“The primary motivation for this
work is safety,” Emily Dziuban,
assistant to the Isle of Palms city
administrator said. “Each season
the island is visited by more folks
and plans have been announced
for more development to occur in
neighboring communities. City
Council hopes to fnd a balance
between the number of visitors
on the island and the City’s
ability to keep them safe and
provide medical and emergency
assistance.”
Currently, there are one
thousand metered parking spaces
on IOP’s Front Beach. Visitors
can also park within the right
of way that boarder resident’s
properties. However, this right-
of-way parking is limited.
“This Island cannot provide
a parking space for everyone
that wants to come over here,”
said Sandy Ferencz, city council
member.
The Island ends up having
a huge population issue on
the beaches and on residents’
properties during the summer
months. The town of IOP has
hired Stantec, an engineering,
consulting, and design services
company, to work with the town
to investigate the potential for a
parking permit implementation
plan, create an on-street parking
review, and look at on-street
parking feld verifcation. Stantec
was contracted to work on these
projects on Nov. 2, 2013 and
the last of their contracts ended
on Feb. 28, 2014. Stantec has
created a comprehensive map
detailing the available shoulder
distance along all roadways on
the City of Isle of Palms from the
property lines to the edge of the
roadway pavement. According to
Stantec’s report on beachfront
parking, nearly 60 percent
is blocked by obstructions.
Obstructions can be fowerbeds,
trees, or other things that are in
the right of way area. Over 600
properties on IOP are currently
obstructed.
“What will be done about
obstructions is a diffcult if
not impossible problem,” Barb
Bergwerf, IOP council member
said. IOP homeowners cannot
put anything on their property
in the SCDOT area without frst
getting a permit. If a person has
obstructions in their property the
DOT issues a notice.
“DOT has issued a notice
to the people they are out of
compliance... and nothing else
happens it just sits there with
them out of compliance,” Linda
Tucker, city administrator, said.
“The object of all this is to
protect the quality of life of our
residents… not become the
state’s parking lot,” Bergwerf
said.
Stantec has proposed to start
the permit program next summer,
running from May 15 through
September 15. It will most likely
be paid. They have also proposed
restricting the permit to certain
hours of the day; 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.
was suggested.
“The number of permits will be
discussed after the Memorial Day
and Fourth of July weekend,”
Bergwerf said. “Stantec will be
doing intense research including
hourly fyovers to study the
density, movement, and traffc
backups. After this study they
Parking continues on page 3
IOP considering beach parking permits
P L A N B E I N G I N V E S T I G AT E D T O K E E P T H E I S L A N D
S A F E D U R I N G T H E B E A C H S E A S O N
BY KATHRYN CASEY
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Monday, May 26
Memorial Day
City administrative offces for
both islands will be closed.
4 May 23, 2014
Beaches on IOP go green
BY KATHRYN CASEY
ISLAND EYE NEWS REPORTER
T
he Isle of Palms is leading the way in
keeping our beaches clean and green.
A program to implement recycling on
the city’s beaches could go into effect as
soon as Memorial Day, according to Mayor
Dick Cronin.
“We are the frst in parade of hopefully
others to encourage visitors to recycle the
materials they take down there,” he said at
the April city council meeting.
On April 22, the Ways and Means
Committee discussed the possible beneft
of adding recycling bins to the beach
entrances. Currently, Isle of Palms has
yellow plastic trash bins; a blue bin will be
added for recycling materials.
Linda Tucker, city administrator,
expressed the excitement the committee felt
at the idea of recycling bins on the beach, and
in addition, said it was something the City
wanted to do. However, fnding the money
within
the
budget
has been
tricky.
“Where
we get
into the
diffculty
of
making
decisions
is about
how to
fund it,”
Tucker
said. “There is an expense of materials to
be picked up, the materials, and to keep the
operation gong.”
The city has decided to go ahead however,
under the assumption that Charleston
County will be able to pick up most of the
bill.
“Charleston County is looking at a
program to pay us starting FY15, but if we
want to do it sooner than July then that
would fall to us. We’ve taken decision to
proceed and take up cost of $7,200 out of
our state ATAX between now and July 1.”
If Charleston County’s budget doesn’t pass
then the Isle of Palms will be responsible for
paying for the program for the balance of the
year.
“The blue recycling barrels have been
ordered, and as soon as the City receives
them and they are appropriately marked,
they will be deployed alongside the yellow
barrels,” Tucker said.
The program could go into effect as soon
as Memorial Day, basically as soon as the
blue barrels are delivered and placed on the
beach.
Once it does, Schupp Enterprises will
service them and take the recyclables to a
central location for the county to collect and
transport to the recycling center.
“Upon departure from the beach, residents
and visitors are encouraged to deposit their
recyclables in the blue recycle container
and their trash/garbage in the yellow trash
container,” Tucker said.
Public hearing on
SI Town budget
STAFF REPORT
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
T
he Town of Sullivan's Island will hold
a public hearing on the municipal
budget for the 2014-2015 fscal year on
Monday, June 2, 2014 at 6 p.m. at Sullivan’s
Island Town Hall, 2050-B Middle Street.
Current Fiscal Year Revenues:
$4,406,660
Projected Revenues 2014/2015:
$4,273.320
Change in revenues:
3%
Current Fiscal Year Millage:
29.3 mills
Current Fiscal Year Expenditures:
$4,136,162
Projected Expenditures:
$4,418,611
Percentage Change in Expenditures:
6.8%
Estimated Millage for 2014-2015:
$1,776,000
The public is encouraged to attend and
offer public feedback to Council. For more
information on the fnancials of the town visit
http://sullivansisland-sc.com/departments/
Financial.aspx.
CIVIC
Parking continues from page 2
will report to City Council in late
July as to the numbers on the
Island and traffc impact. From
that we will decide on a number
that will be safe.”
In addition to having the
permits restricted to certain
months and hours of the day,
Stantec has also proposed
having three different permits.
One would be a day pass, for
‘day trippers,’ a second would
be a weekly pass for tourists
renting a house for the week, and
a third would be a season long
pass for frequent beach visitors.
IOP residents would be treated
the same as visitors, and if they
wanted to park in the right of
way they will be required to have
a permit.
Once the Council decides on
which method is best, they will
have “10 months to educate the
public,” Bergwerf said. These
recommendations are still
under review by the Planning
Commission and City Council
and will not be decided upon
until the end of this calendar
year.
This parking program could
be creating more issues than
the council has prepared for,
however.
“They’re creating a bigger
problem then they imagine,”
Richard Brendel, a resident of
Folly Beach said. Brendel believes
that the parking permit program
placed on IOP will drive more
traffc toward other beaches,
including Folly.
He isn’t alone in this thought,
Gina Rowe, a Sullivan’s Island
business owner, believes the
permit plan on IOP will affect
the parking situation on
Sullivan’s.
“Especially when people are
coming from Goose Creek,” she
said. “They’re not going to turn
around once they’ve loaded up
their cars and gotten their kids
ready. They’re going to look
for the next available place to
park (for free), which could be
Sullivan’s.”
“I would think Sullivan’s will
have to come to terms with
their own parking challenge,”
Bergwerf said.
The next step in the process
is for Stantec to continue to
collect data.
“Stantec will spend this
beach season gathering
information regarding the
numbers of visitors and their
patterns,” said Dziuban. “The
City is installing new traffc
counters at the intersection
of the Connector and Palm
Boulevard and at Breach Inlet.
Stantec will also be on the
island during peak visitation
weeks, such as Memorial Day
weekend, to record data.”
The next meeting between
Stantec and the Planning
Commission has been set for
August 21 at 5:30 p.m.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
weeks after admission. Additional care included antibiotics, vitamin
supplements and a healthy diet.
A little over a year later and the 150lb loggerhead had returned to
full health and was ready to go back home. He was released in front
of cheering crowds at the IOP state park with the assistance of the
father and son who had helped rescue him.
If you fnd a sick or injured sea turtle, contact the SCDNR sea
turtle hotline at 800.922.5431. You can also help care for sea turtles
in recovery in the Aquarium's Sea Turtle Rescue Program by going
to scaquarium.org and making a donation, and by visiting the South
Carolina Aquarium and booking a behind-the-scenes tour of the Sea
Turtle Hospital.
To track the progress of current patients in recovery, visit the Sea
Turtle Rescue Program blog at scaquarium.org.
Turtle continues from cover
Peter and Cullen lead Huntington back to the sea.
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
8 May 23, 2014
T
he Beach Company, of Charleston, SC, announces
that major renovations at Island Center on Isle of
Palms wrapped up as Harris Teeter opened April 30.
Owned by Pastime Amusement Company and managed by
The Beach Company, the 55-year-old property underwent
a major rehabilitation as the previous grocery building was
demolished, and a brand new one was built to suit the
specifcations of a new Harris Teeter supermarket.
Isle of Palms residents and visitors will now have on-Island
access to a full-service butcher’s market, farmers’ market
produce, full-service foral department, artisan bakery,
pharmacy and an extensive wine and beer selection.
Three new restaurants are also making their homes at
Island Center. Bushido Japanese fusion restaurant, Yobe
Yogurt, and Pizza Hut open in May.
“The Isle of Palms deserves a Class A shopping center in
their own neighborhood,” said Leonard Way, Vice President
of Asset and Property Management of The Beach Company.
“The upgrades at Island Center were planned to better serve
the Isle of Palms community.”
The Island Center renovations also included new roofs and
a new façade, the demolition of a former bank building, three
tenant relocations and an additional building rehabilitation.
One
2,000 sf outparcel remains available for lease.
Three new
restaurants join
Harris Teeter
I S L A N D C E N T E R MA K E O V E R B R I N G S
Q U A L I T Y A N D C O N V E N I E N C E T O I O P
BY KAREN BACOT
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
S
ullivan’s Island Park
Foundation is beginning the
process of landscaping Stith
Park prior to the new Town Hall
being built adjacent to the park.
“Part of the plan for the town hall
includes some park enhancements
and the public restrooms—which
we’ve been asking for twenty years,”
Mary Jane Watson, Sullivan’s Island
council member, said.
“At the Park Foundation we’re
working on our conceptual plan
for the park,” she said. “We’ve
spoken to tree experts and
landscape professionals and they’ve
determined the park on the side by
the bandstand is over populated
with oak. We want to remove six
of the oak and replace them in the
back toward the mound.”
Additionally, two Bradford
Pears that have reached their life
expectancy and are planned to be
removed as are fve river birch that
are dead. They will be replaced by
something other than river birch
Watson said.
“The Park Foundation has been
very lucky, we’ve had successful
fundraisers so we want to get
working on our master plan for the
park,” Watson said. “We want to
move forward get some sunlight and
some grass and more play area in the
park. That’s why we’ve asked council
to remove six trees and replace them
elsewhere. Everybody we’ve talked
to say it’s over populated, and that’s
why there’s no grass, so we what
we want to do is thin it out a little
bit. Everything except for the two
Bradford Pears will be replaced.”
Town Council is scheduled to
vote on the landscaping plan at
the Tuesday, May 20 meeting.
If any residents want to provide
input before the project begins
contact Mary Jane Watson at
maryjanewatson99@yahoo.com.
Any actual cutting won’t begin until
the middle to the end of June.
“The trees proposed to be cut
down are currently tagged,” she
said. “If it has a red band around it,
it is going to be cut down.”
A map of the proposed removals is
also available at the Town’s website
www.sullivansisland-sc.com.
Stith Park trees
scheduled to be cut
T R E E - R E MO VA L WI L L H E L P P R O V I D E S U N L I G H T,
G R A S S , E X PA N D E D P L AY A R E A
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
May 23, 2014 9
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
The Ben Sawyer Causeway
Multi-use Path Improvement
Project was originally set to
wrap up this month. Is that
still the case?
The offcial contract completion
date is and has always
been June 16. We were hopefully
to be fully complete by May 23,
Memorial Day weekend, but the
contractor will not meet this
goal. If work is not substantially
complete by June 16 the
contractor, L&L Contractors, will
incur penalties.

How’s it coming so far?
Overall, good. While we won’t
make our goal date of full
completion by Memorial Day weekend, the work is progressing
satisfactorily and being constructed per plans and specifcations.

What has slowed down the work, if it’s been slowed down at all?
The contractor got off to a slow start which was primarily due to
being restricted to working at night. This was a stipulation from
SCDOT, no daytime lane closures, in an effort to limit disruptions to
the public. We discussed the situation with SCDOT and they agreed
to adjust the working hours so that limited lane closures could take
place during the day time. This has signifcantly improved the pace
of construction allowing the contractor to get back on schedule. So,
County staff along with SCDOT
are doing all that we can to assist
the contractor in improving
production.

As people head to the beach on
Sullivan’s Island this weekend
and in the coming weeks, what
should they look out for in the
construction process?
While no work will be going on
during the weekend, motorist
should still be aware that this
is a work zone and travel with
caution adhering to all signage.
Paving of the new asphalt path is
complete on the Mount Pleasant
side of the bridge. Grading and
base installation is underway on
the Sullivan’s Island side of the bridge. We are hopeful that the path
on the Sullivan’s Island side will be paved the week of May 19.

What’s left to do with the project?
Paving of the new path on the Sullivan’s Island side, installation
of sweetgrass plants between the path and roadway, vegetative
stabilization (grassing) of the site including the slope between the
path and marsh, and general site cleanup remain.
Update on Ben Sawyer Causeway
improvement project
BY ERIC ADAMS
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
10 May 23, 2014
the petition invalid.
Before we descend too far
into legal jargon, the crux of the
matter is this. Islanders for a
Smaller School presented Town
Council with a petition in 2011
seeking a referendum to require
the new school be no larger than
the existing one and that the new
school be submitted for review by
the Town’s Design Review Board.
The Town Council, after seeking
legal advice, declared that such
an ordinance was outside their
powers and proceeded to seek a
declaratory judgment in support
of its decision from the courts.
That lawsuit was never fled
however, due to the city’s inability
to identify a defendant.
Under South Carolina State
Law, when citizens present their
government with a petition it
must do one of the following: 1.
Work with the petitioners to craft
a mutually-agreed petition 2.
Hold a referendum 3. Take the
issue before a judge.
Islanders for a Smaller School
say Judge Dennis ruled in their
favor on this point and that the
Town acted illegally by violating
the plaintiffs’ right by neither
adopting their ordinance or
conducting a referendum on it.
“We are awaiting a detailed
written order from the judge
with the basis for his ruling,”
Rutledge Young III, attorney for
the plaintiffs, said in an interview
with Island Eye News. “But the
voters prevailed on their request
to have the judge state whether
the Town Council lacked the
authority to do what they did.”
Trenholm Walker, the lawyer
representing the town, said in
an email to Island Eye News:
“The judge said that the ultimate
question of legal validity is for the
courts, not council. The Town
never disputed the court has the
fnal say. The judge found nothing
wrong with the way the town
approached things. It brought
a lawsuit to determine the
validity of the initiated ordinance
and dismissed it months after
plaintiffs brought this case. The
judge said there was no reason for
the town to serve and prosecute
the earlier case. The plaintiffs'
lawsuit did basically the same
thing—test the legal validity of
the initiated ordinance.”
The Judge’s written ruling,
which will clarify matters, has not
been published yet. Traditionally,
a draft of the order is prepared by
the side that won the case. Walker
said Judge Dennis has directed
him to prepare an order entering
judgment in favor of the Town.
No matter what the fnal
written order says, or how it is
phrased, what will not change are
the results of the Judge’s rulings.
There will not be a referendum on
the size and design of the school, as
the petition originally requested,
because the Judge ruled that the
petition was defective. In August,
as scheduled, the children of
Sullivan’s Island will enter their
brand new 72,000 square foot
school on the beachfront.
“No one ‘won,’” Mayor Mike
Perkis, who was unable to attend
teh trial, said “It’s black and white.
It’s the facts. We believe we got out
of it what we wanted. Now, how do
we move forward.”
“Town Council welcomes the
input and suggestions of all of its
residents, including all residents
who signed the Petition," Kaynard
said. “We are a small community
and we are all neighbors. Our
government works better when
all residents participate. Town
Council wants to encourage the
continuing involvement by all
our residents, especially those
who signed the Petition for a
Referendum. Hopefully, that
will make Town Council a more
effective government. Residents’
suggestions are important and
essential in preserving and
improving our quality of life on
this special island.”
Trial continues from cover
S
ophia and Michael McCoy share their love of reading with
Red Dog and handler, Sis Nunnally. Star Therapy Dogs enjoy
stories and welcome booklovers of all ages at the Edgar Allan
Poe Library on the second Saturday of every month from 10:30 to
11:30 a.m.
Poe's goes
to the dogs
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
"NO ONE ‘WON.’ IT’S BLACK AND WHITE. IT’S THE FACTS. WE
BELIEVE WE GOT OUT OF IT WHAT WE WANTED. NOW, HOW DO
WE MOVE FORWARD." ~Mayor Perkis
May 23, 2014 11
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
F
riends of Sullivan’s Island Elementary School
are offering people the opportunity to show their
support for the new school and its mission by
purchasing an individualized brick to be placed at
the front entrance.
There are two options:
• 4x8” brick with three lines of text, 18 characters
per line – $150
• 8x8” brick with six lines of text, 18 characters
per line - $300
A 1.5x3” commemorative brick with the
inscription on it comes with each brick.
Visit www.friendsofsies.org or
www.bricksrus.com/order/sies.
H
ome Team BBQ’s Sullivan’s Island location
celebrated 5 years with a special weekend of fun and
food May 15 through 17. Events included specials
on Gamechanger Pints and live music from Microwave
Dave & The Nukes, Stewart & Winfeld and Gracie Curran
& High Falutin'. “It is hard to believe it has been fve years
since we opened our Sullivan’s Island location but we are
excited to celebrate,” stated Sean Daniher, manager of
the location, pictured here on opening day 2008.
Happy birthday
Home Team!
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
12 May 23, 2014
L
ocal historian Suzannah Smith Miles came by her love of the
Lowcountry honestly. Raised on Charleston’s peninsula, Miles
moved with her family to Sullivan’s Island at the age of ten.
In her new book, “The Islands: Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms,
An Illustrated History,” Miles goes into detail about the history of the
two islands. She also describes an idyllic childhood growing up on the
islands.
“We island kids on Sullivan’s
Island and Isle of Palms had
a truly enviable childhood.
The abandoned forts were our
playgrounds, places for exploration
and thrilling games of hide-and-
seek. We had the beach—oh, did
we have the beach.”
Miles’s passion for history
started even before she arrived
on Sullivan’s Island. At the age
of fve, Miles dug up a canon ball
right near her historic downtown
home.
“Right then I was bitten by the history bug,” Miles said with a laugh.
She carried that love of the past with her to the islands.
“Yes, we wild island children had fun but even then we were cognizant
of the history around us. We knew the islands were different, that we
lived in a place famous for its past,” Miles writes. “We didn’t simply
learn history. We lived it.”
Miles has written several books about the coastal areas of South
Carolina, but says The Islands was a true labor of love. The book
takes a closer look at life on the islands from the early 1700’s until
the beginning of the 20th century, something Miles says few have
done before. In fact, according to Miles, over half of the book is new
information that has never been published.
Miles’s work on “The Islands” began ten years ago, and researching
the book soon became her life. Spending countless hours going through
old newspapers, photographs and maps allowed Miles to stumble on
some truly interesting stories about the beginnings of what we now
know as Sullivan’s Island and the Isle of Palms.
One of her main goals was to make the book as visually appealing
as possible, and Miles credits the Library of Congress, US Navy, US
Army and US Coast Guard for supplying her with some amazing
photographs. Local photographer Marnie Hughes provided pictures of
the islands as they are today, and many others contributed pictures
from their personal collections.
Despite her years documenting the history of the area, Miles found
herself surprised by some of the facts that she uncovered for this book.
Some of her particular favorites included the diary of Dr. Thompson
Foster, a surgeon who arrived on “Long Island” (now known as the
Isle of Palms) during the June 1776 Battle of Fort Sullivan, and the
history of African Americans on the islands. Overall, Miles says that
is was a pleasure learning about some of the famous and infamous
personalities who made up early coastal South Carolina.
Miles relied on her own background in publishing to get her book
into the hands of the public. Now in its second printing, Miles says
that the response has been overwhelmingly positive.
Revealing a place famous for its past
H I S T O R I A N A N D A U T H O R S U Z A N N A H S MI T H MI L E S C E L E B R AT E S H E R H O ME I N N E W B O O K
BY ANNE HARRIS
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
Sullivan’s Island native and local historian Suzannah Miles Smith at her
home in Mount Pleasant.
“WE ISLAND KIDS ON SULLIVAN’S ISLAND AND ISLE OF
PALMS HAD A TRULY ENVIABLE CHILDHOOD.”
T
he Edgar Allan Poe May
book club will discussion
"A Hundred Flowers" on
Saturday, May 17, 10:30 a.m.
at the Edgar Allan Poe Branch
Library. Refreshments
will be served. Questions?
Contact Darlingc@ccpl.org or
843.883.3914.
A powerful new novel about
an ordinary family facing
extraordinary times at the
start of the Chinese Cultural
Revolution.
China, 1957. Chairman
Mao has declared a new
openness in society: “Let
a hundred fowers bloom;
let a hundred schools
of thought contend.”
Many intellectuals fear
it is only a trick, and Kai
Ying’s husband, Sheng, a
teacher, has promised not
to jeopardize their safety
or that of their young son,
Tao.
A Hundred Flowers by Gail Tsukiyama
BY CONNIE DARLING
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
May 23, 2014 13
February 4: Tuesday
Suspicious Circumstances/
Trespassing: Hartnett Boulevard.
The victim reported that a
subject living on 29th Avenue
has been trespassing on their
property. The subject allegedly
entered onto the property and
plugged an extension cord into
an exterior, rear outlet and
thereafter ran the extension cord
to his residence on 29th Avenue.
An Offcer responded to the
suspect residence and observed
the extension cord being used to
provide electricity to a number of
appliances.
February 11: Tuesday
Burglary: Grand Pavilion
Boulevard. The complainant
reported that unknown person(s)
entered into the rental property
and stole a fat screen television.
The residence has not been
occupied since last Thanksgiving.
Fraud: Carolina Boulevard.
The victim reported that
sometime between 01/27/2014
and 01/28/2014 unknown
person(s) cloned her cellular
account information, resulting
in $4330.70 in usage charges.
Almost all charges originated
from Cuba.
February 20: Thursday
Petit Larceny: Palm Boulevard.
The victim reported that
unknown person(s) stole six blue,
marker-type refectors from the
front of his residence.
February 21: Friday
Petit Larceny: Palm Boulevard.
The victim reported that
unknown person(s) stole an
AV Receiver from within his
rental residence. There were no
indications of forced entry.
February 24: Monday
Petit Larceny: 41st Avenue. The
complainant reported that a boat
left the fuel dock without paying
for fuel. Contact was made with
the boat owner who advised he
thought his girlfriend had paid
for the fuel. After the bill was
paid, the complainant did not
wish to pursue charge.
March 1: Saturday
Simple Assault/Assault on a
Police Offcer: Conch Court.
Offcers were dispatched to
an assault in progress. Upon
arrival, the suspect had fed the
scene. The subject was quickly
located hiding in landscaping
bushes surrounding the
victim’s residence. The subject
was placed under arrest. A
search of his person, incident
to arrest produced a quantity
of marijuana, of which he was
also charged. The subject was
transported to a local medical
facility for treatment of the
injuries he sustained during
the physical altercation. Upon
arrival at the hospital, the subject
became hostile and physically
assaulted an Offcer.
March 7: Friday
Theft From Motor Vehicle:
Grand Pavilion Boulevard.
The complainant reported that
unknown person(s) removed a
ring from the inside of her vehicle
while she was staying in Wild
Dunes for the weekend. No forced
entry.
March 8: Saturday
Simple Assault: Grand Pavilion
Boulevard. The victim reported
that he and a cab driver argued
over the amount of a fare when
the cab driver pulled out a gun
and pointed it at him, threatening
his life. The gun was recovered
by responding offcers and
determined to be a BB gun. The
cab driver was arrested at the
scene.
March 9: Sunday
Theft From Motor Vehicle: Ocean
Blvd. Victim stated unknown
person(s) removed her purse
from inside her parked vehicle.
The victim’s purse contained
$104.00 in cash, ID, passport,
and a credit card. The victim’s
vehicle was secured except for
the sunroof. No forced entry.
March 10: Monday
Grand Larceny: Palm Boulevard.
The complainant reported that
a black male with dreadlocks
removed $10,000 worth of scrap
copper wiring from a construction
site. The male suspect left in
a burgundy Ford F150 pickup
truck.
March 12: Wednesday
Identity Theft: Morgan Place
Drive. The victim reported that
he discovered a discrepancy on
his credit report after receiving
a letter from a collection agency
for a debt that was not his.
Furthermore, the victim stated
he received an income tax refund
check for this tax year despite the
fact he had not yet fled. There
was an additional name written
on the check.
March 14: Friday
Breach of Trust: Palm Boulevard.
Victim stated that the delivery
driver for their company sold
excess product off his delivery
truck for cash and then kept the
proceeds.
March 18: Tuesday
Theft From Motor Vehicle:
Waterway Boulevard. The
victim reported that while she
was watching television, she
heard a disturbance outside her
residence. Upon investigating,
she discovered that unknown
person(s) had entered into her
vehicle and stole a quantity of
cash from her wallet, which
she had left lying on the center
console. The victim also stated
that shortly after she exited
her residence to investigate the
disturbance, she observed a
golf cart, occupied by two (2)
white male subjects in the area.
Offcers patrolled the area for the
subjects, with negative fndings.
March 21: Friday
Trespassing: Ensign Court.
Offcers responded to the area
in reference to a burglary that
had just occurred, where a white
male subject was seen exiting
the vacant residence and feeing
the area on foot. A description
of the subject was provided to
all responding offcers who were
able to locate the subject in the
area of Waterway Boulevard
and Timber Lane. The victim
positively identifed the subject,
who was subsequently placed
under arrest. The same subject
was the primary suspect in
several thefts that occurred in
January, 2014. During interview
with Investigators, the subject
confessed to being on the
property without permission, as
well as two (2) previously reported
thefts.
March 24: Monday
Burglary: Cameron Boulevard.
The victim reported that he heard
a noise in his kitchen and went
to investigate. He then discovered
that unknown subject(s) had
removed two bottles of wine
from the kitchen. Victim further
reported seeing an unknown
white male subject looking in his
window two days prior during
early morning hours, after which
the victim stated he was missing
a bottle of rum.
March 29: Saturday
Simple Assault: Front Beach.
Offcers responded to the area
in reference to an assault that
had just occurred. The victim
stated he had been pushed by
another patron of the business
after a brief argument. The victim
wished to pursue charges but
was unable to locate or pick out
the subject who pushed him.
The victim neither reported any
injuries nor showed any signs of
injury.
Petit Larceny: Palm Boulevard.
The victim reported that
unknown subject(s) removed
a glass table top from a table
located on her front porch. This
incident is likely related to a
previous incident, where another
glass table top was removed from
the same front porch and found
by the victim shattered in the
street on 03/22/14.
Simple Assault: Front Beach. The
victim reported he was struck in
his head by another male subject
while in an argument over a taxi.
The victim showed no signs of
injury and did not wish to pursue
any charges.
IOP Police Report February/March
July 19 Is l and Eye Cal endar
May 9
ONGOING EVENTS
Mondays
Core and More
10:30-11:30 a.m. Isle of Palms
Recreation Center. Build core
muscles and a sculpted body with
this $10 class every Monday. For
more information visit www.iop.net
or call 843.886.8294.
Ballet (2-5 yrs)
Mondays 4/21-5/12, 12:30 p.m.-
1 p.m., Isle of Palms Recreation
Center. $50 residents fee and
$55 non-residential fee. For more
information call 843.886.8294 or
visit www.iop.net.
Tuesdays
Storytime
10:30 a.m. Time for Twos at
Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Branch. Starting June 3.
Mount Pleasant Farmers Market
3:30-7 p.m. Corner of Coleman
and Simmons Street
Tai Chi/Qigong
11 a.m.-12 p.m. at the Isle of
Palms Recreation Center. $10 per
class. For more information call
843.886.8294.
Wednesdays
Nickelodeon Character
Wednesdays
Starting June 4 your favorite
Nickelodeon characters will be
making special appearances at the
waterparks on Wednesdays this
summer. Catch them during your
visit to Splash Zone, Splash Island,
and Whirlin’ Waters Adventure
Waterpark. Characters will make
appearances during regular park
hours (10 a.m. – 6 p.m.); exact
times will be available on site.
Barn Jam
The Awendaw Green Barn every
Wednesday, 6-10 p.m. $5 at the
door, all ages welcome. Enjoy
a night of diverse music from
around the globe on the uniquely
bohemian ground of the Sewee
Outpost. Wood fred pizza and
fresh grilled oysters (while in
season) will be available as well
as libations. www.facebook.com/
awendawgreen.
Thursdays
Mah Jongg Nights (adults)
Poe’s Library hosts Mah Jongg
Thursdays at 6 p.m. Learn to
play American Mah Jongg. No
experience necessary. 1921 I’on
Avenue, 883.3914.
Fridays
Acoustic Sunset Oyster Roast
The Wreckfsh, 7690 Northwoods
Blvd. Every Friday 5-8 p.m. on
the outdoor patio. There is $12
all you can eat oysters as well as
live music and drink specials. Call
843.580.4040 for more info.
Saturdays
Tae Kwon Do for Seniors
Must be 50 or older. 9-10 a.m.
at the Isle of Palms Recreational
Center. $35 resident fee and $40
non-resident fee. There is a drop
in fee of $10 per class. For more
information call 843.886.8294
Charleston Farmers Market
8 a.m.-2 p.m. rain or shine in
Marion Square, 329 Meeting
Street. A variety of local produce,
plants, herbs and cut fowers
as well as breakfast and lunch
vendors, live entertainment and
an assortment of juried arts and
crafts from local artisans for
visitors to experience.
Ongoing
Unfurled: Flags from the Collections
of the Charleston Museum
The Charleston Museum presents
an original exhibition, Unfurled:
Flags from the Collections of the
Charleston Museum, from May
5, 2014 to January 4, 2015. On
display in its Historic Textiles
Gallery, the Museum's fag
collection spans from the early
19th century to the late 20th
century, with examples covering
a range of functions and styles.
Many fags are exhibited for the
frst time.
FRIDAY, MAY 23
Spoleto & Piccolo Spoleto
Festivals Kick Off
Visit spoletousa.org and www.
piccolospoleto.com for details. See
story on page 19.
Crafternoon: Turtle Crafts
4 p.m. Celebrate International
World Turtle Day by making a
turtle puppets, at Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch.
SATURDAY, MAY 24
SOS “fun-raiser”
Mount Pleasant Memorial
Waterfront Park (at the foot of the
Ravenel Bridge) 6 p.m. This marks
the event’s 10th anniversary, and
it will feature two bands, food,
friends and a healthy dose of
hope for breast cancer survivors
and patients. All proceeds raised
stay in South Carolina – helping
individuals managing the
crushing expenses associated
with breast cancer diagnosis and
treatment. Tickets are $35 in
advance and $50 the day of, and
can be purchased onlineat etix.
com or by calling 800.514.ETIX
(3849). One hundred percent of
the net proceeds from the event
will directly beneft breast cancer
patients in South Carolina.
Play: Fabric Finger Painting
10:30 a.m. We’ll bring the fabric
and paint, and you bring the
fngers at the Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch.
MONDAY, MAY 26
MEMORIAL DAY
Charleston County Waterparks
Open Daily
Starting May 26 Splash Zone
Waterpark at James Island County
Park, Splash Island at Mount
Pleasant Palmetto Islands County
Park, and Whirlin’ Waters at
Wannamaker County Park are now
open every day through August
15. Visit www.splashparks.com for
hours, fees and other details.
THURSDAY, MAY 29
East Cooper Medical Center Hosts
5th Annual We Know Women. The
event will take place from 5:30pm
– 7:30pm at the hospital. The event
will offer free health screenings
that include foot, skin cancer,
varicose vein, and osteoporosis.
Physician consultations will also
be available in several specialties.
There’s no cost to attend, but
please call or go online to reserve
your space. Call 843.884.7031or
visit www.eastcoopermedctr.
com and click “Find an Event.”
This event will take place in the
main lobby of East Cooper Medical
Center located at 2000 Hospital
Drive, Mt. Pleasant. Refreshments
will be served.
FRIDAY, MAY 30
Jewelry Sale
The Volunteers at East Cooper
Medical Center are sponsoring
a Masquerade $5 Jewelry Sale.
7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the lobby of
East Cooper Medical Center, 2000
Hospital Drive, Mt. Pleasant. Items
include necklaces, bracelets,
earrings and more. Everyone is
Welcome! Everything is $5. All
proceeds beneft the Volunteer
Services Organization Scholarship
Fund to help individuals pursuing
a career in the medical felds.
SATURDAY, MAY 31
Play: “Donald In Mathmagic
Land” And More
10:30 a.m. Enjoy this short Disney
classic and join us for mathmagic
crafts and games, at Edgar Allan
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch.
MONDAY, JUNE 2
The Art of Healing with John
Westmark
1 a.m. A conversation and
reception with artist John
Westmark and Gibbes curator Pam
Wall, moderated by Dr. Jeb Hallett,
Roper St. Francis surgeon, around
the exhibition John Westmark:
Narratives. Sponsored by Roper
St. Francis Healthcare and Whole
Foods in partnership with the
Piccolo Spoleto Festival, $15 in
advance, $18 at the door.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4
Nickelodeon’s SpongeBob
SquarePants at Splash Island
Located within Mount Pleasant
Palmetto Islands County Park. For
further details on the waterparks,
or a full summertime character
schedule, visit splashparks.com or
call 843.795.4386.
FRIDAY, JUNE 6
Summer Reading Kick-Off at
Edgar Allan Poe Library
Enjoy ice cream with toppings and
check out your frst book of the
summer.
SATURDAY, JUNE 7
Piccolo Spoleto Sand Sculpting
9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Front Beach Isle
Of Palms, free event. Individual
and team entries are permit
(Maximum 4 people on a team).
Registration will be offered at 8:30
a.m. day of event. Free T-shirts
to the frst 200 pre-register
participants. To register call
843.886.8294 or visit www. iop.
net.
23rd Annual Floppin’ Flounder
5K Run and Walk
Race starts at 8 a.m. at the
Fish Fry Shack, Middle Street
and Station 15. Presented by
Charleston Running Club.
Entry Fees until June 6 are $25
for CRC members and $30 for
non-members. Entry fees for
day-of-race signup are $35 for
members and non-members.
Early packet pickup is Friday,
June 6 from 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
You can register online at www.
charlestonrunningclub.com.
Men’s Club BBQ
4:30 – 7 p.m., The First United
Methodist Church – Isle of Palms,
21st Blvd, is holding its annual
barbecue. Come join us for great
food – BBQ w/sauces, baked
beans, slaw, pickles. Tickets $10.
Homemade desserts prepared
by the Ladies of the church, will
also be available. We offer several
dining options – Dine-in, Carry
out or Drive-thru. All proceeds
beneft local charities. For more
information call 843.886.6610.

Play: DIY Arts and Crafts
10 a.m. at the Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch. Being
crafty and creative is easier than
you think.
TUESDAY, JUNE 10
Tech Tuesdays:
Do you speak antique?
At Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s
Island Branch. Join special guest
Linda Page for the CCPL Antiques
Research Roadshow at 12 p.m.
Discover the value of your own
treasures by using CCPL’s great
resources.
MONDAY, JUNE 23
Learn Valuable Lessons In
Leadership with Summer
Etiquette Camp
June 23-27, The Wild Dunes
Resort, ages 11-15. The Charleston
School of Protocol and Etiquette,
Inc. will offer its Annual Summer
Etiquette Camp: Civil Savvy Camp.
The camp is fve days and covers
topics such as: confdence is the
foundation of leadership, positive
attitudes, behaviors and beliefs.
Social skills like: smart phone
etiquette, proper dining skills,
social conversation, introducing
yourself and others, extending
and accepting invitations, skill
of listening, poise, posture, etc.
Afternoon sessions will introduce
the students to social dancing,
public speaking and image
development. Cost is $1,195.00
per person which includes
morning and afternoon classes,
daily lunch tutorials, handouts,
guest speakers, pool party, an
afternoon tea and a graduation
dinner. A 10 percent discount
applies when two or more from
the same family enroll. For more
information or to enroll, call Cindy
Grosso at 843.207.1025 or visit
charlestonschoolofprotocol.com.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25
Blue from Nickelodeon’s Blue’s
Clues at Splash Island
For further details on
the waterparks, or a full
summertime character schedule,
visit splashparks.com or
call 843.795.4386.
SATURDAY, JUNE 28
Annual SIF&R Fish Fry
5-7 p.m., ticket & event
information coming soon.
SATURDAY, JULY 19
IOP Beach Run 5K Run/Walk
and 10K Run
8 a.m., Front Beach Isle of Palms.
Register at www.racesonline.
com ; www.iop.net or at the IOP
Recreation Department #24 28th
Ave, Isle of Palms.
16 May 23, 2014
island eats
Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream
favors, from Chocolate Therapy
to Peach Cobbler on Isle of Palms’
Ocean Boulevard
$
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Boulevard,
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Café Medley
Start your day or end it with
a well rounded café, serving
breakfast, lunch, and a glass of
wine in the evening.
$$
793-4055
www.cafemedley.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
High Thyme Cuisine
A small island bistro with a wide
range of dishes from seafood,
tapas on Tuesdays, and a brunch
on Sunday mornings.
$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas, as
well as Sunday brunch.
$$
883-3131
www.hometeambbq.com
2209 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Long Island Cafe
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood plus so much
more at this island favorite.
$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality.
$$$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
80 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poe-
inspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fsh tacos.
$$
883-0083
www.poestavern.com
2210 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC
SALT at Station 22
Enjoy a fun atmosphere with fresh
seafood and southern favorites,
and a fresh, local raw bar.
$$$
883-3355
www.saltstation22.com
2205 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
SaltWorks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
fresh breakfast, smoothies, &
sandwiches. Open from 7AM-3PM
daily.
$
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
founder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere, as well as lunch on
the weekends.
$$
883-3222
2019 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made-from-scratch “Tex
Mex” soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas.
$$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
B
eloved New York
Times bestselling author
Dorothea Benton Frank
once again takes us deep in the
heart of the magical Lowcountry,
a sultry land of ancient magic,
glorious sunsets, and soothing
coastal breezes, where three
generations of strong women
wrestle with the expectations
of family while struggling to
understand their complicated
relationships with each other, in
her newest novel “The Hurricane
Sisters” set in Sullivan’s Island,
SC.
Best friends since the frst
day of classes at The College of
Charleston, Ashley Anne Waters
and Mary Beth Smythe, now 23
years old, live in Ashley’s parents’
beach house on Sullivan’s Island
rent-free. Ashley is a gallery
assistant who aspires to become
an artist. Mary Beth, a gifted
cook from Tennessee, works for
a caterer while searching for a
good teaching job. Though they
both know what they want out of
life, their parents barely support
their dreams and worry for their
precarious fnances.
While they don’t make much
money, the girls do have a
million-dollar view that comes
with living in that fabulous house
on Sullivan’s Island. Sipping
wine on the porch and watching
a blood-red sunset, Ashley and
Mary Beth hit on a brilliant and
lucrative idea. With a new coat
of paint, the frst foor would
be a perfect place for soirées
for paying guests. Knowing her
parents would be horrifed at
the idea of common strangers
trampling through their home,
Ashley won’t tell them. Besides,
Clayton and Liz Waters have
enough problems of their own.
Then there is Maisie, Liz’s
mother, the family matriarch
who has just turned eighty, who
never lets Liz forget that she’s not
her perfect dead sister, Juliet.
For these Lowcountry women,
an emotional hurricane is
about to blow through their
lives, wreaking havoc that will
test them in unexpected ways,
ultimately transforming the
bonds they share.
Frank is a wonderful and
thoughtful storyteller and her
style of writing will engage you
from the very frst page. A native
of Sullivan’s Island, SC, Frank is
quite a character, with her witty
southern humor, and her unique
outlook on life and relationships.
Frank deliberately eases into
a very diffcult subject in “The
Hurricane Sisters” – domestic
abuse. She expertly weaves
this into the storyline so that it
will remain with you long after
you fnish. Frank writes with a
tremendous love and knowledge
of the Lowcountry, and will
delight you as much as a glass
of sweet tea on a hot summer
day. It’s the perfect book to add
to your beach bag this summer.
“While doing research for ‘The
Hurricane Sisters’ I was shocked
to learn that South Carolina
leads the nation in domestic
violence against women. I
took this as the theme for the
book, to start a conversation,
because I want this on the tip of
everyone's tongue,” Frank said.
“Please consider a donation of
any kind to support your local
battered women’s shelter. They
save women and children, help
to make them whole again, and
most of all, they give victims
hope.”
“The Hurricane Sisters”
releases on June 3, 2014. Learn
more by visiting www.dotfrank.
com.
Frank’s ‘The Hurricane
Sisters’ published next month
BY LORI MCGEE
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Local professor receives
prestigious award
STAFF REPORT
ISLAND EYE NEWS
I
sle of Palm’s resident Professor Julie Ann Lipovsky and Cadet Nolan Moore
received the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, an award presented to
students and faculty in recognition of high thought and noble endeavor,
at the Class of 2014 commencement exercise Saturday, May 10, 2014.
Dr. Lipovsky has taken on the challenge of improving The Citadel
environment by spearheading a number of programs on campus to help
students, faculty, and staff become more aware and understanding of
diversity in all its forms. She has partnered with the South Carolina Board of
Equality to implement Safe Zone workshops to enhance the understanding
and awareness of the needs of our diverse community. She has also created
programs for Women’s History Month.
As a teacher and a member of the campus community, she has modeled
the importance of kindness, respect, consideration and sympathy. A native
of Lynchburg, South Carolina, Cadet Major Nolan Ronald Moore is a history
major who has distinguished himself through his compassionate and
humanitarian spirit.
RUSSELL PACE, THE CITADEL
17 May 23, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
D
eciding when to begin
receiving Social Security
benefts is a major fnancial
issue for anyone approaching
retirement because the age at
which you apply for benefts will
affect the amount you'll receive. If
you're married, this decision can be
especially complicated because you
and your spouse will need to plan
together, taking into account the
Social Security benefts you may each
be entitled to. For example, married
couples may qualify for retirement
benefts based on their own earnings
records, and/or for spousal benefts
based on their spouse's earnings
record. In addition, a surviving
spouse may qualify for widow or
widower's benefts based on what
his or her spouse was receiving.
Fortunately, there are a couple of planning opportunities available
that you may be able to use to boost both your Social Security
retirement income and income for your surviving spouse. Both can
be used in a variety of scenarios, but here's how they generally work.
File and suspend
Generally, a husband or wife is entitled to receive the higher of his
or her own Social Security retirement beneft (a worker's beneft) or
as much as 50 percent of what his or her spouse is entitled to receive
at full retirement age (a spousal beneft). But here's the catch: under
Social Security rules, a husband or wife who is eligible to fle for
spousal benefts based on his or her spouse's record cannot do so
until his or her spouse begins collecting retirement benefts.
However, there is an exception--someone who has reached full
retirement age but who doesn't want to begin collecting retirement
benefts right away may choose to fle an application for retirement
benefts, then immediately request to have those benefts suspended,
so that his or her eligible spouse can fle for spousal benefts.
The fle-and-suspend strategy is most commonly used when one
spouse has much lower lifetime earnings, and thus will receive
a higher retirement beneft based on his or her spouse's earnings
record than on his or her own earnings record. Using this strategy
can potentially boost retirement income in three ways.
1. The spouse with higher earnings who has suspended benefts
can accrue delayed retirement credits at a rate of 8 percent per
year (the rate for anyone born in 1943 or later) up until age 70,
thereby increasing his or her retirement beneft by as much as
32 percent.
2. The spouse with lower earnings can immediately claim a higher
(spousal) beneft.
3. Any survivor's beneft available to the lower-earning spouse will
also increase because a surviving spouse generally receives a
beneft equal to 100 percent of the monthly retirement beneft
the other spouse was receiving (or was entitled to receive) at the
time of his or her death.
Here's a hypothetical example. Leslie is about to reach her full
retirement age of 66, but she wants to postpone fling for Social Security
benefts so that she can increase her monthly retirement beneft from
$2,000 at full retirement age to $2,640 at age 70 (32 percent more).
However, her husband Lou (who has had substantially lower lifetime
earnings) wants to retire in a few months at his full retirement age
(also 66). He will be eligible for a higher monthly spousal beneft based
on Leslie's work record than on his own—$1,000 vs. $700. So that
Lou can receive the higher spousal beneft as soon as he retires, Leslie
fles an application for benefts, but then immediately suspends it.
Leslie can then earn delayed retirement credits, resulting in a higher
retirement beneft for her at age 70 and a higher widower's beneft for
Lou in the event of her death.
File for one beneft, then the other
Another strategy that can be used to increase household income
for retirees is to have one spouse fle for spousal benefts frst, then
switch to his or her own higher retirement beneft later. Once a
spouse reaches full retirement age and is eligible for a spousal beneft
based on his or her spouse's earnings record and a retirement beneft
based on his or her own earnings record, he or she can choose to
fle a restricted application for spousal benefts, then delay applying
for retirement benefts on his or her
own earnings record (up until age 70)
in order to earn delayed retirement
credits. This may help to maximize
survivor's income as well as retirement
income, because the surviving spouse
will be eligible for the greater of his or
her own beneft or 100 percent of the
spouse's beneft.
This strategy can be used in a
variety of scenarios, but here's one
hypothetical example that illustrates
how it might be used when both
spouses have substantial earnings
but don't want to postpone applying
for benefts altogether. Liz fles for her
Social Security retirement beneft of
$2,400 per month at age 66 (based
on her own earnings record), but her
husband Tim wants to wait until age
70 to fle. At age 66 (his full retirement
age) Tim applies for spousal benefts based on Liz's earnings record
(Liz has already fled for benefts) and receives 50 percent of Liz's
beneft amount ($1,200 per month). He then delays applying for
benefts based on his own earnings record ($2,100 per month at full
retirement age) so that he can earn delayed retirement credits. At age
70, Tim switches from collecting a spousal beneft to his own larger
worker's retirement beneft of $2,772 per month (32 percent higher
than at age 66). This not only increases Liz and Tim's household
income but also enables Liz to receive a larger survivor's beneft in the
event of Tim's death.
Things to keep in mind
• Deciding when to begin receiving Social Security benefts is
a complicated decision. You'll need to consider a number of
scenarios, and take into account factors such as both spouses'
ages, estimated beneft entitlements, and life expectancies. A
Social Security representative can't give you advice, but can
help explain your options.
• Using the fle-and-suspend strategy may not be advantageous
when one spouse is in poor health or when Social Security
income is needed as soon as possible.
• Delaying Social Security income may have tax consequences--
consult a tax professional.
• Spousal or survivor's benefts are generally reduced by a
certain percentage if received before full retirement age.
This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an
investment recommendation. It is solely the opinion of our investment
team at the time of writing. Fusion Capital is a Registered Investment
Advisor frm. If you have comments or questions, please contact Jason
Mengel at jmengel@fusioncapital.net or call 843-972-0065.
Social Security claiming strategies
for married couples
BY JASON MENGEL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
FINANCIAL
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
18 May 23, 2014
I
t's a beautiful summer day
and you're walking along the
beach when you come across
a dying dolphin in the surf. You
want to help. What do you do?
Too often people try to push
the dolphin back into the ocean
but this doesn't help the animal
and could result in injury to
the person if the dolphin tries
to resist. There's also a serious
risk of bacteria and disease being
transmitted.
Wayne McFee of the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration said people who
come across dolphins on beaches
should not approach or touch
the dolphin and call the Marine
Mammal Stranding Network at
800.922.5431.
Currently the southeastern
coast is being hit with the
morbillivirus, a disease similar
to measles. The virus killed 753
dolphins in 2013 from New York
to Florida. 112 dolphins stranded
in our state is the "highest South
Carolina has ever seen," McFee
reported.
This year as the dolphins
migrate along the coast,
dolphins are stranding at above-
average rates in South Carolina,
North Carolina and Georgia.
The morbillivirus cannot be
transmitted to humans, but
infected dolphins could be
carrying other diseases or
bacteria that can be transmitted.
People should not touch a wild
dolphin, whether stranded on the
beach, or in the water, even if the
dolphin appears healthy.
Dolphins are a sentinel
species, our siblings in the sea.
Like us, dolphins are mammals.
“If dolphins are not doing well,
it says something about what
humans may be exposed to,” said
Dr. Pat Fair of NOAA.
Fair explained that scientists
are looking for signs of other
emerging diseases and chemical
body burdens that may be making
the dolphins sick. Scientists
also will test for diseases more
common to humans but are
becoming more prominent in
dolphins.
I’ve long dreamed of writing
about the dolphins I often see
here in the Lowcountry but the
moment was just never right, until
I learned this fact from NOAA:
48-52 percent of the resident
dolphins in South Carolina and
Florida are sick or contaminated.
That fact was the impetus for the
trilogy. I thought to myself, how
could I not get involved?
Dr. Fair allowed me to
participate in the study on a
foating “doctor’s clinic” where
researchers ran a battery of
medical tests on our local resident
dolphins. These are the dolphins
that do not migrate but live in
our estuarine waters year round.
Dr. Fair served as a mentor for
me while writing The Lowcountry
Summer Trilogy. And to further
my knowledge of the species,
I volunteered at the Dolphin
Research Center in Florida where
I worked with programs designed
for special needs children and
wounded military veterans.
With every novel, I strive to
re-connect human nature with
the natural world. And my hope
is that when readers close the
book they love the story, but
also realize that they've learned
a lot about our beloved Atlantic
bottlenose dolphins.
About the contributor: Mary
Alice Monroe lives on the Isle of
Palms and is a member of the
Island Turtle Team. To learn
more about The Summer Wind
and her other books, visit www.
maryalicemonroe.com.
Lowcountry author and Isle of Palms
resident Mary Alice Monroe wants to
spread the word of the plight of dolphins.
Writing for dolphins in peril
L O WC O U N T R Y A U T H O R E X P L A I N S H E R C O N N E C T I O N T O T H E C R E AT U R E S
BY MARY ALICE MONROE
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
South Carolina Stranding
Hotline: 800.922.5431
O
n May 24, 2014 offcers
from Isle of Palms
Police Department and
community members will come
together in an informal, neutral
space to discuss community
issues, build relationships and
drink coffee.
All community members are
invited to attend. The event
begins at 8 a.m. at Joe’s to Go
located at 1120 Ocean Boulevard.
Please contact Captain Caldwell
with questions: 843.886.6522 or
dcaldwell@iop.net.
Coffee with a Cop provides
a unique opportunity for
community members to ask
questions and learn more about
the department’s work in Isle of
Palms neighborhoods.
The majority of contacts law
enforcement has with the public
happen during emergencies,
or emotional situations. Those
situations are not always the most
effective times for relationship
building with the community,
and some community members
may feel that offcers are
unapproachable on the street.
Coffee with a Cop breaks down
barriers and allows for a relaxed,
one-on-one interaction.
“We hope that community
members will feel comfortable to
ask questions, bring concerns,
or simply get to know our
offcers,” said Chief Thomas
Buckhannon. “These interactions
are the foundation of community
partnerships.”
Coffee with a Cop is a national
initiative supported by The United
States Department of Justice,
Offce of Community Oriented
Policing Services. Similar events
are being held across the county,
as local police departments strive
to make lasting connections with
the communities they serve.
The program aims to advance
the practice of community
policing through improving
relationships between police
offcers and community members
one cup of coffee at a time.

IOP PD hosts
Coffee with a Cop
PROGRAM OFFERS OPPORTUNI TY TO MEET
L OCAL OFFI CERS, DI SCUSS COMMUNI TY I SSUES
BY DAWN CALDWELL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
19 May 23, 2014
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
May 23
May 24
May 25
May 26
May 27
May 28
May 29
May 30
May 31
Jun 1
Jun 2
Jun 3
Jun 4
Jun 5
3:56am/4:30pm
4:54am/5:27pm
5:49am/6:20pm
6:42am/7:09pm
7:31am/7:55pm
8:18am/8:39pm
9:03am/9:20pm
9:47am/10:00pm
10:30am/10:39pm
11:13am/11:19pm
11:57am/11:59pm
12:42pm
12:41am/1:30pm
1:27am/2:20pm
10:01am/10:40pm
10:56am/11:39pm
11:48am
12:34am/12:38pm
1:25am/1:25pm
2:13am/2:10pm
2:58am/2:53pm
3:41am/3:35pm
4:22am/4:16pm
5:01am/4:57pm
5:40am/5:39pm
6:19am/6:24pm
7:00am/7:14pm
7:44am/8:08pm
Y
ou never know what will
spark someone’s creativity.
Justine Post says of
her childhood growing up on
Sullivan’s Island.
“I would sometimes open the
freezer to get some ice cream and
a frozen bird carcass would fall
into my lap,” she said.
Her ornithologist father and
artist mother surrounded the
family with nature and creative
experiences. A poetry workshop
at Creative Spark with poet
laureate Marjory Wentworth and
an elementary school classroom
visit from Jack Tracey began her
interest in poetry but it wasn’t
until she attended a Piccolo
Sundown Poetry reading by Mark
Strand as a teenager that she
discovered her own creative voice.
“I had been reading the classic
poetry in high school but seeing
a poet that was living and that
I responded to writing in a
contemporary voice opened up my
eyes. Oh! Poetry can be written in
the language we speak in today
instead of being antiquated,” she
remembers thinking.
Birds and sea creatures
populate her poems which tell
of her connection to Charleston:
“The water rises with the feel of
clasping, the familiar bit of salt…”
Having published her frst book
“Beast” to critical acclaim, she’s
thrilled to be a featured poet on
May 27 at the Sundown Poetry
Series at the Dock Street Theater
courtyard this year.
“Poetry is to be read aloud, off
the page which gives it different
meanings. It transforms the
poetry and gets the audience
excited about it,” she says.
Piccolo Spoleto was created to
celebrate local talent, but don’t
let that make you think “second
rate.” Several local artists have
catapulted to national fame. The
Halsey Institute of Contemporary
Art will welcome home prodigal
son Shepherd Fairey for his
frst major exhibition in his
hometown. His new body of work
is on the subject of power. Many
remember his ubiquitous “Andre
the Giant Has a Posse” project
consisting of enigmatic stickers
that were posted everywhere.
From that humble beginning he’s
launched a successful career as
a graphic designer, illustrator,
activist and artist including his
controversial and iconic “Hope”
portrait of Obama. It’s easy to
imagine Fairey’s irreverent, edgy,
political images igniting artistic
fres in developing minds of
young viewers who may relate to
Fairey’s background as a local
skateboarder.
He’s sharing the bill with one
of the country’s most prominent
artists, Jasper Johns who was
long-time friends with William
Halsey for whom the gallery is
named.
Another local art celebrity
will be exhibiting nearby on the
peninsula. Mary Edna Fraser’s
batik exhibit at Ann Long Gallery
is based upon thousands of aerial
images she’s photographed. Her
batiks have appeared in over 100
solo exhibitions including at the
Smithsonian Institution. A large
one graces the ceiling at the
Charleston International airport
concourse.
She’s also presenting a free
slide show of her work “Our
Common Thread: Environmental
Awareness” in cooperation with
the local Sierra Club. Mary Edna’s
art depicts our area’s fragile
natural beauty and her activism
supports local environmental
causes. An avid patron of the arts
and musician herself, she never
misses the Sunset Serenade at
the US Customs House, a free
performance by the Charleston
Symphony Orchestra on May 23.
Charleston has long been a
center for jazz and the scene is
now thriving. Locally cultivated
trumpet player Cameron Harder
Handel developed her chops
in Wando High School’s band
program and has toured the
world including a current gig
with Michael Bolton. Catch her
in the big band at one of the
many Charleston Jazz Orchestra
Charleston celebrates the success of its own
P I C C O L O S P O L E T O K I C K S O F F N E X T WE E K
BY CAROL ANTMAN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Piccolo continues on page 20
concerts at the Music Hall or at
Kiawah. Repertoire ranges from
Latin to swing to Duke Ellington.
Want more jazz? The jazz
cruises are not just for tourists.
Catch Lonnie Hamilton’s grooving
sax or Franklin Ashley’s smokin’
piano rendition of “Summertime”
while cruising under the Ravenel
Bridge in the moonlight. These
are “Chamber of Commerce
moments.” They make you fall in
love with Charleston.
What could be more
inspirational than stepping out of
the heat and humidity into one of
Charleston’s majestic churches to
hear magnifcent music played by
stellar musicians? Local actress
Dana DeMartino recommends
attending one of the dozen
Spotlight Concerts.
“I absolutely love organ music
and the experience of being
in a church and hearing this
instrument resonate off the walls
of a large cathedral reminds me
of my youth in Paris so this is
always a must,” she said.
A highlight this year is The Choir
of St. Martin-in-the-Fields on a
world tour from England. They’re
stopping at Grace Episcopal
Church on June 6 to present a
diverse program inspired by the
British Isles with music ranging
from Vaughn Williams to George
Shearing.
Piccolo Spoleto will have over
700 performances in seventeen
days beginning May 23, 2014.
Many are free. There’s theater,
comedy, drama, music, children’s
activities and literature. The
festival is a toast to Charleston,
the muse. It’s a celebration of
our city’s engaged audiences, its
stellar talent and of those who
carry the city in their hearts as
they rise to artistic success.
For more information visit www.
piccolospoleto.com.
Piccolo continues from page 19
Charleston Jazz Orchestra preforming at the Music Hall.
23 May 23, 2014
T
he ocean is the most valuable
resource on the planet. Here in
South Carolina, we’re blessed
with one of the prettiest stretches
of coastline found anywhere in
the world. Cobalt blue offshore
waters, breathtaking white sand
beaches, and an endless expanse of
backcountry marshes and estuaries.
For fshing guides like myself, I
couldn’t imagine a life without the
sea. My typical morning commute is
a run across Charleston Harbor, past
pods of playing dolphins, famous
historical landmarks, and under
bridges; most of which are clogged
with traffc and car horns sounding
off in all directions. I just bump my
throttle up and smile as I trade the
urban clamor for the serenity of this
saline paradise.
People always tell me how “lucky”
I am to be on the water so regularly.
Luck has nothing to do with it. This
is a lifestyle anyone can be a part
of. The ocean is there for the taking,
and she’s beckoning you to come
play on her.
Charleston offers boaters a
plethora of activities to choose from
while on the water. Our harbor and
rivers are perfect for family activities
like cruising, skiing, tubing, and
sightseeing. Beaches like Morris
Island, Capers, and North Kiawah
are perfect for boaters who want to
relax on the sand without fghting
the traffc and crowds at Folly
or Sullivan’s. Waterfront dining
abounds in areas like Shem Creek
and Isle of Palms.
Don’t even get me started on
the fshing. We’ve got hundreds
of different species of fsh in the
Lowcountry, from Blue Marlin
pushing the thousand-pound mark,
to tasty Cobia, to shallow water
dwelling redfsh, and even the ever-
present, crowd pleasing Whiting.
Tackle stores like The Charleston
Angler can rig you up and send you
right to the fsh. In short, if you’re
not out there soaking up what the
ocean has to offer, you’re cheating
yourself out of the best resource in
the state.
At frst glance, these ocean based
activities can seem far too expensive
for the general public. The sky is
the limit with boat pricing, but you
don’t need a million dollar yacht to
play on the sea. Small aluminum
johnboats are dirt cheap, and great
for plying the marshes and rivers.
Bay boats in the 20’ range are
awesome for family activities and
most forms of fshing. Charleston
has plenty of boat dealerships
around town that can help you get
in to a vessel without punishing
your wallet. If you don’t want to fool
with the hassle of boat ownership,
there are hundreds of captains
in Charleston that can take you
on a custom trip to do anything
from fshing, sightseeing, dolphin-
watching, to shell collecting. Going
out on a charter is great way to get
your toes wet and see if the saltwater
lifestyle is something you’d like to
be a part of. There is also the option
of participating in a time-share
style boat ownership offered by
companies like Freedom Boat Club.
Allowing you to sample the life of a
boat-owner without most of
the hassles.
The summer is just
getting kicked off with
Memorial Day weekend,
so get out there and
dive head-frst into all
that Charleston’s world-
renowned waters have to
offer. Seventy-percent of
the world is covered by
water, yet ninety-percent
of people spend their whole
lives on dry land; don’t let
you and your family fall
into that category!
PHOTOS BY RALPH SECOY
Don’t own a boat? Get out on the water with some of these
boating activities offered by Wild Dunes Resort.
Capers Island Wildlife Exploration
Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. $44/adult; $34/child
ages 3-12; 2 and under complimentary
Cruise through the salt marsh and tidal creeks aboard a covered
pontoon as you and a naturalist look for bottlenose dolphins,
egrets, herons, crabs, and more. The fnal part of the trip is
spent as free time exploring Capers Island’s Boneyard Beach at
your own pace.
Schooner Pride Tall Ship
Daily. Afternoon sail: 1 - 3 p.m. Evening sail: 7 - 9 p.m. through
Aug 4; 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Aug 5-Labor Day. $36/adult; $28/child
for the afternoon. $46/adult; $33/child for the evening
Tour Charleston Harbor and experience the best in Charleston
sailing, sightseeing and attractions on The Schooner Pride, a
classic 84’ tall ship. Modeled to resemble the old coastal trading
schooners, the Schooner Pride has all the charm and character
of the great old days of sail. No cancellations.
Santee Pass Excursion
Thursday. Runs at low tide only. Cost is $50/adult; $40/child
ages 3-12; 2 and under complimentary
This 4-hour cruise takes you through the less traveled Santee
Pass to the northern tip of Capers Island aboard a covered
pontoon. Once stopped at Capers Island, explore the fully
exposed Boneyard Beach, tidal pools, and other treasures left
behind.
The joys of boating
G E T Y O U R T O E S WE T WI T H T H I S G U I D E T O T H E S A L T WAT E R L I F E S T Y L E
BY COLT HARRISON
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
25 May 23, 2014
S
ummer on Sullivan’s Island. It’s hot. It’s
muggy. The heat is draining, suffocating,
and oppressive.
If you’re like me, summer is not a good
time to ramp up your ftness routine. Even
indoors, where treadmills, indoor cycling
classes, and weight stacks live. The heat zaps
me of energy and the last thing I want to do
is workout.
So I need a goal. A reason to stay ft and
something to get me moving, because I’m
sure not motivated to do it “just because,”
like I may be when the weather is more
tolerable. In the book, “Younger Next Year,”
authors Chris Crowley and Henry Lodge call
it a “kedge.” The defnition of kedging is, in
nautical terms, to draw a vessel along by
hauling in on the cable of a light anchor that
has been dropped some distance from it,
hence moving the vessel forward. So in the
upcoming summer months, I need to fnd a
“kedge:” something to throw out there that
will keep me moving forward, training, and
active. To keep me motivated in my path
towards my “kedge,” it better be motivating,
it better be rewarding, and it better be fun!
Fortunately there are a few fun kedges out
there in the months ahead. So if you need a
goal, a reason to continue (and maybe ramp
up) your ftness routine, or maybe even a
reason to get started on one, keep reading.
June 7: The 23rd Floppin’ Flounder 5K on
Sullivan’s Island
Although many races in the area have
come and gone, the Floppin’ Flounder has
managed to stay on course. The Sullivan’s
Island Fire Department initiated the event,
handing it over to the Charleston Running
Club in 2011. One of the last events in
the local spring racing scene, the Floppin’
Flounder is always a good time, and this year
promises to deliver even more including a
great new t-shirt design, fun overall and age
group awards, and race medals for the frst
30 children to fnish.
This year, participants and volunteers
will enjoy a not-to-be-missed post-race
breakfast provided by
Triangle Char &
Bar and Black Bean
Co. Be sure to stick
around after the
awards for a chance
to win some great
raffe prizes. Details
can be found on the
Charleston Running
Club’s Facebook
page. The Charleston
Running Club hands
over half of all proceeds
to the SIFD. You can register to run and
to volunteer at www.charlestonrunningclub.
com.
July 26: The North Charleston Fight For
Air Stairclimb
If you really, really don’t like the heat,
then you have no excuse not to train for and
participate in the North Charleston Stairclimb.
Held indoors at the North Charleston
Coliseum, you’ll enjoy the air conditioning as
you get one heck of a workout (and by that I
mean it is like no other, not that you won’t
live to tell about it). Beneftting the American
Lung Association, one of the cool things
about this event is watching the frefghters
participate in full gear. Contrary to what you
might think, anyone can do this. Learn more
about the event at www.climbcharleston.org,
or contact Meredith at PrimeTime Fitness
(Meredith@primetimeft.net; 843.883.0101)
for information about joining, sponsoring, or
donating to the PrimeTime team.
August 23 – 28: Fitness Field Trip to
Jackson Hole
Now this is what kedging is all about.
From Saturday—Thursday, you’ll experience
fve days of ftness disguised as fun as we
travel to Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Hiking,
biking, yoga, massage, and more. This trip is
all about coming back ftter than when you
left home. Contact Meredith (Meredith@
primetimeft.net; 843.883.0101) for more
details!
If none of these events appeal to you,
although you know you do need to keep
moving during the summer months, feel free
to contact us at PrimeTime Fitness. We will
be happy to help you identify a kedge of your
own, and make a plan to get to it.
Find your kedge this summer
F I T N E S S G O A L S A R E WO R T H F I N D I N G , A N D K E E P I N G
BY MEREDITH NELSON
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
26 May 23, 2014
I
t seems the entire internet and
even old fashioned phones
have lit up lately with a new
round of hackers/bad guys/gals
wanting to steal your money and
information. I've written about
these scams but I think it's time
to visit them again.
In the past couple of weeks I
have received many calls about
whether Microsoft can really
see the viruses on the computer
and the answer is no. No one
is monitoring your computer
(unless infected) from afar (okay,
I guess I have to discount the
NSA), and they cannot tell that 23
gazillion viruses are getting ready
to swarm into your computer. It's
the old salesman's trick that if
you call enough people someone
will be on the internet at that
moment and will be gullible
enough to allow them on the
computer. Do not allow anyone
who cold calls you to access your
computer, don't believe anything
they say. Just hang up.
Last week I heard from a
customer who answered the
phone and said yes he was on the
computer. The caller (in broken
English) explained that the
monitoring section of Microsoft
had detected unusual activity in
his computer and they would be
happy to show him the problems.
He was panicked and allowed
them to access his computer
remotely. How do they do that
you ask? Well there are lots of
programs such as LogMeIn and
TeamViewer that allow a person
at another computer to "log"
into your computer and take
control of it. Once you allow
this, the person can do almost
anything they want. So the guy
allows them to take over the
computer, and suddenly he sees
a screen showing hundreds if
not thousands of infections with
more downloading before his very
eyes.
The scam is that the infections
are not real, and what they
are showing are called screen
shots that happened on another
computer or were produced
much like a Power Point product.
Nothing being shown to the
fellow was real, but it sure looked
like it. At the same time the
person logged in is infecting the
computer with a real virus to do
damage at a later date. That way
they can bleed the poor fellow for
more money later.
Next the pitch begins, and
you are told that for only $79 or
$99 they can clean the infection.
But to be really safe, you should
buy extra protection for only
$179 for a year! Of course not all
malicious software is included,
but they will monitor 24/7 for
that type and let you know right
away. Which happens about 2-4
weeks later and is another $79-
$200 to clean.
No valid company will call
you, email you, fax you or send
a letter, no matter what. Anyone
that does is a scammer and only
want money or information that
ends in costing you money. Use
good anti-virus software, keep it
up to date and be very aware of
scammers.
In closing, remember that an
email sent to you with no text
in the body is a pure and simple
way to hack your computer. Never
unsubscribe to anything you did
not subscribe to, it just lets the
spammer know your email is a
valid (real) one. Never let someone
take over your computer unless
you know them.
As always if you have questions
or need help you can call me, Rent
A Bob, at 843.822.7794 or email
rentabob@live.com.
Beware of the hackers
BY BOB HOOPER
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
E
mily Pitts, the Mount
Pleasant Artists Guild
scholarship 2014 winner,
presented her artwork at the May
5 meeting of the MPAG.
The Guild awards an annual
visual art scholarship to a high
school senior who resides in
the East Cooper area. Emily,
a graduating senior at Wando
High School, will attend
Anderson College this fall and
major in interior design. Emily
was selected based on a written
application, a resume of scholastic
and artistic accomplishments,
and a portfolio interview by a
panel of guild members.
Mount Pleasant Artists Guild
meetings are held September
through May on the frst Monday of
the month, except for September;
when it is the second Monday of
the month due to Labor Day. New
members are always welcome.
For more information, visit www.
mtpleasantartistsguild.com.
MPAG
awards art
scholarship
BY JEANNE JUHOS
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
COMPUTER CORNER
T
he Purple Martin is our
largest swallow. This species
is found in the eastern half
of the US and parts of the West
during the breeding season. It
spends winters in South America.
Males are easily distinguishable by
their dark bodies with iridescent
bluish hues. Females have duller
brown tones. Purple Martins feed
exclusively on insects, which they
catch during fight. They are rarely
seen taking caterpillars from
the ground and gleaning from
tree leaves. Contrary to popular
belief, they are not known to eat
mosquitoes.
Purple Martins usually forage
during the day high in the air,
while mosquitos stay closer to
the ground and are out in greater
numbers in the evening. Eastern
populations of Purple Martins
rely exclusively on humans for
their nest sites. They nest in man-
made houses and gourds. In the
west, where Purple martins are
much less numerous, they nest
in old woodpecker holes and even
saguaro cacti. House Sparrows
and European Starlings are a
big threat to populations in the
Eastern US.
In order to reduce the numbers
of these two invasive species
from nesting in martin boxes,
the unwanted nests must be
frequently and consistently
removed. Once House Sparrows
and/or Starlings have been
established in a martin house,
it is unlikely martins will ever
return. Ways people can improve
reproductive success include
installing starling-proof entrances
and porch dividers between
entrance holes. Snake-guards can
also be installed on the poles.
Purple Martin
BY SARAH DIAZ
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
SARAH'S BIRDS
Eastern populations of Purple
Martins rely exclusively on
humans for their nest sites.
27 May 23, 2014
O
n Tuesday, May 13, representatives
from the Maritime Heritage Program
at NOAA’s Offce of National Marine
Sanctuaries, presented their fndings on
the probable discovery of the Civil War
steamer Planter, commandeered from
Confederate service by Robert Smalls to
carry its enslaved crew and their families to
freedom.
The presentation took place at the Sewee
Visitor and Environmental Education Center,
Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge in
Awendaw. NOAA announced the probable
location of the remains of the Civil War-era
sidewheel steamer Planter, which gained
national fame in 1862 when a group of
enslaved African Americans commandeered
the Confederate Navy transport ship in a
daring escape to freedom.
The effort to fnd the Planter supports
NOAA's Voyage to Discovery initiative, which
seeks to highlight African-American maritime
history through education, archaeology,
science and underwater exploration.
Under the leadership of Robert Smalls, the
ship's steersman, crew members navigated the
steamer out of Charleston Harbor on May 12,
1862, and delivered the vessel to the United
States Navy. The New York Herald called the
escape "one of the most daring and heroic
adventures since the war was commenced."
The notoriety generated by the escape and
capture of the Planter led to Smalls eventually
becoming the frst African-American master
in the U.S. Navy and a member of Congress
representing South Carolina – the state where
he was born a slave. NOAA's report helps fll
gaps in the largely untold story of Robert
Smalls and the Planter, which wrecked on a
beach in March 1876 while trying to tow a
grounded schooner.
In an attempt to answer lingering questions
about the Planter's fate, NOAA researchers
reviewed historical documents and analyzed
oceanographic and meteorological conditions
that may have existed at the time of
the Planter's loss. The likely site where the
vessel came to rest, off Cape Romain between
Charleston and Georgetown, S.C., was
confrmed with magnetometer and hydro-
probing surveys that detected the presence of
large concentrations of iron consistent with
the remains of a sunken ship. The vessel's
remains are buried under 10-15 feet of sand
and water in an environmentally sensitive
area in Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.
"Our interest in fnding the Planter is
about more than just unlocking the past and
secrets of the deep," said Daniel J. Basta,
NOAA's Offce of National Marine Sanctuaries
director. "This expedition is an opportunity to
highlight African-American contributions to
the country's maritime heritage and inspire
young people to consider careers in marine
science to help expand the boundaries of
ocean exploration."
Following Smalls' commandeering of
the Planter on May 12, 1862, the ship
continued to be used by the U.S. Navy as a
dispatch and supply vessel with Smalls as
pilot. However, by September of that year, the
Navy transferred the craft to the U.S. Army
Quartermaster Corps, where it supported
Army operations around Charleston, Port
Royal and Beaufort.
News accounts suggest that after the
war, Smalls and the Planter were well
known among local African Americans. As
the Planter's captain, he transported many
freed slaves to newly created farmsteads and
communities at Hilton Head and Port Royal.
With Smalls at the helm, the Planter was
reported as the ship that carried black
dignitaries and passengers to the ceremony
of the symbolic raising of the Fort Sumter
fag which had been lowered after the fort's
capture by the Confederates.
On March 25, 1876, while trying to tow a
grounded schooner, Planter sprang a plank in
the bow and began to take on water in the hold.
The captain elected to beach the steamer and
repair the plank, hoping to get off the beach
with the next high tide. However, stormy seas
battered the Planter as the tide rose and the
ship was too badly damaged and had to be
abandoned. Upon hearing of its loss, Robert
Smalls was reported to have said that he felt
as if he had lost a member of his family.
NOAA identifes probable location of
iconic Civil War-era steamer
BY VERNON SMITH
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS