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Page 8
Charleston Collegiate
Volume 8 Issue 3 May 23, 2014 FREE
SINCE MAY 2007
Page 16
Joys of Boating
Page 18
Piccolo Spoleto
Goal Getter continues on page 3
Huntington continues on page 7
Peter Gerace and his son, Cullen, help Huntington back to the ocean.
The Hunt Begins
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
F I RST PUBL I C
SEA T URT L E
REL EASE OF
T HE SEASON
TOOK PL ACE ON
I SL E OF PAL MS
H
untington, a juvenile loggerhead
sea turtle, was returned to the
ocean on May 5 after an extended
stay at the South Carolina Aquarium Sea
Turtle Hospital.
Last May Peter Gerace and his son,
Cullen were boating in the waters of
Huntington Beach State Park. Tey saw
Huntington foating and unable to dive.
Recognizing that the large loggerhead
was in trouble, they successfully brought
the turtle aboard the boat and contacted
SCDNR.
Upon admittance to the Aquarium’s
Sea Turtle Hospital, it was determined
that Huntington was anemic and had
abnormally low levels of protein in the
blood. Radiographs revealed an intestinal
impaction and excessive gas in the
intestines which caused the buoyancy
disorder. Treatment included vibrational
therapy, enemas, fuids and tube feeding
of mineral oils to break up the impaction,
which passed approximately four weeks
after admission. Additional care included
antibiotics, vitamin supplements and a
healthy diet.
A little over a year later and the 150lb
loggerhead had returned to full health
Goal-Getter
SEABROOK
RESI DENT
RUNS BOSTON
MARAT HON
BY ANNE HARRIS
For The Island Connection
T
he importance of having a goal
is something Seabrook resident
Linda Clarkson has learned time
and again over her lifetime. It was that
outlook that helped Clarkson go from an
average active person to someone who just
completed the 2014 Boston Marathon,
the only one from the Sea Islands to do
so this year. For Clarkson, the road to
Boston took a lot of determination, some
great teachers, and even some help from
up above.
Clarkson’s frst real athletic triumph
came years ago, when living in the Middle
East. She and a friend partnered to swim
in a charity event to raise money. Te
weather was treacherous on the day of
the actual event, and it was called of.
Her swimming partner insisted that they
complete the race and raise the money
despite the conditions, and while it was no
easy task, they accomplished their goal.
Clarkson took that lesson with her
when she later moved to Blufton, SC, and
joined a nearby gym. Her spin instructor,
BY KATE DITLOFF
For The Island Connection
Huntington heads home
The Island
Connection
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com

Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee
sales manager
lori@luckydognews.com
Alejandro Ferreyros
graphic designer
alejandro@luckydognews.com
Ralph Secoy
Resident Photographer
Contributors
Kathryn Casey
Kerry Welch
Grace Newland
Mike Vegis
Carol Antman
Maria Gurovich
Bob Hooper
Joyce Hudson
Harriet Lee
Colt Harrison
Anne Harris
Kate Ditloff
Vernon Smith
Mary Alice Monroe
Published by
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Future deadlines: May 28 for
submissions
for the June 6 Issue
Op-Ed articles and letters to the editor do not
necessarily refect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News or its writers.
Lucky Dog Publishing, LLC
Publishers of Island Eye News,
The Island Connection
Civic Calendar
KIAWAH ISLAND TOWN HALL
21 Beachwalker Drive
Kiawah Island, SC 29455
Phone: 768-9166
Fax: 768-4764
SEABROOK ISLAND TOWN HALL
2001 Seabrook Island Road
Seabrook Island, SC 29455
Phone: 768-9121
Fax: 768-9830
Email:
lmanning@townofseabrookisland.org
JOHNS ISLAND COUNCIL
Meetings are held at the Berkeley Electric Co-op
located at 3351 Maybank Hwy, Johns Island.
Chairman Chris Cannon: 343-5113
CHARLESTON COUNTY COUNCIL
4045 Bridge View Dr, N. Charleston
958-4700t
CITY OF CHARLESTON
75 Calhoun St.
724-3745
2 May 23, 2014
daily
Tuesday, May 27
Kiawah Town Council
Meeting
2 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Seabrook Town
Council Meeting
2:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Seabrook Town Hall
Tuesday, June 3
Kiawah Town Council
Meeting
2 – 4 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Wednesday,
June 4
Seabrook Town
Planning Commission
Work Session
2:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Seabrook Town Hall
Kiawah Planning
Commission Meeting
3 – 5 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Thursday, June 5
Kiawah Arts Council
Meeting
3 – 5 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Mounday, June 9
Kiawah Municipal
Court
10:30 – 11:30 a.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Tuesday, June 10
Kiawah
Communications
Committee Meeting
3 – 5 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Wednesday,
June 11
Kiawah Public Safety
Committee Meeting
2 – 4 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Seabrook Town
Planning Commission
Meeting
2:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Seabrook Town Hall
Monday, June 16
Kiawah Board of
Zoning and Appeals
4 -5 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Farmers’ Market returns to Freshfelds
PRODUCE, PREPARED F OODS AND CRAF T S
ABOUND EVERY MONDAY
BY KERRY WELCH
For The Island Connection
S
hop for Lowcountry produce, prepared foods, crafts,
specialty products and more at the Farmer’s Market at
Freshfelds Village. Te Market will begin June 2, and will
take place every Monday from 4 to 8 p.m. until August 25.
From seafood and sweet treats to artisan cheese and favored
olive oil, food lovers will be pleased with this year’s vendor line-
up. Visitors can also pick up locally made crafts and handmade
products, including soaps, Sweetgrass baskets, handmade dog
collars and custom clay silhouettes.
Shoppers should come hungry because there are also several
prepared food vendors ofering items like BBQ, pierogies, cookies
and more.
2014 vendors:
•Big Smile Peaches
•Cannonborough Beverage Company: All natural sodas
made with local ingredients
•Carolina Crunch: Charleston-made gourmet granola
•Carolina’s Harvest: Homemade cobblers, cakes, ready-mixes
and more using fresh fruit and ingredients with no additives or
preservatives
•Ceramic Silhouettes: Handmade, custom clay silhouettes of
children
•Charleston Artisan Cheesehouse: Artisan cheese
made in Charleston
•Charleston Festival Foods: Lemonade slush, shaved
ice and funnel cakes
•Charleston Spice Company: Organic, hand-
blended herbs and spices
•Crew LaLa: Handmade dog collars, leashes and
bow-tie collars
•Dale’s Lowcountry Cuisine: Lowcountry sauces,
crab cakes and crab bites
•Essentially Southern: Handmade bath and body
products
•Great Food Co-Op: Salsa, jams, dried fruit, salsa,
preserves and more
•Great Harvest Bread: Breads made with pure,
wholesome ingredients and no added fats, oils or
preservatives
•Holy Smoke Olive Oil: Cold-pressed and cold-
smoked extra virgin California olive oil
•Joseph Fields Farms: USDA Certifed organic fruits
and vegetables
•King of Pops: Handmade, all natural popsicles
•Lowcountry Lemonade: Fresh squeezed lemonade and tea
with fruits, herbs and spices
•Lowcountry Olive Oil: Herb and fruit infused extra virgin
olive oils
•Mary Ann’s Sweetgrass Baskets
•M.C. Cannon Farms: Pasture-raised chicken and beef
•Molly & Me Pecans: Candied and favored pecans
•Pierogi Hut: Handmade pierogies with a variety of fllings
•R&C Barbeque: Barbeque, pork ribs, fries, coleslaw and
fried green tomatoes
•Stella di Mare Designs: Ornaments and décor made with
local starfsh and vintage jewelry
•Sweetie Pies: Homemade whole and 3” “palm” pies made
with fresh, local ingredients
•T & T Kettle Korn: Kettle korn, popcorn and Bavarian nuts
•Te Cookie Chick: Small batch, gourmet cookies
•Te Seafood Lady: Fresh, local seafood like tilapia, founder,
grouper, mahi-mahi, wild salmon, shrimp, lobster tails, crab legs
and more
May 23, 2014 3
Health
Goal Getter continuesfrom cover
Island Connection seeks
community reporter
civic
Linda Clarkson proves age is no barrier to athletic success.
a local ex-Marine, was training for a
Triathlon and used their 5:30 a.m. class
as part of his training. His motto to his
students was to “have a goal, no matter
what.” Clarkson and some friends set their
sights on the “Beach Bum Triathlon,” a
sprint event held in Hilton Head and she
ended up winning a prize.
“I won a coconut,” Clarkson laughs,
“to this day it is one of the best awards I
have!”
From there her athletic career really
took of. Competing in sprint events,
triathlons, and eventually her frst full
marathon—the Kiawah Marathon—in
2012.
It was after the Kiawah Marathon that
Clarkson learned she had qualifed to
run in the Boston Marathon. She started
training last December, something she
took very seriously. Part of her training
included taking frst place in this year’s
Cooper River Bridge Run in the 65-69
age category.
“You have to have a plan,” says
Clarkson, “I trained, and I went over the
course again and again in my head so that
I would be mentally prepared.”
Te media coverage relating to the
2013 Boston Marathon bombings was
starting to pick up by the time Clarkson
left for Boston. By the time she arrived she
found herself very emotionally reacting to
what the people of Boston had survived
the previous year and the slogan “Boston
Strong!”
“Te atmosphere was amazing, none
of these people were letting any of the
limitations imposed upon them by the
bombing hold them back.”
One experience during the race in
particular stood out to her.
“Tey had running guides with the
blind runners, and I was running near
one of them towards the end of the race,”
Clarkson says. “I heard the guide say to
his runner ‘Listen to
that, do you hear it?
Tey are cheering for
you. You only have
three miles left—
enjoy this.’”
Her goal and the
camaraderie, spirit
and determination
she found in Boston
are exactly what
Clarkson attributes
her successes.
“We all need
somebody, we are not created to be
singular,” Clarkson says.
In addition to the people in her life
who have helped her to meet her goals,
Clarkson credits God in her achievements.
Her mantra is “He died for me, I live for
Him”.
Clarkson’s husband, Mike, is also a
huge supporter of his wife’s goals.
“He gets to keep the t-shirts from all
of my races,” Clarkson laughs, “except for
Boston…I’m keeping that one!”
As a ftness coach, events trainer and
swim instructor, another of Clarkson’s
goals is to help train others so that they
too can develop a ft lifestyle. She says that
no matter what age you are, you can have
a better quality of life and live better for
longer. Clarkson is a licensed professional
trainer and spends a lot
of time with her clients.
“I try to look at a
person’s entire lifestyle,
to help them set goals
and motivate for greater
health,” she says.
In addition to training
others, Clarkson’s next
personal goal is the
London Marathon
in April 2015. While
there might be some
fundraising and other
obstacles in the way, with her track record
there is no doubt she will to do whatever it
takes to get there.
Learn more about Linda Clarkson on
her website at tri3Lindac.com or contact her
directly at 843.298.0788 or Tri3Lindac@
gmail.com.

The atmosphere
was amazing, none
of these people
were letting any
of the limitations
imposed upon them
by the bombing
hold them back.
Linda Clarkson
T
he Island Connection is looking
to hire a part-time reporter to
cover municipal government on
Seabrook and Kiawah Islands.
Te successful candidate will
be required to attend various
municipal committee meetings
and Town Council meetings
and translate the information
succinctly and accurately to the
citizens of the islands. He or she
will also have the opportunity to
contribute feature stories to the
newspaper.
Previous reporting experience
preferred, but training will
be ofered to a candidate who
demonstrates enthusiasm and
interest in the subject matter.
To apply for the position please email
a cover letter, resume and samples of your
writing to jennifer@luckydognews.com.
4 May 23, 2014
May 23, 2014 5
daily
Time/Life photographer Arie deZanger speaks at
Charleston Collegiate
TAL K PART OF SCHOOL’ S NEW CREAT I VI T Y COMPET I T I ONS
BY JOYCE HUDSON
For The Island Connection
C
harleston Collegiate hosted retired
Time/Life food photographer
Arie deZanger last month. Te
celebrated food photographer spoke about
his career as part of a set of new enrichment
programs being ofered to students in
the form of creativity competitions. Te
photography competition began in March
and will be followed by competitions in
public speaking and fnance. Governor
Nikki Haley has agreed to write a letter
of encouragement to students in public
speaking.
Te new programs ofer competitions
to students that build on what they
have learned in class. Tese independent
projects put students in contact with
community mentors who have been
successful in their felds in the real world.
As part of the photographer
competition students created a portfolio
for submission in portrait photography
and photojournalism. As well as Arie
deZanger, the students have heard
from John Sanders, founder of the
Kiawah Island photography group, and
photojournalist Alice Keeney.
Te second competition in public
speaking will begin in the fall. Guest
lecturers will include local meteorologist
Tom Crawford and Nicki Joy,
motivational speaker and writer for the
Mercury. Community mentors will be
public speakers from the world of the
ministry, politics, TV, acting, sales, and
motivational speaking.
Students in the entrepreneurship
classes at Charleston Collegiate have
the experience of running a mock
corporation. Te third competition that is
in the planning stages for the fall will be in
fnance to expand on the entrepreneurship
course at the school. Wall Street money
managers and business owners will be
among the mentors in this competition.
Charleston Collegiate School practices
a project based learning approach that
it claims results in a 700 percent better
recall than traditional lecture formats.
Te school concentrates on teaching
bright local students to be successful in
life. Last year 100 percent of graduating
seniors went on to college. In October
of 2013 YEScarolina presented South
Carolina Entrepreneurship Teacher of the
Year to Head Master Hacker Burr.
PHOTO BY RALPH SECOY
6 May 23, 2014
May 23, 2014
7
wildlife
and was ready to go back home. He was
released in front of cheering crowds with
the assistance of Peter and Cullen who
had helped rescue him.
If you fnd a sick or injured sea turtle,
contact the SCDNR sea turtle hotline at
800.922.5431. You can also help care for
sea turtles in recovery in the Aquarium’s
Sea Turtle Rescue Program by going to
scaquarium.org and making a donation,
and by visiting the South Carolina
Aquarium and booking a behind-the-
scenes tour of the Sea Turtle Hospital.
To track the progress of current patients
in recovery, visit the Sea Turtle Rescue
Program blog at scaquarium.org.
Huntingtong continues from cover
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA PHOTO BY BARBARA BERGWERF
PHOTO BY BARBARA BERGWERF
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Collegiate continues on next page
DAILY
O
ver $15,000 was awarded to
student competitors as seed
money last week at the 3rd
Annual Motley Rice County Business
Plan Competition. Trough a partnership
with Motley Rice, YEScarolina was able
to award start-up cash to thirty young
entrepreneurs that presented their ideas
and innovations to judges throughout the
day.
Hosted at the College of Charleston
School of Business, future business owners
competed in several rounds of competition
2014’s top 3. 2nd and 3rd places went to Charleston Collegiate students Paola Macias and Claudia
Soto, and Riley Steward
Daily
Correction
In the last issue of The Island Connection Murray Neale, head of CATR at the
Brickhouse Equestrian Center, was misidentifed. The photo was in fact of her husband.
Here is the real Murray Neale. The Island Connection regrets the error.
8 May 23, 2014
Charleston Collegiate
students earn start-up cash
YESCAROL I NA HOST ED SUCCESSF UL 3 RD
ANNUAL COUNT Y HI GH- SCHOOL
BUSI NESS PL AN COMPET I T I ON
BY HARRIET LEE
For The Island Connection
DAILY
Collegiate continues from previous page
before the fve fnalists landed themselves
in the closing challenge round. Six local
business leaders made up the fnal judge
panel such as Eric Bowman CEO of
SPARC, Carolyn James
and Laura Holcomb
of Motley Rice, and
local attorney Margie
Pizarro.
West Ashley High
School student,
Dekeiya Cohen, won
the coveted frst place
prize of $1,000 for her
innovative business
idea, Te Catching
Prodigy. Te invention
Dekeiya created is
intended to improve
the catching ability
of basketball players
by making Te Catching Prodigy an
afordable, yet valuable, training device
that anyone can use. Cohen is a senior and
will be attending Baylor University on a
full basketball scholarship.
Second place prize of $500 went to
the duo behind the business idea, Two
Beans. Paola Macias and Claudia Soto
of Charleston Collegiate School came up
with a business selling authentic Mexican
tamales made with passion. Tey are
breaking into the food delivery service
industry by selling their tamales frozen in
packs of ten.
Riley Steward also of Charleston
Collegiate won the third place prize of
$250 for her business Riley 2 the Rescue.
Her business was created to provide a
more afordable pet sitting service than
a kennel and ofers a family oriented
environment. Riley is in ninth grade and
currently operates this business from her
parent’s house on John’s Island.
Te two runners up were Jasmine
Godbolt of Summerville
High School for her
child care business
idea, Te Village, and
Austin Tomas of
Fort Dorchester High
School for his business,
Charleston Auto
Detailing.
Tese fve young
entrepreneurs now
advance to the Mark
Motley State Business
Plan Competition June
18th at the College of
Charleston School of
Business in addition to ffteen students
from around the city and state. Te public
is encouraged to attend and watch the
entrepreneurship challenge fnals at 5:30
p.m. where the frst place winner will
receive $3,000, second place $2,000 and
third place $1,000. Te frst place winner
will also advance to the NFTE National
Challenge October 9 in Silicon Valley.
“Great experience and opportunity
to see what the young entrepreneurs
of Charleston are developing. I was
extremely impressed with the amount of
business background they were taught,
assimilated into their presentations and
product development. Wow! Great job
YEScarolina!” said Christine Osborne,
owner of Wonder Works and judge at the
business plan competition.
May 23, 2014 9

I was extremely
impressed with the
amount of business
background they
were taught,
assimilated
into their
presentations
and product
development.
Christine Osborne
10 May 23, 2014
history TENNIS
Kiawah ranked as No. 2
tennis resort worldwide
BY MIKE VEGIS
For The Island Connection
K
iawah received the ranking of the
#2 Tennis Resort in the World by
www.tennisresortsonline.com for
2014. Te rankings come out each May
1 listing the top 75 tennis resorts in the
world. Even though Kiawah was edged
out of the #1 ranking spot for only the
second time in the last nine years, the
resort ranked #1 in the World for the Best
Staf category and the Best Children’s
Program category.
Te source of the rankings comes from
vacationers who are asked to assess resorts
in seventeen categories. Tose include not
only all aspects of the tennis experience but
also such diverse of-court characteristics
as the quality of lodging, restaurants,
children’s programs, and value for the
dollar—so the ranking is defnitely a total
resort team efort.
Kiawah also ranked high in the
following categories:
#1 Best Staf
#1 Best Overall Children’s Programs
#3 Best Lodging
#3 Best Spa
#4 Best Pro Shop
Here’s how the top ten ranked:
1. Omni Amelia Island Plantation
Resort, Fl.
2. Kiawah Island Golf Resort, SC
3. Rancho Valencia, CA
4. Wild Dunes Resort, SC
5. La Quinta Resort & Club, A
Waldorf Astoria Resort, CA
6. Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, Hawaii
7. Bio-Hotel Stanglwirt, Tirol,
Austria
8. Te Resort at Longboat Key
Club, Fl
9. JW Marriott Springs Resort &
Spa, CA
10. Palmetto Dunes Oceanfront
Resort, SC
NOAA identifes probable
location of iconic
Civil War-era steamer
F ORMER SL AVE ROBERT SMAL L S
PI L OT ED PL ANT ER TO F REEDOM
Robert Smalls between 1870 and 1880s (Library of Congress)
Daily
Freshfelds outdoor movie
series features family
classics, recent blockbusters
STARL I GHT CI NEMA OF F ERS F REE
MOVI ES EVERY
WEDNESDAY T HI S SUMMER
G
rab a beach chair or blanket, pack a
picnic and head the Village Green
at Freshfelds Village for Starlight
Cinema, a free outdoor movies series.
Beginning May 28, Starlight Cinema will
take place every Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
until August 27.
Tis summer promises top new releases
such as Muppets Most Wanted and
Frozen, as well as classic family movies like
Honey I Shrunk the Kids and Remember
the Titans.
Upcoming movies include:
•May 28 - Te Smurfs 2 (PG, 105 min,
2013) Gargamel is back, and this time he’s
sending the Smurfs on a wild adventure
through Paris. Determined to harness the
magical essence of the Smurfs, wicked
wizard Gargamel creates a diminutive
race of mischief-makers known as the
Naughties. But in order to get the results
he’s looking for, Gargamel will need to get
his hands on a genuine Smurf. Adventure
ensues!
•June 4 - Hook (PG, 145 min, 1991)
Peter Pan has become Peter Banning
(Robin Williams), a 40-year-old mergers
and acquisitions lawyer with a permanent
scowl on his face and a cellular phone in
his belt. Banning has lost any memory
of being Peter Pan, and is also in danger
of losing his family. On a return visit to
London, he visits Granny Wendy and is
swept back into Never Land and reminded
of life’s true joys.
•June 11 - Despicable Me 2 (PG, 98
min, 2013) Universal Pictures presents
this sequel to the wildly successful 2010
animated picture following Gru, the
ex-scheming evildoer-turned-parental
fgure, from animation company
Illumination Entertainment.
•June 18 - Honey I Shrunk the Kids
(PG, 86 min, 1989) Inventor Wayne
Szalinski has been experimenting with
an electromagnetic shrinking machine.
He leaves the device unattended in his
attic; where his children and neighbor
are inadvertently minimized to ¼-inch
tall beings struggling in a world of giant
bumblebees and more.
•June 25 - Te Nut Job (PG, 86 min,
2014): Surly, a curmudgeon, independent
squirrel is banished from his park and
forced to survive in the city. Lucky for
him, he stumbles on the one thing that
may be able to save his life, and the rest
of park community, as they gear up for
winter - Maury’s Nut Store.
BY GRACE NEWLAND
For The Island Connection
BY VERNON SMITH
For The Island Connection
O
n Tuesday, May 13, representatives
from the Maritime Heritage
Program at NOAA’s Ofce of
National Marine Sanctuaries, presented
their fndings on the probable discovery
of the Civil War steamer Planter,
commandeered from Confederate service
by Robert Smalls to carry its enslaved
crew and their families to freedom.
Te presentation took place at the Sewee
Visitor and Environmental Education
Center, Cape Romain National Wildlife
Refuge in Awendaw. NOAA announced
the probable location of the remains of the
Civil War-era sidewheel steamer Planter,
which gained national fame in 1862 when
a group of enslaved African Americans
commandeered the Confederate Navy
transport ship in a daring escape to
freedom.
Te efort to fnd the Planter supports
NOAA’s Voyage to Discovery initiative,
which seeks to highlight African-
American maritime history through
education, archaeology, science and
underwater exploration.
Under the leadership of Robert Smalls,
the ship’s steersman, crew members
navigated the steamer out of Charleston
Harbor on May 12, 1862, and delivered
the vessel to the United States Navy. Te
New York Herald called the escape “one
of the most daring and heroic adventures
since the war was commenced.”
Te notoriety generated by the escape
and capture of the Planter led to Smalls
eventually becoming the frst African-
American master in the U.S. Navy and a
member of Congress representing South
Carolina – the state where he was born
a slave. NOAA’s report helps fll gaps in
the largely untold story of Robert Smalls
and the Planter, which wrecked on a
beach in March 1876 while trying to tow
a grounded schooner.
In an attempt to answer lingering
questions about the Planter’s fate, NOAA
researchers reviewed historical documents
Robert Smalls continues on page 11
May 23, 2014
11
history
Music on the green
returns to
Freshfelds Village
F REE, FAMI LY- F RI ENDLY
CONCERT S EVERY
F RI DAY T HI S SUMMER
BY GRACE NEWLAND
For The Island Connection
F
riday nights will be rocking at
Freshfelds Village when Music on
the Green kicks of its weekly free
concerts on the Village Green, May 30,
from 6 to 9 p.m. Tese family-friendly
live performances are the perfect place to
kick your heels up and enjoy the sounds
of rock, blues, jazz, country, soul, disco
and every genre in between! Music on
the Green will take place every Friday
through August 29.
Here’s the complete schedule:
May 30: Groove Train’s high energy
and rich vocals deliver high-quality R&B,
pop, rock and recent hits.
June 6: Shelly Waters is a Louisiana
native who brings her Cajun country,
swamp pop, Gulf Coast rhythm n’ rock
sound to the East Coast.
June 13: Chris Crosby Group is a
multi-talented group of musicians who
perform everything from acoustic and jazz
to country and beach.
June 20: Coconut Groove Band’s fve
members pride themselves on playing
“feel good music.” Whether it’s island,
soul, rhythm & blues, funk, blues or
easy listening, they are guaranteed crowd
pleasers.
June 27: Rubberband puts on a high
energy show mixed with disco, reggae,
hip hop, funk, R&B and rock hits to keep
everyone on their feet.
Guests are encouraged to bring a beach
chair or towel, and food and beverage will
be available for purchase. Music on the
Green is sponsored in part by the Town
of Kiawah, Barrier Island Marine and
Charleston Magazine.
arts & events
Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms, etc., are NOT included in the predictions.
Tidal current direction changes and tide time predictions can be
very diferent. Tide predictions are PREDICTIONS; they can be
wrong so use common sense.
May 23
May 24
May 25
May 26
May 27
May 28
May 29
May 30
May 31
June 01
June 02
June 03
June 04
June 05
Source: saltwatertides.com
4:15am/4:49pm
5:13am/5:46pm
6:08am/6:39pm
7:01am/7:28pm
7:50am/8:14pm
8:37am/8:58pm
9:22am/9:39pm
10:06am/10:19pm
10:49am/10:58pm
11:32am/11:38pm
12:16pm
12:18am/1:01pm
1:00am/1:49pm
1:46am/2:39pm
10:21am/11:00pm
11:16am/11:59pm
12:08pm
12:54am/12:58pm
1:45am/1:45pm
2:33am/2:30pm
3:18am/3:13pm
4:01am/3:55pm
4:42am/4:36pm
5:21am/5:17pm
6:00am/5:59pm
6:39am/6:44pm
7:20am/7:34pm
8:04am/8:28pm
and analyzed oceanographic and
meteorological conditions that may have
existed at the time of the Planter’s loss.
Te likely site where the vessel came to
rest, of Cape Romain between Charleston
and Georgetown, S.C., was confrmed
with magnetometer and hydro-probing
surveys that detected the presence of large
concentrations of iron consistent with
the remains of a sunken ship. Te vessel’s
remains are buried under 10-15 feet of
sand and water in an environmentally
sensitive area in Cape Romain National
Wildlife Refuge.
“Our interest in fnding the Planter is
about more than just unlocking the past
and secrets of the deep,” said Daniel J.
Basta, NOAA’s Ofce of National Marine
Sanctuaries director. “Tis expedition
is an opportunity to highlight African-
American contributions to the country’s
maritime heritage and inspire young
people to consider careers in marine
science to help expand
the boundaries of ocean
exploration.”
Following Smalls’
commandeering of the
Planter on May 12, 1862,
the ship continued to be
used by the U.S. Navy
as a dispatch and supply
vessel with Smalls as pilot.
However, by September
of that year, the Navy
transferred the craft to the
U.S. Army Quartermaster
Corps, where it supported
Army operations around
Charleston, Port Royal and
Beaufort.
News accounts suggest
that after the war, Smalls
and the Planter were well
known among local African
Americans. As the Planter’s
captain, he transported many
freed slaves to newly created farmsteads
and communities at Hilton Head and
Port Royal. With Smalls at the helm,
the Planter was reported as the ship that
carried black dignitaries and passengers
to the ceremony of the symbolic raising
of the Fort Sumter fag which had been
lowered after the fort’s capture by the
Confederates.
On March 25, 1876, while trying to
tow a grounded schooner, Planter sprang
a plank in the bow and began to take on
water in the hold. Te captain elected to
beach the steamer and repair the plank,
hoping to get of the beach with the next
high tide. However, stormy seas battered
the Planter as the tide rose and the ship
was too badly damaged and had to be
abandoned. Upon hearing of its loss,
Robert Smalls was reported to have said
that he felt as if he had lost a member of
his family.
The steamer Planter (Harpers Weekly June 1862)
Robert Smalls continues frompage 10
May 23, 2014
10 May 23, 2014
Island Connection Calendar
ONGOING EVENTS
Mondays
Farmers’ Market
Shop for Lowcountry produce, prepared
foods, crafts, specialty products and more at
the Farmer’s Market at Freshfelds Village.
Te Market will begin June 2, and will take
place every Monday from 4 to 8 p.m. until
August 25.
TUESDAYS
Mah Jongg Practice
2nd, 3rd, and 4th Tuesday of the month,
Te Lake House - Osprey 2, 1 - 4 p.m.
Open to all new players, those returning
to the game, and anyone else who wants
a chance to practice with others who
are learning the game. If you have any
questions, please contact Helen Tompson
at hmtsbsc@gmail.com.
Wednesdays
Nickelodeon Character Wednesdays
Starting June 4 your favorite Nickelodeon
characters will be making special
appearances at the waterparks on
Wednesdays this summer. Catch them
during your visit to Splash Zone, Splash
Island, and Whirlin’ Waters Adventure
Waterpark. Characters will make
appearances during regular park hours (10
a.m. – 6 p.m.); exact times will be available
on site.
Freshfelds Village Outdoor Movie Series
8:30 p.m., May 28-August 27. Starlight
Cinema ofers free, outdoor movies on
Wednesdays. Bring a beach chair or blanket,
pack a picnic and head to the Village Green.
Tere will be new releases like Frozen and
classic family movies like Remember the
Titans playing this summer. Upcoming
movies include Te Smurfs 2, Hook,
Despicable Me 2, Honey I Shrunk the Kids,
and Te Nut Job. For more information
visit www.freshfeldsvillage.com.
Fridays
Preschool Zone
Fridays in April at 10:30 a.m., 351 Maybank
Highway, Johns Island Regional Library.
3-6 years old with adult. Call 843.559.1945
for more information.
Music on the Green
6-9 p.m., May 30-August 29 at Freshfelds
Village. Kiawah Island will be rocking with
Freshfeld Village’s free weekly concerts on
the Village Gree. Tese are family friendly
live performances. Tere will be rock,
blues, jazz, country, soul, disco and every
genre in between. Upcoming concerts
include Groove Train, Shelly Waters, Chris
Cosby Group, Coconut Groove Band, and
Rubberband. Visit www.freshfeldsvillage.
com for more information.
Saturdays
Amy’s Place live entertainment
Te restaurant features live entertainment
with Steve Joy (Jazz) every Saturday night
from 6 – 8 p.m. Special guest appearances
by beloved Ann Caldwell singing R&B, Joe
Tedesko, John Stockdale and Shrimp City
Slim.
Homegrown
New Johns Island Farmers’ Market. Every
Saturday at 3546 Maybank Highway
Johns Island, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. www.
johnsislandfarmersmarket.com.
Charleston Farmers Market
8 a.m.-2 p.m. rain or shine in Marion
Square, 329 Meeting Street. A variety of
local produce, plants, herbs and cut fowers
as well as breakfast and lunch vendors, live
entertainment and an assortment of juried
arts and crafts from local artisans for visitors
to experience.
Summer Concert Series on the Sanctuary
Grand Lawn
Shows begin at 5 p.m. on Saturday
evenings. Te Summer Concert Series
is Kiawah Island Golf Resort’s summer
live music lineup which will be held most
Saturdays at Te Sanctuary on the beautiful
Grand Lawn overlooking the Atlantic
Ocean. Each concert is packed with family
friendly entertainment and beachy, summer
music. Each concert will host a diferent
regional band for this complimentary event
sponsored by State Accommodations Tax
(SATAX) Funds, Town of Kiawah and
Kiawah Island Golf Resort.
Ongoing
Unfurled: Flags from the Collections of
the Charleston Museum
Te Charleston Museum presents an
original exhibition, Unfurled: Flags from
the Collections of the Charleston Museum,
from May 5, 2014 to January 4, 2015. On
display in its Historic Textiles Gallery, the
Museum’s fag collection spans from the
early 19th century to the late 20th century,
with examples covering a range of functions
and styles. Many fags are exhibited for the
frst time.
THURSDAY, MAY 22
Live music at Amy’s Place
6 p.m. Ann Caldwell performs at the
restaurant located at 1001 Landfall Way,
Seabrook Island
FRIDAY, MAY 23
Spoleto & Piccolo Spoleto Festivals Kick
Of
Visit spoletousa.org and www.
piccolospoleto.com for details. See story on
page 19.
Mullet Hall Open Trail Ride: Memorial
Day Weekend
May 23-26, Mullet Hall Equestrian Center.
Bring a horse, camping gear, and supplies
for two nights of camping and trail riding
on 20 miles of beautiful, wooded trails.
Te fee includes a stall, one bag of shavings,
and weekend camping. Full restrooms and
shower facilities will be available. Pre-
registration required by 12 p.m. on May
23. Call 843.795.4386 to register or for
more information. A registered and paid
chaperone is required for participants ages
15 and under. Fee: $50/$40 MHEC Trail
Pass Holders.
Beachwalker Bird Walks
8:30 -11 a.m., meets at: Beachwalker Park,
Ages 12 and up, Fee: $0/$0 CCR Discount.
Te southwestern end of Kiawah Island
is an excellent place to spot seabirds and
shorebirds. We’ll hike nearly two miles of
pristine beach looking for a variety of birds,
including raptors and songbirds. Chaperone
required for ages 15 & under.
Freshfelds Free Concerts
6-9 p.m., Freshfelds Green on the Village
Green. May 23-25. A diferent band will
play each night to celebrate the unofcial
start to summer in the Lowcountry.
Performances by JAVA, Suckerpunch, and
Gracious Day. Guests are encouraged to
bring chairs, blankets and food. Beverage
will be available for purchase. For more
information visit www.freshfeldsvillage.
com/event/memorial-day-weekend-concert-
series/.
SATURDAY, MAY 24
Freshfelds Free Concerts
Saturday, May 24 – Suckerpunch:
May 23
Island Connection Calendar June 14
Suckerpunch’s members hold music degrees
and they use them to rock the house with
the best in pop, dance, R&B, ‘60s, rock and
recent hits.
SUNDAY, MAY 25
Freshfelds Free Concerts
Sunday, May 25 – Gracious Day: Enjoy
the sounds of country and Southern music
with Gracious Day, which will bring its full
band to the Village Green stage. Expect
vocal harmonies as they perform the best in
vintage and contemporary country.

MONDAY, MAY 26

Charleston County Waterparks Open
Daily
Starting May 26 Splash Zone Waterpark at
James Island County Park, Splash Island at
Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County
Park, and Whirlin’ Waters at Wannamaker
County Park are now open every day
through August 15. Visit www.splashparks.
com for hours, fees and other details.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28
Early Morning Bird Walks at Caw Caw
8:30 -11:30 a.m., Meets at Caw Caw
Interpretive Center, Fee: $5/Free for Gold
Pass Holders. Our trek through many
distinct habitats will allow us to view and
discuss a variety of birds, butterfies, and
other organisms. A registered and paid
chaperone is required for participants
ages 15 and under. Pre-registration is
encouraged, but walk-in registrations at
Caw Caw are welcome.
Piccolo Comes to Kiawah
6:45 p.m. at River Course Clubhouse.
Tickets may be purchased for $10 at
866.811.4111 or at piccolospoleto.com.
Te program will consist of two parts:
1) a slide show and presentation given
by Karen Ann Myers, Halsey Institute
Associate Director, and 2) a concert by
Jazz Artists of Charleston, featuring Leah
Suarez and Friends. During the Piccolo
Spoleto Festival, the Halsey Institute
of Contemporary Art at the College of
Charleston will present a major exhibition
featuring two world renowned artists who
are originally from South Carolina. Te
exhibition features new works by Shepard
Fairey and a survey of prints made between
1982 and 2012 by Jasper Johns.
THURSDAY, MAY 29
St. Johns Micro Soccer
May 29-July 7, 6-7:30 p.m., St John’s High
School, Fee: $36/$30 CCR discount.
For ages 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. Te coed
micro soccer league will concentrate on
fundamental skills as well as building
positive character. Tis program will teach
children the importance of teamwork and
social skills. Registration fee includes a team
jersey, shorts, and socks. Birth certifcate
must be submitted prior to course start
date. Practice and game schedules will be
provided at the mandatory parents meeting
on May 29 at 6 p.m. Age cut of for soccer
is as of Sept. 1, 2014. Pre-registration
required.
Animal Vocalizations for the Visually
Impaired
6-8 p.m., Caw Caw Interpretive Center,
Ages 9 and up, Fee $9/$7 CCR Discount.
Join CCPRC’s naturalists to discover who
is making noises at night. We will listen
for and learn about owls, frogs, insects,
and other nocturnal noisemakers. Blind
and visually impaired persons of all ability
levels, as well as sighted persons, with an
interest in sharpening their listening skills,
are welcome. Activities include adaptive
techniques for safe, enjoyable participation.
Personal assistants for visually impaired
participants are welcome free of charge. A
paid and registered chaperone required for
participants 15 and under. Pre-registration
required.
Johns Island Basketball Clinics
Learn the fundamentals of basketball
including dribbling, shooting, passing, and
ofensive and defensive positioning. Specifc
details will be discussed at the mandatory
parent meeting held on May 29 from 6 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Age cut of for basketball is as of
Sept 1, 2014. Pre-registration required. May
29-July 7, 4 -6 p.m., May 29-July 9 4 -6
p.m., Meets at St John’s High School, Age:
9-12, Fee: $18/$15 CCR Discount.
SATURDAY, MAY 31
Seabrook Art Guild Reception
Artists of the Month host a reception
from 5 - 7 p.m. at the Lake House. All are
welcome to attend. Teir works will be
on display at the Lake House from June 1
through June 30.
Summer Concert Series at Kiawah Island
Golf Resort
5 p.m. Common Ground. A High energy
bluegrass and folk, and Americana music
group playing at Te Sanctuary.
SUNDAY, JUNE 1
CrossFit John’s Island Cookout.
3 p.m. CrossFit John’s Island is committed
to building a stronger, healthier community
while ofering quality ftness at an afordable
price. CrossFit John’s Island ofers
unlimited classes at $50 a month, $35 with
military, fre, police, EMS and educator
discount, $75 for couples. Cookout/
workout is open to the local community.
MONDAY, JUNE 2
Te Art of Healing with John Westmark
1 a.m. A conversation and reception with
artist John Westmark and Gibbes curator
Pam Wall, moderated by Dr. Jeb Hallett,
Roper St. Francis surgeon, around the
exhibition John Westmark: Narratives.
Sponsored by Roper St. Francis Healthcare
and Whole Foods in partnership with the
Piccolo Spoleto Festival, $15 in advance,
$18 at the door.
SATURDAY, JUNE 7
Summer Concert Series at Kiawah Island
Golf Resort
5 p.m. Palmetto Soul, a variety band
featuring a cool mix of hot songs from the
70’s, 80’s, 90’s, and today is playing on the
Grand Lawn at the Kiawah Island Golf
Resort.
THURSDAY, JUNE 12
2014 Disaster Awareness Day
Sponsored jointly by the Towns of Kiawah
Island and Seabrook Island, at the River
Course on Kiawah.
FRIDAY, JUNE 13
Live music at Amy’s Place.
6 p.m. Shrimp City Slim playing live music
at Amy’s Place.
SATURDAY, JUNE 14
Summer Concert Series at Kiawah Island
Golf Resort
5 p.m. Te Sneakers a dynamic party band
playing Beach and Blues to Funk and Jazz is
playing on the Grand Lawn at the Kiawah
Island Golf Resort.
14 May 23, 2014
www.islandconnectionnews.com
wildlife
dolphins are not
doing well, it says
something about
what humans may
be exposed to.
Dr. Pat Fair
Writing for dolphins in peril
L OWCOUNT RY AUT HOR EXPL AI NS HER
CONNECT I ON TO T HE CREAT URES
I
t’s a beautiful summer day and you’re
walking along the beach when you
come across a dying dolphin in the
surf. You want to help. What do you do?
Too often people try to push the
dolphin back into the ocean but this
doesn’t help the animal and could result in
injury to the person if the dolphin tries to
resist. Tere’s also a serious risk of bacteria
and disease being transmitted.
Wayne McFee of the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration said
people who come across dolphins on
beaches should not approach or touch the
dolphin and call the Marine Mammal
Stranding Network at 800.922.5431.
Currently the southeastern coast is
being hit with the morbillivirus, a disease
similar to measles. Te virus killed 753
dolphins in 2013 from New York to
Florida. 112 dolphins stranded in our
state is the “highest South Carolina has
ever seen,” McFee reported.
Tis year as the dolphins migrate along
the coast, dolphins are stranding at above-
average rates in South Carolina, North
Carolina and Georgia. Te morbillivirus
cannot be transmitted to humans, but
infected dolphins could be carrying
other diseases or bacteria that can be
transmitted. People should not touch a
wild dolphin, whether stranded on the
beach, or in the water, even if the dolphin
appears healthy.
Dolphins are a sentinel species, our
siblings in the sea. Like us, dolphins are
mammals. “If dolphins are not doing well,
it says something about what humans
may be exposed to,” said Dr. Pat Fair of
NOAA.
Fair explained that scientists are
looking for signs of other emerging
diseases and chemical body burdens
that may be making the dolphins sick.
Scientists also will test for diseases more
common to humans but are becoming
more prominent in dolphins.
I’ve long dreamed
of writing about the
dolphins I often see
here in the Lowcountry
but the moment was
just never right, until I
learned this fact from
NOAA: 48-52 percent
of the resident dolphins
in South Carolina
and Florida are sick or
contaminated. Tat fact
was the impetus for the
trilogy. I thought to myself, how could I
not get involved?
Dr. Fair allowed me to participate in the
study on a foating “doctor’s clinic” where
researchers ran a battery of medical tests
on our local resident dolphins. Tese are
the dolphins that do not migrate but live in
our estuarine waters year round. Dr. Fair
served as a mentor for me while writing
Te Lowcountry Summer Trilogy. And
to further my knowledge of the species,
I volunteered at the Dolphin Research
Center in Florida
where I worked with
programs designed for
special needs children
and wounded military
veterans.
With every novel,
I strive to re-connect
human nature with
the natural world.
And my hope is that
when readers close
the book they love the
story, but also realize that they’ve learned
a lot about our beloved Atlantic bottlenose
dolphins.
Mary Alice Monroe lives on the Isle of
Palms and is a member of the Island Turtle
Team. To learn more about Te Summer
Wind and her other books, visit www.
maryalicemonroe.com.
BY MARY ALICE MONROE
For The Island Connection
Lowcountry author and Isle of Palms resident Mary Alice Monroe wants to spread the
word of the plight of dolphins.
May 23, 2014 15
computer corner volunteer spotlight
Tom and Lorraine McDermott
BY MARIA GUROVICH
For The Island Connection
Editor’s Note: Volunteer Spotlight is a new column in Te Island Connection highlighting
members of the community who give their time to help others. If you know of a volunteer who
deserves the spotlight email jennifer@luckydognews.com.
T
om and Lorraine McDermott
have volunteered at Our Lady of
Mercy Community Outreach for
12 years. Tey met at Catholic University
where they were both studying. Married
for 54 years, they have four children and
fve grands scattered around the country.
Tom spent most of his working years in the
fnancial industry, Lorraine in health care.
Tey fell in love with the Lowcountry and
made Seabrook Island their home in 1999.
Both their parents and their faith taught
them to give back so when they moved
here they asked themselves “what now”.
Tey frst got involved with the Outreach
teaching English as a Second Language
Program. Tey were hooked by the stories
they heard from those students (people
who against all odds where working hard
to make a better life).
Tey have both been involved in
various projects over the years. Lorraine
was chairperson of the Board of Directors
for OLMCO for two years. Currently
she helps manage the quilting project
and mans the desk a couple of afternoons
a month. Tom currently helps prepare
people for the citizen exam and he is on the
Development committee as he realizes the
difculty and importance of raising the
money necessary to run this multifaceted
organization.
In the beautiful world of Charleston
and the barrier islands Lorraine and
Tom realize how easy it is for the poor
to become “invisible.” Tey have devoted
their golden years to keeping that from
happening.
You, too, can get involved with Our Lady
of Mercy Community Outreach and make a
positive change in someone’s life. For more
information on how to get involved with
Our Lady of Mercy Community Outreach
contact Maria Gurovich at 843.559.4109
or mariad@olmoutreach.org.
Our Lady of Mercy Community
Outreach is a sponsored ministry of Te
Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy.
It serves James Island, Johns Island,
Wadmalaw Island and Te Neighborhood
House of Charleston.
Tom and Lorraine McDermott
Beware of the hackers
BY BOB HOOPER
For The Island Connection
I
t seems the entire internet and even
old fashioned phones have lit up lately
with a new round of hackers/bad guys/
gals wanting to steal your money and
information. I’ve written about these
scams but I think it’s time to visit them
again.
In the past couple of weeks I have
received many calls about whether
Microsoft can really see the viruses on
the computer and the answer is no. No
one is monitoring your computer (unless
infected) from afar (okay, I guess I have to
discount the NSA), and
they cannot tell that 23
gazillion viruses are
getting ready to swarm
into your computer. It’s
the old salesman’s trick
that if you call enough
people someone will
be on the internet at
that moment and will
be gullible enough
to allow them on the
computer. Do not
allow anyone who cold
calls you to access your
computer, don’t believe
anything they say. Just
hang up.
Last week I heard from a customer who
answered the phone and said yes he was
on the computer. Te caller (in broken
English) explained that the monitoring
section of Microsoft had detected unusual
activity in his computer and they would be
happy to show him the problems. He was
panicked and allowed them to access his
computer remotely. How do they do that
you ask? Well there are lots of programs
such as LogMeIn and TeamViewer that
allow a person at another computer to
“log” into your computer and take control
of it. Once you allow this, the person can
do almost anything they want. So the guy
allows them to take over the computer,
and suddenly he sees a screen showing
hundreds if not thousands of infections
with more downloading before his very
eyes.
Te scam is that the infections are not
real, and what they are showing are called
screen shots that happened on another
computer or were produced much like
a Power Point product. Nothing being
shown to the fellow was real, but it sure
looked like it. At the same time the person
logged in is infecting the computer with
a real virus to do damage at a later date.
Tat way they can bleed the poor fellow
for more money later.
Next the pitch begins, and you are told
that for only $79 or $99 they can clean
the infection. But to be
really safe, you should
buy extra protection
for only $179 for a
year! Of course not
all malicious software
is included, but they
will monitor 24/7
for that type and let
you know right away.
Which happens about
2-4 weeks later and is
another $79-$200 to
clean.
No valid company
will call you, email
you, fax you or send a
letter, no matter what. Anyone that does
is a scammers and only want money or
information that ends in costing you
money. Use good anti-virus software,
keep it up to date and be very aware of
scammers.
In closing remember that an email sent
to you with no text in the body is pure
and simple a way to hack your computer.
Never unsubscribe to anything you did not
subscribe to, it just lets the spammer know
your email is a valid (real) one. Never let
someone take over your computer unless
you know them.
As always if you have questions or
need help you can call me, Rent A Bob, at
843.822.7794 or email rentabob@live.
com.
No valid
company will
call you, email
you, fax you or
send a letter,
no matter what.
Bob Hooper
16 May 23, 2014
outdoords
The joys of boating
GET YOUR TOES WET WI T H T HI S
GUI DE TO T HE SALT WAT ER L I F EST YL E
BY COLT HARRISON
For The Island Connection
T
he ocean is the most valuable
resource on the planet. Here in
South Carolina, we’re blessed with
one of the prettiest stretches of coastline
found anywhere in the world. Cobalt
blue ofshore waters, breathtaking white
sand beaches, and an endless expanse
of backcountry marshes and estuaries.
For fshing guides like myself, I couldn’t
imagine a life without the sea. My
typical morning commute is a run across
Charleston Harbor, past pods of playing
dolphins, famous historical landmarks,
and under bridges; most of which are
clogged with trafc and car horns
sounding of in all directions. I just bump
my throttle up and smile as I trade the
urban clamor for the serenity of this saline
paradise.
People always tell me how
“lucky” I am to be on the water
so regularly. Luck has nothing
to do with it. Tis is a lifestyle
anyone can be a part of. Te
ocean is there for the taking,
and she’s beckoning you to
come play on her.
Charleston ofers boaters a
plethora of activities to choose
from while on the water. Our
harbor and rivers are perfect for
family activities like cruising,
skiing, tubing, and sightseeing.
Beaches like Morris Island,
Capers, and North Kiawah
are perfect for boaters who
want to relax on the sand
without fghting the trafc and
crowds at Folly or Sullivan’s.
Waterfront dining abounds in
areas like Shem Creek and Isle of Palms.
Don’t even get me started on the
fshing. We’ve got hundreds of diferent
species of fsh in the
Lowcountry, from
Blue Marlin pushing
the thousand-pound
mark, to tasty Cobia, to
shallow water dwelling
redfsh, and even the
ever-present, crowd
pleasing Whiting.
Tackle stores like Te
Charleston Angler can
rig you up and send
you right to the fsh. In
short, if you’re not out
there soaking up what the ocean has to
ofer, you’re cheating yourself out of the
best resource in the state.
At frst glance, these ocean based
activities can seem far too expensive for
the general public. Te
sky is the limit with boat
pricing, but you don’t
need a million dollar
yacht to play on the
sea. Small aluminum
johnboats are dirt cheap,
and great for plying the
marshes and rivers. Bay
boats in the 20’ range
are awesome for family
activities and most forms
of fshing. Charleston has
plenty of boat dealerships
Seventy-percent
of the world is
covered by water,
yet ninety-percent
of people spend
their whole lives
on dry land.
PHOTOS BY RALPH SECOY
Joys of Boating continues on page 17
May 23, 2014 17
www.islandconnectionnews.com
outdoors
around town that can help you get in to
a vessel without punishing your wallet.
If you don’t want to fool with the hassle
of boat ownership, there are hundreds of
captains in Charleston that can take you
on a custom trip to do anything from
fshing, sightseeing, dolphin-watching, to
shell collecting. Going out on a charter is
great way to get your toes wet and see if
the saltwater lifestyle is something you’d
like to be a part of. Tere is also the
option of participating in a time-share
style boat ownership ofered by companies
like Freedom Boat Club. Allowing you to
sample the life of a boat-owner without
most of the hassles.
Te summer is just getting kicked of
with Memorial Day weekend, so get out
there and dive head-frst into all that
Charleston’s world-renowned waters have
to ofer. Seventy-percent of the world is
covered by water, yet ninety-percent of
people spend their whole lives on dry land;
don’t let you and your family fall into that
category!
Joys of Boating continues from page 16
18 May 23, 2014
arts & events
Piccolo Comes to Kiawah
Wednesday, May 28 at 6:45 p.m. at River
Course Clubhouse. Tickets $10 Piccolo
Spoleto Hotline (866.811.4111), at
piccolospoleto.com, or at the event.
On Wednesday, May 28, the City of
Charleston Ofce of Cultural Afairs
and Piccolo Spoleto Festival will present
“Piccolo Comes to Kiawah” at the River
Course Clubhouse as an extension of the
Piccolo Preview event which is funded by
Town of Kiawah Island ATAX dollars.
Te program will consist of two parts:
1) A slide show and presentation given
by Karen Ann Myers, Halsey Institute
Associate Director.
2) A concert by Jazz Artists of
Charleston, featuring Leah Suarez and
Friends.
During the Piccolo Spoleto Festival, Te
Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
at the College of Charleston will present
a major exhibition featuring two world
renowned artists who are originally from
South Carolina. Te exhibition features
new works by Shepard Fairey and a
survey of prints made between 1982
and 2012 by Jasper Johns. During the
30 minute presentation, beginning at
6:45 pm, Ms. Myers will share photos,
interesting facts about the artists and
additional behind-the-scenes information
about the planning of this exhibition.
General information about the museum
for guests who have not had the chance
to visit will also be provided. Tere will
be time for Q&A. At 7:30 pm, Leah
Suarez and Friends will perform a mix
of standard and popular jazz repertoire,
from swing to samba, Gershwin to
Jobim, for a special evening not to be
missed.
Leah has performed extensively
throughout the Charleston area and
is currently the featured vocalist
for Charleston’s resident big band,
Charleston Jazz Orchestra.
Piccolo continues on page 19
Y
ou never know what will spark
someone’s creativity. Justine Post
says of her childhood growing up
on Sullivan’s Island.
“I would sometimes open the freezer
to get some ice cream and a frozen bird
carcass would fall into my lap,” she said.
Her ornithologist father and artist
mother surrounded the family with
nature and creative experiences. A poetry
workshop at Creative Spark with poet
laureate Marjory Wentworth and an
elementary school classroom visit from
Jack Tracey began her interest in poetry
but it wasn’t until she attended a Piccolo
Sundown Poetry reading by Mark Strand
as a teenager that she discovered her own
creative voice.
“I had been reading the classic poetry
in high school but seeing a poet that was
living and that I responded to writing in
a contemporary voice opened up my eyes.
Oh! Poetry can be written in the language
we speak in today instead of being
antiquated,” she remembers thinking.
Birds and sea creatures populate her
poems which tell of her connection to
Charleston: “Te water rises with the
feel of clasping, the familiar bit of salt…”
Having published her frst book “Beast”
to critical acclaim, she’s thrilled to be a
featured poet on May 27 at the Sundown
Poetry Series at the Dock Street Teater
courtyard this year.
“Poetry is to be read aloud, of the
page which gives it diferent meanings.
It transforms the poetry and gets the
audience excited about it,” she says.
Piccolo Spoleto was created to celebrate
local talent, but don’t let that make you
think “second rate.” Several local artists
have catapulted to national fame. Te
Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
will welcome home prodigal son Shepherd
Fairey for his frst major exhibition in his
hometown. His new body of work is on
the subject of power. Many remember his
ubiquitous “Andre the Giant Has a Posse”
project consisting of enigmatic stickers
that were posted everywhere. From
that humble beginning he’s launched a
successful career as a graphic designer,
illustrator, activist and artist including his
controversial and iconic “Hope” portrait
of Obama. It’s easy to imagine Fairey’s
irreverent, edgy, political images igniting
artistic fres in developing minds of
young viewers who may relate to Fairey’s
background as a local skateboarder.
He’s sharing the bill with one of the
country’s most prominent artists, Jasper
Johns who was long-time friends with
William Halsey for whom the gallery is
named.
Another local art celebrity will be
exhibiting nearby on the peninsula.
Mary Edna Fraser’s batik exhibit at Ann
Long Gallery is based upon thousands
of aerial images she’s photographed. Her
batiks have appeared in over 100 solo
exhibitions including at the Smithsonian
Institution. A large one graces the ceiling
at the Charleston International airport
concourse.
She’s also presenting a free slide show
of her work “Our Common Tread:
Environmental Awareness” in cooperation
with the local Sierra Club. Mary Edna’s
art depicts our area’s fragile natural
beauty and her activism supports local
environmental causes. An avid patron of
the arts and musician herself, she never
misses the Sunset Serenade at the US
Customs House, a free performance by
the Charleston Symphony Orchestra on
May 23.
Charleston has long been a center for
jazz and the scene is now thriving. Locally
cultivated trumpet player Cameron
Harder Handel developed her chops in
Wando High School’s band program and
has toured the world including a current
gig with Michael Bolton. Catch her in the
big band at one of the many Charleston
Jazz Orchestra concerts at the Music Hall
or at Kiawah. Repertoire ranges from
Latin to swing to Duke Ellington.
Want more jazz? Te jazz cruises are not
just for tourists. Catch Lonnie Hamilton’s
grooving sax or Franklin Ashley’s smokin’
piano rendition of “Summertime” while
cruising under the Ravenel Bridge in
the moonlight. Tese are “Chamber of
Commerce moments.” Tey make you fall
in love with Charleston.
What could be more inspirational than
stepping out of the heat and humidity into
one of Charleston’s majestic churches to
hear magnifcent music played by stellar
musicians? Local actress Dana DeMartino
recommends attending one of the dozen
Spotlight Concerts.
“I absolutely love organ music and
the experience of being in a church and
hearing this instrument resonate of the
walls of a large cathedral reminds me
Charleston celebrates
the success of its own
PI CCOL O SPOL ETO KI CKS OF F NEXT WEEK.
BY CAROL ANTMAN
For The Island Connection
The free concert at the Customs House will once again open Piccolo Spoleto.
May 23, 2014 19
arts & events
of my youth in Paris so this is always a
must,” she said.
A highlight this year is Te Choir of
St. Martin-in-the-Fields on a world tour
from England. Tey’re stopping at Grace
Episcopal Church on June 6 to present a
diverse program inspired by the British
Isles with music ranging from Vaughn
Williams to George Shearing.
Piccolo Spoleto will have over
700 performances in seventeen days
beginning May 23, 2014. Many are free.
Tere’s theater, comedy, drama, music,
children’s activities and literature. Te
festival is a toast to Charleston, the muse.
It’s a celebration of our city’s engaged
audiences, its stellar talent and of those
who carry the city in their hearts as they
rise to artistic success.
For more information visit www.
piccolospoleto.com.
Shepherd Fairey, the artist behind this iconic Hope portrait, returns home for his frst
major exhibition in Charleston.
Piccolo continues from page 18
20 May 23, 2014
May 23, 2014 21
arts & events
Seabrook artist and photographer of the month
STAFF REPORT
For The Island Connection
Artist of the Month—Frank Cassara
Frank moved to Seabrook in 2003
from Annapolis, MD with his wife,
Linda. At that time he was still working
as an account manager for a major
pharmaceutical company. After retiring in
2005 Frank has been able to fully enjoy all
the wonderful activities that Seabrook has
to ofer, including tennis, golf, kayaking,
cycling, cooking, the beach, and music.
He has sung with the Charleston
Symphony Orchestra Chorus and now
sings with the Johns Island Presbyterian
Church choir and occasionally plays piano
at services. Currently he is serving on
the House Committee for the Club and
the SI Natural History Group planning
committee.
Frank has been interested in drawing
and art since early childhood. He took art
classes through high school and considered
majoring in art in college. Other interests
and career distractions kept him from
pursuing this passion until recently when
he took up painting in oil.
He loves to use bold colors to capture
the beauty of nature in all its many forms.
Te marshes, ocean, and sun of his home
on Seabrook provide ample subject matter.
However, he is also interested in the colors
of winter, mountains, wildlife and fowers.
Frank works mainly from his studio at
home and from his own photos but has
also done some plein aire work. He is
currently studying under Bob LeFevre on
Seabrook Island and displays locally.
Photographer of the Month—Stan
Ullner
Stan is a retired professional residing on
Seabrook Island. Photography is a passion
that started while working for his school
newspaper over 55 years ago. Over the
years he has attended many seminars with
some of America’s great photographers.
His interest is street shooting with a
slant toward fnding geometric images
in their natural setting. He processes and
prints his images to museum quality on
archival materials. Stan has won numerous
awards for his photography. Some of the
more recent honors bestowed to Stan are:
1st place Charleston Artist Guild 2014
Member’s Exhibition
HM Charleston Artist Guild 2014
Signature Exhibition
HM Charleston Artist Guild 2013
Signature Exhibition
1st place Charleston Artist Guild 2013
Member’s Exhibition
Juried SE Region Artfelds Show, Lake
City, SC 2014
Wells Gallery Juried Shows 2009-2014
Juried Halsey Post Card Show
Wells Gallery 2 Man Show, R.E. Ofce
Frank Cassara and one of his paintings.
Stan Ullner and one of his photographs.
May 23, 2014 22
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Lucky Dog
Take home a Lucky Dog
KENNEDY & ROOSEVELT
F
all in Love at Te Charleston Animal Society. Kennedy and Roosevelt are
two handsome 5 month old Shepherd Mix pups. Both are friendly and in
need of a loving home. Can you adopt one today? If you›re looking for an
adult dog instead, Charleston Animal Society is ofering great deals on adult dogs
through Memorial Day. All of our animals come with their shots and some degree
of training. Visit us today at 2455 Remount Road in North Charleston.
Charleston Animal Society led the way to making
Charleston the frst No Kill Community in the Southeast
in 2013. It is South Carolina’s largest animal rescue
organization, taking in 90 percent of Charleston’s homeless
animals.

daily
Seabrook Garden Club
celebrates 26 years
BY LYNNE KEENER
For The Island Connection
O
n May 9, Seabrook Island
Garden Club celebrated its 26th
anniversary with a grand luncheon
at the Seabrook Island Club. Over 60
ladies gathered together to celebrate the
successful past year. Tey brought fond
memories of old and new friendships
made through the Club, excellent monthly
educational programs and speakers, and
what they have accomplished every year
through outreach programs, such as
Habitat landscaping, the Symphony Open
House, the Angel Oak Foundation and,
most of all, the Trident Tech scholarships.
Starting in 1998, by increasing dues,
the Club was able to start a Trident Tech
scholarship for students who were studying
horticulture and landscaping, earmarking
and donating the funds collected mostly
to veterans. Te frst scholarships provided
money for books and fees.
Garden Club membership has
increased to well over 100 within the last
few years and that has allowed it to be able
to provide annual scholarships in 2012,
2013 and 2014 of $800 for a semester’s
tuition for qualifying students.
Tose chosen and their families have
thankfully said that these scholarships
have meant so much and that they have
made a diference in their lives because
someone believed in them enough to
grant them an opportunity for further
education.
Mark your calendars for next September
to come join the Seabrook Island Garden
Club in welcoming a new year. Te
Club has already started planning new
“green” adventures for 2014-2015, so plan
on the 2nd Friday of every month from
September through May to stop by at the
Lake House at 9:30 a.m., have a cup of
cofee or tea, nibble on some wonderful
baked delights, meet friends and learn
about our world and our environment.

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