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ASSESSMENT OF THE CHILD-FRIENDLINESS OF

SECONDARY
SCHOOL IN REGION X – NORTHERN MINDANAO
SCHOOLYEAR 2012-2013


Proponent : Dr. Rogelio J. Bahian
Education Program Supervisor – Mathematics
DepED Regional Office X
Velez Street, Cagayan de Oro City

ABSTRACT :

This study was designed to assess the Child-Friendliness
of the secondary schools in Region X – Northern Mindanao.
Specifically, it aimed to gather data on the school’s “Child-
Friendliness” adapting the validated CFSS research
instruments and procedures of UNICEF. It determined the
extent to which the basic rights of children have been realized
in the school and recommend action steps for the secondary
schools to fully realize the seven (7) goals of CFSS. Ten per
cent(10%) of thetotal secondary school were used as samples
of the study and classified as Large, Medium and Small schools
based on the school enrolment as reflected in the BEIS. The
respondents were limited to all the school heads and select
external and internal stakeholders of the identified 10%
secondary schools.
The major findings of the study found out that the
secondary schools of Region X are generally Child-Friendly.
The researcher recommends for the school heads to
propose strategies and activities in consonance to the CFSS
Goals to ensure school improvement for students’ welfare,
health, safety and security. Furthermore, school heads must be
innovative, creative and compassionate and make the schools
in good hands with proper direction to attain the vision and
mission of EFA goals by 2015.
Rationale

The UNICEF-funded CFSS in the secondary level began
with a modeling process that identified eight (8) un-friendly
environments such as frequent natural disasters, child laborers,
armed conflict, among others. It was expanded to 54 schools
with BSE funding. The Regional and division coordinators for
CFSS, school heads, teachers, students and other important
stakeholders were trained on the CFSS framework and
principles which are basically anchored on the four child’s
rights. Also, they were provided with CFSS Modules.
Most of the regional and division coordinators claimed that
they were able to cascade the CFSS framework and principles.
There are other education interventions similar to CFSS that
were provided by several DepED and non-DepED
organizations. There is a need to determine how friendly are
these schools. Media reports un-friendliness in the classroom
such as corporal punishment, bullying, lack of facilities and
cases of harassment. This study hopes to present a picture of
the child-friendliness of selected secondary schools.
Objectives of the Study
The main objective is to assess the CFSS-ness of
selected secondary schools. Specifically, the study will
 Gather data on the school’ “child-friendliness” using
CFSS research instruments and procedures;
 Determine the extent to which the basic rights of
children have been realized in the schools; and
 Recommend action steps for the secondary schools to
fully realize the seven (7) goals of CFSS.
Statement of the Problem
This study aimed to assess the secondary schools of its
implementation of the Child-Friendliness. Specifically, this study
sought answers to the following questions:
1. What is the status of implementation of the Child-
Friendliness in the secondary schools of Region X-
Northern Mindanao in terms of:
1.1. School Setting ?
1.2. Distance of student’s residence to the school ?
1.3. Distance of school to police station, hospital, fire
station, healthcenter, barangay
hall/office and mayor’s office ?
1.4. Curricular Offerings ?
1.5. Number of Shifts ?
1.6. Class-size in terms of teacher-student ratio ?
1.7. Availability of Instructional facilities such as
Academic Classrooms,Science
laboratory, Home Economics, Industrial Arts Room
and ComputerLaboratory?
1.8. Availability of non-instructional facilities for
ancillary services ofstudentssuch as
Library, clinic, canteen, faculty room, guidance room
?
1.9. Availability of armchairs, tables and benches ?
1.10.Availability of Water and Electric supplies ?
1.11.Availability of Toilets and Urinals ?
1.12. Availability of teaching staff with specialization ?
1.13. Availability of Non-teaching personnel ?
2. What is the status of stages of the school’s
implementation of the seven(7) goals of Child-
Friendliness vis-à-vis the CFSS Standards as assessed by the
FGDs?
3. What is the status of the School’s Environment in terms
of social and emotional aspects as perceived by the
students across year levels ?
4. Is there significant relationship between the school’s
level of CFSS Goals as assessed by the FGDs and
school’s educational Indicators ?
5. How do the assessment of students on their school
environment relate significantly to the school’s
educational indicators ?
6. Is there significant difference in the NAT performance of
the three schools categorized as large, medium and
small ?
7. How do the students’ assessment on their school
environment differ significantly by year level ?
8. Is there significant difference in the NAT Performance
between the schools having teachers with specialization
and the schools having teachers without specialization
?
Statement of Hypotheses
In this study, problems 1, 2 and 3 are hypothesis-free.
However, the following hypotheses are stated in the null form in
order to guide the researcher. These hypotheses are tested
at .05 level of significance:
Ho
1
: There is no significant relationship between the
school’s level of CFSS Goals as
assessed by FGDs and school’s educational indicators.
Ho
2
: The perception of students on their school
environment and the educational indicators
are significantly related .
Ho
3
: There is no significant difference in the NAT
Performance between the schools having
teachers with specialization and the schools having teachers
without specialization.
Ho
4
:The NAT performance of the schools regardless of
the classification differ significantly.
Ho
5
: There is no significant difference in the perceived
agreements of students on school
environment when they are grouped by year level.
Significance of the Study
The findings of this study would benefit the following:
Students. This study leads to the use of School
Environment Survey questionnaire and the checklist to
determine the level of child-friendliness of the school.Its results
will be useful to determine the extent on the provision of the
rights of the child.
Teachers. Results of this study will be useful to the
teachers as their parameter of handling students in the delivery
of quality teaching and learning processes in order to attain the
child-friendliness of the school viz-a-viz CFSS standards for the
year 2015.
School Administrators. The outcomes of the study will
guide the administrators in making decisions in improving the
physical facilities such as instructional and non-instructional,
school environment, teaching and non-teaching staff and of
course the teaching strategies that would affect the students’
social, emotional, educational aspects of their students.
Curriculum Planners. Data from this study may provide
guidance in enriching and modifying the curriculum in all
learning areas. They will be provided with significant
information on the relationships and differences of student
achievement level in schools with and without Child-friendliness
practices so that education of the Philippines would be at par in
other parts of the world.
Parents. The findings of the study will help the parents
aware of the security and safety of their children viz-a-viz child-
friendliness standards and performance of their children in all
learning areas. At least they can get insights for more
alternative solutions of helping their children’s achievement
level in spite of the school situation.
In general, the Child-Friendliness assessment and
evaluation should be done in order to find ways to solve
problems exhibited of deteriorating quality of school outputs as
reflected in the recent NAT result where most of the secondary
schools in the country achieved very low and very far from the
Mastery Level.

Scope and Limitation of the Study
This study was conducted from November 2012 to April
2013.. It is an assessment of child-friendliness of the 10%
secondary schools of Region X – Northern Mindanao for
School Year 2012-2013. The research instruments used in
gathering data are validated and adapted from the UNICEF.
The respondents are all the school heads and select external
and internal stakeholders of the identified 10% secondary
schools of the region which are classified as Large, Medium
and Small based from the school enrolment. All types of
schools offering regular and special curriculum.
Definition of Terms.
CFSS – Child Friendly School System of the UNICEF
adapted by the Philippine Educational System.
UNICEF – United Nation International Children Education
Fund
FGD – Focal Group Discussion who will compose of
individuals representing the different groups of stakeholders.
Firmly EstablishedCFSS– Child-Friendliness
assessment for a school which has fully realized the seven (7)
goals of CFSS through collaborations and partnerships with
both internal and external stakeholders. The school has fulfilled
three elements: a) the consultative process with all
stakeholders, b) the approval of SGC, and the SIP as the
material output.
Developing CFSS – Child-Friendliness assessment for a
school has moved beyond the Beginning stage, puts more
efforts at coming up with quality outputs, and exhibits a more
systematic effort at forming collaborations and partnerships
with stakeholders to achieve the CFSS goals. The school has
come up with the SIP and has obtained the approval of SGC,
but fails to do collaborative process.
Beginning CFSS – the school is characterized by
compliance with the required outputs, with little regard to due
processes and minimal pro-activeness. The school has come
up with the SIP without the benefit of collaboration and
consultation with the SGC. In the criterion, inclusion of CFSS
school should have included programs and projects at least five
CFSS goals to score 1 point per activity or practice.
SIP – School Improvement Plan
SGC – School Governing Council

METHODOLOGY
The Research Design
The research design is descriptive-normative survey
method because it aimed to investigate the effects and
relationship of the school profile and the assessment of the
Team’s Focal Group Discussion (FGB) viz-a-viz CFSS
Standards and Checklist of the seven (7) CFSS Goals and the
assessment of the students on school environment survey.
The Research Environment
There are three (3) environment or settings of this study.
The setting was conducted based on the groupings of the
following school respondents in terms of school enrolment:
Large schools, the medium schools, and the small schools.
Normally, the large schools are usually located in an urban or
big municipality. The medium schools are usually located in
the municipalities while the small schools are those in the
remote or in the hinterlands.
The Sample and Sampling Procedures
There were only thirty (30) schools were subjected for the
survey. This number comprised the 10% of the total number of
secondary schools in the whole region. These were classified
based on the following sizes of enrolment. A) Large schools
whose enrolment ranges from 3,00 and above; b) Medium
schools whose enrolment ranges from (2,00) but less than
(3,000) and c) Small schools whose enrolment of less than
(2,000).
The Research Instruments
There are three (3) Survey Forms used in this assessment
survey: a) The School Profile Form to be filled by the school
head; b) The Self-Assessment Checklist to be used by the
Assessment Team for validation; and c) The School
Environment Survey by the students to be responded.



CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK AND RELATED LITERATURE

Child-Friendliness is one of the many aspects in curricular
evaluation. It focuses on security and safety of the learners. It
should also focus on teaching methods, instructional and non-
instructional facilities, school environment’s social and
emotional aspects of students, internal and external
consistency of learning experiences. The main problem, no
matter how good the teaching, learning and facilities, if the
goals of realization of Child-Friendliness are not attained then
the school curriculum is invalid (O’Neil, 1993).
Famador (2010) stressed in one of her conferences with
the education program supervisors about the essence of Child-
Friendliness in school. It isof utmost importance for everyone
to consider the students’ needs, safety and security, academic,
social, moral and emotional aspects especially in planning
regional activities. Teachers, school administrators and
supervisors must include these needs in planning the teaching-
learning processes and formulation of the individual Work Plan
of all the supervisors.
Farnazo (2012) pointed out the concepts of assessment
during his first Regional Executive Committee Meeting
(REXECOM). According to him assessment should give
sufficient data and relevant information for planning to ensure
improvement and quality educational outcomes. Education
Supervisors should have sufficient knowledge of management
and supervision particularly on the strengths and weaknesses
of the school heads, the nature and needs of the school
children, and the student’s learning environment which are the
vital aspects for planning and formulation of policies in the
implementation of child-friendliness in all schools.
THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
Figure 1
Schematic Diagram




PROCESS
School Activities
Strategies towards CFSS Standards
INPUT
School Facilities
SIPs/DEDPs
Internal-External
Environment
OUTPUT
Firmly Established Schools complied to the 7
CFSS Goals/Standards
Firmly Established SchoDevelopin

Feedback

The theory of Input-Process-Output must be applied
following the systems approach. The schematic diagram
clearly shows the inputs like formulation of the School
Improvement Plan (SIP) wherein the Child-Friendliness is the
focus and adhere to the CFSS standards. The Division
Educational Development Plan (DEDP) must include division
and school activities relevant to the seven (7) goals of CFSS
and the child’s rights. The School Governing Council (SGC)
shall have sufficient knowledge on how the school’s child-
friendliness be implemented in school. They can also
participate in the decision making for the appropriate school
activities for the safety, security and welfare of the school
children.
The systems approach should be well-understood and
articulated to both the internal and external stakeholders.

Table 1 – shows the 30 Secondary Schools Which Comprised
the 10% of the total Number of Secondary schools of Region X
with the Corresponding Enrolment

Division Schools Enrolment Category

1. Misamis Oriental Mis. Or. Gen. Comp. High School 10,986 Large
2. Iligan City Iligan City National High School 7,335 Large
3. Malaybalay City Bukidnon National High School 5,330 Large
4. Ozamiz City Ozamiz City National High School 4,621 Large
5. Cagayan de Oro City Cagayan de Oro City Nat. High Sch. 3,950 Large
6. Valencia City Valencia National High School 3,789 Large
7. Gingoog City Gingoog City Comp..High School 3,327 Large
8. Misamis Oriental Tagoloan Night National High School 3,158 Large
9. Oroquieta City Misamis Occidental Nat. High School 3,053 Large
10. Bukidnon Bukidnon Nat Sch. of Home Industries 2,424 Medium
11. Bukidnon ManoloFortich National High School 2,055 Medium
12. Misamis Occidental Clarin National High School 1,970 Medium
13. Bukidnon Kalilangan National High School 1,795 Medium
14. Misamis Oriental Salay National High School 1,705 Medium
15. Cagayan de Oro City Carmen National High School 1,589 Medium
16. Misamis Oriental Laguindingan National High School 1,321 Medium
17. Bukidnon Talakag National High School 1,252 Medium
18. Bukidnon Old Damulog National High School 1,161 Medium
19. Iligan City Tomas Cabili National High School 1,131 Medium
20. Misamis Oriental Misamis Oriental National High School 1,077 Medium
21. Iligan City Iligan City National School of Fisheries 1,058 Medium
22. Misamis Oriental Cogon National High School 808 Small
23. Valencia City Lurugan National High School 632 Small
24. Bukidnon New Nongnongan National High Sch 499 Small
25. Bukidnon Dalirig National High School 414 Small
26. Cagayan de Oro City Tablon National High School 358 Small
27. Tangub City Bongbong National High School 290 Small
28. Misamis Oriental D.G Pelaez Memorial National High Sch 210 Small
29. Gingoog City LURISA National High School 150 Small
30. Misamis Occidental Bitibut Integrated School 36 Small

Table 1. Shows the 30 sampled schools categorized as
Large, Medium and Small schools based on the enrolment.
There are nine (9) or (30%) comprised the large secondary
school. There are twelve (12) or (40%) comprised the medium
secondary schools and another nine (9) or (30%) comprised
the small schools.
RESULTS ANDDISCUSSION


I. General Assessment Information

A. PROFILE of the Identified 10% of the Three(3) Types of
Schools: as to :

a) Large, b) Medium, and c) Small

A.1. Performance Indicators – Large Divisions

Division Cohort-
Survival
Rate
Completi
on Rate-
Drop-
Out Rate
NAT- MPS
Math Eng Sci Fil AP
1. MOGCHS 76.1 85.5 5.05 29.4 44.5 36.9 52.9 41.06
2. ICNHS 73.8 83.9 3.7 35.9 46.3 37.2 55.1 42.3
3. BNHS 66.16 57.79 6.5 36.77 48.9 42.7 66.46 63.64
4. OCNHS 75.4 64.2 8.3 38.63 43.51 41.25 57.46 60.42
5. CdeONHS 75.65 87.27 2.65 28.63 44.20 37.11 41.26 44.49
6. VNHS 80.1 79.3 4.87 43.0 50.09 38.45 52.8 55.27
7.GCNHS 70.77 68.28 8.49 30.59 42.65 33.16 49.89 40.55
8. TNNHS 74.0 94.0 1.6 30.0 39.6 33.14 37.3 41.05
9. MOcNHS 76.8 94.6 0.9 33.3 40.5 39.7 42.8 44.2

Table A.1 shows the Performance Indicators of the nine
(9) categorized as Large Secondary Schools. It can be gleaned
that Valencia City National High School is the highest in
Cohort-Survival Rate while the lowest is Bukidnon National
High School. For the Completion Rate, the highest is Misamis
Occidental National High School in OroquietaCitywhilethe
lowest is again Bukidnon National High School. In terms of
Drop-Out Rate, Misamis Occidental National High School in
Oroquieta City is again has a good record of almost zero drop-
out rate while Gingoog City National High School with 8.49% of
the students who dropped-out. On the other hand, in terms of
the Academic or Achievement Rate per learning area, all the
nine (9) Large schools category achieved poorly in all the
subject areas.
A.2. Performance Indicators –Medium Divisions

Division Cohort-
Survival
Rate
Com-
pletion
Rate-
Drop-
Out Rate
NAT
Math Eng. Sci Fil AP
10.BNSHI 88.1 97.8 0.9 39.49 43.86 34.91 48.99 50.41
11.MFNHS 75.3 84.5 1.1 38.3 40.4 32.3 50.1 50.4
12.CNHS 83.7 95.8 1.3 39.6 44.8 35.4 50.7 51.4
13.KNHS 78.0 88.0 4.06 34.82 37.85 35.4 53.1 52.0
14.SNHS 63.99 67.0 1.76 66.61 59.31 32.5 37.77 39.69
15.CNHS 66.4 68.3 4.2 39.0 40.0 32.8 41.09 40.0
16.LNHS 79.37 76.07 3.6 62.25 61.31 65.11 62.68 67.81
17.TNHS 87.47 69.96 5.8 34.18 53.89 40.07 56.86 60.56
18.ODNHS 78.3 69.48 6.83 27.10 32.04 28.64 42.01 34.11
19.TCNHS 87.47 69.96 10.8 34.18 53.89 40.07 56.86 60.56
20.MOrNHS 78.31 85.88 0 62.0 65.0 42.52 63.0 65.25
21.ICNSOF 85.08 79.8 5.82 35.07 44.57 30.69 49.48 50.4


Table A.2 shows the Performance Indicators of the twelve
(12) categorized as Medium Secondary Schools. It can be
gleaned that BNSHI –Bukidnon National School of Home
Industries is the highest in Cohort-Survival Rate while the
lowest is SNH- Salay National High School. For the
Completion Rate, the highest is again BNSHI-Bukidnon
National School of Home Industries while the lowest is again
SNHS – Salay National High School. In terms of Drop-Out
Rate, MOrNHS -Misamis Oriental National High School in
Balingasag, Misamis Oriental is again a good record of zero
drop-out rate while TNHS-Tomas Cabili National High School of
Iligan City with 10.8% of the students who dropped-out. On the
other hand, in terms of the Academic or Achievement Rate per
learning area, all the twelve (12)Medium schools category
achieved poorly in all the subject areas. However, in
comparison to the other schools categorized as Large schools,
medium schools performed a little bit higher but not significant.
A.3. Performance Indicators –Small Divisions


Division Cohort
Survival
Rate
Comple
tion
Rate-
Drop-
Out
Rate
NAT
Math Eng. Sci Fil AP
22.CNHS 71.73 68.18 7.97 62.83 56.58 66.59 55.47 83.67
23.LNHS 76.69 77.78 8.82 39.0 48.19 34.07 50.6 48.3
24. NNNHS 62.13 61.55 7.38 34.58 29.76 44.97 34.58 57.83
25. DNHS 53.00 98.00 6.0 38.0 45.0 58.0 49.0 59.0
26. TNHS 45.63 42.50 6.86 63.8 68.4 46.9 48.5 50.95
27. BNHS 60.45 70.2 2.0 30.49 62.82 61.15 55.10 53.89
28. DGPMNHS 67.0 62.0 5.0 51.39 76.36 63.09 48.75 48.78
29. LURISA new new 5.4 new new new new new
30. BitibutIntegSch new new new new new new new new

Table A.3 shows the Performance Indicators of the nine
(9) categorized as Small Secondary Schools. It can be gleaned
that LNHS – Lurugan National High School of Valencia City is
the highest in Cohort-Survival Rate while the lowest is TNHS-
Tablon National High School of Cagayan de Oro City. For the
Completion Rate, the highest is DNHS-Dalirig National High
School of Bukidnonwhile the lowest is again TNHS –Tablon
National High School of Cagayan de Oro City. In terms of Drop-
Out Rate, BNHS-Bongbong National High School of Tangub
City has a good record of almost zero drop-out rate while
LNHS-Lurugan National High School of Valencia City
with8.82% of the students who dropped-out. On the other
hand, in terms of the Academic or Achievement Rate per
learning area, all the nine(9) Small schools category achieved
poorly in all the subject areas. There are two (2) secondary
schools categorized as small schools have nor recordsof the
performance indicators because these two schools are newly
established.

Table 2. Compliance to CFSS Standards

Schools CFSS Goals
1-A 1-B 1-C 2 3 4 5 6 7 Interpretation

1.MOGCHS F.E.. F.E. F.E. Dev.. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
2.ICNHS F.E. F.E. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
3. BNHS F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E.. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
4. OCNHS F.E. Dev.. F.E. F.E. F.E.. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
5. CdoNHS F.E Dev. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
6. VCNHS F.E.. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
7. GCCNHS Dev. F.E. F.E.. Dev.. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
8. TNNHS F.E. Dev.. F.E. F.E. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
9. MocNHS F.E.. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E.. F.E. F.E.. F.E. Firmly Established
10.BNSHI Dev. F.E. Dev. F.E.. F.E.. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
11.MFNHS F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
12.CNHS F.E. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
13.KNHS Dev. F.E. F.E. Dev. F.E.. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
14.SNHS F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
15 CNHS Dev. F.E.. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
16.LNHS. F.E. Dev. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
17.TNHS F.E. Dev. F.E. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
18. ODNHS Dev. Dev. F.E Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
19. TNHS F.E. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
20. MorNHS F.E. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
21. ICNSOF F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
22. CNHS Dev. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
23. LNHS Dev. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E.. F.E. F.E. F.E. Firmly Established
24. NNNHS Dev. Dev. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E.. F.E.. F.E.. F.E.. Firmly Established
25. DNHS Beg. Dev. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. Dev. Dev. Dev. Developing
26. TNHS Dev. Dev. Dev. Dev. Dev. Dev. F.E. F.E. F.E. Developing
27. BNHS Dev. Beg. Dev. Dev. Dev.. F.E. F.E. Dev. F.E. Developing
28. GPMNHS Dev. Beg. Beg. Dev. F.E. F.E. Dev. F.E. F.E. Developing
29. LURISA Beg. Beg. Beg. Dev. Beg. Beg. Beg. Dev. Dev. Beginning
30. BitiInteg School Beg. Beg. Beg. Beg. Beg. Beg. Beg. Beg. Beg. Beginning


Table 2shows the assessment of the thirty (30)
secondary schools for the compliance of Child Friendly School
System (CFSS). The CFSS has seven (7) Goals and the
schools were then classified as Firmly Established (F.E.),
Developing (D), and Beginning (B). It can be glean on the table
that there are twenty-two (22) or 73% classified as Firmly
Established (F.E.); six (6) or 20% classified as Developing; and
only two (2) or 7% classified as Beginning (B).
CFSS-GOALS FOCUSED


1. CFSS Goals MostFocused by the schools are the
following:

 Goal No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7 with 73% of the
schools have met theStandard for Firmly
Established. The table above shows the
interpreted data.Goal No. 2is about the
promotion
of health education, healthy behavior, safe and protective
environment for students’ well-being. This includes the water
and sanitation, School Health Program, Physical Safety and
Protection, Prevention of Risk Behavior, and Psycho-Social
Health
 Goal No. 3is about Opportunity for all to enroll
and complete schooling.
 Goal No. 4is aboutPromotion of effective child-
centered teaching-learning practices and
development of life-long skills.
 Goal No. 5is about Building and Sustaining
Collaborative Partnerships between and among
students, families, and communities.
 Goal No. 6is about Enhancement of Learners’
Professional Capacity and improve Morale and
Motivation.
 Goal No. 7.is about Creating Gender-Friendly
Learning Environment

2. CFSS Goals Least Focused by the schools .

 Goal No. 1-B with 27% of the schools
surveyed have met the CFSS Standard for
Firmly Established as it can be gleaned on the
Table 2. It is about the preparation and content
of
school handbook for students and staff and on
the implementation of School Handbook.
Part III. PERCEPTIONS OF LEARNERS on their school
environmentIn order to come up with substantial

information on how the students of Northern Mindanao view
some issues related to their school was


environment, the Surveywas carried out to all year levels of the
respective sampled schools. The activity

started on the second week of November 2012 until the 2
nd

week of January, 2013.

One hundred per cent (100%) of the thirty (30)
sampled schools conducted the survey. However, out of the
expected respondents of these 30 schools only 20,139
students responded the questionnaires which is around 26% of
the total population (76,592) One hundred per cent (100%) of
the schools’ reports were retrieved. However, around ten
percent (10%) of these reports were not answered completely.
Only ninety percent (90%) were substantially answered. The
survey form has nine (9) items with several sub-items in it. The
responses of the students were tallied, collated, tabulated and
presented in the graphs. These are the result.
On sub-items 1.1 – 1.3, of the students checked
the sumasang-ayon(agree) scale. Seventy-five percent
(75%) or 14,355 students checked the Sumang-ayon or
Agree) This implies that the secondary students (male or
female) are worried with the various uncomfortable happenings
that occurred within the school campus. Some of these
misdeeds identified were bullying and teasing. On the other
hand, students expressed full agreement, based on sub-item
1.4 frequency of responses that their worry would only vanish if
there is additional security within the area. However, this
concerns do not stop them from attending to their classes and
going to school eventually (sub-item 1.5). In terms of safety,
students feel somewhat safe while near the school campus or
within the school campus especially along the corridors and
comfort rooms. But students feel most safe while they are
inside their respective classrooms.
In relation to how students perceive others in school
(item 3), students disagree on the thought that students are not
united and do not help each other. For they believed that each
individual student is accepted for whoever he is regardless of
his religion, culture and social status. Students agree on the
fact that most of their school activities and responsibilities were
done as a group, as a sign of unity and acceptance.
On sub-item 3.6, signified that they are determined
to conquer whatever complexities they may encounter in life.
On the other hand, both male and female students are strong
on their conviction to “NO to CHEATING”, even if some
students are doing it. Students’ idea split when asked about
performing well in any school activities though some of it is not
interesting. Male students agree on the idea while the female
students expressed disagreement. Obviously, male students
can go with a task although it irks them than the female
students do.
With regards to the perception towards their
teachers, Sixty-one (61%) of the students agreed that the
teachers’ strategies and methods of teaching allow them to
understand the lesson clearly. They are encouraged to share
their thoughts on the things they have learned. Teachers also
allow students to explain their answers in order to ensure that
the students have grasped the lessons very well. They also
give students special assignments and things-to-do in case of
reasonable absences so that students can cope with the lost
points. Apart from this, teachers were perceived as
considerate and caring to their students.
Eighty percent (80%) of the students also asserts
on the fact that older personalities in the school are much
helpful and impartial to all. With this, students in Region X-
Northern Mindanao were thankful that they enrolled in the
various public schools and they became part of the school
activities, programs and projects. According to them, they can
ask for help anytime they have problems whether personal or
school matters during their vacant periods. Students likewise
concur on the idea that they expected to perform well especially
on Mathematics , Science and English for them to be prepared
for college.

Item number six (6), aims to know the frequency of
occurrence of some activities within this school year.Seventy
percent (70%) of the students were unanimous in their ideas
that they were only asked once or twice by their teachers to do
the following activities, to wit: writing a 2-page reflection paper
regarding latest activities in the school, providing the class with
a presentation regarding their readings and researches or to
make a project that could be utilized whether at home or in
school.
With regards to problems in Item seven (7)
encountered inside the classroom, seventy-two percent (72%)
of the students agree that teachers should know or will be
informed about it. Students also agree that they could always
open up and share things that border them to people and
mature individuals in the school.
Item number eight (8) aims to identify the
perception of students towards their classes. Fifty percent
(50%) of the students, both male and female, concurred that
they find their subjects difficult. But in terms of making tasks,
someone could readily find somebody – the teachers, who
could help if one would find the task hard and tricky. That
everyone is considered unique thus, everyone is treated
equally.
With regards to the subject matter or topics being
discussed in the classroom, eighty-three percent (83%) of the
students are unanimous in their responses. Students agree
that their classes are all interesting and fun. These serve as an
avenue for them to think and learn. With this, students are
motivated to go to school and attend to their classes.
In summary, the result of the survey showed that
seventy-five percent (75%) or (22)of the sampled
schools of Northern Mindanao are committed to the total
development of each student. These schools provide varied
activities, whole some school environment and conducive for
learning and progression.

Conclusion and Recommendation
It is therefore concluded that the secondary schools of
Region \X are generally Child-Friendly.The researcher
recommends for the school heads to propose strategies and
activities in consonance to the CFSS Goals to ensure school
improvement for students’ welfare, health, safety and security.
Furthermore, school heads must be innovative, creative and
compassionate and make the schools in good hands with
proper direction to attain the vision and mission of EFA goals
by 2015






References

Downie, N.M. & Heath, R.N. (1974).Basic Statistical
Methods.4
th
Edition.
Harper and Row Publishers.

Ebel, Robert L. (1979). (3
rd
Ed.).Essential of Educational
Measurement. New
Jersey. Prentice-Hall Inc.

Ferguson, George A. (1981) (5
th
Ed.).Statistical Analysis in
Psychology and
Education. New York: McGraw-Hill Inc.

Roland and Walpole.(1982). Introduction to Statistics. New
York: McMillan
Publishing Co. Inc.












Title : ASSESSMENT OF THE CHILD-FRIENDLINESS OF SECONDARY
SCHOOL IN REGION X – NORTHERN MINDANAO
SCHOOL YEAR 2012-2013


Proponent : Dr. Rogelio J. Bahian
Education Program Supervisor – Mathematics
DepED Regional Office X
Velez Street, Cagayan de Oro City


ABSTRACT :

This study was designed to assess the Child-Friendliness of the
secondary schools in Region X – Northern Mindanao.
Specifically, it aimed to gather data on the school’s “Child-Friendliness”
adapting the validated CFSS research instruments and procedures of UNICEF.
It determined the extent to which the basic rights of children have been
realized in the school and recommend action steps for the secondary schools
to fully realize the seven (7) goals of CFSS. Ten per cent (10%) of the total
secondary school were used as samples of the study and classified as Large,
Medium and Small schools based on the school enrolment as reflected in the
BEIS. The respondents were limited to all the school heads and select external
and internal stakeholders of the identified 10% secondary schools.
The major findings of the study found out that the secondary schools of
Region X are generally Child-Friendly.
The researcher recommends for the school heads to propose strategies
and activities in consonance to the CFSS Goals to ensure school
improvement for students’ welfare, health, safety and security. Furthermore,
school heads must be innovative, creative and compassionate and make the
schools in good hands with proper direction to attain the vision and mission of
EFA goals by 2015.

Title : THE IMPACT OF REGIONAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM OF
ELEMENTARY (RIPE) – MATHEMATICS IN THE PERFORMANCE
OF GRADE VI PUPILS IN THE NATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST
Year 2010– 2012

Proponent : Dr. Rogelio J. Bahian
Education Program Supervisor
Mathematics


Abstract:

This study was conducted in 3 clustered seminar workshops every year
for 3 consecutive years which started in summer of 2009 to 2011. A total of
990 participants who were the grade six mathematics teachers of the
identified academically challenged schools based from the NAT results in
mathematics. The topics taken for RIPE-Math Training Workshop were the
least mastered competencies issued by the NETRC in the annual NAT result
with corresponding level of performances expressed in Mean Percentage
Scores (MPS) shown through color coding. With the initiative of the
researcher, this RIPE – Math was conceptualized in 2008 and conducted
starting 2009. The content, teaching strategies and development of appropriate
Instructional Materials (IMs) for teaching the operations of rational numbers
which include fractions, decimals, percentages, ratio and proportion,
measurement and interpretation of graphs applied to problem solving.
The speakers and trainers were all the division education supervisors,
They were given specific topics each which revolved around in the least
mastered competencies. All the teacher participants were given a 40-item
pretest-post test constructed by the researcher parallel to the least mastered
topics issued by the NETRC. The validity and reliability of the test were
established statistically. The pretest results showed no significant difference
to the pupils’result in math as reflected in the NAT. However, the post test
result showed significant difference with NAT result in math.
The researcher had concluded that RIPE-Math has a significant Impact
to the performance of grade six pupils in mathematics since there was a
continuous increase of NAT result for 3 consecutive years. Among the 5
learning areas tested in the NAT of this region, math is ranked 1 from rank 4 in
the previous years. Hence, the Impact of RIPE-Math is effective. It really
helped in terms of the pupils’ mastery of the content and it developed the
teachers’ confidence, pedagogically expert, efficient and teaching the difficult
topics in Math Grade VI.
Hence, the researcher simply offered to the chief of the promotional
division to continue conducting the RIPE-Mathematics every summer.















Introduction


In consonance to the attainment of the goals and objectives of the Basic
Education Sector Reform Agenda (BESRA) and in support to the Department’s
thrust to improve pupils’ performance in mathematics, DepED Region X, through the
initiative of the Education Supervisor for Mathematics had conceptualized the
Regional Intervention Program of Elementary in Mathematics (RIPE-Math).
This regional initiative aims to enhance the knowledge and teaching skills of
the mathematics grade six teachers specifically those identified academically
challenged schools where the school’s NAT result fall far from the mastery level. It
also provide the teachers knowledge and skills in the use of different forms of
assessment.analyzing and utilizing results to improve performance and guide them
in the preparation of lesson exemplars, modules, and development of instructional
materials for mathematics teaching.
The result showed that there is significant increase of performance of grade
six pupils in mathematics after the teachers were required to attend the RIPE-M
Summer Training by clusters.
Three years of 2009, the performance of grade six pupils in mathematics as
shown in the NAT result was very poor. The NETRC further analyzed that the
grade six pupils werepoor in the operations of rational numbers applied to problem
solving, measurement, ratio and proportion, percentages problems, and graph
interpretation.
Operations of rational numbers which include the four fundamental operations
of fractions, decimals, percentages, ratio and proportion, per cent and percentage
problems and in the interpretation of graphs and tables should not be avoided by
teachers. Teachers should find interesting and meaningful problems which are real-
life for pupils to solve orally with accuracy(Bell: 2000)
On the other hand, in order to meet the pressing demand globally competition
on technology and strategies. It is proper to prepare the students’ to improve their
proficiency in mathematics. On this premise that the researcher feels there is a
need to conduct a study and investigate why there was always a downward trend of
students’ performance in mathematics. The result will be the bases for adopting
appropriate measure to improve theteaching-learning processes and improve the
performance in the NAT and for the life-long skills.

Statement of the Problem
This study attempted to find out the impact of the Regional Intervention
Program of Elementary – Mathematics for the Year 2010 - 2012.
Specifically, this study sought to answer the following questions:
1. What is the Impact of RIPE – Mathematics in the performance of the
grade six pupils in the NAT for the 3 consecutive years startingthe Year
2010-2012 ?
2. How do the performance level of the Grade VI pupils in NATand teachers’
performance in the Pre-Test and Post test during the cluster training
differ significantly ?
3. Is there significant effect of RIPE – M in the NAT result of pupils
whose teachers underwent the training ?


Statement of Hypotheses

Problem No. 1 is a hypothesis free. Hypotheses testing can only
beapplied to Problems No. 2, and 3. .This study used the .05 level of
significance in testing the following null hypotheses:
Ho
1
: There is no significant difference in the performance of students in the
NAT and the teachers in the Pre-Test and Post Test in Mathematics differ
significantly.
Ho
2
: There is significant effect of RIPE – Mathematics on the NAT results of
mathematics for students whose teacher underwent RIPE – Mathematics seminar-
workshop.
















THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

Performance of pupils in mathematics is dependent on the quality of
teaching- learning delivered by the teachers. Improvement of pupils’ performance is
evident on test results either local or national examinations.
Three years before 2009, pupils performance in mathematics as
reflected in the NAT Result showed fluctuations when plotted on the graph. On these
years, among the five learning areas tested in NAT, mathematics was always the
last. On the 2008, Mathematics had surpassed Science. Mathematics was on the
second to the last.
Schematic Diagram










Feedbacks




The schematic diagram shows the theory of INPUT – PROCESS- OUTPUT of
Systems Approach. The Inputs are the Modules of Mathematics, Lesson Exemplars
Modules
Lesson Exemplars
Workbooks

RIPE –MATH


Grade VI
Teachers’
Cluster Training
Seminar-
Workshop
IMPROVED
PUPILS’ NAT
PERFORMANCE
IMPROVED
TEACHERS’
STRATEGIES
Teaching Strategies
and the appropriate Teaching Strategies. These are processed in the RIPE-M
Training-Workshop. The result or the Output is the NAT Result of Math in 2010,
2011and 2012.
METHODOLOGY
The Research Design
The Descriptive-Normative method was used in this study. This method was
preferred since the result was analyzed based on the norms established by the
NETRC.

The Research Environment
This study was conducted in 3 clusters every year for 3 consecutive years
which started in Summer of 2010 – 2012. Cluster 1 was at RELC for the divisions of
Cagayan de Oro City, Gingoog City, Camiguin and Iligan City. Cluster 2 was at the
Training Center of the division of Bukidnon for the divisions of Bukidnon, Malaybalay
City and Valencia City. Cluster 3 was at the Training Center of the division of
Ozamiz City for Tangub City, Ozamiz City, Oroquieta City and Misamis Occidental.

The Subjects

The subjects of this study were the grade six mathematics teachers whose school
was classified as the academically challenged school as per result of the National
Achievement Test result every year for 3 consecutive summers from 2010-2012.

The Respondents

The respondents comprised of a total 990 grade six math teachers for 3 clusters with
110 teachers of every cluster for3consecutive summers from 2010-2012.

The Sampling Design and Procedure
To arrive at the required number of respondents needed in this research,
the researcher employed the cluster-purposive sampling. After having divided the
research environment into 3 clusters, the researcher identified the grade six math
teachers corresponding to the distribution of participants per division in every cluster.
Gay (1976:213) suggested that a cluster sampling may be employed to a population
which were spread out geographically far from each other. This sampling design
would help facilitate in the identification of the samples.

Table 1-Distribution of Participants

Cluster Center Division Number of Trainees
I RELC-Cagayan de
Oro City

Cagayan de Oro City 20
Gingoog City 15
Misamis Oriental 40
Iligan City 20
Camiguin 15
Total 110
II Division Training
Center -Bukidnon

Bukidnon 60
Malaybalay City 25
Valencia City 25
Total 110
III Division Training
CenterOzamiz City

Misamis Occidental 40
Lanao del Norte 40
Ozamiz City 10
Tangub City 10
Oroquieta City 10
Total 110
Grand Total 330




RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

The performance of both groups was analyzed to determine the Impact of
RIPE – Mathematics. This intervention is to address the pressing problems that the
grade six pupils got low in mathematics as reflected in the NAT yearly. .In answer
toProblem 1. The RIPE-Mathematics has an increasing significant impact in the
performance of grade six pupils in mathematics as reflected in the 3 consecutive
NAT results from School Year 2010-2011 to School Year 2012-2013.
Obviously, although there was an increase every year but still the performance of the
teachers was still far from the standard score or MPS of 75%. However, there were divisions
which obtained MPS with the evaluation , MASTERY already such as Bukidnon, Misamis
Oriental, Camiguin, Malaybalay City, Misamis Occidental, Oroquieta City, Ozamiz City and
Tangub City, These divisions have a continuous increase of about 2% – 5 % MPS every
year and they were almost to Mastery Level of 75% MPS. The NAT result of the School
Year 2008-2009 was used as the baseline. Table 1 below is the Comparative NAT Results
from School Year 2008-2009 to SY 2011-2012.

Table 1 – Comparative NAT Result by Division
Division Elementary
SY 2008-2009 SY 2009-2010 SY 2010-2011 SY 2011-2012
Bukidnon 62.89 62.60 61.60 62.58
Cagayan de Oro
City
58.43 70.24 69.36 61.94
Camiguin 71.46 75.52 77.45 79.76
Gingoog City 71.35 79.38 79.95 78.91
Iligan City 49.94 58.25 64.49 62.08
Lanao del Norte 65.44 72.96 76.26 74.09
Malaybalay City 65.32 67.25 61.16 63.25
Misamis
Occidental
61.67 67.85 73.16 75.44
Misamis Oriental 72.84 77.73 79.73 80.39
Oroquieta City 65.14 76.16 76.49 76.65
Ozamiz City 72.06 61.82 64.85 71.69
Tangub City 69.39 72.58 77.18 78.89
Valencia City 62.23 67.88 65.97 63.38
Regional Level 64.23 69.16 70.39 69.52


Table 2 shows the result of the teachers’ Pre-test for 3 years which

started inSummer of 2009 – 2012.

Content Areas No. of
Items
Performance Level (MPS) Interpretationof MPS
based on NAT
Descriptive Mark
2010 2011 2012
1. Rational Numbers 20 45.2 48.8 52.4
Legend:

L.M. -Least Mastered
N.M -Nearly Mastered
M - Mastered
2. Measurement 10 38.1 38.7 43.9
3. Problem Solving 10 37.2 40..5 42.6
Total 40 40.2 42.6 46.3
Descriptive Mark L.M L.M L.M

Table 2 shows that the teacher-participants have no mastery on the
topics in mathematics grade six tested to them in the Pretest. In the following
training days, content specifically the least mastered topics were discussed
intensively and teachers were taught how to present these topics to be easier for the
pupils to grasp the difficult lessons. Before the close of the seminar, all the teacher-
trainees took the Post Test and the result was tabulated in Table 3.





Table 3 – shows the computed Mean Percentage Scores (MPS) of the
teacher participants in the Post Test for consecutive 3 years during summer which
started in 2010 to 2012.
Content Areas No. of
Items
Performance Level (MPS) Interpretation of MPS
based on NAT
Descriptive Mark
2010 2011 2012
1. Rational Numbers 20 55.2 60.8 62.4 Legend:

L.M. -Least Mastered
N.M -Nearly Mastered
M - Mastered
2. Measurement 10 58.1 65.7 75.9
3. Problem Solving 10 57.2 64.5 67.4
Total 40 56.8 63.7 68.57
Descriptive Mark N.M N.M. N.M

% of the school divisions are improving from SY 2010 – 2012, however 50% of the
divisions have obtained MASTERY level ratingin NAT 2012 . Other divisions are
almost at the Mastery Level of 75% MPS. School heads were also knowledgeable
with regards to teaching strategies and mostespecially if they have full knowledge
regarding mathematics content standards and teaching strategies.
The above table shows the performance level of teachers in the Post Test
given during the last day of their training. The result of the 3 sets of teacher trainees
by clusters of the 3 consecutive years is presented and analyzed.The increase was
attributed to the awareness of teachers that pre-test and post test are given before
the training proper. Hence, there was significant improvement in the Post Test result.


Conclusion and Recommendation

As it can be gleaned in Table 1, there is significant increase in the NAT.
Hypothesis was rejected at .05 level of significance. In other words, there was a
significant increase which is the Impact of the initiated intervention.
The researcher offered recommendation to conduct of RIPE regularly and
revive the mechanics ensure the content topics be discussed by their mathematics
teachers following the spiraling approach of teaching. Hopefully, by next school year,
the RIPE must be enhanced and regularly implemented in all elementary schools in
the whole region.




















References

Downie, N.M. & Heath, R.N. (1974).Basic Statistical Methods.4
th
Edition.
Harper and Row Publishers.

Ebel, Robert L. (1979). (3
rd
Ed.).Essential of Educational Measurement. New
Jersey. Prentice-Hall Inc.

Ferguson, George A. (1981) (5
th
Ed.).Statistical Analysis in Psychology and
Education. New York: McGraw-Hill Inc.

Roland and Walpole.(1982). Introduction to Statistics. New York: McMillan
Publishing Co. Inc.















Introduction


In consonance to the attainment of the goals and objectives of the Basic
Education Sector Reform Agenda (BESRA) and in support to the Department’s
thrust to improve pupils’ performance in mathematics, DepED Region X, through the
initiative of the Education Supervisor for Mathematics had conceptualized the
Regional Intervention Program of Elementary in Mathematics (RIPE-Math).
This regional initiative aims to enhance the knowledge and teaching skills of
the mathematics grade six teachers specifically those identified academically
challenged schools where the school’s NAT result fall far from the mastery level. It
also provide the teachers knowledge and skills in the use of different forms of
authentic assessment. The teachers were trained and guided on how to analyze
and utilize test results to improve pupils’ academic performance. They were also
trained on how to write lesson exemplars, teaching modules, and in the
development of instructional materials for mathematics teaching.
The result showed that there is significant increase of performance of grade
six pupils in mathematics after the teachers had undergone seminar-workshop in the
RIPE-Math Summer Training by clusters.
Three years before 2009, the performance of grade six pupils in mathematics
as shown in the NAT result was very poor. The NETRC further analyzed that
grade six pupils were poor in the operations of rational numbers applied to problem
solving, like fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percentages problems,
measurement and graph interpretation.
Teachers should find interesting and meaningful problems which are in real-
life situations for pupils to solve orally with accuracy (Bell: 2000)
On the other hand, it is proper to prepare the students to improve their
proficiency in mathematics in order to compete other students around the world. On
this premise, the researcher feels there is a need to conduct RIPE-Math every
summer and ensure a continuous increase of Math a study and investigate why
there was always a downward trend of students’ performance in mathematics. The
result will be the bases for adopting appropriate measure to improve the teaching-
learning processes and improve the performance in the NAT and for the life-long
skills.

Statement of the Problem
This study attempted to find out the impact of the Regional Intervention
Program of Elementary – Mathematics for the Year 2010 - 2012.
Specifically, this study sought to answer the following questions:
1. What is the Impact of RIPE – Mathematics in the performance of the
grade six pupils in the NAT for the 3 consecutive years starting the
School Year 2010-2011 to School Year 2012-2013 ?
2. How do the performance level of the Grade VI pupils in NAT and
teachers’ performance in the Pre-Test and Post test during the cluster
training differ significantly ?
3. Is there significant effect of RIPE – M in the NAT result of pupils whose
teachers underwent the training ?




Statement of Hypotheses

Problem No. 1 is a hypothesis free. Hypotheses testing can only be applied
to Problems No. 2, and 3. .This study used the .05 level of significance in testing the
following null hypotheses:
Ho
1
: There is no significant difference in the performance of students in the
NAT and the teachers in the Pre-Test and Post Test in Mathematics differ
significantly.
Ho
2
: There is significant effect of RIPE – Mathematics on the NAT results of
mathematics for students whose teacher underwent RIPE – Mathematics seminar-
workshop.
THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

Performance of pupils in mathematics is dependent on the quality of
teaching- learning delivered by the teachers. Improvement of pupils’ performance is
evident on test results either local or national examinations.
Three years before 2010, pupils’ performance in mathematics as
reflected in the NAT Result showed fluctuations when plotted on the graph. On these
years, among the five learning areas tested in NAT, mathematics was always the
last. In the 2008, Mathematics had surpassed Science. Mathematics was on the
second to the last.
Schematic Diagram





Modules
Lesson Exemplars
Workbooks

RIPE –MATH


Grade VI
Teachers’
Cluster Training
Seminar-
Workshop
IMPROVED
PUPILS’ NAT
PERFORMANCE
IMPROVED
TEACHERS’
STRATEGIES
Teaching Strategies





Feedbacks


The schematic diagram shows the theory of INPUT – PROCESS- OUTPUT of
Systems Approach. The Inputs are the Modules of Mathematics, Lesson Exemplars
and the appropriate Teaching Strategies. These are processed in the RIPE-M
Training-Workshop. The result or the Output is the NAT Result of Math in 2010,
2011and 2012.

METHODOLOGY
The Research Design
The Descriptive-Normative method was used in this study. This method was
preferred since the result was analyzed based on the norms established by the
NETRC.

The Research Environment
This study was conducted in 3 clusters every year for 3 consecutive years
which started in Summer of 2010 – 2012. Cluster 1 was at RELC for the divisions of
Cagayan de Oro City, Gingoog City, Camiguin and Iligan City. Cluster 2 was at the
Division Training Center of Bukidnon for the divisions of Bukidnon, Malaybalay City
and Valencia City. Cluster 3 was at the Training Center of the division of Ozamiz
City for Tangub City, Ozamiz City, Oroquieta City and Misamis Occidental.

The Subjects

The subjects of this study were the grade six mathematics teachers whose school
was classified as the academically challenged school as per result of the National
Achievement Test result every year for 3 consecutive summers from 2010-2012.
The Respondents
The respondents comprised of a total 990 grade six math teachers for 3
clusters with 110 teachers of every cluster for 3 consecutive summers from 2010-
2012.
The Sampling Design and Procedure
To arrive at the required number of respondents needed in this research,
the researcher employed the cluster-purposive sampling. After having divided the
research environment into 3 clusters, the researcher identified the grade six math
teachers corresponding to the distribution of participants per division in every cluster.
Gay (1976:213) suggested that a cluster sampling may be employed to a population
which were spread out geographically far from each other. This sampling design
would help facilitate in the identification of the samples.

Table 1-Distribution of Participants
Cluster Center Division Number of Trainees
I RELC-Cagayan de
Oro City

Cagayan de Oro City 20
Gingoog City 15
Misamis Oriental 40
Iligan City 20
Camiguin 15
Total 110
II Division Training
Center -Bukidnon

Bukidnon 60
Malaybalay City 25
Valencia City 25
Total 110
III Division Training

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

The performance of both groups was analyzed to determine the Impact of
RIPE – Mathematics. This intervention is to address the pressing problems that the
grade six pupils got low in mathematics as reflected in the NAT yearly. In answer to
Problem 1. The RIPE-Mathematics has an increasing significant impact in the
performance of grade six pupils in mathematics as reflected in the 4 consecutive
NAT results from 2010-2013.
Obviously, this School Year 2012-2013, the grade six pupils obtained the
over-all MPS of 75% in Mathematics. There were divisions which obtained MPS
lower than MPS of 75%, however, these divisions have a continuous increase of
about 2% - 5% MPS every year and they were almost meeting the target of the ideal
mastery level of 75% MPS. To mention the divisions are Bukidnon, Misamis Oriental,
Camiguin, Malaybalay City, Misamis Occidental, Oroquieta City, Ozamiz City and
Valencia City, El Salvador City, Iligan City and Cagayan de Oro City. As reflected in
Table 1 of the next page, shows the Comparative NAT Result of Camiguin,
Gingoog City and Tangub City that obtained the target of 75% MPS from School
Year 2008-2009 to SY 2012-2013.


CenterOzamiz City
Misamis Occidental 40
Lanao del Norte 40
Ozamiz City 10
Tangub City 10
Oroquieta City 10
Total 110
Grand Total 330

Table 1 – Comparative NAT Result by Division
Division Elementary
SY 2008-2009 SY 2009-2010 SY 2010-2011 SY 2011-2012
1. Bukidnon 62.89 62.60 61.60 62.58
2. Cagayan de Oro City 58.43 70.24 69.36 61.94
3. Camiguin 71.46 75.52 77.45 79.76
4. Gingoog City 71.35 79.38 79.95 78.91
5. Iligan City 49.94 58.25 64.49 62.08
6. Lanao del Norte 65.44 72.96 76.26 74.09
7. Malaybalay City 65.32 67.25 61.16 63.25
8. Misamis Occidental 61.67 67.85 73.16 75.44
9. Misamis Oriental 72.84 77.73 79.73 80.39
10.Oroquieta City 65.14 76.16 76.49 76.65
11.Ozamiz City 72.06 61.82 64.85 71.69
12.Tangub City 69.39 72.58 77.18 78.89
13 Valencia City 62.23 67.88 65.97 63.38
Regional Level 64.23 69.16 70.39 69.52


Table 2 – Five-Year Comparative NAT Result in Mathematics Grade VI
Division
SY 2008-2009
SY 2009-2010 SY 2010-2011 SY 2011-2012 SY 2012-2013
1. Bukidnon

2. Cagayan de Oro City

3. Camiguin

4. El Salvador City

5. Gingoog City

6. Iligan City

7. Lanao del Norte

8. Malaybalay City

9. Misamis Occidental

10. Misamis Oriental

11. Oroquieta City

12. Ozamiz City

13. Tangub City

14. Valencia City

Regional MPS


Table 3 shows the result of the teachers’ Pre-test for 3 years which

started in Summer of 2009 – 2012.

Content Areas No. of
Items
Performance Level (MPS) Interpretation of MPS
based on NAT
Descriptive Mark
2010 2011 2012
1. Rational Numbers 20 45.2 48.8 52.4
Legend:

L.M. -Least Mastered
N.M -Nearly Mastered
M - Mastered
2. Measurement 10 38.1 38.7 43.9
3. Problem Solving 10 37.2 40..5 42.6
Total 40 40.2 42.6 46.3
Descriptive Mark L.M L.M L.M

Table 3 shows that the teacher-participants have no mastery on the
topics in mathematics grade six tested to them in the Pretest. In the following
training days, content specifically the least mastered topics were discussed
intensively and teachers were taught how to present these topics to be easier for the
pupils to grasp the difficult lessons. Before the close of the seminar, all the teacher-
trainees took the Post Test and the result was tabulated in Table 4.

Table 4 – shows the computed Mean Percentage Scores (MPS) of the
teacher participants in the Post Test for consecutive 3 years during summer which
started in 2010 to 2012.
Content Areas No. of
Items
Performance Level (MPS) Interpretation of MPS
based on NAT
Descriptive Mark
2010 2011 2012
1. Rational Numbers 20 55.2 60.8 62.4 Legend:

L.M. -Least Mastered
N.M -Nearly Mastered
M - Mastered
2. Measurement 10 58.1 65.7 75.9
3. Problem Solving 10 57.2 64.5 67.4
Total 40 56.8 63.7 68.57
Descriptive Mark N.M N.M. N.M

% of the school divisions are improving from SY 2010 – 2012, however 50% of the
divisions have obtained MASTERY level rating in NAT 2012 . Other divisions are
almost at the Mastery Level of 75% MPS. School heads were also knowledgeable
with regards to teaching strategies and most especially if they have full knowledge
regarding mathematics content standards and teaching strategies.
The above table shows the performance level of teachers in the Post Test
given during the last day of their training. The result of the 3 sets of teacher trainees
by clusters of the 3 consecutive years is presented and analyzed. The increase was
attributed to the awareness of teachers that pre-test and post test are given before
the training proper. Hence, there was significant improvement in the Post Test result.
Conclusion and Recommendation

As it can be gleaned in Table 1, there is significant increase in the NAT.
Hypothesis was rejected at .05 level of significance. In other words, there was a
significant increase which is the Impact of the initiated intervention.
The researcher offered recommendation to conduct of RIPE regularly and
revive the mechanics ensure the content topics be discussed by their mathematics
teachers following the spiraling approach of teaching. Hopefully, by next school year,
the RIPE Math must be enhanced and regularly implemented in all elementary
schools in the whole region.















References

Downie, N.M. & Heath, R.N. (1974).Basic Statistical Methods.4
th
Edition.
Harper and Row Publishers.

Ebel, Robert L. (1979). (3
rd
Ed.).Essential of Educational Measurement. New
Jersey. Prentice-Hall Inc.

Ferguson, George A. (1981) (5
th
Ed.).Statistical Analysis in Psychology and
Education. New York: McGraw-Hill Inc.

Roland and Walpole.(1982). Introduction to Statistics. New York: McMillan
Publishing Co. Inc.

































DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Republic of the Philippines
Department of Education
REGION X – NORTHERN
MINDANAO
Gregorio A. Pelaez, Sr. Memorial Sports Center
Velez Street, Cagayan de Oro City