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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY
KANSAN
Volume 127 Issue 122 Monday, June 2, 2014
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Todays
Weather
HI: 79
LO: 63
Isolated thunderstorms. Highs in
the upper 70s and lows in the 60s.
INSIDE
THIS ISSUE
Kansas fell to Kentucky 8-6
Sunday in the NCAA Tournament
after making a late comeback. It
was the teams rst tournament
appearance in ve years. Recap
on PAGE 10.
The Spencer Museum of Art will
start a $5 million renovation
process this fall. See what it will
look like on PAGE 2.
Ireland native and current Law-
rence resident Nick Carswell is
part of Silly Goose Records, a
local music collective and inde-
pendent record label. Read his
story on PAGE 9.
From track and eld to rowing,
several University non-revenue
sports experienced success this
year. Recap on PAGE 11.
ICYMI: Whats happened in spring
sports since nals week PAGE 11
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 2
N
news
STAFF
Editor-in-chief
Emma LeGault
Managing editor
Tom DeHart
Multimedia editor
James Hoyt
Design chief
Clayton Rohlman
Business manager
Scott Weidner
Sales manager
Alek Joyce
Sales & marketing
adviser
Jon Schlitt
Content director
Brett Akagi
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weather,
Jay?
Whats the
weather.com
WEDNESDAY
HI: 94
LO: 67
Morning clouds
followed by afternoon
sun.
Time for da pool
TUESDAY
HI: 92
LO: 73
Sunny in the morning
with isolated t-storms
later in the day.
Grab that umbrella
THURSDAY
HI: 79
LO: 63
Isolated thunderstorms.
Highs in the upper 70s
and lows in the 60s.
Thu-thun-thunderstorms
FRIDAY
HI: 81
LO: 63
Mix of sun and clouds.
Highs in the low 80s
and lows in the 60s.
Cool, shady day
Spencer renovation plans revealed
CAMPUS
BEN CARROLL
news@kansan.com
Pei Cobb Freed and Partners, an
international architectural design
frm, revealed its $5 million design
plan for phase one of the major reno-
vation and expansion plan for the
Spencer Museum of Art on May 29.
Phase one, which is scheduled to
begin in the fall, will remodel more
than 15,000 square feet of interior
space inside the museum, including
tripling the size of the lobby and the
visitor orientation space.
Saralyn Reece Hardy, museum
director, said the renovations would
afect students.
Were committed to having the
museum be both be a place of educa-
tion and learning, but also a place
where students can feel at home in,
Hardy said. Tere will be a much
more inviting entrance and a much
more interactive space when you
come in.
Te central court and adjacent
galleries will also be renovated with
foor-to-ceiling windows to fll the
gallery with natural light and allow
visitors to connect with nature while
overlooking Marvin Grove and the
Campanile.
To further achieve the museums
mission of strengthening and sup-
porting teaching, learning and re-
search, the phase will also introduce
a new gallery that will allow faculty
and the public to explore and learn
more about the museums collections.
Te project will also include an
additional study room named afer
Stephen Goddard, the museums
associate director and senior curator.
As well as doubling the storage space
for the museum, Hardy said the
room will provide increased access
to students, researchers and patrons
with the museums collection of more
than 18,000 works on paper.
Hardy said that the museum is still
in the design phase, but the renova-
tions will incorporate new technol-
ogy, such as a video wall that will
appear in the front of the building.
She also said there would be a central
staircase to create better circulation
for visitors inside the museum.
Pei Cobb Freed and Partners has
designed over 20 museums, includ-
ing the Louvre in Paris and other
pieces of work across the globe.
Designer Yvonne Szeto and Bruce
White will lead the project with as-
sistance from Sabatini & Associates,
a Lawrence architecture frm selected
to be the associate architect.
Te renovation is really for the
students now and for the students in
the future, Hardy said. Were very
excited to be looking ahead on behalf
of the students.
Edited by Tom DeHart
COURTESY SPENCER MUSEUM OF ART AND PEI COBB FREED AND PARTNERS
A graphic rendering shows the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art with a glass entryway and expanded lobby. The rst phase of
the renovation is scheduled to begin in the fall and will remodel more than 15,0000 square feet of interior space.
CHECK OUT
THE Q&A WITH THE NEW
HONORS PROGRAM
DIRECTOR AT KANSAN.COM
KANSAN Q&A
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 3
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Robin W
ayne Bai|ey
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.C. Cham
bers
Andy Duncan
Sarah Frost
Tessa Gratton
Jam
es Gunn
M
atthew Jacobson
Kij Johnson
Christopher M
cKitterick
Sarah Pinsker
Eric T. Reyno|ds
Lane Robins
Bryan Thom
as Schm
idt
Jerem
iah To|bert
Kevin W
i||m
ott
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K SIGNING: Saturday, June 14,
12:45-1:30 pm
at Jayhawk lnk, Kansas Union, Level 2
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Stop by before l eavi ng for summer tri ps and
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HELPING KANSAS STUDENTS
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MAKE IT THROUGH
I m havi ng a mental
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my car i s brokedown!
SUMMER
Senate builds momentum for upcoming year
MIRANDA DAVIS
news@kansan.com
STUDENT SENATE
While the majority of the student
body has taken a vacation from
campus and classes, members of the
Student Senate executive board are
back on campus starting work for the
2014-2015 school year.
Student Body President Morgan
Said and Vice President Miranda
Wagner have been working since the
school year ended and will spend the
summer in Lawrence meeting with
faculty and staf and starting work on
platforms.
One of the frst things on Saids
agenda is the creation of the social
equity director position on the execu-
tive staf. Said said she hopes this po-
sition will work with whoever is hired
as the Universitys new vice provost
of diversity and equity. According to
the Grow KU website, this person will
also work in partnership with the Of-
fce of Multicultural Afairs.
Our hope is that these two indi-
viduals can work together on their
projects throughout the year from the
administrative side but also from the
student side, Said said.
Once the executive staf writes the
details of the position, it will go be-
fore the frst cycle of the new Senate.
If its adopted, hiring will begin, and
Said said she hopes to have someone
by mid-September.
Te executive staf is also rewriting
some parts of the Senate Rules and
Regulations as well as many of the
job descriptions for the executive staf
and make them clear and specifc.
Weve been looking through our
Rules and Regulations and some of
the old things that have been in Sen-
ate for a really long time, Said said.
Were saying, Do they meet the stan-
dards of todays time? If they dont,
we are reconfguring it.
Said also noted that the mental
health platform will take precedence.
She said she hopes to hire another
psychologist at Student Health Ser-
vices if the funding is available.
Last year there was a wait list of a
couple months for students to get into
CAPS, which is just outrageous, she
said. We are really looking into see-
ing if we can fnd a way to fnd some
funding to hire a new psychologist
pretty immediately so that problem
doesnt occur ever again.
Along with mental health, Said is
also looking into the protocol on
campus in case a shooter situation
did occur.
We have talked to the Student
Health Advisory Board and Active
Minds quite a bit about our mental
wellness platform. In light of some of
the recent occurrences on other col-
lege campuses, we are taking a look
at the University's protocol if there
were to be a campus shooter, she
said. Were taking looks at all sorts
of things on campus, these what if,
god forbid situations. Its important
to make sure we are up to standard on
things of that sort.
Chief of Staf Mitchell Cota is in
Lawrence working with Said and
Wagner. He said that once the school
year ended he, Said and Wagner start-
ed meeting to decide what the execu-
tive staf would do this summer and
next school year.
Cota said in addition to working to
add a social justice minor at the Uni-
versity, hes also working with Said
and Wagner to create the social equity
director position.
Working in the summer sets the
tone for the rest of the year, Cota
said. Tis is the time when the ex-
ecutive staf builds momentum for
beginning platform initiatives as well
as fnishing some.
Edited by Emma LeGault
MIRANDA DAVIS/KANSAN
Student Body President Morgan Said poses
in her new ofce.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 4
O
opinion
How are you spending your
rst two weeks of summer?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just might
publish them.
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
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Length: 300 words
The submission should include the authors
name, grade and hometown. Find our full
letter to the editor policy online at kansan.
com/letters.
Emma LeGault, editor-in-chief
elegault@kansan.com
Tom DeHart, managing editor
tdehart@kansan.com
Scott Weidener, business manager
sweidener@kansan.com
Alek Joyce, sales manager
ajoyce@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategist
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial
Board are Emma LeGault, Tom
DeHart, Scott Wedener and Alek
Joyce
Appreciate unconventional music choices
BRANCHING OUT
FIRST-YEAR STRUGGLES
T
rap music saved my music
taste. Te no-holds-barred
party genre introduced me
to a world of electronic music and
transformed me from cookie-cutter
hipster to a legitimate music lover.
I dont think Ill forget the moment
of truth for a long time. We were
cruising through the suburbs in the
backseat of someones car, blasting
Yeezus for the frst time and had
no clue what was in store. Te re-
appropriated TNGHT beat drop on
Kanyes Blood On the Leaves drew
a howl of damn from all of us. Car
speakers were blown out that night.
Te hype of that moment has
consumed me for the past year, and
Ive been on the hunt to reclaim that
sense of pure, unadulterated excite-
ment ever since.
Im not going to knock the granola-
and-latt hipsters who bump Elliot
Smith and Pavement all dayI used
be one of them. Tats the kind of
mood music that gets you pegged
as the hipster in every school club
you join.
I wont hate on the people rocking
Top 40 hits, theres no harm in that.
Pop music is pop music.; the stufs
made to sell records and be fun.
Te problem between the two
groups is the mutual suspiciona
musical DMZ. So-called hipsters
are convinced, even though they
wont admit it, that the public masses
are brainwashed sheep devoid of
taste. Te Top 40 lovers cant stand
the quintessential hipster aloofness
and trash talk them every chance
they get.
I stood there amongst the cut-of
jean shorts crowd swirling with ciga-
rette smoke for most of my former
years. Tough I didnt like to own
up to it, I thought deep down in my
heart that I was better than most of
America because I listened to Death
Grips and Swans. Its a natural group
mentality to stratify the other. In
that case it was pop music.
But then Kanye dropped Blood On
the Leaves.
Trap, for those who arent familiar,
is a sub-genre of electronic dance
music (EDM) that uses 808 drums
and wailing synths to get crowds
hyped out of their minds. It became
huge on the festival circuit. Some say
that trap is excitement distilled into
music. I think its mostly true.
It took a type of music that ignored
convention, complexity and pretty
much everything else to show me
the light. Like most music trans-
formations, it was a slippery slope
into house, electronica, and fnally
Katy Perry and Ariana Grande. Te
metamorphosis was so complete
that I hardly recognized my Spotify
playlists.
Te thing was, though, that I didnt
leave any of my old favorites behind;
Id merely expanded them. Trap
took me under its partying wing and
opened my eyes to a larger world of
music.
Ill admit that I see trap through a
rose-tinted glass. Pretty much every
time it comes on, I cant help but
dance. Something about it still grabs
my soul, but its not a cure-all or even
that great of music to begin with. Its
pure energy and pure fun, and in my
mind, nothing can beat that.
If youre stuck on either side of the
music divide, search for your own
trap. Give that genre you despise an-
other listen. Push past preconceived
notions about what you and your
friends like and dip a toe in some
fresh water.
I still cant stand country music
though. Yuck.
Kenney is a junior from Leawood
studying English. Find him on Twitter @
wilkenney.
By Wil Kenney
opinion@kansan.com
Dont let freshman title dene friendships
D
uring your senior year of
high school, you become the
boss of your athletic team.
You waited for four years to become
the captain, and then you have to
give it all up when you go to college
and become a freshman again.
Going from a senior back to a
freshman is usually hard for every-
one, but it can be especially tricky for
people on sports teams. Ive learned
from my time on the track and cross
country teams that everyone has to
do his or her part for the team. We
are all individual cogs making sure
the whole machine works.
Freshman year is a year of learn-
ingfguring out who you can lean
on and whos got your back. As a
freshman I was lucky enough to have
a big brother on the team. He was
always there, helping me with school
work and teaching me how to get
around campus. For most freshmen,
regardless if they were an athlete or
not, they need to fnd that person
who helps them make the adjust-
ment to college life. For me, it was a
teammatea sort of big brother.
Being part of a sports team is a
huge help when you are a freshman
again and a long way from home.
Te team looks out for you and be-
comes a second family. Te veteran
runners help when I am lost on
campus or need some advice about
school work. Im glad I found them
when I needed them.
But Im really glad to be a sopho-
more.
Yunk is a sophomore from Belvidere,
Ill. studying strategic communication.
Find him on Twitter @tyleryunk. By Tyler Yunk
opinion@kansan.com
@hannahwv92
@KANSANOPINION crying
about graduating
FIND THE FULL COLUMN
AT KANSAN.COM
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 5
l?t1 |l? l||
tl?|I lI? 8lfl1tt
340 Fraser | 864-4121
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Students and
Non-Students
Welcome
Campus bars remain popular for more than 50 years
BAR-MUDA TRIANGLE
On a map, the locations of three
popular bars form a triangle. Te
Wagon Wheel, Bullwinkles and Te
Jayhawk Caf are located within two
blocks of each other. On weekend
evenings, the area buzzes with stu-
dents.
Just last month, Te Wheel was
named one of Te 33 Best College
Bars in America by the lifestyle web-
site Trillist for its rich history, party
potential, and cheap food and drinks.
For more than fve decades, all three
bars have remained popular estab-
lishments and each ofers its own ex-
perience with location in common.
Tey are nestled among an entirely
residential area, between 13th and
14th Streets down the hill from Te
Oread Hotel, which makes for loud
nights for residents.
Rob Farha, owner of Te Wagon
Wheel, said unlike the bars on Mass
Street, many students are within
walking distance from their homes.
He said the location outweighs the
noise complaints because it tends to
prevent students from driving afer
drinking.
When you have such a strong Mass
Street, you need multiple places to
pull together to bring people to the
neighborhood, Farha said.
He said he has architectural dia-
grams that indicate 14th Street was
originally commercial buildings in-
cluding a seamstress and tobacco
shop before it became mostly apart-
ments.
Te Wheel, Te Hawk and Te Bull
are open for the summer with adjust-
ed hours.
THE WAGON WHEEL
WINS TITLE
Te crimson, blue and cobblestone
facade of Te Wagon Wheel at 507
W. 14th St. is recognizable to cur-
rent students, alumni and now the
nation.
Its listed as one of Te 33 Best
College Bars in America on the
lifestyle website Trillist. Farha
attributes the title to the bars long
existence and minimal changes
since 1955.
He is the third and current owner
and a 1988 graduate. He said he
likes that its considered the quintes-
sential alumni and upperclassmen
bar.
I just love it here because every-
one seems to know everyone when
they come in, Farha said.
He said diners are guaranteed to
recognize someone, whether it be
a friend or a basketball legend, like
1950s All-American Ron Loneski,
who chowed down in a corner
booth on a Tuesday in May before
the grill closed for the summer.
Any hankering for the bacon-
stufed Wang burger or slice of pizza
will have to wait until the Wheels
kitchen reopens the third week of
August. During the summer lull, bar
hours are Tursday, Friday and Sat-
urday from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. which
means the 16 ounce Pounder beer
cans for $3 are still on the menu.
Tats where dreams were made
while slugging beers, throwing darts
and listening to the good old tunes
on the jukebox, said Sarah Gayed, a
2009 graduate.
Gayed said she remembers the
old photos and writing on the walls
fondly, and said the patio was a
great place to be on game days.
Amanda Pittman, a senior from
Archie, Mo., said Te Wheel is a
destination for her friends on week-
ends even in the summer.
Its the one bar that has so much
tradition, Pittman said.
Currently, the beer garden is sim-
ply a cement patio, but Farha said
every year he dreams of building a
deck complete with seating. So far,
he hasnt made any major changes,
and for the past 17 years hes owned
the Wheel, it hasnt stopped people
from fltering through the front
door.
BULLWINKLES TRIVIA
Last year, Bullwinkles at 1344 Ten-
nessee St. underwent an extensive
renovation including a new concrete
patio when Joe Sorrentino took the
reigns as owner.
On game days, the patio flls with
students clutching various beverag-
es. Even though its a popular hang-
out, manager Shelda Jewell, a senior
from Kansas City, Mo., provided
details that most people dont know
about the corner bar.
1. In 1979, the bar was known
as Pour Richards and owned by
the Mall family. Other than that,
the name Bullwinkles has stayed
the same for nearly three decades
through the last four owners.
2. Te most recent noteworthy ap-
pearance was former Kansas City
Chiefs quarterback Trent Green ear-
lier in May.
3. Te ingredients for Moosebulls,
a popular drink on the menu, are
known only to the employees. Te
recipe was created in 2011 by former
manager Johnny ODonnell who
graduated in 2013.
4. Tis year, management discussed
buying umbrellas to shade the patio
this summer, but they discovered a
nearby tree ofered enough shade
that canvas covers arent yet neces-
sary.
5. Te 20 or so employees get major
bonuses in the form of holiday par-
ties and trips to Kansas City Royals
games in party buses. Jewell said
Sorrentino spoils them.
6. Owner Sorrentino is a busy man
with several other jobs and Jewell
said he isnt a big drinker. Howev-
er, when he does drink something
stronger than water, its a tall vodka
soda with a lemon wedge.
7. Employees outft the giant moose
head behind the bar with diferent
hats depending on which big game
is on.
8. Bullwinkles hardly ever has a
cover, but when it does, the money is
donated to local charities. Te most
recent collection of $1,000 went
to Ballard Community Services in
Lawrence.
BEHIND THE BAR AT THE JAY-
HAWK CAFE
Te volume inside the Hawk at
1340 Ohio St. increases as hip-hop
music thumps and as the crowd of
students grows. Tey make their way
to the bar for both creative and clas-
sic concoctions made possible by the
bartenders.
Kendall Law, a senior from Lenexa,
said he starts his bartending shifs
afer 8 p.m., and the fast-paced eve-
ning lasts until about 3 a.m.
"When it's crowded and you try
to squeeze through, people usually
won't bother to move for you," Law
said. "But when they see that you're
an employee trying to get through,
the crowd will split."
As a bartender, he said he's gained
a new level of respect. On his nights
of, he said he's even allowed to cut
in linea beneft reserved for all
Hawk employees.
In August, Law will have worked
at the Hawk for a year. Since he be-
gan working at the Hawk, he said his
social circle has expanded tremen-
dously.
He said it makes for a good night of
work when familiar faces visit, and
his coworkers have become good
friends.
During his frst shif, Law said he
was intimidated by the thick crowd
and minimal training. He said his
coworkers ofered their help, which
put him at ease.
"Tey told me I could go at any
pace I wanted, and if a customer was
being belligerent, I could let them
know that, 'Hey, I'm the one making
drinks,'" said Law.
Now a seasoned bartender, he said
he has his favorite drinks to make.
For shots, he goes with the Orange
Gatorade made with UV Orange,
Triple Sec, and sour, part of soda
gum. As for drinks, he keeps it
simple with the classic whiskey and
coke.
Te owner declined to comment.
Edited by Emma LeGault
and Tom DeHart
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
SUMMER HOURS
The Wheel
Thursday, Friday, Saturday: 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.
The Bull
Wednesday: 7 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Thursday: 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday, Saturday: 2 p.m. to 2 a.m.
The Hawk
First dollar night is June 4.
Te construction and road work
on Jayhawk Boulevard entered its
second stage on May 19. Tis phase
will extend from Poplar Lane to the
intersection of Sunfower Road and
Jayhawk Boulevard.
Te road is in a serious state of
disrepair and hasnt undergone this
level of maintenance for several
decades, Gavin Young, the provosts
communication coordinator for the
University, said.
Young said the overhaul will
completely reconstruct the road.
Te road will be torn up and the
construction workers will lay a new
foundation that will create a more
stable and durable road. In past
years, construction crews have only
added new concrete to the road.
Te construction will last from May
19 to Aug. 15., according to an email
from Sharon Anthony, the admin-
istrative assistant at the Universitys
Ofce of Design and Construction
Management.
Because the intersection of Jayhawk
Boulevard and Sunfower Road is
part of the project, trafc through
campus is closed of at each of the
four trafc booths. Students, staf
and visitors should navigate the
construction site with care.
Another construction project will
occur on Naismith Drive and will
close areas between 15th Street and
Crescent Road. Te intersections at
both ends of the construction will
remain open, and will be completed
by Aug. 1 along with the construc-
tion on Jayhawk Boulevard.
In addition to the roadways, the
University will be improving rainwa-
ter management and runof systems.
Construction on two new resi-
dence halls on Daisy Hill will make
progress this summer, which will
close of Engel Road and Irving Hill
Road. Te Lied Center will be used
PAGE 6 MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
KU-Hillcrest Area
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English professor conducts 36th trip abroad
LAUREN KATZ
news@kansan.com
FACULTY
TRANSPORTATION
When it comes to study abroad,
Professor Mary Klayder has three
rules for students who travel with
her. Te frst: Have a good time.
Te second: Let me have a good
time. And the third: Dont let rule
number one interfere with rule
number two.
Klayder, a lecturer in the honors
program and associate director in
the English department, believes
that when it comes to learning, good
experiences in other cultures are
the best ways for students to build
knowledge and understanding. Her
enthusiasm for combining travel and
academics is so great that this sum-
mer, shell be conducting her 36th
trip abroad.
Mary sees the beauty in the
strange, said Taylor Bettles, a senior
from Wichita who traveled to Lon-
don with Klayders London Review
course this past March. Its just
fun to get to be a part of her world,
especially when shes going abroad
because its such a diferent culture
and you see how she reacts to that,
and it just makes it that much more
exciting to be there.
Each year, Klayder takes students
on trips as part of two travel writing
classes and one summer program. In
the fall semester, she leads a 12-day
trip to Costa Rica and in spring, a
trip to London. Over the summer,
Klayder leads a trip to various loca-
tions in the U.K. called the British
Summer Institute.
Klayder created these study abroad
programs in response to low enroll-
ment rates in the travel writing
courses. In fact, one of the classes
started with just four people. At the
time, study abroad programs did not
include any short-term options and
staf in the study abroad department
wanted more afordable programs.
Afer Klayder implemented her frst
trip abroad, 30 students signed up
with seven on a wait list. In her 35
trips, Klayder estimates she has taken
more than 800 students total.
Her programs have a lot more
students than most of the other
programs I work with, said David
Wiley, a program coordinator in the
KU Ofce of Study Abroad. She
outworks everybody else. She un-
derstands that it requires more than
just putting forward an interesting
program for students.
For Klayder, the class opportunities
are what she calls appetizer pro-
gramsprograms that develop an
appetite in students who never would
have thought about studying abroad.
I like experiential learning, Klay-
der said. I like seeing people change
and get comfortable in another city
or another culture.
Klayder is one to know all about
diferent cultures: she comes from
English heritage and has a spe-
cial interest in British literature,
especially 20th-century London and
contemporary Scottish literature. Her
knowledge of these types of literature
and culture led her to bring the
British Summer Institute program to
the University in 1990. Twenty-four
years later, the program averages
about 25 students per trip.
As for choosing Costa Rica, Klayder
conducted her own research along
with the help of her two children.
Klayders family traveled to four
diferent cities and chose which cities
gave the best sense of the country for
class purposes.
With Costa Rica I kind of started
from square one, and my motiva-
tion was that my kids are from Costa
Rica and I wanted to understand
more about that, Klayder said. Its a
whole diferent place. Te language is
diferent, and I had to step out of all
sorts of comfort zones.
Alternative thinking and gain-
ing a global perspective are part of
Klayders mantra. During each trip,
she encourages students to attend
and write about events that relate to
their own interests, and then invites
them to vocalize their feelings over
a refective group dinner, which is
one of Klayders favorite aspects of
the trip.
People end up writing what they
want to say, and thats what makes
people write better, Klayder said.
Teres a little turn that takes people
over, and they get that confdence
and thats a real epiphany for me.
Edited by Emma LeGault
Campus construction
JACK FEIGH
news@kansan.com
Follow
@KansanNews on
Twitter
as additional parking for students.
Tose living around the residence
halls or commuting in Lawrence will
see construction on the bridge over
Iowa Street has reduced the bridge to
one lane. Te route from University
Drive connecting to Iowa Street can
be used for those trying to get from
main campus to any building on west
campus.
It was long overdue sprucing up
of [Jayhawk] Boulevard, and I think
they chose a good time to do it dur-
ing the summer, Mitchell Seeman,
a recent University graduate from
Overland Park, said.
However, some students fnd the
construction to be an inconvenience
as classes are starting.
Its kind of inconvenient to get to
places like the Union, Maddie Noe,
a junior from Chesterfeld, Mo., said.
I didnt know about it before this
was happening.
Edited by Tom DeHart and
Emma LeGault
Detour
Blocked off
Bus only
GOOGLE MAPS
PAGE 7 MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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LAWRENCE
Food trucks struggle with city laws
LAUREN KATZ
news@kansan.com
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Torched Goodness, a food truck serving
crme brle, is the latest addition to
Lawrence.
With only two food trucks in town,
Lawrence is a tough place for mobile
food vendors to get business going,
especially in comparison to cities that
are making it easier for the industry.
Lawrence has strict limitations on
when and where food trucks can op-
erate. No more than two mobile food
units may operate at the same time
on any single property. Mobile food
vendors are also prohibited from sell-
ing on a single property for more than
three hours at a time.
Exceptions were made last month
during Lawrences frst food truck
festival. Community members hoped
the festival would spark more ac-
ceptance of mobile eateries afer
residents had a taste of the food truck
fair. Te festival featured six trucks
fve from Kansas City, Mo., and one
from Lawrence. Proceeds from the
event benefted the Douglas County
food bank, Just Food.
Food truck culture has been suc-
cessful in many cities, such as Austin
and Portland, but is just beginning to
make its way into smaller, less popu-
lous cities such as Lawrence.
At one time there were quite a few
[people] that wanted to have these
food trucks and we had meetings,
Diane Trybom, acting city clerk, said.
We just came up with the license for
mobile food vending and we havent
had a lot come in since then.
Jeremy Farmer, CEO of Just Food
and vice mayor of Lawrence, attri-
butes the lack of food trucks in the
area to that fact that many Lawrence
community members are unfamiliar
with the concept of food trucks. He
also said that there is a fear that food
trucks will create competition with
restaurants.
Downtown is a very highly en-
tertainment- and restaurant-driven
strip, and food trucks have typically
not been a part of the conversation
just because we have such a great se-
lection of locally owned and operated
restaurants, Farmer said.
Additionally, food trucks have hit
the college campus scene. Te Na-
tional Association of College and
University Food Services estimates
that there are at least 100 food trucks
operating on campuses around the
country. However, there are currently
none on the Universitys campus.
Te co-owners of Te Blissful Bite,
the frst food truck that came to Law-
rence in 2012, said they have found
some success but still struggle with
city policies such as the lack of access
to vend in many locations.
Last year we started to experiment
with it and have learned a lot along
the way within trying to make it work
in town and on what the city regu-
lations are, and thats one of the big
hurdles, said co-owner Jason Hering.
Specialty dessert food truck Torched
Goodness is the other mobile food
vendor in Lawrence that arrived just
last month. Torched Goodness had
four years of success in Phoenix, serv-
ing over 30 diferent favors of crme
brle ranging from chocolate to
raspberry lemon.
Te owner of Torched Goodness,
Julia Ireland, said the truck was a
vendor on Arizona State Universitys
campus and served weekly truck
lunches.
Hering said Te Blissful Bite co-
owners plan to work with Torched
Goodness on catering and on chang-
ing the current restrictions on mobile
food vending. Both the Blissful Bite
co-owners and Torched Goodness
owners have also discussed vend-
ing on campus, but have not yet ap-
proached the University.
Hering, Ireland and Farmer said
they would like to see food truck cul-
ture thrive in Lawrence.
I think it would be sad if we con-
tinued to say no to new and cool
and progressive ideas all because we
didnt want to change, Farmer said.
I think we would regret that 20 years
down the road.
Edited by Amelia Arvesen
WANT MORE?
READ THE
FULL STORY
AT KANSAN.COM
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utoring
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vailable
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 8
A
arts & features
HOROSCOPES
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Harmony requires concentration. Don't present
your project until it's ready. Others give you a
boost. Confess your worries, and work things
out.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Use good judgment regarding a controversy.
Keep your social schedule, to positively impact
your income.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Don't gamble with the rent. Draw upon hidden
resources for the effect you're after.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Costs may be higher than expected. Postpone
a celebration. Humility is a virtue. Go over the
details carefully, and acknowledge everyone
who contributes.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Wait to see what develops. Keep it practical,
or there's trouble. Avoid stepping on anyone's
toes. Prioritize tasks and synchronize schedules.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Avoid risky business. Keep your credit cards
locked away. New career opportunities surface.
Work the numbers, before choosing.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Collaborate on a creative project. Discover new
tricks and practice them. Carefully select what
to spend on.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You receive the nal gures. Patience wins
today. Don't spend if you don't need to. Encour-
age another's enthusiasm, and compromise on
who does what.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Research could interfere with your socializing.
"All things in moderation," serves today. Guard
against overspending or overeating.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Get comfortable, without frills or great expense.
Consider possible career investments. Review
the material, and choose the way to play it.
Celebrate together.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
In a stalemate, don't ask for favors. There
may be a temporary clash between love and
money. Apply nishing touches to creative work
and beat a deadline. Tap into a secret energy
source.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Balance work assignments. Every little bit
counts. Show appreciation to someone who
helped out. Put in some overtime, and repay a
favor. Completion leads to new status.
PUZZLE
http://bit.ly/1kntzqg
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THE ANSWERS
Recycle
this
paper
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 9
Sitting across from me on the well-
worn leather of my living room
couches last Tursday, Nick Carswell
began describing himself.
Well, Im a music type, he said.
Carswell, a local Lawrence musi-
cian, performs with Carswell & Hope
as well as Pink Royal, and he is also
the founder of Silly Goose Records,
a music collective and independent
record label that Carswell formed in
2010 while he was living in his native
Ireland.
Most recently, Carswell hosted Mix-
Master 2014 (MXM2014) in Law-
rence on May 4, an event that show-
cased local musicians, and released a
Carswell & Hope album on May 15.
He has also planned an upcoming
Irish tour of 14 shows in 12 cities,
where one of his previous bands, Te
Elective Orchestra, will merge with
members of Carswell & Hope.
In Ireland, Carswell was making a
living as a full-time musician, playing
both commercially and recreationally.
He was booked at restaurants, hotels,
weddings and parties, but Carswell
had diferent plans for his original
musiche wanted to tour in Ireland.
In 2010, two of his bands were near-
ing the end of the long, meticulous
process of creating and releasing an
album. He and his bandmates had an
idea: to form a record label to help
promote and release their music. Te
idea came to fruition in the form of
Silly Goose Records.
Carswell hired a publicist, ran pub-
lic relations campaigns, acquired legal
and technical consulting and booked
his frst tour in 2010, billed as the
Hope Tour. Featured on the tour
were Carswells band at the time, Te
Elective Orchestra, and another Lim-
erick group, Te Brad Pitt Light Or-
chestra. Te tour was such a success
that he booked another one.
Carswell released one record in 2010
and another in 2011. Meanwhile, he
got a masters degree in music and
media technology and moved from
Limerick, Ireland, to Lawrence with
his wife, Hannah Down, in 2011.
In Lawrence, Carswell got a job
at Barrel House piano bar, which is
now Leroys Tavern, where he met a
number of local musicians, includ-
ing Austin Quick, a recent University
graduate of the Kansas City soul/funk
group Te Phantastics. He said he be-
came a part of Silly Goose Records for
the community aspect.
Lawrence is so communal, and so
is Silly Goose, Quick said. Te Silly
Goose mentality fts right in.
Carswell echoed that sentiment.
We thought that we could all help
each other by working together, and
so we restructured Silly Goose Re-
cords to include various people that
we met from playing music and who
were trying to do stuf with their mu-
sic, to put out records, and actually do
something with their music, he said.
Initially, the collective consisted of
Te Phantastics, Carswell & Hope
and the female soul vocalist Faith
Darnells self-titled solo project,
F.A.I.T.H., but grew to include Pink
Royal, Forrester and most recently
the afrobeat group SUNU. Many of
the musicians in the collective are re-
cent University graduates or current
University students.
Carswell said he hopes that his col-
lective can help emerging acts get a
good start.
It feels like every year new students
come to town and new bands show up
[and] are formed. Te idea is that they
can make a career out of it if they do
things right and theyre good at what
they do, Carswell said. Even though
theyre here to study, they dont have
to become lawyers or accountants.
We want to let them know that it is
possible to support yourself with mu-
sic.
When Carswell formed the collective
he knew he wanted to have a show-
case performance of all the bands in
the collective. Trough his day job at
InterUrban ArtHouse, a Kansas City
nonproft that supports emerging vi-
sual artists, he approached members
of the Midwest Music Foundation,
the Kansas City Volunteer Lawyers
and Accountants for the Arts with his
vision for MXM2014.
Te City of Lawrence liked the idea,
and the Cultural Arts Commission
ofered Carswell a grant to help with
event costs.
Te May 4 showcase involved a
workshop during the day where
promoters, booking agents, music
columnists and attorneys shared in-
formation with the musicians who
attended, and the showcase at night
with performances by all six bands in
the collectivetheir frst appearance
in the public spotlight.
Quick said he was surprised at how
successful the event was.
What I love about Silly Goose is
that its an easy outlet for serious mu-
sicians to get together and really try
to make a good start, Quick said. Its
not just a couple of guys jamming in
basement. Everyone in the collective
is trying to raise the bar.
Edited by Emma LeGault
and Tom DeHart
Irish musician creates label
LOCAL MUSIC
DYLAN GUTHRIE
news@kansan.com
DYLAN GUTHRIE/KANSAN
Ireland native and Lawrence musician Nick Carswell strums his guitar on a May
afternoon. Carswell is the creator of Silly Goose Records, a music collective based in
Lawrence that includes many local acts such as Forrester and Pink Royal.

What I love about Silly Goose


is that its an easy outlet for
serious musicians to get to-
gether and really try to make
a good start.
NICK CARSWELL
Founder, Silly Goose Records
LOVE NETFLIX? GO TO KANSAN.COM TO CHECK OUT FOUR SHOWS TO WATCH THIS SUMMER.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 PAGE 10
S
sports
THE BREW
Newest recruit strengthens team
Kansas coach Bill Self and his
coaching staf brought in another
highly sought-afer recruit to the
2014 class in Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk
from Cherkasy, Ukraine. Mykhailiuk
is the fourth signee for the incoming
class, joining Clif Alexander, Kelly
Oubre and Devonte Graham, each of
which are in the Rivals Top 40 Rank-
ings for 2014.
Mykhailiuk is listed at 6-foot-
8-inches and can play guard or
forward.
Most recently, Mykhailiuk shined
in the 2013 FIBA Europe Under-16
Championship, leading Ukraine with
25.2 points, 8.0 rebounds and 3.4
assists per game. He was named to
the all-tournament team. Mykhailiuk
also played for the professional bas-
ketball club Cherkaski Mavpy in the
Ukrainian Basketball SuperLeague
from 2012-2014.
Te commitment of Mykhailiuk
only adds to Kansas incredible
ability to pick up some of the best
recruits over the past few years. In
particular, the coaching stafs last
two recruiting classes have been the
most talented in Self s 11 years in
Lawrence, and 2013 is considered by
many to be the best he has ever had.
But with three top 40 recruits
coming in, and with a kid whose
nickname is the foreign phenom,
that statement becomes debatable.
Andrew Wiggins and Joel Embiid
are some of the best recruits to come
through Lawrence, and are likely
to be taken early in this years NBA
Draf. As far as individual talent, it
cant get much better than those two.
As a whole, however, this recruiting
class holds more unifed talent.
Im not saying any of these incom-
ing guys will be the frst two picks of
the NBA Draf Board when nextJune
comes around, but the four recruits
in this years class have the capacity
to ft into Self s system far better than
last years class. Te 2013-2014 Kan-
sas basketball team was a type Self
had never coached before. Te team
possessed so much talent, but was
also much diferent than any team he
had previously encountered.
First, a commonality with last years
team was that the team did not have
a consistent point guard. Naadir
Tarpe had moments of brilliance,
but many of those instances were
followed by costly mistakes. Devonte
Graham brings a skillset to Lawrence
that hasnt been seen in years. He is,
as all scouting reports say, a game
managera pass-frst point guard
who distributes more than he shoots.
Some of Self s best teams have had
a workhorse in the painta strong,
sturdy power forward that can score
and rebound as well as play defense.
Most notable players have included
Tomas Robinson, Darnell Jackson
and Markief Morris. Both Robin-
son and Jackson were on Final Four
teams. Clif Alexander is a mirror
image of these players, and can only
get better.
Kelly Oubre is similar to a Brandon
Rush. His strong suit comes on the
defensive end, but boy can he shoot.
His ofensive game is polished and
has come a long way since he frst
signed his letter of intent.
Tat brings us to Mykhailiuk. With
him, we dont know what to expect.
Hell still be adjusting to American
life when he frst steps on the basket-
ball court in October for a preseason
game. He could be the most talented
player in this class. He has the skillset
and the talent to do big things in
Lawrence.
Self said it best when describing
Mykhailiuk as an immediate impact
guy, and that statement reaches
further than just him. Every player in
this class has the ability to contribute
immediately.
Edited by Tom DeHart
By GJ Melia
sports@kansan.com
Kansas falls to Ken-
tucky, ends season
Te Kansas baseball team fell to
Kentucky 8-6 in the NCAA Regionals
Sunday, ending the Jayhawks season.
Te team fnished the year with a re-
cord of 35-26.
Te Jayhawks beat the Wildcats on
Friday, following numerous rain de-
lays, which set them up with a game
against the regional host the Louis-
ville Cardinals. Kansas fell to Louis-
ville on Saturday, which set them up
with a rematch with Kentucky on
Sunday.
Te NCAA Regionals are double
elimination, and each team came into
the day with a 1-1 record. Te winner
would take on Louisville and the loser
would go home.
Te Wildcats jumped out quickly to
a lead, which grew to 8-0 by the top of
the sixth inning. Te game looked all
but over before junior outfelder Con-
nor McKay hit an RBI single to start
the scoring game for Kansas.
Te Jayhawks were able to string a
few runs together before the sixth
inning ended, leaving the score at
8-5 heading into the seventh. Senior
catcher Kaiana Eldredge was able to
hit a solo shot in the bottom of the
eighth to make it 8-6, his frst home
run of the year.
Kansas was unable to do much of
anything in the ninth inning, though,
and the dramatic comeback fell two
runs short. Te team will return
much of their lineup next year, but
will lose key seniors including El-
dredge, outfelder Tucker Tarp and
right-handed pitcher Jordan Pich.
GJ Melia
BASEBALL
See the full column on Kansan.com.
As the NBA draf approaches, for-
mer Kansas stars Andrew Wiggins
and Joel Embiid fnd themselves atop
most experts draf boards.
Wiggins is being considered the best
athlete of this years draf class while
Embiid has been given the highest
ceiling.
Coming to Kansas, Wiggins was the
number one overall recruit. He didnt
disappoint in his freshman season,
breaking the Kansas freshman scor-
ing record, averaging 17.1 points per
game.
Wiggins is the type of player that
can shine on the right NBA team.
Kansas ofense runs as one fuid sys-
tem, it is structured and there is not a
lot of room for a player like Wiggins
to operate and create his own shots.
In a restricted system, the 6-foot-8-
inch Canadian was still able to score
597 points his freshman year.
Joel Embiid entered Lawrence as
the number-one ranked center in the
country and the sixth best prospect
overall. However, he had only been
playing basketball for a few years and
his skills were still very raw. He was a
skinny seven-footer and no one really
knew what to expect.
Embiid answered all the questions,
averaging 11.2 points, 8.1 rebounds
and 2.6 blocks per game. Embiid was
an absolute force down low, anchor-
ing Kansas to their 10th straight Big
12 title.
Te Cameroonian center is drawing
interest from each one of the 30 NBA
franchises, partly due to comparisons
to NBA Hall of Fame center Hakeem
Olajuwon.
Between Wiggins and Embiid, the
Jayhawks have a legitimate chance of
having the frst and second picks in
the NBA draf, making them the frst
collegiate teammates to be drafed
consecutively since Kentuckys An-
thony Davis and Michael Kidd-Gil-
christ in 2012.
For now, the Cleveland Cavaliers are
on the clock, and Wiggins, Embiid
and all of Jayhawk nation are awaiting
their decision.
Edited by Emma LeGault
Wiggins, Embiid hold bright NBA futures
COMMENTARY
By Ben Felderstein
sports@kansan.com
PAGE 11 MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Non-revenue teams excel
throughout year
SPOTLIGHT REWIND
SAM DAVIS
sports@kansan.com
Baseball
On the brink of an NCAA Tour-
nament appearance, the Jayhawks
won their last nine regular season
games against conference foes,
sweeping Baylor, Texas Tech and
West Virginia. Tis hot stretch
helped the team fnish in third-
place in the Big 12Kansas
highest conference fnish since the
league expanded. It also helped to
qualify for the squads ffh NCAA
Tournament, where the Jayhawks
went 1-2.
Te team got of to a hot start,
beating the Kentucky Wildcats
10-6 in its frst game with the help
of six runs in the frst two innings.
Facing the top seed its region, the
third-seeded Jayhawks cooled of
against Louisville, falling 6-3. Kan-
sas loaded the bases in the ninth
inning but couldnt capitalize.
With the double-elimination
format, the Jayhawks still had a
chance to win the regional and
needed to beat Kentucky to earn
a rematch with Louisville. Despite
falling behind 8-0 against the
Wildcats, the Jayhawks came back
with a fve-run sixth inning. Te
comeback attempt fell just short as
Kansas lost 8-6. One of the most
successful seasons in Kansas base-
ball history, the team fnished with
a winning record of 35-26.
Softball
Unsure of its postseason fate
at the end of the regular season,
the sofball team was awarded an
at-large bid to the NCAA Tourna-
ment, which was Kansas frst tour-
nament appearance since 2006. Te
Jayhawks got of to a hot start in
the tournament, defeating No. 19
overall seed Nebraska 3-1 behind a
three-run frst inning. Tat set up a
marquee showdown against the No.
16 Missouri Tigers, who edged the
Bradley Braves in their frst round
matchup. Tis marked the frst
showdown between the Border Ri-
vals since Missouri departed for the
Southeastern Conference in 2012.
Despite a comeback attempt
in the last inning, the Jayhawks
fell 6-3 to the host Tigers. With a
double-elimination format, Kansas
had the chance to set up a rematch
with Missouri, but Nebraska sought
revenge of its own and defeated
the Jayhawks 2-1, ending their
postseason run.
Track and eld
At the Big 12 Outdoor Champi-
onships, the mens team fnished
seventh and the womens team
fnished fourth. Te two teams
combined had 35 entries in the
the preliminary round of the 2014
NCAA Division I Outdoor Track
& Field Championships on May
29-31. Te top 12 fnishers for each
event will qualify for the semifnal
and fnal rounds at the champion-
ships in Eugene, Ore.. Kansas will
send six entries to Eugene:
Long jump: Sydney Conley
Discus: Jessica Maroszek
Heptathlon: Lindsay Vollmer
4100 meter relay: Sydney
Conley, Diamond Dixon, Ali-
sha Keys, Tianna Valentine
400-meter hurdles: Michael
Stigler
4400-meter relays: Michael
Stigler, Drew Matthews, De-
Mario Johnson, James Wilson
Womens basketball
Freshmen guards Dakota and
Dylan Gonzales will transfer to the
University of Nevada Las Vegas
(UNLV) according to a University
statement. Tey were the Jayhawks
top-ranked recruits last year ac-
cording to ESPN, each earing a
score of 90 out of 100.
Edited by Emma LeGault
FILE PHOTO
The Kansas volleyball team breaks down before their NCAA Tournament game against
Wichita State in Allen Fieldhouse on December 6, 2013. Kansas went on to defeat WSU
and Creighton before falling to Washington in the tournament.
Recap: Spring
sports wrap-up
While football and mens basketball
harbor most of the fan and media
attention throughout any given
year, another group comprised of
hundreds of Jayhawk athletes are
tirelessly training, practicing and
competing to continue the win-
ning tradition that the University
cherishes.
Te Universitys streak of athletic
success within the non-revenue
sphere started roughly a year ago
when the womens track and feld
team brought its frst national title to
Lawrence, but the stretch didnt stop
there.
Volleyball
In the fall following the Jayhawks
title-winning summer, the volleyball
team, led by senior All-American
Caroline Jarmoc, fnished second in
the Big 12 behind an elite Texas team
that won the national title in 2012.
Te Jayhawks were selected as a
three-seed in the NCAA Tournament
and advanced all the way to the tour-
naments Sweet Sixteen. Head coach
Ray Bechard fnished the season with
his second straight Big 12 Coach of
the Year Award.
Womens golf
Te spring sports season continues
to bring success for Kansas Athlet-
ics. Te womens golf team fnished
in the top ten in every tournament
it completed, winning two of them
in the process. Both frst place fn-
ishesthe Sunfower Invitational in
Manhattan and the Palmetto Inter-
collegiate in South Carolinacame
in the frst half of the long season.
Te exceptional year also included
ten top-fve fnishes. In the postsea-
son, the Jayhawks tied for fourth in
the conference championship and
tied for ffh at the NCAA Regionals.
Te teams exceptional performance
earned them a trip to Tulsa, where
they competed in their frst NCAA
championship in 24 years. Te team
fnished its season ranked 24th in the
country.
Moving forward
Associate Athletics Director Jim
Marchiony said Kansas Athletics
continues to develop as a whole with
the increasing success of non-reve-
nue sports teams.
Success breeds success, and I
think anytime you have success, no
matter what sport it is, it makes it
easier to to make that succcess a con-
tinual success, Marchiony said. We
hope that the winning culture grows
and continues to grow, permeating
itself into all of our sports.
Te facilities at the University also
continue to grow with new endeav-
ors like Rock Chalk Park, helping
Kansas climb the rungs toward the
top of the collegiate sports ladder.
We want to try to give the stu-
dent athletes in those sports a frst-
class place to compete, and as we go
along we will continue to evaluate
facilities and do the best we can in all
sports, Marchiony said.
Kansas continues to secure and sign
young, talented athletes to all of its
teams. Seven freshmen will join the
volleyball team next year and are ex-
pected to efect the Jayhawk rotation
immediately. One incoming player,
setter Ainise Havili, was recently
selected to the U.S. Womens Junior
National Training Team.
Te womens basketball team
recently signed two players, Timeka
ONeal and Lorraine Enabulete, who
will be key in getting the team back
to the NCAA Tournament.
We have terrifc coaches who care
about their student athletes and do
everything they can to make them
successful on and of the feld,
Marchiony said. We have a ter-
rifc support system and its a family
atmosphere, and that combination
makes KU a great place to be.

Edited by Tom DeHart
BRIAN HILLIX
sports@kansan.com
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