2 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.

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PUBLISHER
Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
POLITICAL EDITOR
Justin Snow
ASSISTANT EDITOR
John Riley
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Rhuaridh Marr, Doug Rule
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Christopher Cunetto, Julian Vankim
CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS
Scott G. Brooks, Christopher Cunetto
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Daniel Burnett, Christian Gerard,
Brandon Harrison, Chris Heller, Will O’Bryan
Troy Petenbrink, Richard Rosendall,
Kate Wingfield
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WEBMASTER
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4 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
MAY 29, 2014
Volume 21 / Issue 5
NEWS 6 THE STATES OF MARRIAGE
Justin Snow
8 SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY
John Riley
12 COMMUNITY CALENDAR

BUSINESS 16 SPIRITED BUSINESS
John F. Stanton
SCENE 18 DC BLACK PRIDE OPENING RECEPTION
Ward Morrison
SCENE 20 DC BLACK PRIDE
HEALTH & WELLNESS EXPO
Christopher Cunetto
SCENE 23 CAPITAL PRIDE HEROES RECEPTION
Christopher Cunetto
FEATURE 26 FUNNY GUY
Doug Rule
Photography by Todd Franson
OUT ON THE TOWN 35 AUNTIE GAY
Doug Rule
38 SMOKEY MEMORIES
Doug Rule
40 SEXUALLY CHARGED
Doug Rule
HEALTH 43 THE STRENGTH-TRAINING TRINITY
Brandon Harrison
Illustration by Christopher Cunetto
GEARS 45 SWEDISH TEASE
Rhuaridh Marr
GAMES 47 NINTENDO’S GAY MARRIAGE WOES
Rhuaridh Marr
PETS 49 SPREE
Rhuaridh Marr
NIGHTLIFE SCENE 53 DC BLACK PRIDE MEN’S PARTY
Ward Morrison
SCENE 59 DC BLACK PRIDE WOMEN’S PARTY
Christopher Cunetto
62 LAST WORD
5 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
6 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
The States of Marriage
Rulings in favor of marriage equality add Pennsylvania and Oregon to a growing list
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett
by Justin Snow
T
HE NUMBER OF MARRIAGE
equality states increased to 19
last week after federal judges
handed down rulings in Penn-
sylvania and Oregon striking down those
states’ respective same-sex marriage bans.
On May 19, U.S. District Court Judge
Michael J. McShane struck down Or-
egon’s same-sex marriage ban, declaring
the law in violation of the Equal Protec-
tion Clause of the Fourteenth Amend-
ment to the United States Constitution.
Oregon voters approved a constitutional
amendment in 2004 defining marriage as
between a man and a woman.
McShane, who was appointed to the
bench by President Barack Obama and is
the first openly gay federal judge in Ore-
gon, wrote that he is aware there are many
in Oregon who have a religious or moral
objection to expanding the definition of
civil marriage to include same-sex couples.
“My decision will not be the final
word on this subject, but on this issue of
marriage I am struck more by our simi-
larities than our differences,” McShane
wrote. “I believe that if we can look for
a moment past gender and sexuality, we
can see in these plaintiffs nothing more
or less than our own families. Families
who we would expect our Constitution
to protect, if not exalt, in equal measure.
With discernment we see not shadows
lurking in closets or the stereotypes of
what was once believed; rather, we see
families committed to the common pur-
pose of love, devotion, and service to the
greater community.”
The consolidated case — Geiger v.
Kitzhaber, filed on October 13, 2013,
and Rummell v. Kitzhaber, filed on De-
cember 19, 2013 — was argued on April 23.
State officials in Oregon have stated
they will not appeal McShane’s deci-
sion, which went into effect immediately.
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The National Organization for Marriage
(NOM) had sought to intervene in the
case to defend the state ban in federal
court but were denied that request by
McShane. NOM appealed to the 9th Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals and, prior to the
decision, requested an emergency stay to
prevent marriages from beginning in Or-
egon. NOM’s request for a stay was denied
by the appellate court earlier.
“Where will this all lead?” McShane
asked in his ruling. “I know that many
suggest we are going down a slippery
slope that will have no moral boundaries.
To those who truly harbor such fears, I
can only say this: Let us look less to the
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News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
News: Casa Ruby Marks Second Anniversary
Home: Selling Success
7 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
LGBTNews
8
bedrock constitutional guarantees of due
process and equal protection,” Jones con-
tinued. “We are a better people than what
these laws represent, and it is time to dis-
card them into the ash heap of history.”
Twenty-four hours after Jones issued
his decision legalizing same-sex marriage
in Pennsylvania, Republican Gov. Tom
Corbett announced he would not appeal.
“I have thoroughly reviewed Judge
Jones’ opinion in the Whitewood case.
Given the high legal threshold set forth
by Judge Jones in this case, the case is
extremely unlikely to succeed on ap-
peal. Therefore, after review of the opin-
ion and on the advice of my Common-
wealth legal team, I have decided not to
appeal Judge Jones’ decision,” Corbett
said in a statement.
Pennsylvania was the only Northeast-
ern state to not permit same-sex marriage
nor civil unions for same-sex couples.
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen
Kane, a Democrat, announced two weeks
after the Windsor decision that she would
not defend the state’s 1996 law prohibit-
ing same-sex marriage, thus leaving Cor-
bett to defend to law. With Corbett’s deci-
sion, Pennsylvania became the 19th state,
plus D.C., to legalize same-sex marriage.
“As a Roman Catholic, the traditional
teaching of my faith has not wavered,”
Corbett continued. “I continue to main-
tain the belief that marriage is between
one man and one woman. My duties as
Governor require that I follow the laws
as interpreted by the Courts and make
a judgment as to the likelihood of a suc-
cessful appeal.
“Throughout the debate on this im-
portant and meaningful issue, I have
sky to see what might fall; rather, let us
look to each other...and rise.”
One day after McShane handed down
his decision, a federal judge found Penn-
sylvania’s same-sex marriage ban uncon-
stitutional as well.
“Today, certain citizens of the Com-
monwealth of Pennsylvania are not guar-
anteed the right to marry the person they
love. Nor does Pennsylvania recognize
the marriages of other couples who have
wed elsewhere,” U.S. District Court Judge
John Jones wrote. “Hoping to end this
injustice, eleven courageous lesbian and
gay couples, one widow, and two teenage
children of one of the aforesaid couples
have come together as plaintiffs and asked
this Court to declare that all Pennsylva-
nians have the right to marry the person
of their choice and consequently, that the
Commonwealth’s laws to the contrary are
unconstitutional. We now join the twelve
federal district courts across the country
which, when confronted with these ineq-
uities in their own states, have concluded
that all couples deserve equal dignity in
the realm of civil marriage.”
Jones, who was appointed to the fed-
eral bench in 2002 by President George
W. Bush, found Pennsylvania law defining
marriage as between a man and a woman
in violation of both the Due Process and
Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
“The issue we resolve today is a divi-
sive one. Some of our citizens are made
deeply uncomfortable by the notion of
same-sex marriage. However, that same-
sex marriage causes discomfort in some
does not make its prohibition constitu-
tional. Nor can past tradition trump the
maintained that Commonwealth officials
and agencies would follow the provi-
sions of Pennsylvania’s marriage law un-
less or until a court says otherwise. The
court has spoken, and I will ensure that
my administration follows the provisions
of Judge Jones’ order with respect for all
parties.
“It is my hope that as the important is-
sue of same-sex relationships continues
to be addressed in our society, that all in-
volved be treated with respect.”
The case that ushered in marriage
equality in Pennsylvania was filed in July
by the American Civil Liberties Union on
behalf of 11 same-sex couples, a widow
and the two teenage children of one of
the couples.
“This is a milestone for our move-
ment,” James Esseks, director of the
ACLU Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Trans-
gender Project, said in a statement. “It
reinforces the reality that this isn’t a par-
tisan issue. It’s about fundamental fair-
ness and dignity for all people, including
lesbians and gay men.”
The decisions are the latest in a
string of federal and state court wins
for same-sex marriage following last
June’s sweeping U.S. Supreme Court de-
cision in U.S. v. Windsor — striking down
the federal government’s definition of
marriage as between a man and a woman.
Since then, federal courts have ruled in
favor of marriage equality in Utah, Ohio,
Oklahoma, Kentucky, Idaho, Illinois, In-
diana, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and
Virginia. According to the Human Rights
Campaign, about 44 percent of the U.S.
population now live in a marriage equal-
ity state. l
MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Southern Hospitality
Celebrity chef Art Smith to host Powerbear Party benefitting the DC Center and HRC’s
Project One America
by John Riley
T
he post-Memorial Day sum-
mer season is often associated
with cookouts and pool par-
ties. But Art & Soul’s celebrity
chef Art Smith is combining the two for a
June 5 gathering expected to draw more
than 200 people to a rooftop pool just
blocks from the U.S. Capitol.
An openly gay, married man who hails
from Florida and specializes in South-
ern cuisine, Smith is partnering with the
Liaison Capitol Hill, Metro Weekly, and
real estate firm MetroNando to spon-
sor a “PowerBear Party for Equality” on
the Liaison’s rooftop. Guests will enjoy
complimentary wine and beer and snack
on small bite-sized portions of food from
Art & Soul while grilling gourmet hot
dogs. Proceeds from the event will bene-
fit the Human Rights Campaign’s (HRC)
Project One America, aimed at achiev-
ing LGBT equality in Southern states,
as well as the DC Center for the LGBT
community.
Hubert Tate, the press secretary for
Project One America, says HRC plans
to hire three individuals for three full-
time positions in Mississippi, Alabama
and Arkansas, states that currently lack
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a statewide organization or campaign. The aim of Project One
America is to help those states to achieve progress on behalf of
LGBT residents, both in the form of marriage equality and non-
discrimination protections in employment, housing and public
accommodations.
David Mariner, executive director of the DC Center, says
he is grateful that Smith selected his organization in searching
for a local LGBT organization that could also benefit from the
PowerBear Party.
“Chef Art Smith generously offered to do a benefit for us,”
Mariner says. “I don’t know what a PowerBear is, but I look
forward to finding out.”
The PowerBear Party got its start from a nickname given to
LGBT staffers in the government.
“There are a lot of influential members of the LGBT com-
munity who work on the Hill or in government agencies,” says
Smith, himself a self-described bear. “A couple of friends of
mine happen to be bears, so I call them the PowerBears.”
The PowerBear Party comes just a week before Smith is set
to host another fundraiser for equality in Mississippi, where
the state legislature passed and the governor signed into law a
measure that allows businesses to discriminate against LGBT
people. Smith notes that 18 other states already have similar
laws in place.
Smith selected the DC Center as a beneficiary of the event on
the recommendation of local D.C. organizers, but he similarly
supports programs for LGBT youth and teenagers who need
services, counseling or a safe space, whether at the DC Center
or at the Center on Halsted, the DC Center’s counterpart in
Smith’s hometown of Chicago.
Smith says the location of the Liaison’s rooftop, just blocks
from the center of power of the U.S. government – and inciden-
tally, where he and his husband, Jesus Salgueiro, held their 2011
wedding reception – is a perfect setting for a benefit centered
around promoting equality through the political process.
“I’ve learned with parties that if you...feed people, you’ll get
them to stay,” Smith says. “And who doesn’t love hot dogs? And
the hotel has a wonderful rooftop pool, so people can wear their
swim trunks or whatever underneath their suits!”
Chef Art Smith’s PowerBear Party for Equality will take place on
Thursday, June 5, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Liaison Capitol Hill,
415 New Jersey Ave. NW. For more information, visit PowerBear-
Party.eventbrite.com. l
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DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,
Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. dignitynova.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
SUNDAY, JUNE 1
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 8.6 miles on
Massanutten Trail near Luray, VA. Bring beverages,
lunch, bug spray, sunscreen, $25 in fees, and funds
for dinner afterwards. Carpool at 8:30 a.m. from
East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride lot. Craig, 202-
462-0535. adventuring.org.
DC STROKES ROWING CLUB, the oldest LGBT
rowing club, seeks more than 100 volunteers for
its 21st Stonewall Regatta. No rowing experience
necessary for volunteers. Morning and afternoon
shifts available. For more information, volunteers@
stonewallregatta.org or stonewallregatta.org.
STONEWALL KICKBALL’S 4TH ANNUAL DRAG
BALL & OUTDOOR MOVIE seeks volunteers to
help with event benefitting The DC Center and
Capital Pride. Francis-Stevens Field, 24th & M Sts.,
NW. 4-10 p.m. $5 donation. For more information,
visit stonewallkickball.leagueapps.com
WEEKLY EVENTS
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
Join LINCOLN CONGREGATIONAL TEMPLE –
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST for an inclusive,
loving and progressive faith community every
Sunday. 11 a.m. 1701 11th Street NW, near R in
Shaw/Logan neighborhood. lincolntemple.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,
8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas
Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.
FRIDAY, MAY 30
WEEKLY EVENTS
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30 p.m.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m.
The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-2245,
gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION (GAMMA)
is a peer-support group that meets in Dupont Circle
every second and fourth Friday at 7:30 p.m. gay-
married.com or GAMMAinDC1@yahoo.com.
PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social
group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SATURDAY, MAY 31
ADVENTURING outdoors group to hold one-way
49-mile bike trip from DC to Baltimore. Bring
helmet, beverages, snack, $2 trip fee, and funds for
lunch in Baltimore and for return transportation to
DC. Ride begins at 8:30 a.m. from south parking lot
of Columbia Island Marina off southbound lanes of
GW Parkway. Jerry, 703-920-6871. adventuring.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer
organization, volunteers today for an activity with
the National Cherry Trees around the Tidal Basin.
To participate, visit burgundycrescent.org.
CHRYSALIS arts & culture group visits the Phillips
Collection to see exhibit “Made In The USA.” $12
admission, $10 seniors. Lunch follows. Meet at 11
a.m. in the entrance lobby at 1600 21st Street NW.
Craig, 202-462-0535. craighowell1@verizon.net.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/
time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
THURSDAY, MAY 29
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session
at the Takoma Aquatic Center, 7:30-9 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m.
Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia social
group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in Reston,
11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor bar, 7-9
p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-745-
7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or Takoma Park,
301-422-2398.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410
7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
marketplace
13 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.
MONDAY, JUNE 2
ADVENTURING outdoors group goes whitewater
rafting on Cheat River in WV. Stay at private condo
at Md.’s Deep Creek Lake Monday night, go rafting
Tuesday, return Wednesday. Must pay $50 for spot on
raft in advance. Bob, 703-271-4190. adventuring.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a
program of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. No cost, newcomers
welcome. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary, 1200 S St. NW.
dcscandals.wordpress.com.
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
The DC Center hosts BREAKING THE SILENCE:
OUR MILITARY STORIES panel discussion on
LGBT issues in the military. 12-2 p.m. 10 First St.
SE. eric.perez@thedccenter.org
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
14 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504, secretary@wetskins.
org, wetskins.org.
TUESDAY, JUNE 3
Join CASA RUBY as they celebrate another year of providing essential services
to Latino GLBT community. 6:30-9:30 p.m. PEPCO Edison Place, 702 8th St
NW. $50 tickets for host committee, $30 general admission. bit.ly/vintageaffair
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4
Rayceen Pendarvis hosts the “ASK RAYCEEN SHOW” with a panel discussion
featuring various DJs entitled “Last Night A DJ Saved My Life: A Celebration of
Dance Music” at Liv Nightclub. 2001 11th St. NW. Free admission. Doors open at
6 p.m., show at 7 p.m. 202-505-4548.
BOOKMEN DC, an informal men’s gay-literature group, discusses Frank
O’Hara’s 1964 poetry collection, “Lunch Poems,” at 7:30 p.m. at the Tenleytown
Library. 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. All are welcome. For more information,
www.bookmendc.blogspot.com
QUEER FOR CHRIST official Pride Happy Hour, hosted for young-adult
Christian group. 7-9 p.m. Larry’s Lounge, 1836 18th St NW. All welcome.
facebook.com/groups/QFCDC/
THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB meets for Social Bridge. No
reservation or partner needed. All welcome. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St.
SE. 301-345-1571. l
15 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
16 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Spirited Business
Chanel Turner has brought a new kind of vodka to D.C.’s bars
Turner
By John F. Stanton
W
HETHER YOU LIKE
your martini shaken or
stirred, vodka is what
makes the drink extra
special. For many years, patrons at Wash-
ington-area bars, restaurants and liquor
stores desiring a vodka martini or cock-
tail have ordered their favorite brands
of vodka, distilled in countries including
Poland, Russia, and Scandinavia.
Recently, however, area vodka devo-
tees have noticed a new name on the
shelves. With its distinctive purple-col-
ored lightning bolt-shaped bottle, FOU-
DRÉ Vodka was recently introduced to
vodka lovers by a Washington area entre-
preneur, Chanel Turner. Named Emerg-
ing Entrepreneur of the Year by the
Capital Area Gay and Lesbian Chamber
of Commerce (The Chamber), Turner
created FOU-DRÉ (a play on the French
phrase for “struck by lightning”) as the
first true boutique-brand Ultra-Premium
vodka in the Washington area.
FOU-DRÉ CEO Turner, who markets
FOU-DRÉ part time and is a website
developer by day, launched her premium
vodka brand just a year ago. She credits
The Chamber with helping her penetrate
the LGBT market, a highly lucrative one
for distilled spirits. “I’ve had nothing
but great experiences with The Cham-
ber,” says Turner. “The Chamber was
instrumental in letting us penetrate the
LGBT market, which has provided us
with many new customers.
“CAGLCC was the first Chamber
that we joined and has given us a great
impression and fulfilled experience with-
in area DC business Chambers. Joining
CAGLCC not only introduced us to the
LGBT market, but exposed the brand to
other influencers and social groups with-
in the city. The overwhelming response
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that we’ve received is a reflection of the
esteem that CAGLCC holds.”
Turner has been a sponsor for a num-
ber of Chamber events, including the
most recent Awards Gala. She has also
participated in other Chamber events,
including last year’s g.life.
“G.life was our first opportunity to
do an event with The Chamber where
we could not only serve our product to
patrons, but also let them purchase a
bottle if they wanted to keep the experi-
ence alive,” she says. “We were able to
connect with so many different vendors
and share our story while networking
with potential clients.”
FOU-DRÉ was also a participant in
last year’s Pride celebration. “Pride is a
festive time of year and participating in
the parade and reception was definitely
a memorable experience,” Turner says.
Vodka lovers can enjoy FOU-DRÉ as
vodka was intended, neat or on the rocks
with “the over ice experience.” FOU-
DRÉ Vodka can also compliment any
mixer and is the perfect spirit for any
craft cocktail. Distilled and bottled in
South Carolina, FOU-DRÉ is an all-natu-
ral infused vodka, with a patented distil-
lation process that removes free radicals
and other substances that can create a
harsh taste, instead giving the drinker the
pleasant hint of pomegranate and ginger.
Initially popular with female consum-
ers, Turner wants to increase patronage
among male vodka aficionados as well.
“We want men to see FOU-DRÉ as a
‘manly’ drink,” she says.
She plans future events to help expand
her product’s appeal, including a mixol-
ogy competition to be judged by industry
leaders, as well as consumers. The com-
pany will roll out a variety of new recipes
with their spring cocktail menu designed
to highlight FOU-DRÉ’s gravitation
towards the health libation lover. Food
and bar bloggers will be invited to taste
the new creations from the cocktail list.
Turner already has about 35 accounts
in the Mid-Atlantic region, mostly with
retail outlets. However, her vodka has
begun to develop an international follow-
ing, with sales in Singapore, and soon,
Japan. Distribution is being explored in
other countries as well. Domestically,
she plans to increase penetration into the
Northeastern United States.
For further information on Chanel Turner
and FOU-DRÉ Vodka, please email her at
info@fou-dre.com or visit www.fou-dre.com.
The Chamber Means Business. For more
information visit caglcc.org or facebook.
com/CAGLCC. On Twitter,
follow @DCLGBTBIZ.
John F. Stanton, a CAGLCC member, is
the president of SRP & Associates Inc., a
strategic marketing and public relations
firm in Northern Virginia. l
L
G
B
T
Business
Chamber
Connections
17 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
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scene
DC Black Pride
Opening Reception
and Awards Ceremony
Friday, May 23
Grand Hyatt
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
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with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
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scene
DC Black Pride Health
& Wellness Expo
Sunday, May 25
Francis-Stevens
Educational Campus
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
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with your
smartphone
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pics online!
Capital Pride
Heroes Reception
Wednesday, May 21
Artisphere
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
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25 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
26 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
27 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
A
CTOR MICHAEL URIE COULD NOT HAVE IMAGINED A ROLE
like Alex More. Or a show like Buyer and Cellar.
“I would describe it,” Urie says, “as a completely fictional tale
about a completely fake person who works in the absolutely real
basement mall at Barbra Streisand’s house.”
Yes, absolutely real: In her 2010 book My Passion for Design,
Streisand makes passing reference to having a personal mall in
her Malibu mansion. From that little detail playwright Jonathan
Tolins hit the ground running, digging deeply into his imagination to create an improb-
able — and improbably funny — one-man show about an unemployed actor who takes a job
as Streisand’s subterranean shop boy. Played by Urie, the fictitious Alex More tends to the
tchotchkes while pining for more visits from Streisand, his only customer.
Urie is best known from ABC’s Ugly Betty, where he played Vanessa Williams’s flamboy-
ant, conniving assistant. But in the Off-Broadway Buyer and Cellar, the 33-year-old is not
just playing another diva’s assistant, he actually portrays the diva in a few scenes, including
one hilarious moment in which Alex helps Streisand rehearse lines for the star’s true-to-life
dream role: Mama Rose in a proposed new film version of Gypsy.
“I’ve learned more about audiences doing this play than anything else — because they’re
my co-star; they’re the other actor,” Urie says, who in recent years has appeared on Broad-
way in How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying, Off Broadway in The Temperamen-
tals, and on CBS’s short-lived sitcom, Partners. And to play the part to satisfaction requires
some imagination on each audience member’s part. “You’re not getting a full Barbra,”
explains Urie, who doesn’t don drag for his empathetic portrayal. “You’re not getting a full
mall. You have to come up with a lot of it yourself.”
Urie has been playing Alex, Streisand and a handful of other characters in Buyer and Cel-
lar for over a year now, since originating the role in a production Off Broadway for the small
Rattlestick Playwrights Theater. In a few weeks, Urie will appear at Harman Hall in a short
run of the show presented by the Shakespeare Theatre Company. The company’s director
Michael Kahn was one of Urie’s teachers at Juilliard a decade ago. In fact, Kahn helped trig-
ger the current national tour of Buyer and Cellar, which makes additional stops in Chicago,
San Francisco and Los Angeles. There may be more to come, though Urie deflects a question
about future plans by channeling Streisand: “There’s talk, but nothing I can tawk about. It’s
all just tawk.”
In the meantime, the New York-based Texas native welcomes a return to the D.C. stage,
after starring as Mercutio in a 2005 production of Romeo and Juliet at the Folger Theatre.
“I was really impressed with the audiences here,” he says during a recent inter-
view in a reception room in the Harman Center for the Arts. “They’re very smart. I
think people will really like this play here. It’s very clever. And, you know, D.C. has its
egos, and its big personalities. So I just think Washingtonians will relate to the play.”
Funny
Guy
Michael Urie has long focused on finding the funny in even the
most serious of subjects, including Barbra Streisand
Interview by Doug Rule / Photography by Todd Franson
28 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
METRO WEEKLY: How did you come to Buyer and Cellar?
MICHAEL URIE: Jon [Tolins] and I both ended up on a sitcom
together [Partners], that he was a writer on and I was in. We
were both transplanted to the West Coast and became good
friends doing that. And that’s when he passed me the script.
Which was originally written for another actor named Jesse
Tyler Ferguson. Jesse loved it but couldn’t commit to it, because
of his Modern Family schedule, and eventually gave Jon his
blessing to attach me to it instead. That stupid fool. [Laughs.]
MW: Did that inform how you approached the role at all, that it was
originally written for Ferguson?
URIE: No. I can’t even imagine how Jesse would do it. I mean, it’s
so different. You have to bring so much of yourself to this show.
Because the play is essentially about a guy telling you a story, it
really only I think works if you use your own storytelling skills
to tell that guy’s story.
MW: How did you prepare for portraying Barbra Streisand?
URIE: I watched all the movies and all the interviews and, of
course, I listened to a lot of the albums, especially the concert
albums where she talks as herself. It’s a recent Barbra, a mod-
ern Barbra that we needed. The play basically takes place in
2010, when the book came out. It’s not young Barbra, it’s now
Barbra. It’s late-60s Barbra. It’s Roz Focker. That movie, Meet
The Fockers, which she’s in with Dustin Hoffman, that was the
most helpful to me. But I then also added whimsical elements
from her early work like The Owl and the Pussycat and Funny
Girl and What’s Up, Doc? — I needed that whimsical Barbra.
The sort-of serious, smart Barbra, the Prince of Tides Barbra, the
interview Barbra, that wasn’t as helpful. Because she’s very seri-
ous in interviews for the most part. But she’s silly in movies, and
I needed a silly Barbra to find my Barbra for the show. So the old
movies and the new movies were the most helpful.
MW: Was there ever any talk of doing it in actual drag?
URIE: No, that was never part of it. Jon never wanted it to be a
drag interpretation. We don’t call it an impression, or an imper-
sonation. What I think is wonderful about that conceit is that
the audience really has to bring their own experience of her. Or,
if they don’t have much of an experience of her, they can create
one as the play goes on, so that they fill in who it is. I have this
fairly neutral costume, and this wonderfully neutral set, and
there are some things suggested my projection. And I describe
a lot of things. But it’s not literal. What you see when you watch
the play isn’t literal at all. So your imagination is constantly
working. And I think that is part of why people like the play
so much, because they’re invested. They’re actually using their
imagination. With movies, nothing is left to the imagination any
more. And a lot of theater, you can show everything on a stage
these days. You know, put a car on stage, shoot people on stage.
You can do a lot of different things, and an audience doesn’t have
to use their imagination as much. But in this, you’re not getting
a full Barbra. You’re not getting a full mall. You have to come up
with a lot of it yourself.
MW: But your great mannerisms as Streisand really aid in the
portrayal.
URIE: Yeah, her nails. You know who taught me her nails? John
Epperson, Lypsinka. He was the first person I asked to come see
it. Mostly because I wanted his blessing. But I also wanted tips.
I’d never played a woman before. And I didn’t want to go too far.
And also I knew John, he’s got a real knack for mimicry, but he’s
not really a drag queen. What he does is so specific with his lip-
synching character that I thought he’d be able to help me. And
he did. He’s the one who gave me the nails mannerisms. Some-
times people tell me they think that I have long nails after they
see the show because I’m pretending to play with them. And you
just gesture differently when you have long nails. You can’t do
certain things when they’re long. And then with the hair — I do
a hair thing as Barbra in the play that she doesn’t actually do, but
I think if she had my hair, it’s what she would do.
MW: Did you consider yourself a fan of Streisand before? Do you
now?
URIE: I am a fan. I wouldn’t say I was a mega-fan, but I certainly
respect and appreciate her. It wasn’t until I was deep into learn-
ing about her that I started to truly appreciate and love her. I
always knew she could sing. And I knew there was something
funny about her. And people found her funny, and people had
a love/hate thing for her. But I didn’t realize how good an actor
she was until I started watching the movies.
MW: Has she seen the play?
URIE: No.
MW: Do you think she will? Would you want to know if she were
in the audience?
URIE: I definitely wouldn’t want to know if she was in the audi-
ence. And I wouldn’t want the audience to know if she was there
either. Because it would mess it all up. But I don’t think it would
be fair to her to have to sit and watch it with people.
MW: So maybe if you do it in her house — in her mall.
URIE: Yeah, I’ll do a command performance for her. It’s a weird
thing. It’s not a real story, it didn’t really happen. There are a
lot of things I say that are based on truth that Jon has found in
interviews doing his homework about her. But if she can’t get
29 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
past, “Nobody works in my basement!” she’s not going to enjoy
it. And then everyone’s going to be laughing at her. I just don’t
think it would be fair. I don’t think it would be fair for her to
watch it with people. Maybe if we filmed it someday, she could
watch a video of it.
MW: Streisand may be your diva of the moment, but previously, on
Ugly Betty, you had Patti LuPone.
URIE: That’s right. Patti LuPone played my mom there. So I’ve
been around some divas before.
MW: And you worked for Vanessa Williams.
URIE: And Judith Light was in the show. And we had Christine
Baranski, and Bernadette Peters and Christine Ebersole and
Donna Murphy and Faith Prince — I mean we had some amazing
divas on our show. But yeah, Patti LuPone played my mom. And
actually kind of looks like my real mom, which was cool. I’m part
Italian, and she’s quite Italian. But it was awesome. She couldn’t
have been cooler. She loved working on our set. We were all
such fans of hers. And by the end of her time on our set, we were
all huddled around a laptop in our director’s chairs watching her
on YouTube with her.
MW: You watched random videos of LuPone?
URIE: Yeah. Saying, “Look Patti, this is you at the Tonys in 1979,”
or whatever. It was so fun. She loved it!
MW: You weren’t out when you were on Ugly Betty.
URIE: Not the whole time. Not at first. It was a different time.
MW: But the character was out.
URIE: Oh, the character was out. He was way, way, way out. But
me, nobody knew then. Nobody was out. I think it wasn’t until
the second or third year that I was on the show that Neil Patrick
Harris came out. And I was being told by certain people, “Don’t
come out. If this show doesn’t make it...” But then I was like,
“Come on!” I work way more out than I would have if I had
been in.
MW: Explain what you mean.
URIE: Well, I play all these gay parts. I’ve done Angels in America
and The Temperamentals and Buyer and Cellar. I was in this
movie Petunia and this new movie Such Good People. I’ve just
had a lot of jobs because I’m out. And not to mention getting to
work with great organizations like the Point Foundation. And
the Trevor Project.
My documentary Thank You for Judging, which I co-directed,
played at OUTfest, L.A.’s LGBT film festival. It’s about high
school speech and debate. We followed my old high school
speech team to the state meet. The reason we were at Outfest
is because one of the main characters is competing in original
oratory. He’s written a speech about how it is socially accept-
able for a young girl to be a tomboy, but the reverse, a young
boy who likes to primp and moisturize, doesn’t get a cute term
like tomboy. They’re generally referred to as sissies. It’s a bril-
liant speech. And he sort-of becomes the star of the film. And
he’s gone on to do amazing things. He’s actually about to go to
Harvard Law School.
MW: You were actually on that speech team in high school. Did you
think you might pursue public speaking, or was acting always in
your sights?
URIE: I first wanted to be a director. The first thing I wanted to
do was direct movies, which I’ve gotten to do now. And I really
loved doing theater in high school. And I loved and respected
and looked up to my teachers so, so much. So then I thought I
wanted to be a theater director — a drama teacher — that also
acted. But it was actually in a speech tournament. I was doing a
poetry interpretation where I was reading from a poem that I
thought was extremely serious and dramatic. And I kept getting
laughs. And in the middle of doing the thing, I was like, “Why
are they laughing at me? This is really serious, and I’m trying to
be serious.” And they just kept laughing at me. At my delivery,
my inflection. And I thought, “Well shit, I guess maybe I’ll try to
make it funnier. If they want it to be funny, maybe I can make
it funny.” And so I switched gears and tried to make it funny on
purpose. And it was nonstop laughs, and I won. And that’s the
night I was like, “I want to be an actor!” Because that was such
a thrilling live experience, of having an audience like that, of
having them in the palm of my hand. That was the first time I’d
ever really felt that.
MW: This was in high school. Did you like high school?
URIE: Yeah, I did. I loved high school. I had a really great experi-
ence in high school. Thanks to speech and debate and theater.
Doing plays and stuff. And I was in marching band. It was great,
I loved it.
MW: What instrument?
URIE: French horn. I was horrible. I mean, terrible. And it’s a
great instrument, a beautiful instrument. But I was terrible. I
quit eventually because I had to focus on theater. When I quit
band for theater, my dad was like, “Are you crazy?” He has since
taken that back. [Laughs.] He didn’t quite realize that I was
terrible at band and good at theater. He just knew that I was
in band. He liked going to football games and watching me in
marching band.
MW: Right, this was in Texas, football country. Weren’t you
encouraged to play football?
URIE: Not football, but when I was a little kid of course I was
made to do t-ball. And I hated it, and they let me quit. And then
they made me do soccer. But eventually they were cool. They
knew I didn’t like it, and that I didn’t have a knack for it. And I
have an older sister who was good at every sport, so I think that
helped. She was really good at it, and she really liked it, and she
did it. And they could tell that once I came along, that I wasn’t
good at it and I didn’t like it and I was going to do everything I
could to not do it. So they were not going to make me do it.
MW: And then you moved to New York to go to Juilliard from high
school and haven’t looked back.
URIE: Yep, when I was 19, I moved to New York. I love Texas, I
have a great fondness for it, and anytime I go back I’m always
very happy and very pleased with what’s happening there, espe-
“What I really truly love about this play is its truth. There’s a real humanity
to it that people relate to and respond to. More than anything people say,
‘I knew I’d laugh, but I didn’t know
I would be moved.’”
30 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
cially in the arts community. Just a lot of very cool things hap-
pening in the Dallas area. But New York is home.
MW: And in New York you’ve added directing to your credits. Talk
about your first feature film, He’s Way More Famous Than You.
URIE: Halley Feiffer and my partner Ryan Spahn wrote the
screenplay. It’s a meta-comedy. So in it we all play ourselves,
and they’re writing a script and asking me to direct it. So there
are scenes in the movie that actually happened, but it’s a warped
version of the real world. A completely bizarre, warped, Curb
Your Enthusiasm-type version of the real world. It’s hilarious. It
came out a year ago — just over a year ago now in select cities and
now it’s on DVD and VOD. And since then, I produced another
film and directed a short film that are both traveling the festival
circuits and looking for distribution.
MW: Have you ever directed theater?
URIE: I haven’t. I directed a few things in high school, and I’ve
since directed a few staged reading-type things. But I don’t think
I’m as good at it. I think in part it has to do with me wanting to
be in it. When it’s on stage, it’s hard for me to not want to be in it.
MW: You like performing for a live audience.
URIE: I do. I really like that. Creating something for a live audi-
ence. I’d much rather be part of what the audience sees. I’m sure
it’s just my own — what would it be, narcissism? [Laughs.] I don’t
know. I’m a ham! I guess it’s that I’m a ham.
MW: And that’s where I was going to go next.
URIE: “You’re a ham! Talk about being a ham! Everyone says
you’re a ham!”
MW: You obviously have a knack for comedy, and comedic act-
ing. Would you like to do more serious work, or do you just prefer
comedy?
URIE: I would like to do more. I like to do serious things. But I
always try to find the levity in even the most serious things. I
mean, Angels in America — it’s hilarious. It’s a truly funny play.
And I played Prior Walter, who has crazy-good laughs. But it’s
not a comedy. And The Temperamentals too — there are a lot of
very funny things in that. But it’s also not a comedy. And I don’t
think I would ever want to do something that is completely
devoid of humor. That would be hard for me, to do something
that was absolutely not funny at all. I think I would feel stifled
in that sense.
MW: Well, not knowing you, I would imagine that’s reflective of
how you are in your normal life. I imagine you’re the funny one
among your family and friends.
URIE: I’m a very serious person. [Laughs.] Yeah, I guess so. I
choose to be silly. My mom always thought I was really, really
funny. And I was funny among my friends. Yeah, I was the fun-
nier one among my friends.
This play has good surprises in it. That feeling of truly sur-
prising an audience, that kind of laugh that you get. Not the, “Ha
ha, that was a joke” laugh. But like the, “That happened?” laugh.
That is really fulfilling.
MW: Like the whole premise of the show.
URIE: Kind of, yeah. But then there are certain things that happen
along the way that the audience does not expect. And it’s thrill-
ing, it’s thrilling. And that never gets old. So yeah, I guess I sort
of gravitate towards comedy, but I also like there to be truth. I
mean, what I really truly love about this play is its truth. Even
though it’s fake, it is human. There’s a real humanity to it that
people relate to and respond to. More than anything people say,
“I knew I’d laugh, but I didn’t know I would be moved.”
MW: Who could you do next, among divas? Realizing that this is
not your intention.
URIE: I don’t really know. I mean I never would have guessed
that I could do this. You know, I never thought I would play a
public figure before. It never crossed my mind that I could or
would. I never thought about doing a solo show, either. And I
would think very carefully about doing another, because it’s very
isolating. And lonely. I really miss actors. A lot. A lot. But it’s also
thrilling to be alone. I don’t know, Neil Diamond’s attic?
MW: What has he installed up there?
URIE: I don’t know! Who knows?
MW: On that note, what do you have in your attic? By which I really
mean, how is private life?
URIE: It’s going well. I’ve got this guy, Ryan Spahn, and we’ve
been together for five and a half years. We have pets — a cat and
a dog. Other things in the future perhaps.
MW: Such as children?
URIE: Not opposed to it. Got to figure out the right way and time
to make it happen. That we haven’t figured out yet.
Maybe not while doing a one-man show. It’s tricky. Ryan and
I are both in show business. A lot of times our work overlaps.
We’re doing a reading together in Chicago of John’s other play,
The Last Sunday in June. Looks like we’re going to do a web
series together, too. He’s an actor and a writer. And I’m an actor
and a director. So it works.
MW: I know you’ve done a fair amount of Shakespeare in the past.
Would you like to do more Shakespeare?
URIE: Yes, I would love to do more. It hasn’t worked out for me
yet. Jesse Tyler Ferguson keeps getting my parts in Central Park.
And I have to keep doing the one he passed up.
MW: How about television, do you have any more of that coming
up?
URIE: Well, Jon Tolins created this TV show that he and I sold to
USA. It’s in development — he’s writing the pilot right now. And
if it goes, I’ll be the star. Which will be great. I would love to go
back to TV, and I can think of no better person to go with than
with this guy. He writes good stuff, and I get his stuff, and we
would be a good team I think.
MW: And Jesse Tyler Ferguson didn’t turn it down first.
URIE: No, it was mine! I might turn it down for him!
Buyer & Cellar runs June 20 through June 29 at Sidney Harman
Hall, 610 F St. NW. Tickets are available now. Call 202-547-1122
or visit shakespearetheatre.org.
The film Such Good People screens Friday, June 6, at 9 p.m., at the
Human Rights Campaign, 1640 Rhode Island Ave. NW. Tickets
are $10. Call 202-682-2245 or visit reelaffirmations.org. l
“It wasn’t until I was deep into learning about [Barbra Streisand] that I
started to truly appreciate and love her. I always knew she could sing. But
I didn’t realize how good an actor she was
until I started watching the movies.”
31 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
32 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
33 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
34 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
MAY 29 - JUNE 5, 2014
SPOTLIGHT
BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA,
FOLGER THEATRE
Marin Alsop conducts the women’s chorus of the
Baltimore Choral Arts Society and the BSO while
Edward Berkeley directs his concert adaptation of
William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream
featuring music by Felix Mendelssohn. Among the
actors breathing life into Shakespeare’s classic:
Spencer Aste, Katie deBuys, Kate Eastwood Norris,
Marcus Kyd and Cody Nickell. Thursday, May
29, at 8 p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301
Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Also Friday, May
30, Saturday, May 31, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, June
1, at 3 p.m. Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212
Cathedral St., Baltimore. Tickets are $29 to $94. Call
410-783-8000 or visit bsomusic.org.
CAPITAL JAZZ FEST
Erykah Badu and John Legend perform as part of
a “Special Event: Friday Night Soul” at the 22nd
Annual Capital Jazz Fest. Yet as ever, all three
days find soul and funk acts mixed in with the
namesake genre, chiefly on the Symphony Woods
Stage: This year including Chaka Khan, Dwele,
Klymaxx featuring Bernadette Cooper, The O’Jays,
Faith Evans and Peabo Bryson. Still, jazzheads won’t
be disappointed, with performances from Dianne
Reeves, Michael Franks, Kem, Rachelle Ferrell and
Keiko Matsui. And then there’s the promise of
“special surprise guests” in a tribute show to George
Duke hosted by Al Jarreau and Stanley Clarke.
Friday, June 6, to Sunday, June 8. Merriweather Post
Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia.
Tickets are $56.50 to $185. Call 800-551-SEAT or
visit capitaljazz.com.
CAPTURING FIRE:
QUEER SPOKEN WORD SUMMIT & SLAM
A program of the DC Center, Capturing Fire returns
for a fourth iteration to showcase emerging and
established spoken-word poets from around the
world, but especially in the D.C. area, which has
become something of a poetry hotspot. Among this
year’s events: A free Welcome Ceremony on Friday,
May 30, starting at 6 p.m., at Busboys and Poets on
14th Street NW; “Cupid Ain’t @#$•!,” the annual
reading (and touring show) hosted by J Mase III
with queer writers exploring the pain and pleasure
of relationships, on Friday, May 30, at 8 p.m., at the
DC Center; Trans Reading hosted by Lady Dane
Figueroa Edidi on Saturday, May 31, at 7 p.m., at
the DC Center; an extra edition of the monthly
series “Sparkle: Queer Open Mic” hosted by Regie
Cabico and Danielle Evennou, on Sunday, June 1, at
8 p.m., at Busboys and Poets; and the SLAM finals
and Closing Party on Sunday, June 1, at 10 p.m., at
Busboys and Poets. Admission prices range from $5
to $25, or $50 for an event pass. Call 202-682-2245
or visit capturingfire.org.
thedccenter.org/capturingfire/
CHRISTOPHER K. MORGAN & ARTISTS
Local gay choreographer Christopher K. Morgan
brings his company to Rockville’s American Dance
35
Compiled by Doug Rule
Auntie Gay
E Street screens Auntie Mame as a midnight toast to Pride
A
UNTIE MAME, THE 1958 CLASSIC FILM, HAS SOME SERIOUS GAY
appeal. Andrew Scahill, who teaches film history at Georgetown University,
can easily rattle off a handful of reasons — starting with a theory about the
lead character that, while convincing, might be heresy to some.
“If you take away her biological woman-ness,” Scahill says, “she is very much
a gay man, in a stereotypical sense.” Of course, in a literal sense, as portrayed by
the great Rosalind Russell, Mame was all woman. But figuratively speaking, she
was maybe a touch too-much woman, talking and gesticulating grandly like a drag
queen fresh out of finishing school. “Her performance is so kind of over the top. It’s
so unlike anything else really happening during that period,” Scahill says. “She had
a hard time kind of finding an audience, just because of the oddity of it, in terms
of a Hollywood narrative.” Russell’s Mame was not a romantic protagonist — she
wasn’t even married, gasp! — but rather a mentor to her nephew, who comes under
her tutelage after his father’s death.
“It’s this sort-of fairy godmother narrative,” Scahill adds. Mame opens the
sheltered boy’s eyes to her fabulous, urban, colorful lifestyle, “a queer world of
excess and decadence and joy. Maybe all of us wish that we had that when we were
young.” And now that we’re adults? “Gay men have always coalesced around films
that are quotable,” Scahill says, noting that, when shared, “they can provide a sort-
of cultural identity.”
Next weekend Landmark’s E Street Cinema will present two screenings of the
eminently quotable camp classic in its debut as part of the venue’s weekly boozy
Midnight Madness series. “It is a wonderful film to enjoy with a crowd on the big
screen,” says E Street’s Ruth Hayler, who adds: “We have had requests...so we
decided to give it a try.”
Certainly the timing couldn’t have worked out much better, falling over Capital
Pride weekend. Auntie Mame’s life motto also works as a rallying cry to enjoy Pride:
“Live! Life’s a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!” —Doug Rule
Auntie Mame screens Friday, June 6, and Saturday, June 7, at midnight, at
Landmark’s E Street Cinema, 555 11th St. NW. Tickets are $9. Call 202-452-7672 or
visit landmarktheatres.com.
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
Institute, where he’s a resident artist, for the season-closing mixed-repertory
program By The Inch. On the bill are two world premieres, including a new work
for the women of CKM&A, plus a reconstruction of Morgan’s signature solo piece
The Measure of a Man 10 years after later. Friday, May 30, and Saturday, May 31,
at 8 p.m. American Dance Institute, 1501 East Jefferson St. Rockville. Tickets are
$33.50. Call 301-984-3003 or visit americandance.org or christopherkmorgan.com.
DANCEAFRICA, DC 2014
This 27th annual celebration pays tribute to the vibrancy of African heritage
through dance, music, visual arts, food, clothing and crafts. The festival’s special
guests this year are Illstyle & Peace Productions from Philadelphia, but the
core performances as always will come from the many strong African dance
companies that call D.C. home, including Coyaba Dance Theater, Dance Place
Step Team, KanKouran West African Dance Co., Sankofa Dance Theater and Soul
in Motion. This year’s festival also once again includes an African-style outdoor
marketplace set up on the street in front of lead presenter Dance Place. Vendors
will sell food and wares, and various dance groups, most geared toward children
and students, will offer free performances throughout the afternoons of the main
festival days, Saturday, June 7, and Sunday, June 8. For more details and ticket
information, call 202-269-1600 or visit danceplace.org.
DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Wolf Trap plays local host to a national tour of this hit musical, which debuted
20 years ago on Broadway. Based on Disney’s 1991 animated film, Beauty and the
Beast features music by composer Alan Menken, chiefly in collaboration with the
late lyricist Howard Ashman, though he worked with Tim Rice for additional
songs on stage. The show has changed hardly at all in two decades — of course its
basic love-conquers-all storyline is the same, but so, too, is the way it’s presented.
The original Broadway creative team only made tweaks when they regrouped
to develop this touring show. If it ain’t broke.... Friday, June 6, through Sunday,
June 8, at 8 p.m. Also Saturday, June 7, and Sunday, June 8, at 2 p.m. The Filene
Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $22 to $80. Call
877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
NERO/PSEUDO
WSC Avant Bard presents a world premiere of a glam rock musical by writer
Richard Byrne and composers Jim Elkington and Jon Langford that takes the
historical fall of Rome under Nero as its starting point. Nero/Pseudo follows a
rock and roll Nero imposter who wins over the emperor’s fans and becomes a
celebrity. Patrick Pearson directs a cast including Ryan Alan Jones, Alani Kravitz,
Lee Liebeskind, Brian McDermott, Gillian Shelly and Bradley Foster Smith.
Closes this Sunday, June 1. The Shop at Fort Fringe, 607 New York Ave. NW.
Tickets are $25 to $35. Call 866-811-4111 or visit wscavantbard.org.
ORDINARY DAYS
Signature Theatre’s Matthew Gardiner, who must be the busiest working
director all around D.C., helms a Round House Theatre production and the area
premiere of up-and-coming gay composer Adam Gwon’s musical Ordinary Days.
Touted as a refreshingly honest, funny musical about the difficulty of making real
connections in the overwhelming hubbub and pace of urban life. Erin Weaver,
Will Gartshore, Samule Edgerly and Janine DiVita star. Now in previews. To
June 22. Round House Theatre, 4545 East-West Highway, Bethesda. Tickets are
$35 to $50. Call 240-644-1100 or visit roundhousetheatre.org.
SHAKESPEARE’S THE THING
As part of its yearlong celebration of what would have been William Shakespeare’s
450th birthday, the Folger Shakespeare Library selects from its vast collection
some great or quirky hits — from the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio to a Sanskrit
translation of Hamlet to a Shakespeare board game. Through June 15. Folger
Great Hall, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu.
SHI-QUEETA LEE’S A DRAG SALUTE TO THE DIVAS
Indefatigable local drag sensation Shi-Queeta Lee brings her show “A Drag Salute
To The Divas” to the Rock and Roll Hotel. As ever, Lee is joined by a whole
troupe of celebrity female impersonators, lip-synching and performing along
to pop/hip-hop divas. Thursday, June 5, at 7 p.m. Rock and Roll Hotel, 1353 H
St. NE. Tickets are $20. Call 202-388-ROCK or visit rockandrollhoteldc.com or
adragsalutetothedivas.com.
WILD WITH HAPPY
Center Stage presents this new comedy by playwright/actor Colman Domingo
focused on the struggles of a gay man whose acting career is going nowhere. Now
his personal life is in shambles, too — his boyfriend leaves him and his mother
dies in quick succession. But he does have a boisterous aunt and an extroverted
best friend, who take up the challenge to cheer him up. Jeremy B. Cohen directs
a cast featuring Forrest McClendon, James Ijames, Chivas Michael and Stephanie
Berry. Now in previews. Night Out, including a pre-show happy hour for LGBT
patrons, is Tuesday, June 3, at 6:30 p.m. Runs to June 29. Center Stage, 700
North Calvert St., Baltimore. Tickets are $19 to $62. Call 410-986-4000 or visit
centerstage.org.
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FILM
FUNNY GIRL
Four years after her star-making turn on Broadway
playing Jazz Age vaudevillian Fanny Brice, Barbra
Streisand reprised the role for the film version
of Funny Girl, earning her the Best Actress Oscar
for the effort. William Wyler directed the moving
picture that includes those Streisand signatures
“People” and “Don’t Rain on My Parade.” Saturday,
May 31, and Sunday, June 1, at 3:30 p.m. AFI Silver
Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets
are $12 general admission. Call 301-495-6720 or visit
afi.com/Silver.
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2
HHHHH
Sam Raimi’s 2004 blockbuster Spider-Man 2 was
well paced, competently written, bombastic and
emotionally gratifying, and it made many year-end
“best of” lists. Doubtful Marc Webb’s sequel The
Amazing Spider-Man 2 will enjoy similar acclaim.
Forget villains and super powers, the main focus of
this movie is very much the relationship between
Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) and Gwen Stacy
(Emma Stone). Whereas Tobey Maguire and Kirsten
Dunst had an undeniable spark in the original
trilogy, Garfield and Stone set every scene ablaze.
Their chemistry is undeniable, their affection for one
another bolstered by their status as a couple outside
of the film. Every scene offers a wealth of emotion
and some brilliant acting. Also, action sequences
are nicely helmed — indeed, they’re one area where
seeing the film in 3D may be worth the price of entry.
Now playing. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
(Rhuaridh Marr)
X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST
HHHHH
Not so much a reboot as a reset, X-Men: Days of
Future Past cleverly combines the cast of the original
X-Men films (Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen) with
younger incarnates from 2011’s First Class (James
McAvoy, Michael Fassbender) and restores the
smart, sheer fun of the series while maintaining
its poignancy and gravitas. In order to save society
from a lethal evolution of technology fashioned in
the ‘70s from mutant DNA, fan favorite Wolverine
(Hugh Jackman) is sent back in time to prevent
a key assassination. The narrative takes sudden
turns in directions you can’t possibly see coming
and Jackman, Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence and
especially McAvoy give extraordinary performances
that root the requisite blockbuster action in deep,
resonant emotion. Area theaters. Visit Fandango.
com. (Randy Shulman)
STAGE
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S RIOT
Keegan Theatre, in repertory with Things You
Shouldn’t Say Past Midnight (see separate entry),
presents the world premiere of Rosemary
Jenkinson’s latest one-man tour-de-force, this time a
biting comedy about a poor Irishman who dreams of
becoming a professional golfer — and practices amid
the nighttime fights between Protestant and Catholic
youth that still plague Belfast every summer. Just
as with Jenkinson’s one-man-plays Basra Boy and
Cuchullain, Keegan taps Abigail Isaac to direct
Joss Sticklin. To June 5. Andrew Keegan Theatre
(formerly Church Street Theater), 1742 Church St.
NW. Tickets are $30. Call 703-892-0202 or visit
keegantheatre.com.
CYMBELLINE
The actor-driven Fiasco Theater has been celebrated
T
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S
A

W
O
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Smokey Memories
Arena Stage’s Smokey Joe’s Café is all song and dance, no story
W
HY MESS WITH SUCCESS, RIGHT? ARENA STAGE TOUTS IN
a press release that Smokey Joe’s Café, which debuted nearly two
decades ago, became Broadway’s longest-running musical revue.
Meanwhile, Randy Johnson, the director of Arena’s new production of the
tribute to rock songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, asserts in the show’s
program, “To me lyrics are simply great writing and great songs are three act
plays in and of themselves.”
All well and true, and no doubt the lyrics and certainly great songs featured
in Smokey Joe’s Café will be enough to satisfy many, maybe even most, the-
atergoers. We’re talking mid-20th century standards including — in order of
appearance — “On Broadway,” “Yakety Yak,” “Charlie Brown,” “Hound Dog,”
“Spanish Harlem” and “Stand By Me.” They’re especially entertaining as deliv-
ered by the stellar cast Johnson has assembled, led by gay singer-songwriter
and Tony winner Levi Kreis. If you’ve ever been awed by local veterans E.
Faye Butler, Nova Y. Payton and Stephawn P. Stephens, to name just three, you
certainly will leave appreciative of the work they put in here. Same goes for
the cute, amazingly expressive ways in which Arena’s veteran choreographer
Parker Esse has the performers move around the central Fichlander Stage, with
musical director Rick Fox and his seven-piece band always in sight, smack dab
in the center.
Still, in a show that runs just over two hours, you might wish for some sense
of plot — a story loosely tying together these nearly 40 songs beyond the simple
fact of their creators. Even a little banter between the songs — maybe even
interesting, little-known facts about the songs or the pop stars who originally
performed them — would add zest. But Smokey Joe’s Café was created without a
book writer, its sole focus to showcase the music and lyrics of Leiber and Stoller.
It’s all song and dance, a nonstop hit parade. And whether that ultimately
appeals to you just might be influenced by whether you’re of an age in which
you actually remember when cafes were ever smoky. – Doug Rule
Smokey Joe’s Cafe (HH AND ONE HALF) runs to June 8 at Arena Stage, 1101
6th St. SW. Tickets are $50 to $99. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.
MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
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THE RULEBREAKER REP:
BLOODY POETRY, CHARM
Taffety Punk Theater Company, whose tagline is
“We Will Rock You” and styles itself as a sort of
theatrical rock band, presents two plays in repertory
that focus on 19th century literary giants: Howard
Brenton’s Bloody Poetry, about the meeting two
centuries ago between Percy Shelley and Lord Byron
and their respective lovers — who are also half-
sisters — Mary Shelley and Claire Clairmont; and
Kathleen Cahill’s Charm, about Margaret Fuller,
a writer who wrote what’s considered the first
major feminist work in the U.S. and in the process
upended the male-dominated literary world. Closes
this Saturday, May 31. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop,
545 7th St. SE. Tickets are $15. Call 202-547-6839 or
visit chaw.org or taffetypunk.com.
MUSIC
DAN DEACON
Baltimore-based hipster-y artist Dan Deacon thrives
on experimentation. He primarily creates music most
closely connected to the electronic/pop realm, but at
times he’s veered all the way into the contemporary
classical genre — as a result of one such dabbling, his
work with the quartet So Percussion, the 32-year-
old has already made his debut as a performer at
Carnegie Hall. Deacon’s experimental nature has
MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Sexually Charged
Tom Hill’s erotic paintings of men takes
root at Hillyer
T
HE LGBT MOVEMENT HAS COME SO FAR, BUT
there are underlying themes that are still taboo,” says
artist Tom Hill. Such as? “Such as the desire of a man
for another man, and the exposure of male genitalia.”
Few fine art galleries, in fact, favor works depicting attractive
men, even when clothed. One exception is Dupont Circle’s
Hillyer Art Space, where throughout the month of June, you
can see Hill’s “Spark and Stubble,” a series of vividly colored
paintings. Whether alone or in pairs, Hill’s men proudly display
their bodies in various stages of undress, and each painting is
given a succinct, often suggestive caption. The hand-painted
images are intentionally erotic and sexually charged — not
surprising considering that many originated in gay porn. “Part
of me is trying to push the envelope,” Hill explains. “What are
the distinctions between the body as depicted in porn and the
body as depicted in fine art?” Sometimes, he suggests, it’s as
subtle — and silly — as a costume change: underwear for porn,
a swimsuit for a gallery.
“Painting has always been both a need of expression and a
means for communication throughout my life,” says Hill, who
turns 60 in July. Hill moved back to his native D.C. with his
partner a decade ago after a couple of decades as a professional artist in New York. His day job is in the national advocacy
realm, so he’s run into challenges over the years getting his paintings shown more regularly. “When you do work that has
overt sexuality in it,” he says, “there are many places that won’t show you.” — Doug Rule
The reception for Tom Hill’s “Spark and Stubble” is Friday, June 6, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Exhibit runs to June 28. Hillyer Art
Space at International Arts & Artists, 9 Hillyer Court NW. Call 202-338-0680 or visit artsandartists.org.
that the uninitiated may find obtuse, most will find
the drama unfolding among the three men eminently
accessible. Especially so, given the strong vision of
director Michael Kahn. Tightly sprung, perfectly
pitched and paced, Kahn’s productions are the bloody
steaks and tannic reds of the theater: rich, gratifying
and offering an energy that endures long after the
evening has ended. In rep to June 8. Sidney Harman
Hall, Harman Center for the Arts, 610 F St. NW.
Tickets are $20 to $110 for one play, with discounts
available for combined purchase. Call 202-547-1122
or visit shakespearetheatre.org. (Kate Wingfield)
JUDGMENT AT NUREMBERG
The American Century Theater offers a production
of Abby Mann’s riveting play about the World War
II war crime trials that raises important moral
issues still relevant and controversial today. Joe
Banno directs this rarely produced but critically
praised courtroom drama starring a large cast of
TACT veterans, including Craig Miller, Bruce Alan
Rauscher, Steve Lebens, Mary Beth Luckenbaugh,
Karin Rosnizeck — and Christopher Henley making
his TACT debut in a role played by Montgomery
Clift in the 1961 Oscar-winning film version that also
starred Judy Garland. Opens Friday, May 30, at 8 p.m.
To June 28. Gunston Theater Two, 2700 South Lang
St. Arlington. Tickets are $32 to $40. Call 703-998-
4555 or visit americancentury.org.
in its home base of New York for its inventive,
stripped-down way of reimagining and re-telling
Shakespeare, particularly the Bard’s weaker plays.
Surely, the company has done a lot better with
Cymbelline than they did earlier this month at Folger
Theatre with Two Gentlemen of Verona; Fiasco’s new
production tried to make up for the fact that, as Metro
Weekly’s Doug Rule put it, …Verona “is pretty much
a dog of a play.” At least Fiasco’s Cymbelline was
picked as one of New York magazine’s top shows in
2011 and also won plaudits from the New York Times.
The company’s music-filled rendering, directed by
Noah Brody and Ben Steinfeld, is performed with
just six energetic actors part of the Fiasco family.
Now to June 1. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St.
SE. Tickets are $54 to $72. Call 202-544-7077 or visit
folger.edu.
HENRY IV PARTS I AND II
HHHHH
The Shakespeare Theatre Company presents Henry
IV Part I and Part II in repertory, meaning the plays
can be seen on separate nights but still in order —
a unique opportunity to follow not only Henry’s
history, but also the way in which Shakespeare darkly
and interestingly evolves his characters. Edward Gero
as Henry IV, Stacy Keach as Falstaff and Matthew
Amendt as Hal carry both plays, and even with a big
cast (in which many play multiple roles across the
two productions) and despite an overarching plot
also inspired his development of a smartphone app
that synchronizes with his current live show — which
includes a stop at the Howard Theatre presented by
local promoters BYT — for free. Obviously with that
kind of experiment in crowd demand and access,
you’ll need to get there early. Thursday, June 5,
at 8 p.m. The Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW.
Tickets are free, but issued first come, first served
until venue hits capacity. Call 202-588-5595 or visit
thehowardtheatre.com.
DJ LIL’E’S DIVAS DANCE PARTY
After repeated tweaks to her popular divas dance
party, DJ lil’e (nee Erin Myers) now offers a “battle”
between “Madonna vs. ALL The Divas.” It may
not be much of a contest, but that of course is the
point: It’s all meant to be a fun night of diva-focused
pop, which is basically catnip to the gays. Why, this
round is even offered on the Friday of Capital Pride
weekend to boot. Friday, June 6. Doors at 8 p.m.
Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $15. Call
202-265-0930 or visit 930.com. Also visit 930.com/
friends to sign up for the club’s new Friends With
Benefits rewards program offering exclusive deals
and discounts on tickets, drinks and merchandise.
LUCINDA WILLIAMS
A critical darling — and a songwriter’s songwriter
— Williams writes poetic songs and sings in a
raw, hazy voice often coloring outside the lines.
No wonder some have called her “the female Bob
Dylan.” Sunday, June 8, at 8 p.m. Ram’s Head Live,
20 Market Place, Baltimore. Tickets are $35. Call
410-244-1131 or visit ramsheadlive.com.
MELISSA FERRICK
The repeat Capital Pride performer and folk-rock
powerhouse Melissa Ferrick returns to the area
after touring last fall with Ani DiFranco, who guest-
starred on Ferrick’s stirring 2012 set Still Right Here,
Ferrick’s first studio album in five years. Friday,
June 6, at 8 p.m. Ram’s Head On Stage, 33 West St.,
Annapolis. Tickets are $25. Call 410-268-4545 or
visit ramsheadonstage.com.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Christoph Eschenbach leads the NSO in Brahms’s
Double Concerto featuring two rising young stars,
violinist Nicola Benedetti and cellist Leonard
Eischenbroich. Also on the program is Tchaikovsky’s
Pathetique Symphony No. 6. Thursday, June 5, at 7
p.m., and Friday, Nov. 6, and Saturday, Nov. 7, at 8
p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $10 to
$85. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
SAM HAYWOOD
The Washington Performing Arts Society presents
this British pianist, a composer and director of the
Solent Music Festival. In recent seasons Haywood
has performed with Joshua Bell at the Kennedy
Center and Strathmore, but he now makes his
U.S. solo recital debut performing Beethoven’s
“Moonlight” Sonata among other works by Chopin,
Haydn, Wagner and Liszt. Saturday, May 31, at 2
p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are
$40. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org
or gmcw.org.
DANCE
NATIONAL COLLEGE DANCE FESTIVAL 2014
The biennial National College Dance Festival features
three different gala concerts, each performed twice.
And each concert features 10 different dances, or
what you could call dance sampler platters. “There’s
this level of enthusiasm with the performers that
is so inspiring,” organizer Diana DeFries of the
American College Dance Festival Association told
Metro Weekly in 2012. “And the technical level is
very high. The dancing is beautiful.” Every other
year a panel of experts selects roughly 30 works from
annual regional dance conferences to premiere at the
Kennedy Center during the festival. The concerts
are Thursday, June 5, through Saturday, June 7,
at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace
Theater. Tickets are $25 each. Call 202-467-4600
or visit kennedy-center.org or acdfa.org for more
information.
SOLE DEFINED
Focused chiefly on various music and dance
styles from Africa and Brazil, The Sole Defined
Experiment is the latest production from this local
tap dance-fusion company launched in 2012 as
part of Atlas’s Intersections: A New America Arts
Festival. Co-founded by dancer/choreographers
Ryan K. Johnson (Stomp, Step Afrika) and Quynn
Johnson (Cirque du Soleil, Just Tap), Sole Defined
presents global variations on tap dancing as well
as other urban and Africa-derived dance styles in a
multidisciplinary fashion, incorporating theater and
visuals. Friday, May 30, and Saturday, May 31, at 8
p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE.
Tickets are $38.50 in advance or $43.50 at the door.
Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org or facebook.
com/soledefined.
STEP AFRIKA!
Local dance company Step Afrika!, dedicated to the
tradition of stepping, offers Green Is The New Black,
a new work exploring the notion of using technology
to capture the “power” created through stepping and
convert that power into electrical energy, promoting
concepts of sustainable energy and “climate care.”
Dance Place co-presents this Step Afrika production
with Washington Performing Arts. Thursday,
May 29, through Saturday, May 31, at 8 p.m. Also
41 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
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artists explaining ASCAP’s work. Through July 26.
Performing Arts Reading Room Gallery, the Library
of Congress’s James Madison Memorial Building,
101 Independence Ave. SE. Call 202-707-8000 or
visit loc.gov/concerts.
CREATING THE IDEAL HOME, 1800-1939
Housed in the same building as Constitution Hall, the
D.A.R. Museum offers a new exhibit exploring the
evolution of household comfort and conveniences,
and how American inventors patented all sorts of
laborsaving and leisure-providing home devices,
from the vacuum and the washing machine to the
telephone and television. Through Aug. 30. D.A.R.
Museum, 1776 D St. NW. Admission is free. Call 202-
879-3241 or visit dar.org/museum.
FERMATA: A CELEBRATION OF SOUND
Billed as the venue’s first exhibition dedicated
entirely to sound and also the region’s largest
and most expansive sound exhibition to date,
Artisphere’s Fermata is a months-long extravaganza
featuring works by a wide variety of artists,
including composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, NASA
Kepler scientist Lucianne Walkowicz and D.C.’s
own Richard Chartier. The works will be displayed
in month-long stages, or movements, ending in a
Coda in collaboration with the Transformer Gallery.
Through Aug. 10. Terrace Gallery at Artisphere, 1101
Wilson Blvd., Arlington. Free. Call 703-875-1100 or
visit artisphere.com.
GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE
Thanks to the work of the decade-long, $3
billion Human Genome Project, human society
has gained much greater insight into our bodies
and our health. Scientists have identified genes
that contribute to disease, stoking hope for ways
to treat or eradicate cancer among many other
ailments. This Smithsonian exhibition, which will
soon travel the country, explores the work and
growth in sequencing technology that helped spark
this medical and scientific revolution. Through
September. National Museum of Natural History,
10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Call 202-
633-1000 or visit mnh.si.edu.
HUMAN, SOUL & MACHINE:
THE COMING SINGULARITY!
Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum opens
its 19th original thematic yearlong exhibition this
weekend. Human, Soul & Machine is a playful
examination of the serious impact of technology
on our lives, as seen through the eyes of more
than 40 artists, futurists and inventors in a hot-
wired blend of art, science, humor and imagination.
Through August. American Visionary Art Museum,
800 Key Highway, Baltimore. Call 410-244-1900 or
visit avam.org.
MAKE SOME NOISE: STUDENTS AND THE CIVIL
RIGHTS MOVEMENT
Pegged to the 50th anniversary of the March on
Washington and just one of several exhibitions at the
Newseum marking the occasion, Make Some Noise:
Students and the Civil Rights Movement explores
the new generation of student leaders that emerged
in the 1960s to fight segregation and fight for civil
rights. John Lewis, now a U.S. representative from
Georgia, and Julian Bond, a former chair of the
NAACP, are among the leaders highlighted here.
Through 2015. Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW. Tickets are $21.95 for general admission. Call
888-NEWSEUM or visit newseum.org.
ONE LIFE: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
One Life: Martin Luther King Jr. features historic
photographs, prints, paintings and memorabilia,
mostly drawn from the National Portrait Gallery’s
extensive collection, tracing the trajectory of King’s
Saturday, May 31, at 2 p.m., and Sunday, June 1,
at 4 p.m. Hartke Theatre at Catholic University,
3801 Harewood Road NE. Tickets are $35 at the
door. Call 202-269-1600 or visit danceplace.org or
stepafrika.org.
GALLERIES
A NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION:
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC AT 125
As part of an organization-wide toast to the first
125 years, the National Geographic Museum offers
a visual and interactive exhibition celebrating
modern exploration by featuring some of the most
iconic moments from the institution and its bedrock
magazine. Entered through an archway made of
hundreds of issues of National Geographic magazine,
the exhibition in the complex’s 17th Street gallery
features the work of National Geographic explorers,
photographers, scientists and journalists — everyone
from Jacques Cousteau to James Cameron — and is
sponsored by GEICO, with the North Face a sponsor
of giveaways and events throughout its run. Through
June. National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th St.
NW. Tickets are $11. Call 202-857-7588 or visit
ngmuseum.org.
WHISTLER AND THE THAMES:
AN AMERICAN IN LONDON
An American in London is an international loan
exhibition co-organized by the Arthur M. Sackler
Gallery focused on the 19th century artist James
McNeill Whistler. This American got his start in
Victorian England, charting the changes wrought
by industrialization, from altered vistas to new
landmarks to greater urbanization. More than 80
works are on display in a show that Time Out London
raved, “Every single painting is worth the trip.”
Through Aug. 17. Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, 1050
Independence Ave. SW. Call 202-633-4800 or visit
asia.si.edu.
AN OPENING OF THE FIELD:
JESS, ROBERT DUNCAN…
An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan &
Their Circle is a visual arts and poetry exhibition set
against the backdrop of the love story between two
San Francisco Beat Generation artists: Jess Collins,
known simply as Jess, and Robert Duncan, who
formed their bond in the early 1950s. Jess’s collages
and drawings were often published to accompany
Duncan’s poems and essays, and Duncan’s writings
and ideas often in turn made their way into Jess’s
dense and allusive works. This exhibit looks at
their influence on fellow Beat Generation artists
as well as their unique position as precursors of
Postmodernism, and includes works by other artists
including Edward Corbett and Lawrence Jordan and
poets Jack Spicer and Michael McClure. Through
Aug. 17. American University Museum at the Katzen
Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Call 202-
885-1300 or visit american.edu/cas/museum.
ASCAP: ONE HUNDRED YEARS AND BEYOND
The Library of Congress offers an exhibition
featuring 45 objects celebrating the work of the
leading organization advocating on behalf of
musical artists. Included in this centennial toast
to the American Society of Composers, Authors
and Publishers is the original manuscript of
Henry Mancini’s The Pink Panther theme, Paul
Williams’s lyrics for “The Rainbow Connection,”
and the original lyrics, including the many drafts
and revisions, to the Barbra Streisand staple “The
Way We Were,” written by Alan and Marilyn
Bergman. There are also interactive, audio and
video stations, and the screening of a film featuring
career. Closes this Sunday, June 1. National Portrait
Gallery, 8th and F Streets NW. Call 202-633-8300 or
visit npg.si.edu.
PASSION OF THE EMPRESS:
CATHERINE THE GREAT’S ART PATRONAGE
In the 18th century Catherine the Great reigned
over a golden age of Russian culture, founding
what would become the State Hermitage Museum
and transforming St. Petersburg into one of
Europe’s cultural centers. Hillwood Museum
presents Passion of the Empress, which presents
a selection of dazzling, finely crafted decorative
art pieces in gold, silver, porcelain and enamel —
from Hillwood’s collection as well as other pieces
from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Walters
Art Museum, Dumbarton Oaks, the Birmingham
Museum of Art and private collections. Through
June 8. Hillwood Estate, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW.
Suggested donation is $12. Call 202-686-5807 or visit
HillwoodMuseum.org.
PERUVIAN GOLD:
ANCIENT TREASURES UNEARTHED
National Geographic Museum offers a show of gold
and silver artifacts on loan from three Peruvian
institutions, with the focus on a pre-Colombian
headdress called “El Tocado.” Skilled artisans
created objects, from ceremonial masks to jewelry,
that rival anything produced by the ancient
Egyptians. Through Sept. 14. National Geographic
Museum, 1145 17th St. NW. Tickets are $11. Call 202-
857-7588 or visit ngmuseum.org.
THE BLUE NOTE PHOTOGRAPHS
OF FRANCIS WOLFF
Search for A New Sound focuses on the iconic candid
photography of musicians from the famed Blue
Note Records’ storied 75-year history. The exhibit
is co-produced by the Goethe-Institut and German
Historical Institute and is officially recognized as part
of the “Kennedy Center Blue Note at 75” celebration.
Through July 3. Goethe-Institut Washington, The
German Cultural Center, 812 7th St. NW. Free. Call
202-289-1200 or visit goethe.de/washington.
WINDOW TO WASHINGTON
“Window to Washington: The Kiplinger Collection
at HSW” is an exhibition at Washington’s Carnegie
Library that traces the development of the nation’s
capital from a sleepy Southern town to a modern
metropolis, as documented through the works
of artists. The Historical Society of Washington,
D.C., exhibition was made possible by a donation
from the Kiplinger family. It’s also an early step in
a reorganization effort by the society, which has
struggled to revive ever since its short-lived effort
a decade ago to run a City Museum of Washington
proved too ambitious. Open Mondays and
Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Thursdays
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Historical Society of
Washington, D.C., at the Carnegie Library, 801 K St.
NW. Call 202-393-1420 or visit historydc.org.
ABOVE AND BEYOND
BABE RAINBOW: A PRIDE DANCE PARTY
Upstairs, or on the Mainstage, is DJs Dean Sullivan,
Tommy Cornelis, Keenan Orr and Natty Boom, while
downstairs, or in the Backstage, is Rich Morel’s bear
stew Hot Sauce, which he spins along with Bil Todd.
Saturday, June 7. Doors at 9:30 p.m. Black Cat, 1811
14th St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202-667-4490 or
visit blackcatdc.com. l
MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
43 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
The Strength-Training Trinity
These three items will help assure your strength training succeeds
I
T’S AMAZING HOW MANY GREAT THINGS COME IN
threes: three-piece suits, the three little pigs, the number
of states that lifted bans on same-sex marriage in the same
number of days. It’s a special number. Even the strongest
geometric shape is a triangle (bet you didn’t think you’d be read-
ing that in a health column). When it comes to strength training,
and healthy living, there’s a special group of three, too. Together,
they create the truss bridge that gets you across the sea of obe-
sity, heart disease, and self-loathing.
THE APP: MYFITNESSPAL. It’s simple, really. You put in what
you eat, and it spits out how many calories you have left before
you start storing fat. But, just like a relationship, you get out of
it what you put in. If you only enter in your dinners Monday
through Friday, you’re not likely to get a good result. But if you
track your intake meticulously, you’ll easily reach your goals — at
least logistically, as psychologically is a different matter. MyFit-
nessPal has a terrific, simple interface, barcode scanning, and a
social network aspect to help with positive reinforcement and
encouragement. It’s the most recommended calorie-tracking
app out there, for all the reasons listed above.
THE PROGRAM: STARTING STRENGTH. It’s the beginner’s guide
to barbell training. I don’t care for the author, but that’s neither
here nor there, his book is fantastic. As the title suggests, it’s for
beginners — a term that is far more encapsulating than many
think — and it breaks down the four most basic, and result-pro-
ducing movements with a barbell. Chapters cover the form for
squats, deadlifts, bench press, and barbell rows, with diagrams,
example photos, and accompanying videos online. Ask someone
what to do to start lifting, and they’ll surely recommend this
book to you.
THE FOOD: WHEY PROTEIN. Wait! That’s not a food! It’s a supple-
ment! Yeah, it’s a supplement, made of the same stuff your milk
is made of. Whey protein is the single, and only supplement I
would recommend for anyone. It’s natural, simple to use, comes
in a ton of different flavors, and can be easily purchased from
Wal-Mart, GNC, and virtually anywhere in between. Most
people, including myself, don’t get enough protein in our diets
to satiate and maintain or build muscle. And for good reason.
Meat is expensive and takes a while to cook. Whey protein
supplementation is simply adding protein to the mix. Most
brands provide 20 to 30 grams of protein per scoop, and only at
100 to 150 calories. Many of the flavors taste like desert, which
is my favorite part. A bit of cookies-n-cream whey protein, one
cup of almond milk, and if I’m feeling extra-frisky, a teaspoon of
chocolate syrup — topped with whipped cream — and you have
one hell of a healthy milk shake.
All of the above can be found, at reasonable prices, through
some simple Google-Fu. They’re also some of the only products
that I recommend unabashedly, without any information from
the client. Everyone should be tracking calories, everyone should
be using barbells, and everyone should be getting enough protein
— simple as that. Think of them as the Strength Training Trinity.
Brandon Harrison writes about Health and Fitness for Metro
Weekly. Follow him on Twitter @ttrbrandon. Read more at
metroweekly.com/life/health.l
health
by BRANDON HARRISON
illustration by CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
marketplace
44 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
45 METROWEEKLY.COM DATE 0, 2003
Swedish Tease
Volvo offers glimpses, hints,
but nothing finite in features for
remake of XC90 SUV
T
HERE IS UNDOUBTEDLY A DEEP-ROOTED
pleasure derived from withholding something
important. The lengthy tease, drip-feeding nuggets
of information, goading the intended recipient into
guesswork, testing the limits of their patience as they eagerly
wait for the final reveal. Volvo’s marketing department, then,
must be resting in a near-orgasm state, as they evidently can’t
get enough of that withholding pleasure when it comes to the
all-new XC90 SUV.
For months, now, Volvo has teased and tantalized the world
with hints and suggestions for the upcoming replacement for
its decade-old midsize SUV: Concept models which offered
styling cues that “might” or “could” make it to the production
version. The refreshing or complete overhauling of its entire
range into one of the most attractive and well-balanced
on the road. Technology previews, which would make it
to future models, with PR reps aggressively winking and
mouthing “XC90” at pining journalists. Okay, I may have
slightly exaggerated that last one, but Volvo has certainly been
taking their sweet time to launch the all-new model. Enter,
then, the first official shots of what we can expect to see when
the XC90 eventually rolls into showrooms.
There’s no exterior on show, likewise with what lies under
the hood and in between the wheels. Instead, Volvo is showing
gears
by RHUARIDH MARR
45 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
46 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
off the XC90’s interior – and words can hardly do it justice.
Whereas Volvo interiors have always been clean and functional,
its floating center stack design – though aging well – is hardly
the last word in user-friendliness any more. What’s Volvo to
do? Throw it all out and take inspiration from cars that cost
twice as much. The Swedes have done away with clusters of
tiny buttons and myriads of controls. Instead, a large, Tesla-
like screen dominates the dash, surrounded by rich leather,
wood and presumably premium plastics. The gear shifter is an
elegant crystal affair, produced by bespoke Swedish glassworks
company Orrefors. Tiny Swedish flags adorn the fine stitching
on the leather seats. Norse God is in the details, apparently.
So, luxury would seem to be present. It’s also set to be one
for the digital crowd, too. A new version of Volvo’s excellent
digital display is nestled behind the steering wheel, while that
massive center screen will debut a new infotainment system,
one hopefully more intuitive that Volvo’s current, somewhat
obscure software. Volvo promise access to a range of Internet
applications, while their partnership with Apple for its CarPlay
service should enable those with iOS devices to get better
connected when on the move. Boosting tech credentials is four-
zone climate control, complete with a digital display between
the front seats for rear passenger. Those in the front can benefit
from optional ventilated and massaging seats, while powered
seats come as standard.
Comfort is also a top priority. Volvo claims the new seats
are designed to resemble the human spine, with an emphasis
on ergonomics which will hopefully iron out back ache and
long-haul fatigue. For those left to the back seats, second row
occupants can expect greater space as the previous bench has
been replaced with three individual seats that can recline and
slide to offer greater legroom or increased trunk space. The
current XC90’s third row is very much a child-only option,
but with this new model, Volvo claim adults up to 5’7” can
comfortably sit in the back without complaint, so you can take
7 adults in comfort – provided you have two short friends who
don’t mind sitting together. A new method of entry and exit is
also present, which should make climbing into the rear a little
more elegant for those attempting it and a little less amusing for
those watching. For the lazy owner, power-folding can also be
specified, making the decision between trunk space and a third
row even easier.
Overall, it’s a dramatic departure from the rapidly aging
current XC90, whose overall design has remained largely the
same since its introduction at the start of the millennium. With
such an obvious focus on premium design and materials, it will
be interesting to see if the new XC90’s price takes a marked step
up from its current starting point of $39,700. The Range Rover
Sport and BMW X5 offer premium interiors and 7 seats, both
starting around the $60,000 mark. If Volvo is looking to push the
XC90 upmarket, we could be in for some serious sticker shock.
Sadly, such speculation will continue until we have a finalized
spec sheet in our hands. Volvo promises that the XC90’s guts
will be spilled for the world to see starting mid-July July, while
the much-anticipated exterior will finally make itself known
in August. In the meantime, we’ll keep waiting as the Swedish
automaker’s marketing team carries on their cruel campaign of
withholding.
Read more automotive coverage at metroweekly.com/life/cars.
47 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
Nintendo’s Marriage Woes
The gamemaker weathers criticism for excluding same-sex coupling in Tomodachi Life
N
INTENDO HAS A MARRIAGE PROBLEM. NO,
Princess Peach hasn’t refuted Mario’s repeated ad-
vances and eloped with Luigi, and it’s not the Japa-
nese gamer who “married” a character from a DS
game in 2009. Instead, Nintendo is mired in controversy over
something never intended to be taken seriously by anyone, but
which has found itself under intense scrutiny in a nation at war
with itself over the issue of gay marriage. Tomodachi Life, a Sims/
Animal Crossing hybrid, unsuspectingly waded into the gay mar-
riage debate due to criticism over its handling of same-sex rela-
tionships. Or, specifically, lack thereof.
But first, what exactly is Tomodachi Life? Nintendo bills it as
a social life simulator, heavily injected with doses of Japanese
humor — if you’ve ever watched a game show from the Land of
the Rising Sun, you’ll feel right at home with some of Tomoda-
chi’s more off-beat parts. Released last year in Nintendo’s home
country, it gives players an island world filled with Miis — Nin-
tendo’s virtual avatar characters — and then leaves them to shape
said world as they please. Friends, relatives, work colleagues, all
can be added to the game via a Mii, with the player free to inter-
act with any and all of them as they choose. The main “goal,” of
sorts, is to go about daily life, dressing your Mii, sending them
off to work, buying a new table for the living room, and so on.
Miis will have certain requests — perhaps they want to try a new
food or would like some new furniture, or maybe they just want
your advice on something — but they can also interact beyond
the usual Sim-like micromanaging. You could be asked to play a
game, or test your knowledge, or even enter into a Mii’s dream
and see their hopes and desires, or even participate in a super-
hero fantasy. Should you wish to, you can settle down with an-
other Mii, marrying and raising children with them. It’s all a very
lighthearted, tongue-in-cheek affair designed to offer a humor-
ous parody of reality.
Of course, such parody hasn’t left it shielded from scrutiny.
While it’s possible to form relationships and raise children, it can
only occur between opposite-gender Miis. There’s no option for
same-sex couples whatsoever. Of course, many users found ways
around Nintendo’s system — users could dress a character up as
male or female and then assign them an opposing gender, letting
two men or two women marry and raise children. It is, however,
an awkward workaround to a problem many were surprised to
see existed in the first place. Further fears over Nintendo’s stance
on same-sex relationships emerged during an update to the title
late last year, which caused confused — and incorrect — news
stories to appear stating that Nintendo was updating the title to
prevent the same-sex workaround users had been exploiting. A
patch was issued to correct “strange relationships,” which was
pounced upon by some journalists as Nintendo patching out
same-sex relationships altogether. It transpired that the real pur-
pose of the update was lost in translation: The patch fixed a data
transfer bug between Tomodachi and its predecessor that caused
imported Miis to corrupt game saves. Users were still free to use
the gender workaround to simulate same-sex relationships.
However, it didn’t stop many, particularly in the West where
games
by RHUARIDH MARR
the game will launch June 6, from starting
the #Miiquality campaign aimed at forc-
ing Nintendo to acknowledge its error and
fix the game to include proper same-sex
relationships. Nintendo’s response was far
from a perfect example of PR. “Nintendo
never intended to make any form of social
commentary with the launch of Tomoda-
chi Life,” it said in a statement. “The re-
lationship options in the game represent
a playful alternate world rather than a
real-life simulation.” It continued, adding,
“We were absolutely not trying to provide
social commentary.” That response un-
derstandably left many feeling shunned
by the gaming giant. Why did Nintendo’s
“playful alternate world” not include
same-sex characters, and was it indicative
of the company’s attitudes as a whole?
As the blog posts and news stories
accumulated and #Miiquality started
trending on Twitter, Nintendo was forced
to come back to the PR drawing board
and offer a revised statement. The com-
pany told fans that, should a new title in
the Tomodachi series be developed, Nin-
tendo would “strive to design a game-play
experience from the ground up that is
more inclusive, and better represents all
players.” As for the calls to update Tomo-
dachi Life to include same-sex relation-
ships? Nintendo crushed any such hopes,
though only because of technical limita-
tions: “Unfortunately, it is not possible for
us to change this game’s design, and such
a significant development change can’t be
accomplished with a post-ship patch.”
For the people in charge of the
#Miiquality campaign, the battle was
won. “#Miiquality has succeeded in its
primary goal,” they posted to the cam-
paign’s Tumblr page. “To bring the is-
sue to Nintendo’s attention in hopes
that future iterations of Tomodachi Life
will support same-sex relationships.”
For those looking to buy the Western
release of Tomodachi Life, there will be
no significant changes over the Japanese
release, save for language and some re-
gionalization tweaks — same-sex rela-
tionships are still not officially support-
ed. For Nintendo, the lesson would seem
to be clear: it’s now imperative that any
Western release of a life-simulation
game, no matter how “whimsical,” must
accurately reflect the needs of its users.
Indeed, the embattled Nintendo, with
profits slumping and its Wii U console
dying a painful death at retail, would be
wise to avoid offending users in future
through lack of inclusion.
“We’re not really saying anything
about anything; we’re just constantly try-
ing to create fun and entertaining expe-
riences,” Nintendo’s marketing manager
Bill Trinen told IGN. As it transpires, in
the case of Tomodachi Life, saying noth-
ing about same-sex relationships can
speak volumes. l
48 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
49 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
pets
by RHUARIDH MARR
photography by TODD FRANSON
A
S THE WEATHER IMPROVES AND SUMMER VACATIONS APPROACH, IT’S TEMPTING TO START
splurging on yourself — a new swimsuit, a weekend getaway or finally fixing that broken AC for D.C.’s inevitable
humidity. Whatever your future shopping plans, don’t forget to pamper your furriest life partner. Some delicious
treats, tempting catnip or revitalizing shampoo – there are numerous ways to show some cash-fueled love for your
pet. We’ve trawled the DMV area to find eight great gifts guaranteed to thrill any pampered pooch or coddled kitty.
Jax and Bones Good Karma Rope Toy
$16 / Wagtime / 1232 9th St. NW, Washington, D.C. / 202-789-0870 / wagtimedc.com
Sometimes, a toy has dual functions. Yes, it can provide endless entertainment for its intended recipient, but it can also benefit the gracious owner
who bestowed it. Jax and Bones’ Good Karma chew toys are such a toy. They’re sturdy, eco-friendly, hand-tied and can function as dental floss when
chewed, but they’re also utterly adorable to look at as your dog destroys them. Machine washable and tough enough for chewing, playing fetch or tug
of war, there is a beautiful range of creatures and critters for your dog to happily chew their way through. The only problem we can foresee is having to
watch as Fido devours something so cute.
Natural Balance Dog Food Rolls
$2-$12 / Petco, Various locations
877-738-6742 / Petco.com
Finding the right food for your dog can be a nightmare. Finding the right
food at the right price? Even worse. Enter Natural Balance’s Dog Food
Rolls to make both decisions a little easier. Perfect on their own, mixed
with dry food or as a treat, four flavors are available to satisfy even the
pickiest of pups. Beef, Chicken, Lamb & Chicken and Duck & Turkey
are your options, each fortified with vitamins and minerals specially
selected by vets and animal nutritionists. Each 3.5 pound roll may look
unappetizing for human consumption, but your dog is sure to love it.
Pet Flys Bon Ami Pet Carrier
$135 / Wagtime
While there are many who shudder at the thought of someone
bringing their pet on a flight (though it’s somewhat preferable
to screaming children), there are those who just can’t stand to
leave their beloved pug or chihuahua at home when they go on
vacation. If that includes you, then we’ve got just the thing
to ensure your pooch flies in the best comfort possible,
even if its owner is stuck in coach. With generous
dimensions, 5 air vents, and roll down windows,
letting your pup peek out at this curious metal tube
you’ve brought it into. With 4 styles on offer
and tough, durable materials, they’ll last much
longer than the patience of the person sitting
next to you as you ask them to hold your dog
while you slip out to the restroom.
50 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
PetCandy Catnip Sticks
$8.50 / Wagtime
Cats love catnip. Cats also love brightly colored things they can roll around
with, bite and swat at. Combine the two and you’ve created feline nirvana.
PetCandy’s catnip toys are brightly patterned sticks filled with kitty’s next hit
of catnip – toss it into a room and watch your cat flip head over heels (possibly
literally) as they roll around and generally fall in love with it.
Prairie Dog Antler Chews
$4-$25 / Petco
Make no bones about it, antlers are delicious. Dogs devour them with all the
glee we humans approach a freshly unwrapped bar of chocolate – or uncorked
bottle of wine. Available in a range of cuts and varieties – deer, water buffalo
and elk – these dog chews will offer hours of delight as a happy dog crunches
and nibbles its way through them.
Trixie 3-Story Cat Playground
$132.99 / Petco
Boxes, dark spaces and feeling superior to all
those they look down upon: three things all cats
have an innate affinity for. What, then, if you could
combine all three into one big cat playground?
If your cat acts like lord of the manor, give them
their own manor, with Trixie’s 3-story cat home. It
offers a dark space inside for midday snoozing and
a balcony designed for staring out at the world,
judging all who pass by. The weatherproof, solid
pine home is perfect for outdoor cats who aren’t
fond of getting caught in rain and wind.
51 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014 51 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
Aroma Paws
Luxury Dog Shampoo & Conditioner $14
Deodorizing Dog Coat Spray $14
Wagtime
As much as we love our dogs, there is one
inevitable eventuality that comes from
ownership: they can, on occasion, be fairly
aromatic. That’s putting it mildly, of course.
Aroma Paws deodorizing dog spray and
combination shampoo/conditioner are
specifically engineered for dogs,
utilizing organic, eco-friendly, bio-
degradable ingredients that will
leave your best friend smelling
great and feeling fresh. Available
in a wide variety of scents,
from jasmine and sweet violet
to mandarin, green tea and
grapefruit, there are scents to suit
every nose, both human and
canine. As an added bonus to
seal the deal, the deodorizing
sprays can also be used to
freshen any fabrics your dog
comes into contact with. No
more lingering surprises the
next time your dog decides to
jump into bed.
NIGHT
LIFE
53 METROWEEKLY.COM
t
THURS., 05.29.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRI., 05.30.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
LISTINGS
54 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Banaka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SAT., 05.31.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • $5 Absolut &
Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after
9pm • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Freddie’s Follies Drag
Show 8 pm-10pm,
10pm-1am Karaoke
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Doors 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
DC Rawhides present
Country & Western
Dancing, lessons 7-8pm,
open dance 8-10:30pm,
$5 Cover, 21+ • DJ
Chord’s Summer Pop-Off
• Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • DJ Wess
• Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux and
Banaka, with special guest
Summer Camp • $8 from
10-11pm and $12 after
11pm • 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Doors
8pm • Cover • 21+
SUN., 06.01.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm • Crazy
Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke
8pm-1am
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
55
t
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014
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DC Black Pride
Men’s Party
Saturday, May 24
Echostage
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Pop Goes the World with
Wes Della Volla at 9:30
pm • Happy Hour: 2 for
1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+
MON., 06.02.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUES., 06.03.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
56 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
57 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
THURS., 06.05.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
2-for-1, all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 06.04.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Half-Price Burger Night
• Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
TOWN
La Fiesta Latino Pride
Dance Party • Featuring
Lineysha Sparx, Jocelyn
Carrillo, Juanita Dior,
Drag Kings and DJs El
Especialista & Xstasi
Doors open 10pm• $10
Cover • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
58 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
59 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
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DC Black Pride
Women’s Party
Saturday, May 24
The Howard Theatre
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
60 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
61 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 29, 2014

When Bryan Singer asked me to be in these films he sold it to me on just this point:
as a gay man you can identify with mutants
– people who have talents [but] are despised by society as they’re different

— SIR IAN MCKELLEN, speaking with the UK’s Channel 4 News, regarding his role as Magneto in the X-Men movie franchise.
McKellen, who came out to the public in 1988 and has championed LGBT rights around the world, directly compared the
ostracized mutants in the film with the plight of LGBT individuals. “In many areas of the world being gay is still a mutancy
which is clearly not tolerated in some societies,” he said. “You can be put to death for your sexuality.”
(Channel 4 News)

Never stop talking about testing, your status, condoms, and new options, like
medicines that prevent and treat HIV.”
— The Center for Disease Control (CDC), in a series of new advertisements aimed at promoting its new guidelines for HIV
prevention and awareness, including the recommendation of PrEP. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) drugs, have been proven
to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV between partners where one is positive and the other negative, and as such are
recommended by the CDC for people in serodiscordant relationships and men at risk of catching HIV.
(CDC)

She’s not a gay rights campaigner – it’s not recognition in that sense – but the fact that
under the most socially conservative president since 1994 there is
the first openly gay minister in such a position
is significant.

— STEVEN FRIEDMAN, director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, regarding the appointment of openly gay Lynne Brown to
the position of Minister of Public Enterprises in South Africa’s government. Brown’s appointment makes
her the highest-profile openly gay politician in Africa.
(The Guardian)

If he had just gone about his business and people thought he was a homosexual or heterosexual or whatever,
there wouldn’t be a problem.”
—Pennsylvania State Senator JOHN EICHELBERGER (R), regarding State Rep. Mike Fleck (R). Fleck, who became the first openly
gay member of the state legislature when he came out in 2012, is expected to lose his seat in the state’s House of Representatives
following a write-in campaign from Huntingdon County Treasurer Richard Irvin.
(Altoona Mirror)

Then I started to have a different idea: ‘Is this somebody who is trying to
fight against his homosexual impulses?’”
— DR. ROBI LUDWIG, reality TV psychotherapist, on Elliot Rodger, who killed 6 people in Santa Barbara at the weekend. Ludwig
believed the anger that fuelled Rodger’s rampage was a result of trying to fight his own homosexuality. She later stated
that she had not officially diagnosed Rodger.
(Fox News)
62 MAY 29, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM

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