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HSS 208-02 Sem in Soc Beh Sci-Global Iden

The Triad's Global Identity:

Visual Ethnography of North Carolina’s Immigrant Communities

Images. They are so com- pelling that we cannot not watch them. They are so se- ductive that they have revo- lutionized human social communication. Oral and written communication are in decline because a new form of communication, communication by image, has emerged. Power of Images:

Creating the Myths of Our Time By J. Francis Davis

Stephen J. Sills PhD

sjsills@uncg.edu

By J. Francis Davis Stephen J. Sills PhD sjsills@uncg.edu 14-JAN-2008 to 06-MAY-2008 3 SEM GSB.H M

14-JAN-2008 to 06-MAY-2008 3 SEM GSB.H M W 1400-1515 Office: GRAM 320 Office Hours: T TH 1300 -1500

sjsills@uncg.edu 14-JAN-2008 to 06-MAY-2008 3 SEM GSB.H M W 1400-1515 Office: GRAM 320 Office Hours: T

Visual Ethnography of North Carolina’s Immigrant Communities

 
 

Required Text:

Stanczak, G.

Stanczak, G.

Introduction

2007.Visual

Research

Over the course of the past two decades the Triad area has become home to a large Latino population as well as thousands of Africans and Southeast Asians. In this course we will draw upon the interdisciplinary methods of visual sociology to study the local immigrant, refugee, and transnational communities. Visual sociology involves the use of photography, film, and video to

Methods: Image,

Society, and

Representation.

Sage: Thousand

Oaks, CA.

Optional Text:

document social phenomena as well as the study of visual artifacts of a society as “cultural texts” (Margolis).

We will be reading from the international academic and popular presses on the social issues of migration, assimilation, and incorporation. Students will also learn about the push/pull mechanisms of international migration, the various kinds of migrations, and the local factors which have made the Triad an increasingly popular receiving area for new migrants. Students will also read from the literature on the methods of visual sociology/ anthropology. Students will learn the technical, ethical, and methodological issues of doing visual research.

Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, 2007. Rhetorical Visions: Reading and Writing in a Visual Culture. Pearson:

Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, 2007. Rhetorical Visions: Reading and Writing in a Visual Culture. Pearson: New Jersey.

Other readings and media will be provided via direct links or through electronic reserves on UNCG Blackboard.

Please open account on www.flickr.com/

The class will be conducted in a seminar/ workshop format, emphasizing an interactive learning environment. The course will include student-led class discussions, individual reaction papers to topics presented in the readings and discussions, guest lectures by regional/

individual reaction papers to topics presented in the readings and discussions, guest lectures by regional/

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local experts, group projects, and a final ethnographic exercise. Readings will be presented in a student-led discussion format where the instructor will serve as the moderator/facilitator helping to guide the students through an inductive process emphasizing critical thinking, problem solving, and discovery. Short reaction papers will be written afterward to reinforce theoretical understanding of the topics presented, as well as to encourage students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the theories and methods they have learned.

To move beyond the abstract/theoretical realm, students will hear from leaders of the local immigrant/refugee service agencies and engage in primary research, first in small teams, and then on their own. As part of the course, students will be trained in the use of photo analysis software and the methodology of visual research. Students will also complete an NIH Human Subject training. Group analysis of visual media will introduce students to the tools of visual studies and help to develop visual literacy. In small teams they will then study the visual portrayal of migrants locally in the popular press, television, and other forms of visual media, producing a PowerPoint presentation of their findings (later to be converted by the instructor into a website). Finally, the students will conduct their own ethnographic study of the Triad’s immigrant and refugee communities by engaging in photographic observations at immigrant churches, social service agencies, and community organization. This may take the form of

either a student-led PhotoVoice project or a Photo Documentary. Select photographs from these ethnographic projects will be mounted and framed and then showcased in an end-of-semester gallery exhibition.

Goals and Objectives

This course is intended to inform you about the local diversity of the international community as well as teach you about visual literacy, methods of social research, and ethnography. Instruction will take the form of a participatory seminar with a minimum of lecture and an emphasis on discussion and practical experiences. As a class we will work together on a visual analysis project. In addition, you will individually conduct fieldwork with community organizations, social service agencies, churches, and social groups whose constituencies are migrants and refugees from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

1. Summarize the major theories of international migration

2. Explain the specific factors that have resulted in increased migration to the Triad

3. Describe how migrants have been depicted in the local media

4. Make use of the methods and tools of visual sociological research

5. Critically assess visual research findings

 

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Visual Ethnography of North Carolina’s Immigrant Communities Assignments Seminar Leader: 12 pt, standard margins, MLA
Visual Ethnography of North Carolina’s Immigrant Communities
Assignments
Seminar Leader:
12 pt, standard margins, MLA or ASA
citations). You will summarize the
readings and discussions for the module
and then give your personal reaction to
the topic. There will ten of these short
papers due. Each will count for 20 pts. or
As this class is structured more like a
seminar than a lecture, you will be
required to discuss the reading materials.
Therefore, keeping up with the reading
materials is a must. Students will be
assigned to lead the class discussions
during the semester. Thoughtful
preparation of an outline of the reading
and 3-5 discussion questions will earn you
30pts each time (150 pts total). The
remaining 50 pts will be earned by
evidence of reading through your active
participation in these discussions.
total of 200 pts (20% of your final
grade).
a
A reaction paper is just what its name
suggests - a paper explaining your
reaction to the readings and discussions
from the module. The form of paper
should be a formal essay that summarizes
the key points of the module and provides
your personal perspectives on the topic.
Like any good essay, your reaction paper
should support key points with specific
evidence (references to readings). It
should be written in clear language and in
Reaction Papers:
a
logical order. In preparing to write your
For each of the theoretical and
methodological modules you will write a
short reaction paper. These papers will be
2-3 pages in length (Times New Roman,
reaction paper you may want to re-read
the articles in this module and review your
notes from the in-class discussions. Give
yourself some time to reflect on the topics
covered in the module. I recommend
A+
A-
B
C
D
Thesis/focus: demonstrates an awareness of audience, is
sophisticated, and is clearly established and maintained
throughout.
30%
6
5.4
5.1
4.5
3.9
Organization: has a clear sense of logical order appropriate
to the content and the thesis.
20%
4
3.6
3.4
3
2.6
Development: demonstrates critical thinking that is clear,
insightful, in depth, and relevant to the topic.
20%
4
3.6
3.4
3
2.6
Syntax and Diction: uses sophisticated language that en-
gages the reader
10%
2
1.8
1.7
1.5
1.3
Research: uses sources effectively and documents sources
accurately.
10%
2
1.8
1.7
1.5
1.3
Mechanics: contains very few errors of spelling, grammar,
paragraphing or manuscript format.
10%
2
1.8
1.7
1.5
1.3
Total
Reaction Paper Grading Rubric
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writing an outline first, then a rough draft, then editing and revising the draft into a final reaction paper.

Assignment # 3 NIH Certificate for Human Subjects Research:

Assignment # 1 Visualizing the Triad’s Migrant Communities

To complete the computer-based training provided by the NIH, you must register to take the on-line course. Complete the training and respond to the short questionnaires that follow. There are five modules in all so you may want to plan ahead; this may take some time. Once registered you may return to the site over several sittings to complete the course. Once successfully answering the quiz questions at the end of each module, you will be given an option to print a certificate of completion. Print two copies of the certificate; keep one for your records and bring the second to class. Successful completion of the assignment is worth 50 pts. (5 % of final grade).

Assignment # 4 Photo documentary of the Triad’s Immigrant Community:

As you will learn, visual research is far more selective and intentional than other forms of observational research (and thus able to be manipulated by your biases and preconceptions). In these assignments, you will be conducting your own field work on visualizing the Triad’s immigrant community. In this introductory assignment you are instructed to shoot a series of photographs (10 images total) that visually demonstrate immigration to the Triad. You may interpret these instructions in any way you wish. After shooting the series you are instructed to write a short paragraph for each image explaining how these images are “evidence” of immigration. This assignment is worth 100 pts. (10% of final grade).

Assignment # 2 Group Projects:

In this assignment you will be using the lens as a way of documenting and observing a migrant/refugee group (producing a photo documentary). This assignment will require 2-3 visits outside of class to a church, social service agency, or community organization that serves a migrant/refugee community (I will assist you in introductions and placement). You will be required to write a short reflexive statement in which you attempt to express your attitudes and biases toward the community with whom you will be working (10 pts). You will keep a log of your visits that will include your scratch notes, field notes, comments, photography

You will be assigned to a small research team that will be responsible for collecting visual representations of migrants/ refugees in the media, analyzing those images, and presenting your findings to the class via a PowerPoint show. More details on this project will be given in a later handout in class. Successful completion of the assignment is worth 250 pts. (25 % of final grade). More information on these projects will be provided in Module 6.

 

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Visual Ethnography of North Carolina’s Immigrant Communities

log, and other field records (40 pts). You will use these resources in your analysis and written report. Your final products will include the written report (100 pts), a presentation of your key findings to the class (50 pts), and the presentation of select images in a gallery exhibition (50 pts). More details on this project will be given in a later in class. Successful completion of the assignment is worth 200 pts. (20% of final grade).

Policies

Attendance:

Attendance is required. Official absences are those which occur when you are involved in an official activity of the college, i.e., field trips, tournaments, athletic events, and present an official absence excuse. If you must miss a class for an official reason, present the written excuse to me before the absence. Other official absences include jury duty and subpoenas. Appropriate documentation will be required.

Religious/Cultural Holidays:

You have the right to observe major religious/cultural holidays without penalty. At least one week before the holiday, you should submit a written statement that includes both the date of the holiday and the reason why class attendance is impossible. Prior arrangements must be made. If prior arrangements have been made, you will not be penalized.

Illness:

If you are absent due to personal illness, or illness of a dependent, you must provide written documentation to that effect. Acceptable documentation includes doctor’s note (on office letterhead), hospital record, or records from a recognized medical/healthcare agency.

Special Needs and Considerations:

Please let me know at the beginning of the semester if you have a physical or learning disability that may need accommodations. The college will make reasonable accommodations for persons with documented disabilities. Students should also notify Student Services of any special needs.

for persons with documented disabiliti es. Students should also notify Student Services of any special needs.

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Course Schedule

Module 1:

Introduction to Visual Sociology (Jan 14, Jan 16, & Jan 23 )

NO CLASS Jan 21

Module 2:

International Migration & Transnational Communities (Jan 28 & Jan 30 )

Module 3:

Photographic Representations of Social Life (Feb 4, Feb 6, & Feb 11)

Module 4:

Immigrant and Refugee Populations in the Triad (Feb 13 & Feb 18)

Guest Panel Feb 20, 2008

Module 5:

Visual Content Analysis (Feb 25 & Feb 27)

Module 6:

Sociological Analysis of Depictions of Migrants in The Local Media (Mar 3, Mar 5, Mar 17, & Mar 19)

NO CLASS Mar 10 & 12

Module 7:

Social Scientists with Cameras: Ethical Issues (Mar 24 & Mar 26)

Module 8:

Ethnographic Research: Using the lens to gather data (Mar 31, Apr 2 & Apr 7)

Fieldwork

During this time you should be involved in the data collection for your individual projects. Individual meetings scheduled with instructor will be scheduled on Apr 9 or Apr 16. You will present data gathering to-date and discuss the direction of your project. A schedule will be distributed on or about April 7 th .

Module 9:

(Apr 21 & Apr 23)

Gallery Preparation

We will use the class time on Apr 28 & Apr 30 to prepare for the presentation of individual projects. We will also conduct a peer-critique of the projects on Apr 30 th .

Gallery Show

We will host an open exhibition of student projects in (TBA) gallery on May 7. This exhibition will be open to UNCG faculty and students, participating agencies and individuals, as well as the general public. Final grade assignments will also be made on this date.

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Module 1: Introduction to Visual Sociology

 

Module 1: Introduction to Visual Sociology

 

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Course introduction and overview

Culture is manifested through visible symbols embedded in gestures, ceremonies, rituals, and artifacts situated in

Culture is manifested through visible symbols embedded in gestures, ceremonies, rituals, and artifacts situated in constructed and natu ral environments…. If one can see culture, then researchers should be able to employ audiovisual technologies to record it as data amenable to analysis and presentation. (Ruby 1996)

J. Horton – A Visual Analysis of North Carolina’s Immigrant Communities

 

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1.Stanczak, G. 2007. “Introduction:

Images, Methodologies, and Generating Social Knowledge” Chapter 1 in Stanczak, G. 2007.Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Sage:

Thousand Oaks, CA.

2.Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, 2007. “Rhetorical Visions” Chapter 1 in Rhetorical Visions: Reading and Writing in a Visual Culture. Pearson: New Jersey.

3.

Pink, S. 2001. “The Visual in

Visual media has great potential for giving voice and vision to disenfranchised populations (Wang et. al., 1996). Visual media captures the shared human bond of the viewer and the subject (Margolis, 1990). It also challenges public perceptions of the subjects (Wang et. al., 1996) and has been called the best medium for raising consciousness of important social issues (Wang et. al.

1996).

Ethnography: Photography, Video, Cultures and Individuals,” Chapter 1 in Doing Visual Ethnography: Images, Media and Representation in Research. Sage:

 

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4.Wagner, J. 2007. “Observing Culture and Social Life: Documentary Photography, Fieldwork, and Social Research” Chapter 2 in Stanczak, G. 2007. Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.

5.Becker, Howard. 2007 "Aesthetics and Truth" excerpt from Telling About Society:

This module will introduce you to visual research. Together we will define the topic, then we will discuss its merits and limitations. We will also discuss the general topic of visual literacy and visual rhetoric. Finally, we will discuss the question of validity in visual research.

Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing. University Of Chicago Press.

 

6.

Goldstein, B. 2007. “All Photos Lie:

Images as Data” Chapter 3 in Stanczak, G.

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Module 2: International Migration and Transnational Communities

2007. Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Sage:

Thousand Oaks, CA.

Reaction Paper #1 Due 1/28

In this first reaction paper you should provide an overview of visual research, explain the concepts of visual literacy and visual rhetoric, and discuss the problems of validity and reliability in using visual methods.

Optional Readings

Becker, H., 1995. "Visual sociology, documentary photography, and photojournalism: it's (almost) all a matter of context." Visual Sociology 10: 1/2: 5-14

Harper, D., 1988. "Visual Sociology:

Expanding Sociological Vision", the American Sociologist, 54-70.

Hockings, Paul, Ed. 1995. Principles of Visual Anthropology 2nd Edition. Berlin:

Mouton de Gruyter.

Margolis, Eric.1994. “Video Ethnography:

Toward a Reflexive Paradigm for Documentary” Jump Cut 39: 122-131.

Paradigm for Documentary ” Jump Cut 39: 122-131. Abriendo Puertas 2007 Module 2: International Migration and

Abriendo Puertas 2007

Module 2: International Migration and Transnational Communities

Transnational Ethnoscapes

The concept of ethnoscapes offered by Appadurai indicates that the world may be characterized by an ever increasing mobility of individuals and groups. Therefore, as long as the globalization processes continues, the concepts of assimilation, acculturation and incorporation will be of growing importance. Traditional assimilation theory starts with acculturation, progresses toward structural assimilation, or "the entry of immigrants into the primary groups of the immigration country," and ends with cultural adaptation and absorption into the dominant culture. Yet, Portes and Rumbaut point out that "assimilation as the rapid transformation of immigrants into Americans ‘as everyone else’ has never happened." They explain that ethnic resilience persists despite the pressure to assimilate, and ethnic identity as “hyphen American” (Italian-American, Irish- American, etc.) even has experienced a resurgence among both new and old immigrant groups. This hybridity of cultural identities has been addressed to some degree by the “search for the fundamental” (Robertson 1993) and the renewal of ethnic tribalism, as well as in the discourse on post colonial identity (See especially, Stuart Hall1994 “Cultural Identity and Diaspora,” where he defines cultural identity as a “‘production’ which is never complete, always in process, and

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Module 2: International Migration and Transnational Communities

always constituted within, not outside, representation”. As he explains cultural identity is about “‘becoming’ as well as ‘being’”.). Hybridity has also been a focal point of the growing literature on transnationalism and transnational identities.

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Familia"in Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, 2007. Rhetorical Visions: Reading and Writing in a Visual Culture.

Reaction Paper #2 Due 2/4

In this second reaction paper you should provide an overview of migration theories, assimilation, and examples of migrant experiences in the US.

7.

Faist, T. 2000. “Lacunae of Migration

and Post-Migration Theories” Chapter 1 in

Optional Readings

The Volume and Dynamics of International Migration and Transnational Social Spaces. Oxford: New York.

Stalker's Guide to International Migration: A world on the move. (Read Introduction, History, Why People Migrate, How People Migrate, Impact of

8.

Faist, T. 2000. “A Review Of Dominant

Theories Of International Migration” Chapter 2 in The Volume and Dynamics of International Migration and Transnational Social Spaces. Oxford: New York.

immigration, Impact of emigration, and Effects of globalization)

Glick-Schiller Nina, Linda Basch, & Cristina Blanc. 1995. "From Immigrant to Transmigrant: Theorizing Transnational Migration." Anthropological Quarterly 68:

Discuss Assignment #1Visualizing the Triad’s Migrant Communities

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48-63

Massey, Douglas, Joaquin Arango, Graeme Hugo, Ali Kouaouci, Adela Pellegrino,and. Edward Taylor. 1993.“Theories of international migration:

9.

Heisler, Barbara. "The sociology of

immigration: from assimilation to segmented integration, from the American experience to the global arena” Ch. 4. in Brettell, Caroline, and James Frank Hollifield. 2008. Migration theory :

a review and appraisal.” Population and Development Review 19: 431-466 Fawcett, James T. 1989. “Networks, Linkages, and Migration Systems” International Migration Review. 23

talking across disciplines. New York:

(3):671-680.

Routledge.

 

Portes, Alejandro. 1997. “Immigration theory for a new century: some problems and opportunities.” International Migration Review. 31(4): 799-825.

10.

Southern Poverty Law Center “Close

to Slavery: Guestworker Programs in the

United States”

11.

Hoobler, S. and Hoobler, T. 1994. "La

Portes, Alejandro and Rubén Rumbaut.

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Module 3: Visualizing Social Life

1996. Immigrant America: A Portrait. University of California Press.

Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato's cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads -- as an anthology of images.

- Susan Sontag, On Photography

Module 3: Visualizing Social Life

2/4

Guest L. Levis – Presentation of Findings from Photovoice Project with Greensboro Refugee Community

12. Collier, J and M. Collier. 1986. “The Challenge of Observation and the Nature of Photography” Chapter 1 in Visual

Anthropology: Photography as a Research

1 in Visual Anthropology : Photography as a Research Method. Albequerque: Univ. of New Mexico. (Also

Method. Albequerque: Univ. of New Mexico. (Also available online through UNCG library ebooks)

13. Wagner, J.2002. "Contrasting images,

complementary trajectories: sociology, visual sociology and visual research."

Visual Studies, 17, 160-171.

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14. Chalfen, R. 1981. “Redundant

Imagery: Some Observations on the Use of

Snapshots in American Culture.” The

Journal of American Culture 4 (1), 106–

113.

15.

Collier, J and M. Collier. 1986.

“Photographing Social Circumstances and Interactions” Visual Anthropology:

Photography as a Research Method. Albequerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press.

Presentations of Assignment #1Visualizing the Triad’s Migrant Communities

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Module 3: Visualizing Social Life

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Introduction of Assignment #2

Training on the use of Microfiche machine (J. Horton) meeting in Library

use of Microfiche machine (J. Horton) meeting in Librar y Reaction Paper #3 Due 2/13 In

Reaction Paper #3 Due 2/13

In this reaction paper you should discuss the uses of photography as a means of depicting social life. You should also talk about visual culture and the power of images.

Optional Readings

Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, B. 2007. “Familial Gazes: Reworking the Family Album” Chapter 3 in Rhetorical Visions:

Reading and Writing in a Visual Culture. Pearson: New Jersey.

Blakesley, D. and Collin, B. 2001. "Notes on Visual Rhetoric" Enculturation. (3)2.

Mirzoeff, N. 1998. “What is visual culture?” In The visual culture reader. London: Routledge.

Links of Interest

Walker Evans Revolutionizes Documentary Photography Kevin Bubriski: Documentary Photographer Sociological Research Online Photographysites.com Photographing Poverty and Exclusion

Social Justice Photo Archives Photography and Everyday Life in America, 1945–60 Life Cycles: Reflections of Change and A New Hope for Future Generations Transnational Working Communities

Module 4: Immigrant and Refugee Populations in the Triad

Module 4: Immigrant and Refugee Populations in the Triad Film clip from: " Nuestra Comunidad- Latinos

Film clip from: "Nuestra Comunidad- Latinos in North Carolina," By Joanne Hershfield and Penny Simpson, New South Productions, 2001 Runtime:

3:47

All of the interviewees in this clip discuss the influx of Latinos into North Carolina. Each person introduces him/herself, by telling where they are originally from and why they came to North Carolina. Reflecting the diverse stories of North

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Module 4: Immigrant and Refugee Populations in the Triad

 

The Business

 

Carolina Latino immigrants, some moved here fairly recently and some moved here many years ago.

Journal of the Greater Triad Area - May 5,

2006

In the clip we also hear from North Carolina officials who work with the Latino population and who disucss the increase in the population of Latinos in North Carolina. These include: Iván Parra, Director of El Centro Hispano in Durham, Bill Mace, Center Coordinator, from Centro: La Comunidad in Burlington, Dr. Nolo Martinez, then Director of Hispanic/ Latino Affairs for the Office of the Governor (now Director of the Center for New North Carolinians at UNCG).

21.

Stuart, Alfred & Laura Baum. 2005.

Contemporary Migration in North Carolina” North Carolina Museum of History.

 

22.

Donnelly, Robert A. 2005. “Altering a

black-white binary: Latinos in North Carolina "Chapter 1 in Immigrants and Health Agency: Public Safety, Health, and Latino Immigrants in North Carolina Working Paper 128. The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies University of California, San Diego.

 

2/13

 

2/20

16.

Center for New North Carolinians.

2006. “Immigrant Demographics of Guilford County: Regions of the World that Contribute to our Local Population”

Guest Panel: prepare questions to ask the panelists

 

Reaction Paper #4 Due 2/25

17.

From Latin America to North Carolina

Film clip from: "Nuestra Comunidad- Latinos in North Carolina," By Joanne Hershfield and Penny Simpson, New South Productions, 2001

In this reaction paper you should characterize the local immigrant communities and their impact on NC.

 

Links of Interest

18.

Audio files from: 88.5 WFDD

Different Cultures, One Community:

Hmong population in North Carolina Nuestra Comunidad: Latinos in North Carolina Latino/a Links (Duke Univ) Policymakers Get Cross-Border View of Immigration Immigration Debate: Views from North Carolina

Resettlement Patterns in the Piedmont Triad

Illegal Immigrant Workers

Immigrants & Refugees Job Hunting

2/18

19.

Harrington, Matt “Triad firms see

immigrants remaining vital to work force

 
 

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Module 5: Visual Content Analysis

 

Module 5: Visual Content Analysis

Understanding Images. 4th edition. Mayfield Publishing Company.

Photo by Kenn Christ Creative Commons License http:// www.flickr.com/photos/kchrist/

Photo by Kenn Christ Creative Commons License http:// www.flickr.com/photos/kchrist/

24.

Collier, J and M. Collier. 1986.

“Analysis of Still and Moving Images” Chapter 15 in Visual Anthropology:

Photography as a Research Method. Albequerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press.

25.

Bell, Philip. 2003. “Content Analysis

of Visual Images.” in Handbook of Visual Analysis. Theo van Leeuwen and Carey

Jewitt, eds. London: Sage.

 

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26.

Fahmy, Shahira. 2004. "Picturing

According to Nathansohn (2007), there are two modes of producing visual data:

a 'banal mode' and a 'transgressive mode'. The banal mode, by its exhibition of the 'commonsensical gaze,' plays a role in the reproduction of the existing social order, the fixing of identities and power structures; the transgressive mode of photography, by offering a different, disturbing and unfamiliar gaze, dismantles the banal representational schemes and thus enables a re-thinking about the photographed which could lead to a critique of the social order and of power structures.

Ways of Socio-Visualizing Regev Nathansohn, Tel Aviv University

Afghan women: A content analysis of AP wire photographs during the Taliban regime and after the fall of the Taliban regime." Gazette,(66) 2: 91-112.

27.

Holzman, linda. "Stories of Race in

Popular Culture" Chapter 5 in Media Messages: What film, Television, and Popular Music Teach Us About Race, Class, Gender and Sexual Orientation. NY:

M. E. Sharpe, 2000.

28.Rose, Gillian, 2001, “Content analysis:

counting what you (think you) see,” in Visual Methodologies:An Introduction to the Interpretation of Visual Materials, Sage.

 

2/25

Reaction Paper #5 Due 3/3

23.Barrett, Terry. 2005. "Chapter 2 Describing Photographs: What Do I See?" & "Chapter 3 Interpreting Photographs:

In this reaction paper you should present your perspectives on the various ways in which images may be critiqued and commented upon. In particular discuss how the social sciences use images as “texts” to be deconstructed and analyzed

What Does It Mean?" in Criticizing Photographs: An Introduction to

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Module 6: Sociological Analysis of Depictions of Migrants in The Local Media

for their social and cultural meanings.

Links of Interest

Photographs as answers Richard Chaflen Documentary Educational Resources Jayasinhji Jhala Coding Images and Video FotoTagger Visual Research Resources Photography Criticism CyberArchive The Scream Online Photography Index The Photo Review

Module 6: Sociological Analysis of Depictions of Migrants in The Local Media

This module will focus on the techniques of visual analysis. After preliminary readings, we will learn to use some common tools for analyzing and annotating images. The module will introduce internet-based image storage, editing and retrieval software, as well as more robust software specifically designed for social sciences and humanities researchers.

3/3

29. Peng, Zengjun. 2004. Picturing China:

A Content Analysis of Photo Coverage in the New York Times and Los Angeles Times presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA.

30. Wenk, S and Kreb, R. 2007 Analysing

the Migration of People and Images:Perspectives and Methods in the

Field of Visual Cultures

3/5

31. Tsuda, Takeyuki. 2004. Media Images,

Immigrant Reality: Ethnic Prejudice and

Tradition in Japanese Media Representations of Japanese-Brazilian Return Migrants. Working Paper 107 The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies. University of California, San Diego.

32. Gold, S. 2007. “Using Photography in

Studies of Immigrant Communities:

Reflecting across Projects and Populations” Chapter 6 in Stanczak, G.

2007. Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Sage:

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Group Work Day: Assignment #2

3/19

Group Presentations and Discussions

Society, and Representation . Sage: 3/17 Group Work Day: Assignment #2 3/19 Group Presentations and Discussions

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Module 7: Social Scientists with Cameras: Ethical Issues

Module 7: Social Scientists with Cameras: Ethical Issues

Module 7: Social Scientists with Cameras: Ethical Issues webpub.allegheny.edu/dept/psych/ Ethics.html Sociologists

Sociologists adhere to the highest scientific and professional standards and accept responsibility for their work. Sociologists understand that they form a community and show respect for other sociologists even when they disagree on theoretical, methodological, or personal approaches to professional activities. Sociologists value the public trust in sociology and are concerned about their ethical behavior and that of other sociologists that might compromise that trust. While endeavoring always to be collegial, sociologists must never let the desire to be collegial outweigh their shared responsibility for ethical behavior. When appropriate, they consult with colleagues in order to prevent or avoid unethical conduct.

3/24

33. American Sociological Association's

(ASA's) Code of Ethics

34. Banks, Marcus. 2001. “Chapter 5:

Making Images.” Visual Methods in Social

Research. New York: Russell Sage.

35.Gold, Steven. 1989. "Ethical Issues in Visual Field Work" In G. Blank, James McCartney, and Edward Brent, New Technology in Sociology. New Brunswick,

NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1989, pp. 99-

109.

36. Pauwels, Luc. 2007. The Ethics of Picturing People and Using People’s Pictures: a Visual Researcher’s Dilemma. Paper presentation at the 2007 International Visual Sociological Association Meeting. NY, NY.

3/26

Assignment # 3 NIH Certificate for Human Subjects Research:

During this class time we will complete the computer-based training provided by the NIH.

Reaction Paper #6 Due 3/31

In this reaction paper you should approach the issues of ethics in research weighing the various methodologies presented against their potential costs to participants.

ethics in research weighing the various methodologies presented against their potential costs to participants. Page 16

Page 16

 

Module 8: Ethnographic Research: Using the lens to gather data

Module 8: Ethnographic Research:

4/7

Using the lens to gather data

41.

Wang, Caroline. 2005. “PhotoVoice:

“It is one thing to photograph people. It is another to make others care about them by revealing the core of their humanness.”

Mehtods.” Online at http:// www.photovoice.com/method/index.html

- Paul Strand, American Photographer

42.Clark-Ibañez, M. 2007. “Inner-City Children in Sharper Focus: Sociology of Childhood and Photo-elicitation Interviews” Chapter 7 in Stanczak, G. 2007. Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Sage:

Thousand Oaks, CA.

1890-1976

This module will focus on the “how to” of taking photographs then move to three of the techniques used by visual researchers to collect information via the lens.

43.

Hernandez-Albujar, Y. 2007.

 

3/31

“Exploring Migrant Mothers’ Experiences” Chapter 11 in Stanczak, G. 2007. Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and

Representation. Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA

37.

Milburn, Ken.2002. "Chapter 4

Composing, Focusing, and Metering." Digital Photography: 99 Easy Tips to Make You Look Like a Pro! New York, N.Y. McGraw-Hill Professional

Reaction Paper #7 Due 4/9

In this reaction paper you should discuss the technical issues related to photographing people and social situations. Consider issues that might effect the artistic merits of the photograph versus their utility as “data” for analysis. Also discuss the various approaches to data collection presented on 4/7.

39.

Collier, J and M. Collier. 1986.

“Chapter 7: Photographing Social Circumstance and Interaction” Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method. Albequerque: Univ. of

New Mexico.

40.

Kroes, Rob. 2007. “Photography and

Individual Research Project 4/9 to

Immigration.” Chapter 2:in Photographic memories : private pictures, public images, and American history. Dartmouth

College Press

4/21

 

4/2

Photography Basics: How to Shoot People

Guest Photographer:s Richard Krol & Daniel Smith

 
 

Page 17

Module 9: Communicating with images

 

Module 9: Communicating with images

Thomas. 1995. " Chapter 9: The Photographic Essay: Four Case Studies." Picture Theory: Essays on Verbal and Visual Representation

Whether he is an artist or not, the photographer is a joyous sensualist, for

Whether he is an artist or not, the photographer is a joyous sensualist, for

Reaction Paper #8 Due 5/9

In this reaction paper you should contemplate the power of images to inform, persuade, impress, instruct, and communicate. Discuss the concepts of visual rhetoric, as presented early in the semester, and tell how you have used images to create a visual discourse.

the simple reason that the eye traffics in feelings, not in thoughts. - Walker Evans

Gallery Preparation

 

4/21

We will use the class time on Apr 28 & Apr 30 to prepare for the presentation of individual projects. We will also conduct a peer-critique of the projects on Apr 30 th .

Gallery Show

44.

Papson, S. Goldman, R. and N. Kersey

2007. “Web Site Design: the Precarious Blend of Narrative, Aesthetics, and Social Theory.” Chapter 12 in Stanczak, G. 2007. Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Sage:

Thousand Oaks, CA.

We will host an open exhibition of student projects in (TBA) gallery on May 7.

45.

Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, 2007.

45. Hesford, W. & Brueggermann, 2007.

“Documentary Gazes: Representing History” Chapter 7 in Rhetorical Visions:

Reading and Writing in a Visual Culture. Pearson: New Jersey.

 

4/23

46.

Pink, Sarah. 2001. "Chapter 6:

Ethnographic Photography and Printed Text" Doing Visual Ethnography:

 

Images, Media and Representation in

Research

 

47.

Mitchell, William J. and Mitchell, J.

 

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