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THE
ORIENTATION
GUIDE
THE
PAGE 2: FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK
|
PAGE 3: FESTS
|
ORIENTATION
|
PAGE 4: RELIGION
PAGE 5: A YEAR IN REVIEW
|
PAGE 6: MEN’S BASKETBALL
|
HOCKEY
|
SPORTS ADVICE
PAGE 7: FOOTBALL

DORM LIFE
|
PAGE 8: COFFEE
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NELSONVILLE BYPASS
|
PAGE 9: BOBCATS ON A BUDGET
PAGE 10: KNOWING CAMPUS
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RATEMYPROFESSOR.COM
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STUDENT SENATE
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PAGE 11: PEOPLE YOU
SHOULD KNOW
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WHAT’S GOING ON LOCALLY
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PAGE 12: BAKER
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PAGE 13: PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

DON’T GET ARRESTED
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PAGE 14: WORKOUT
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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITITES
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TEXTBOOKS
PAGE 15: DIVERSITY AT OU
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FOOD
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PAGE 16: PERFORMING ART SERIES
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THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 2 THE ORIENTATION GUIDE
Opinion
>> LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THI NK 740.593.4010
G
reetings, fellow Bobcats, and welcome to
campus! I’m glad you’re here, and I’m sure
it won’t be long until Athens feels like a
second home.
This week is likely one of many firsts
for you: Meeting your classmates, touring
your academic buildings, deciding which Athens cuisine
you’ll post to Instagram first… It’s all a blur — trust me,
I’ve been there.
A lot has changed since my Bobcat Student Orientation
three years ago. But through all the ebbs and flows of
campus life, one thing has been constant during my tenure
in Athens: The Post.
I made it a part of my daily routine from the minute
I set foot on campus, and I urge you to do the same. Our
print product generally
consists of six
broadsheet pages filled
with great photos and
all the culture, news,
opinion and sports
content you need to
ensure you’re the best-
informed person at
the party — er, library.
It’s printed every day
classes are in session
and can be found on
newsstands around
campus and Athens.
We’re also online at www.thepost.ohiou.edu (for now)
and are in the process of launching a brand-new site that
will be your one-stop shop for everything Athens as it
happens. It’ll even have a newsletter to which you and your
parents can subscribe, bringing all that news to your inbox
each morning — assuming you can figure out your new
Catmail account.
In all seriousness, the new site will launch Aug. 1 at
www.thepostathens.com. Add it to your bookmarks bar
now, if you’re into that kind of thing.
If you’re at all interested in journalism, photography,
graphic design, coding, advertising or public relations,
send me an email or drop by The Post newsroom, 325
Baker Center, when class resumes in August. We have a
staff of almost 100 friendly, talented students, and I swear
none of us bite.
In case you’re wondering, The Post is an independent
newspaper. That means our student staff decides what to
publish and when to do so without editorial oversight from
the university. I would be remiss not to mention, however,
that our business manager is a salaried OU employee and
that OU provides our newsroom space.
If you haven’t gotten enough advice about what to
expect during your first year at OU, take a gander at some
of the advice we’ve compiled below.
It’s pretty good stuff — spot on, I say. And while I
have your ear, here’s my two cents. Take it or leave it,
Bobcat fans.
Many of the kooky freshman stereotypes are true,
so have fun with them. (For example: My mother has a
photo of me posing, lanyard
around my neck, in front
of Read Hall, where I lived
freshman year.)
If you’ve been placed in a
“renovated” residence hall,
you’re in luck. The same
goes for living in relative
proximity to a dining hall.
Don’t stress about
picking classes — really,
it’ll be OK — and don’t be
disappointed if you have to
schedule some for Friday
morning. You’ll get through
them.
You and your random roommates will get along just
fine — at least for a while. Then you’ll begin to bicker
about the leftover calzones left in the mini fridge and the
undergarments lying exposed on the futon whenever you
happen to bring that cute guy or gal over to study.
Yes, that’s actually a thing that happens in college.
Employers monitor your social media accounts, so
think twice before posting. The fake IDs sold by the guy
down the hall probably aren’t that convincing. Ask before
you pet the horses.
Watch a sunset from Bong Hill, stand front-row at a
football game and make sure to call your mom often. The
move is going to be hard on her and Dad too.
And remember: Read The Post. Always read The Post.
Your opinion is welcome. Letters should be fewer than 500 words.
Longer submissions will be considered as guest commentaries, but
space is limited.All letters must be signed by at least one individual;
anonymous letters will not be accepted. The Post does not accept
letters soliciting donations or news releases. Please include your
year and major if you are a student. Letters can be submitted
online at www.thepost.ohiou.edu, by email at posteditorial@
ohiou.edu or at The Post’s front desk in the media wing on the
third foor of Baker University Center. We reserve the right to
edit submissions for clarity, vulgarity and Associated Press Style.
The Post is an independent newspaper run by Ohio University
students. We distribute the paper free of charge in Athens, Ohio,
when classes are in session. Editorial page material represents
the opinions of the editors, columnists and letter writers. Opinions
expressed are independent of Ohio University and our printer.
VOLUME 105 ISSUE 140
WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU
1 PARK PLACE, ROOM 325
POSTEDITORIAL@OHIOU.EDU
PHONE | 740.593.4010
FAX | 740.593.0561
MANAGING EDITOR
SARA JERDE
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
XANDER ZELLNER
ASST. MANAGING EDITOR
HAYLEE PEARL
ASST. MANAGING EDITOR
ALLAN SMITH
SENIOR EDITOR
JOSHUA JAMERSON
CAMPUS EDITOR
WILL DRABOLD
LOCAL EDITOR
SAMUEL HOWARD
CULTURE EDITOR
WILLIAM HOFFMAN
SPORTS EDITOR
CHAD LINDSKOG
DESIGN EDITOR
JAKE NEWTON
COPY CHIEF
IAN ORDING
ONLINE EDITOR
LINDSAY FRIEDMAN
PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR
MEG OMECENE
BUSINESS MANAGER
RJ SUMNEY
THE
FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK
ENJOY YOUR FIRST DAYS ON
CAMPUS, AND ALWAYS KNOW
‘THE POST’ IS HERE FOR YOU
Jim Ryan
is a senior
studying
journalism
and editor-
in-chief of
The Post.
Email him
at jr992810@
ohiou.edu
or send him
a tweet at @
Jimryan015.
Ahoy, new Bobcats and welcome to Page 2, often referred to as
the Opinion Page of The Post.
This page is a little different from the rest of the paper.
Instead of news articles, you’ll find daily columns ranging from
national politics to fashion trends and everything in between. You’ll
also find cartoons, photos and quotes from the student body and
letters from readers.
We feature a daily Post Streetview section on this page, in which
we ask various students a random question about student life and
post it on this page along with their photo.
We also publish letters from our readers sent to us at postedito-
rial@ohiou.edu, so we want to hear from you.
Have an opinion about something we covered? Write us a letter.
Feel strongly about something going on at OU? Write us a letter. Did
we mess up? Write us a letter to let us know.
Come back and check out Page 2 to keep up with student life,
get a laugh out of our cartoons or get our take on the news from
our editorials.
*
A NOTE FROM
THE ASSOCIATE
EDITOR
ADVICE FROM THE PRESIDENT,
RODERICK MCDAVIS
ADVICE FROM THE VICE
PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT
AFFAIRS, RYAN LOMBARDI
Xander
Zellner
is a senior
studying
journalism
and is the
associate editor
of The Post.
Email him at
az346610@
ohiou.edu
or send him
a tweet at @
XanderZellner.
- “Engage with your professors. Get to know
them. Go to their office hours. Be a sponge
with them.
- Get involved in a club, sport, organization,
etc. Don't overdo it, but pick 1-2 and really
engage in them.
- Get to know Athens. Don't just stay on
campus and Court Street. Explore the area and
our community. It is a gem.
- Give back to the community. Engage in
service and volunteer to make Athens a better
place.
- Be open to new ideas and considering new
perspectives. Keep your mind open and learn
from those who have had different experiences
in their life.”
“As an alumnus and President of Ohio
University, I can personally attest to the
transformative nature of an Ohio University
education. Our job is to equip you to realize
and achieve your full potential. Your job,
as first-year students, is to simply immerse
yourself in opportunity.
I encourage you to embrace the learning
experience by engaging and interacting with
our outstanding faculty. I urge you to relish
the spirit of discovery through research,
scholarship, and creative activity. Find a
mentor. Find a niche. Find your passion and
delve in.
A degree from Ohio University will provide
you with unlimited opportunities to reach your
highest star. It is now up to you to dream…”
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JIM RYAN
POST CARTOON
EDITORIAL CARTOONS REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OPINION OF THE POST’S EXECUTIVE EDITORS.
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WELCOME TO ATHENS!
athensohio.com/1.800.878.9767
Ohio University’s party
school reputation, perpetuated
every year during spring fest
season as the Internet is littered
with viral videos and photos
of students ripping shots and
bonging beers, is still very much
intact but also seems to be wan-
ing.
The switch from quarters to
semesters, the city’s 2009 “nui-
sance party” ordinance and a
more-concerted law enforce-
ment effort could possibly have
curtailed OU’s perceived drink-
ing culture, according to previ-
ous Post articles.
But that doesn’t mean stu-
dents have stopped their liba-
tious tendencies.
This year, the Athens County
Sheriff’s Office and Athens Po-
lice and Ohio University Police
departments made a total of 279
arrests during the spring fest
season, up from 266 in 2013, ac-
cording to a previous Post ar-
ticle.
The city’s “nuisance party”
ordinance has been enforced
more diligently since 2012’s
rendition of Palmer Fest, when
a fire broke out and Mayor Paul
Wiehl declared the area a riot
zone. The ordinance allows po-
lice officers to shut down par-
ties if partygoers commit one of
14 different crimes, according
to a previous Post article.
OU and local officials re-
cently toyed with a possible ad-
dition to city law that police of-
ficers could invoke to shut down
bangers and arrest partiers.
Under the would-be “social
host” ordinance, law enforce-
ment could arrest a person of
legal drinking age who “negli-
gently” allows an underage per-
son to have or consume alcohol
at his or her home.
Both city and school officials
have said that there is currently
no written proposal and there
may never be one, but the pros-
pects of that change didn’t deter
students from flooding neigh-
borhoods this past spring.
Each street fest — Milliron
Fest, Mill Fest, High Fest, Palm-
er Place Fest and Palmer Fest —
attracts varying numbers of stu-
dents (Mill and Palmer fests are
the largest along city streets),
but Number Fest typically
draws the biggest crowds. More
than 17,000 attendees showed
up for 12Fest in April.
Even with tamer crowds
and tightened police presence,
one 18-year-old out-of-towner
told The Post at 12Fest that
she thought, “It’s really easy to
drink here.”
“18-year-olds can drink eas-
ily,” Norwalk resident Maddie
Rospert said.
Fests noticeably calmer
since 2012 Palmer Fest riot
CALVIN MATTHEIS | FILE PHOTO
Students take part in the festivities on the lawns of various homes during Mill Fest on Mill Street in Athens. The March fest was relatively calmer in 2014 than it has been in past years.
Last summer, Samantha
Gogol’s orientation did not go
as planned. All the “good time
slots” and “good classes” were
full, she recalls.
The culprit? She attended
Ohio University’s last orienta-
tion session. With a few weeks
until classes started, Gogol said
she had little time to organize,
buy books and mentally prepare
for college.
To give incoming freshmen
more time to consider their
classes and prepare for the col-
lege transition, OU has moved
its Bobcat Student Orientation
from July 15 through Aug. 3 to
June 4 through
June 26.
OU admin-
istrators agree
with Gogol
that last year’s
schedule didn’t
give students
enough breath-
ing room.
“I think
the most driv-
ing factor
was probably
catching up
with our shift
to semesters,”
said Ryan
Lombardi, vice
president for
Student Af-
fairs. “The pre-
vious schedule
was set be-
cause we were
in school until
mid-June, and
now that we’re finished in early
May I think it made sense to try
and do it during the earlier part
of summer.”
Incoming students need
more time between orientation
and the first day of classes to
prepare for school, said Jenny
Klein, director of the Allen Stu-
dent Help Center and director of
Orientation Programs.
“The earlier date allows stu-
dents to begin to feel like a Bob-
cat sooner,” Klein said. “Receiv-
ing the information they receive
at orientation and making the
connections they make while
they are here on campus will re-
lieve anxiety and help students
feel comfortable as they prepare
for college.”
OU Orientation staff deter-
mined that other universities
across the country were holding
their orientations closer to the
first-year students’ high school
graduation dates, rather than
their move-in days at the univer-
sities, Lombardi said.
Both Lombardi and Klein
said money was not a factor in
the switch. There is no cost dif-
ference in having an earlier ori-
entation, Klein said.
However, the earlier orienta-
tion will affect class scheduling.
Advanced Placement test
scores will not be in the univer-
sity’s system in time for the ear-
lier orientation dates, which will
affect scheduling for first-year
students, Klein
said. Staff will
have to work
i ndi v i dua l l y
with students
who have
passed appli-
cable AP tests,
she added.
With the
goal of making
first-year stu-
dents’ transi-
tion to college
life as smooth
as possible,
Student Af-
fairs staff is
c on s i de r i ng
holding “re-
fresher” cours-
es during the
first few days
of Fall Semes-
ter to remind
new students
of what they
learned at orientation. That ini-
tiative is not set in stone as of
press time.
“Even with a ‘refresher
course’ I still wish my orien-
tation had been earlier,” said
Gogol, now a sophomore study-
ing anthropology. “People will
feel more secure because they
want to have their act together.
I wanted to know what I was do-
ing before I got here, and now
with more time between orien-
tation and the first day, new stu-
dents will be able to do that.”
Still, students enjoy the revelry of Spring Semester in Athens
New orientation
schedule to ease
stress for newcomers
“Even with a ‘refresher
course’ I still wish my
orientation had been
earlier. People will feel
more secure because
they want to have their
act together. I wanted to
know what I was doing
before I got here, and now
with more time between
orientation and the first
day, new students will be
able to do that.”
Samantha Gogol,
Sophomore studying
anthropology
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Ohio University Culinary Services
offers numerous Meal Plan options
just for you.

O H I O U N I V E R S I T Y
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— Mariah Harris
Ohio University, Junior


The religious and spiritual
beliefs on Ohio University’s
campus are as diverse as the
students themselves.
A variety of student organi-
zations and religious centers
exist in Athens to help accom-
modate those with particular
beliefs. They also serve as learn-
ing centers for people who want
to gather information about dif-
ferent religions.
A common misconception
is that students in college move
away from faith, but a 2007 study
conducted by the Social Science
Research Council found that only
13 percent of four-year college
students renounced religious af-
filiations. Though 64 percent of
college students reported a de-
cline in religious service atten-
dance, 76 percent of those outside
of college also reported a decline.
The Muslim Student Asso-
ciation — housed at the Islamic
Center of Athens, 13 Stewart St.
— is an organization that seeks
to provide a space for Muslim
students and those interested
in Islam to come together, said
Omar Kurdi, a senior study-
ing political science and global
studies and vice president for
the International Student Union.
“(It also hopes) to educate
the greater Athens and OU com-
munity about Islam,” he said.
“(The MSA) can provide a venue
for the students’ spiritual and
material needs, and for students
who are interested in Islam, the
MSA is open to conversations,
dialogues and discussions re-
garding Islam and are open to
visitors most times of the day.”
Hillel at OU is a student or-
ganization for both Jewish and
non-Jewish students interested
in learning about issues of social
justice, religion, Israel and more,
said Rabbi Danielle Leshaw, ex-
ecutive director of Hillel.
Weekly Shabbat services
are held Friday nights at Hil-
lel, 21 Mill St.
“University students are al-
ways welcome to be in touch
to learn more about the Jewish
religion,” Leshaw said. “We’re al-
ways around and love discussing
everything from queer empower-
ment and the intersection of reli-
gious values to Israeli and Pales-
tinian politics and especially how
students can better serve their
local and regional communities.”
The Indian Students Associa-
tion is a representation of stu-
dents from India and all those
who are interested in the Indian
culture. It has organized activi-
ties such as Bollywood Dance
Club and Color Festivals on
campus, said Manindra Singh,
communication director for
the ISA and a doctoral student
studying molecular and cellular
biology.
“Indian students on cam-
pus celebrate various religious
festivals throughout the year,
so word of mouth and making
friends in the Indian community
is certainly helpful to get a casu-
al perspective about Hindu cul-
ture and Hinduism,” Singh said.
There are a number of
churches and Christian student
groups serving Athens as well,
such as Athletes in Action and
Christian Business Leaders.
Whether a student is already
a believer or seeking faith, he or
she is in good hands at OU, said
Erin Tracy, a senior studying
mechanical engineering and a
Bible study leader for Cru.
“(I) have grown so much in
my walk with the Lord since
joining freshman year,” she said.
“Cru is committed to winning
people to Christ, building them
up in their faith and sending
them out to share the good news
with others. It’s a very comfort-
able environment for both new
and old believers.”
ANJELICA OSWALD
STAFF WRITER
@THISISJELLI
AO007510@OHIOU.EDU
Students find security in faith during college
Read The Post online at www.thepost.ohiou.edu.
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If you associate tuition de-
bates, hundreds of millions of
dollars, controversy and wide-
spread construction with col-
lege, you’ve come to the right
place. Here are stories that
shaped Ohio University in the
past year, and some that will
continue to play out this fall:
TUITION INCREASED
OU’s Board of Trustees is ex-
pected to vote — for the sixth-
consecutive time — to raise tu-
ition, this time by 1.5 percent, at
its June 27 meeting. That means
tuition and fees will increase
$156 to $10,535 for current stu-
dents. Tuition for the 2014-15
academic year is, adjusted for
inflation, 12 percent higher than
a decade ago.
“RAPE CULTURE” CONTROVERSY
Following a tweet some per-
ceived as “slut shaming” sent by
Student Senate’s then-president,
which preceded a public sex
act on Court Street, a campus-
wide debate about whether OU
has a “rape culture” — and how
severe it is — engulfed campus
conversation during Fall Semes-
ter.
Rape culture is
a concept in which
sexual violence
toward women
is permitted or
at least tolerated
within a society,
thus normalizing
a culture that ex-
cuses rape.
A group of
students called
F- -kRapeCulture
formed and, in
a public show of
anti-rape culture,
staged a march
around Athens and
OU to protest the
campus’ attitudes
toward women
and sex. Many
march partici-
pants were nearly
nude. Dozens of
letters were writ-
ten to The Post
and other campus media out-
lets, both arguing that there was
and was not a presence of rape
culture at OU.
The controversy was so
intense that when the March-
ing 110, OU’s student marching
band, began practicing Robin
Thicke’s Blurred Lines, many
students expressed outrage that
a song they
said supported
rape culture
would be per-
formed by OU
students. In
the end, the
administration
and directors
in the school of
music decided
not to play the
cont roversi al
song a day be-
fore the foot-
ball game.
GUARANTEED
TUITION
PROGRAM ADVANCED
The university saw its guar-
anteed tuition program —
dubbed “The OHIO Guarantee”
— jump through more hurdles.
The trustees approved the mod-
el in January, which will hold
“tuition, housing, dining and fee
rates established at enrollment
unchanged for 12 consecutive
semesters (four years),” accord-
ing to the university. The Ohio
Board of Regents’
Chancellor ap-
proved the plan
in April. The tu-
ition plan will be
implemented in
Fall 2015 and will
only apply to new
students.
FUNDRAISING
GOALS MET
The university
ended the 2013-14
academic year by
reaching its $450
million Promise
Lives Campaign
goal 14 months
ahead of schedule.
OU will continue
to fundraise un-
til the campaign,
which launched in
2007, ends in July
2015. Goals met
include more than
$100 million for capital projects,
$105 million in support for facul-
ty and $50 million for academic
and student programs
INVESTMENT PLAN ANNOUNCED
OU also detailed a seven-
year plan to internally allocate
$100 million toward “strategic
initiatives” for the univer-
sity. They include $25 million
for scholarships;
$25 million for
endowed profes-
sorships; $8 mil-
lion for academic
and research pro-
grams; $5.9 mil-
lion for student
success programs;
$34.5 million for
i n f r a s t r uc t u r e;
and $12.5 million
for economic de-
velopment.
The university
hopes to have the
$100 million in-
vested by fiscal
year 2019; it start-
ed the plan in fiscal year 2012.
The $25 million for scholar-
ships will be matched with $50
million in donations, and the
$25 million for professorships
will be matched with an equal
sum in donations.
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN
OU’s historic campus is get-
ting an update. New buildings
are going up across campus,
many will be coming down over
the next several years and even
more will see renovations.
The university is planning
to spend nearly $1 billion by
2020 to completely change sig-
nificant parts of its campus.
New residence halls will go
up as much of current South
Green is knocked down and re-
placed. A new science facility
will replace Clippinger Labora-
tories, which dates back to the
1960s and will be destroyed.
Dozens of other buildings will
see renovations or additional
construction as well.
The plan will be paid for by
OU’s stable revenue sources —
namely room and board and
possibly tuition cost increas-
es, according to OU officials.
Four residence halls near the
Ping Center and South Green
comprise the first major part
of the construction and are ex-
pected to open in Fall 2015.
An OU professor
pleaded not guilty
in February to child-
pornography crimes.
Amol T. Kharabe, who
has been with OU since
2012, was placed on
administrative leave.
In May, Kharabe was
dealt nine more felony
charges, bringing
the total number of
charges he faces to 21.
A bill that would have
given Ohio public
universities the option
to grant their student
trustees voting rights
stalled in the Ohio
Senate this year.
OU’s Student Senate,
some student trustees
and other campus
groups have long been
behind such a bill.
OU’s Board of Trustees
and administration
have not taken a
public position on the
legislation but have
been accused by state
legislators of lobbying
against it in private.
WILL DRABOLD
CAMPUS EDITOR
@WILLDRABOLD
DD195710@OHIOU.EDU
Major headlines
from last year’s ‘Post’
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The ice at Bird Arena has
melted and there are skates hung
up, but that has not stopped the
Ohio hockey team from staying
dedicated this summer.
Some players have decided to
go home for the summer while
others have opted to stay in Ath-
ens. No matter where they are,
however, one thing is for certain:
They’ll rarely cease communi-
cating.
“We have a group chat, so
we all talk to each other pretty
much daily through the text,”
said sophomore forward Patrick
Spellacy, who led the Bobcats in
goals last year. “And hopefully
we can skate together. I know
(guys) live in the same cities as
each other, so those who live by
one another will probably get on
the ice and skate together.”
Senior defenseman Scott Fa-
sano also said that the Bobcats
try to plan trips to cities such as
Pittsburgh and Chicago to keep
close ties with teammates who
go home for the summer.
“I think it’s really important
to keep a close relationship with
the guys over the summer,” Fa-
sano said. “The closer we stay
over the summer, the easier it is
to create that team chemistry
and bonding when we get back
to school.”
Senior defenseman Mike
Kretz, senior forward Nathan De
La Torre and junior forward Mi-
chael Harris are among the Bob-
cats staying in Athens for work
or classes this
summer.
And al-
though Bird
Arena is just
around the
corner by
Baker Center,
the players
will be forced
to travel
much farther
to squeeze
in a pickup
game or two.
The arena is
closed for ice
hockey over
the summer
because of the
high cost of
ice upkeep, so
some players travel to Columbus
to get some skating in.
Despite this obstacle, the
team remains confident that it
will come ready to play next sea-
son. Ohio strength coach Dak
Notestine designed a training
regimen for the players to follow
this summer in order to stay in
shape and be ready to compete
come Fall Semester.
“It’s re-
ally important
that we stay in
shape,” Spellacy
said. “It’s pretty
important that
we stick to it
and get into a
routine so we
come to school
in August in
shape and ready
to go.”
HOW TO JOIN
THE HOCKEY
TEAM
Although it is
a key factor for
the current Bob-
cats come back
from summer
ready for the season, it is also im-
portant that the team brings on
new talent. Sophomore forward
Joe Breslin said there will be
open team tryouts at Bird begin-
ning Aug. 25.
That being said, the Bobcats
have a few words of advice for
those interested in trying out:
Fasano: “It’s important to
just play your own game. Don’t
try and do too much, and don’t
play a role that you don’t get.”
Spellacy: “When I first tried
out, there was already a lot of
talent on the ice. So I just had to
play my game and do the things
I’m good at. So for those coming
in, I guess my advice would be
just be yourself. Showcase what
you’re good at and you’ll be fine.”
Kretz: “Play hard like it is
a real game. That is the way we
practice all year, and that is what
the coaches like to see. If you just
work hard, you will be fine.”
Breslin: “My first experience
trying out was fun. The first days
are hectic because there are so
many players, but once you get
later in the week, the (competi-
tion) level goes up. … My advice
would be to just have fun with it,
and see what happens. If you get
too nervous, you won’t play well.”
Sports
KEEP UP WI TH THE BOBCATS @thepostsports
O
hio is spending the summer
settling in after its second
coaching change since mak-
ing a Sweet 16 appearance in
the 2012 NCAA Tournament, in the wake
of former coach Jim Christian’s depar-
ture for Boston College in April.
His successor, former North Dakota
State coach Saul Phillips, is inheriting a
team without the familiar faces Bobcats
fans came to know in guards Nick Kel-
logg and Travis Wilkins and forwards
T.J. Hall, Ricardo Johnson and Jon Smith,
who each finished their senior seasons
last year.
Kellogg broke the program and Mid-
American Conference records for the
most 3-pointers made in a career with
290, and losing players of his caliber will
create a difficult process for the coaching
staff and players. That aside, Ohio is ex-
cited about its 2014-15 prospects.
“I don’t think we have a lot of gaping
holes going into next year,” Phillips said.
“The needs we have short term are depth
— we need quality players that can step
in and play.”
That depth will come from players
who already were worked into the line-
up last season, such as redshirt senior
guard Javarez Willis and sophomore
forward Antonio Campbell, along with
new players that have been recruited
this offseason.
Ohio’s also returning a seasoned vet-
eran in senior guard Stevie Taylor, the
last remaining player from the NCAA
Tournament team three seasons ago,
who has become known as a spark plug
during his tenure in Athens — something
that fuels fan excitement in The Convo.
“I’ve been all around the world and
all around the country in mid-major bas-
ketball. The fan support here is unique,
very unique,” Phillips said. “I met with
the president of the O-Zone … what an
engaged group that is.”
Phillips said that the hardest part of
this offseason will be the adjustment
itself.
The Bobcats have reached the MAC
Tournament championship game in
two of the past three seasons and made
the NCAA Tournament three seasons
ago. Phillips said although last season’s
squad didn’t make it to the champion-
ship game for the third consecutive
year, Ohio is a desirable place for him
to grow a program.
“I think this is as good as any job in
the MAC,” he said. “I intend to build this
thing to where we can contend on a year-
ly basis. I think it would be irresponsible
of me to think any other way while trying
to build this thing.”
NEW FACES
LOOK TO LEAD
OHIO BACK TO
POSTSEASON
After the loss of four seniors and a coaching
change, the Bobcats gear up for their first
season under new coach Saul Phillips.
ALEX BUSCH
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
ALEX BUSCH
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
KELSEY SURMACZ
FOR THE POST
MEN'S BASKETBALL
HOCKEY
ISAAC HALE | FILE PHOTO
Ohio senior forward Maurice Ndour goes up to the hoop while contested by Toledo sophomore center
Zach Garber. The Bobcats clinched the overtime victory against the Rockets 95-90 Feb. 1 at The Convo.
@ALEX_BUSCH91
AB109410@OHIOU.EDU
Players talk summer skating plans, tryouts
FOOTBALL
“As a
freshman I
wish I would
have spoke
my mind more
and was able
to have the
courage to ask
more ques-
tions.”

BASKETBALL
“Just come
here with your
eyes and ears
open and hit
the books
early so you
can set your-
self up to have
fun later.”
VOLLEYBALL
“(As a
freshman) I
wish I would
have bought a
planner, and I
wish I would
have met the
people living in
the same hall-
way as me and
like the people
in my dorm.”

BASEBALL
“(As a
freshman)
I wish I
would've got-
ten to know
more up-
perclassmen.
I met more
upperclassmen
at the end of
the second se-
mester my freshmen year. I wish
I could've spent more time with
those people earlier in the year
because they are either graduat-
ing or graduate soon.”
HOCKEY
“Some-
thing I wish I
did as a fresh-
man would
probably be
exploring
more outside
the bubble
of Athens …
Bong Hill, The
Ridges and
just other things around the
town. You can find some hidden
gems in this town if you take the
time to do it.”
Nathan
De La Torre
senior forward
@DLTdeluxe
Mitch Longo
sophomore
centerfielder
@MitchLongo10
Derrius Vick
senior
quarterback
@OUdvickQB
Stevie Taylor
senior guard
@TV_Taylor22
Kelly
Lamberti
senior outside
hitter
@KellyLamberti1
Advice to
freshmen
from
Ohio
student-
athletes
@ALEX_BUSCH91
AB109410@OHIOU.EDU
@KELSEY_SURMACZ4
KS363012@OHIOU.EDU
“I think it’s really
important to keep
a close relationship
with the guys over the
summer. The closer we
stay over the summer,
the easier it is to create
that team chemistry and
bonding when we get
back to school.”
Scott Fasano,
Senior defenseman
Check www.thepost.ohiou.edu throughout the day for
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Creating a university environment and community inclusive,
supportive, and celebratory of sexual orientation, gender
identity/expression, and queerness.
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Variety of LGBTQ
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Weekly LGBT eNews

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Special Events
and MUCH MORE
ohio.edu/lgbt
Join us for
QUEER BOBCAT MEET & GREET
Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014; 5pm-7:30pm
Bobcat Lounge (1st Floor of Baker)
Connect with other bobcat rainbow warriors, learn about LGBT
resources, and ask questions about queer life at OHIO and South-
eastern Ohio.

Questions? e-mail lgbt@ohio.edu
740.593.0239 354 Baker Center
facebook.com/OULGBTCenter @OULGBTCenter
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Fri. & Sat.
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Bring this ad with you for:
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We offer the following events and services for students:
º Dihher wiIh 12 SIrahgers - FRLL NeIworkihg Dihhers arouhd AIhehs
º NeIworkihg Pahels
º OpporIuhiIies Io cohhecI wiIh 8obcaIs ih your !eld o! sIudy
º SIudehI Alumhi 8oard
Alumni Association
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THE OHIO UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
helps students make the most of their college experience,
and stay connected with OHIO after they graduate.
STUDENT ALUMNI
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SA8 is a dyhamic group o! sIudehIs who sIrive
Io cohhecI sIudehIs Io Ihe UhiversiIy ahd 8obcaI
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sIudehIs who are sIrivihg Io make a di!!erehce
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Stop by Konneker Alumni Center (across from Ellis Hall)
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CONNECT WITH US: @OhioSAB
When minivans were being
packed to the roof and stu-
dents were hustling to leave
Athens for the summer at the
end of finals week, some Ohio
student-athletes had to wait
patiently for their turn to rest.
Others had little-to-no break.
Ohio baseball centerfield-
er Mitch Longo, who lived on
West Green as a freshman last
year, continued to maintain
his baseball schedule well into
May, while also balancing a
daily routine that was devel-
oped throughout the year.
But Longo said he didn’t
mind that Ohio’s season went
until May
17.
“It’s just the life that comes
with being a Division I ath-
lete,” Longo said. “I love base-
ball. It’s been a great experi-
ence.”
Although he suffered a
season-ending injury at the
end of April, Longo, a Mayfield
native, stated that being an
NCAA athlete requires a lot of
time management and consis-
tency.
“Normally, I would have
class in the morning and
then have practice from 3:00-
7:00 in the afternoon,” Longo
said. “It’s
not easy.
You’re a
s t u d e n t
first, and
your edu-
cation is
i mportant.
I use my
planner a
lot to frame
out my day,
and some
of the guys kind of poke fun
at me for it, but it gets the job
done.”
Longo isn’t the only athlete
whose summer is consumed by
sports, however, as Ohio foot-
ball wide receiver Justin Wy-
att, who lived in Boyd Hall as
a freshman last year, said that
being a collegiate athlete is a
“24-hour job.”
“(During March and April),
I didn’t practice much because
of an ankle injury,” Wyatt said.
“So I was basically a full-time
student here. I would go up
to the fourth floor (of Peden
Stadium) and work and watch
practice and do some therapy.”
Wyatt, who is from the At-
lanta area, was in Athens for
the first summer session to
take two classes and partici-
pate in offensive drills every
week.
He’s practicing voluntarily
until July 18, as the offense
throws on Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays at 8:30 a.m.
“There’s not a whole lot of
people up here during the sum-
mer,” Wyatt said. “It’s just ath-
letes up here, and there’s not
a whole lot to do. So you just
have to train and get better for
next season.”
Wyatt and his teammates
will begin their season Aug.
30 on the road against Mid-
American Conference foe Kent
State.
Centerfielder Mitch Longo and
wide receiver Justin Wyatt share
their perspective on living on
campus and how they will be
training during the summer.
Sports
KEEP UP WI TH THE BOBCATS @thepostsports
Despite making five straight
bowl games, Ohio will feature
some new faces on offense this
season.
The Bobcats lost some of
their offensive weapons, includ-
ing quarterback Tyler Tettleton
and running back Beau Blan-
kenship, along with a majority
of their offensive line. The 2014
Ohio team will feature a new
brand of Bobcats football, led by
fresh faces.
The offense will be the most
changed part of the team, in-
cluding the starting quarter-
back position, which has yet to
be decided upon; the two lead-
ing candidates being redshirt
junior Derrius Vick and redshirt
sophomore J.D. Sprague.
C o a c h
Frank Solich
said both have
shown to be
a threat with
their legs and
arm, but un-
less he finds a
definite front-
runner in com-
petition, he will
plan to play the
“hot hand.”
“I’m the
kind of guy that
likes a clear-
cut No. 1 com-
ing in, but it’s got to take shape.
Someone has got to earn it, and
he’s really gotta separate him-
self,” he said. “If that happens,
then there will be a clear-cut
No. 1. If that doesn’t happen, I
think we can
win with more
than one guy
at the quar-
terback posi-
tion.”
W h e n
asked if either
quar t er back
had an edge
following the
spring sched-
ule, quarter-
backs coach
Scott Isphord-
ing said that
the two would
enter summer camp “tied at No.
1.”
After scoring an average of
more than 33 points in its first
eight games in 2013 — six of
which were Ohio wins — the of-
fense mustered a combined 16
points in three ensuing losses.
Scoring points, as well as
not expecting the defense to
make up for lack of scoring, has
become the main focus of the
squad.
“As an offensive unit we are
getting closer and closer as the
days go by,” redshirt sophomore
wide receiver Justin Wyatt said.
“We all know that we can’t de-
pend on the defense to back
us out of the hole and that we
should become a high-powered
offense and score a lot of points
each week. To me, we can’t have
what happened last year.”
The Bobcats played East
Carolina in the Beef ‘O’ Brady’s
Bowl in December, but were de-
feated 37-20 in St. Petersburg,
Florida.
This upcoming season is
a question mark that largely
hinges on offensive production.
Solich said that he is confident
in two-thirds of his team — de-
fense and special teams — while
the other third, the offense, has
yet to prove itself.
“We’re going to be a work
in progress — there’s a lot of
things that we have to get bet-
ter at from the offensive side,”
Solich said. “I think we can be a
very strong, talented defensive
unit. … We’ve really got some
depth across the board on the
defensive side of the football
with talented guys. It should be
the strong point of our football
team next year.”
SPRAGUE, VICK COMPETING FOR QUARTERBACK JOB
ALEX BUSCH
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
FOOTBALL
@ALEX_BUSCH91
AB109410@OHIOU.EDU
Mitch Longo
sophomore
centerfielder
Justin Wyatt
sophomore
wide reciever
LUKE O’ROARK
FOR THE POST
Bobcats spend summer improving game
@LUKEOROARK
LR514812@OHIOU.EDU
“I’m the kind of guy that
likes a clear-cut No. 1
coming in, but it’s got
to take shape. Someone
has got to earn it, and
he’s really gotta separate
himself.”
Frank Solich,
Head Football Coach
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Students can look both off-
and on-campus for some caffein-
ated “pick-me-ups” throughout
the day.
There are four cafés located
on Ohio University’s campus: The
Front Room Coffeehouse, 4th
Floor, Baker University Center;
Café BiblioTech, Alden Library;
South Side Espresso Bar, Nelson
Commons, South Green; and OU-
HCOM SAF Café, Academic & Re-
search Center, West Green.
“Conveniently located across
campus, each of our cafés is
ready to serve its guests with a
variety of menu options,” said
Dan Pittman, assistant director
of auxiliary sales for Culinary
Services. “Best of all, each venue
proudly accepts Flex Points and
Bobcat Cash.”
Zach Finn, a 2014 Ohio Uni-
versity graduate who studied
graphic design, said his friends
often take advantage of using
the allotted $225 in Flex Points
in a Flex meal plan throughout
the semester.
“Front Room is great for stu-
dents to get coffee on the go,
especially when they are trying
to spend Flex Points,” he said.
“Some of my friends have taken
me to get something with them
to help spend it all.”
Among the list of uptown caf-
feine options are Court Street
Coffee, 67 S. Court St. and Don-
key Coffee and Espresso, 17 1/2
W. Washington St.
Due to the laid-back atmo-
sphere and knowledgeable em-
ployees, Hayley Smith, a senior
studying commercial photogra-
phy, said Donkey Coffee is her
favorite coffee shop.
“Donkey has a lot of differ-
ent options and drinks that are
specific to them,” she said. “My
favorite drinks are mochas and
iced coffee with vanilla.”
Some of the coffee shops also
double as performance spaces.
Front Room has open mic nights.
Those who want to perform can
sign up in a notebook that sits
next to the fireplace in the days
leading up to each open mic
night. Donkey Coffee hosts an
Open Stage on Thursday nights,
weekend shows and Designated
Space, a weekly open mic night
for spoken word, storytelling
and poetry.
While a student at OU, Finn
performed at Designated Space.
Finn agreed with Smith and
said that Donkey Coffee was his
favorite coffee shop as well.
“My favorite coffee shop is
Donkey Coffee, for not only its
quality coffee from fair trade,
but also the great atmosphere
the coffee shop has,” he said. “I
spend school work and personal
creative work time at Donkey.”
Freshman year means expe-
riencing all of the local attrac-
tions that Athens County has to
offer — and now, it also means
bypassing some of them.
In October, the 8.5-mile
Nelsonville bypass on U.S. 33
opened to drivers after years of
anticipation. It was, according
to a previous Post article, the
largest road project in South-
east Ohio history.
The bypass means that peo-
ple, specifically Ohio University
students, can cut a significant
amount of time off of their com-
mutes. Generations of OU stu-
dents have commiserated over
white-knuckle traffic along the
small town’s main drag.
Now state officials estimate
that the bypass shortens travel
times to and from Athens by as
much as 30 minutes.
The $200 million project
was first proposed in the 1960s;
however, the project hit speed
bumps because of construction,
funding and environmental con-
cerns over the past five decades.
The bypass was funded
partially by President Barack
Obama’s $800 billion economic
stimulus package. State officials
have said that without that fed-
eral money, ground wouldn’t
have been broken on the final
phase until 2015.
Even though the bypass has
made “travel safer and faster,”
according to David Rose, an
Ohio Department of Transpor-
tation spokesman, Nelsonville
residents have expressed mixed
emotions on the bypass.
While many celebrate the
long-awaited opening — such as
the students joining the Bobcat
family — others point out that it
brings a greater chance of near-
by businesses being overlooked,
and a few of them closed even
before the bypass opened.
Jim Herpy, owner of the Son-
ic Drive-In in Nelsonville, said
last academic year that even
though Nelsonville offers tour-
ist attractions such as Stuart’s
Opera House and the Hocking
Valley Scenic Railway, most
drivers will not be willing to
turn around.
“Let’s face it, people are in a
hurry and want to get from point
A to point B,” he said in a previ-
ous Post article. “If you don’t
have to go through Nelsonville,
you’re not going to go through
Nelsonville.”
ANJELICA OSWALD
STAFF WRITER
Bypass brings fast travel
after years of speed bumps
Coffee: key ingredient for
college student success
KELLY FISHER
STAFF WRITER
@KELLYPFISHER
KF398711@OHIOU.EDU
KATIE KLANN | FILE PHOTO
A raspberry chai latte is one of the
many drinks you can order at Donkey
Coffee, located at 17 1/2
W. Washington St. in uptown Athens.
@THISISJELLI
AO007510@OHIOU.EDU
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 9 THE ORIENTATION GUIDE
With college-sized expenses,
Bobcats have to find their own
ways to stay on budget through-
out the year.
“I would tell freshman that,
believe it or not, they are going
to be a poor college kid at one
point, and it’s always good to
save cash,” said Chris McDuffy,
an undecided sophomore.
Most stores and restaurants
in Athens give out free coupons
and discounts, which most stu-
dents just throw away or turn
down. By using these coupons
from in-town establishments,
McDuffy said he was able to save
a lot of money.
“Once, I used the Green Cab
coupon in (a coupon book) when
me and my buddy were stranded
at Wal-Mart, and we only had to
pay half of the price of the cab
fare, so it saved us a lot of mon-
ey,” McDuffy said.
Another tip McDuffy had was
to embrace the hills and put on
those sneakers.
“I’ve saved a lot of money this
year by not bringing my gas-guz-
zling car here and using my bike
every day,” McDuffy said.
Free items can also be found
on campus. Organizations like
University Programming Coun-
cil throw free events throughout
the year.
Events such as an Aaron
Carter concert, petting zoos and
free food offered around town
can be taken advantage of by
simply looking out for fliers or
other advertisements.
Another way to snag some
free grub is at tailgates prior to
football games and a select few
basketball games.
Sponsors of Ohio Athletics,
such as Domino’s Pizza, Kiser’s
Barbeque and McDonald’s do-
nate food for students. In return,
restaurants and businesses re-
ceive exposure to the student
population, said Drake Bolon,
Ohio Athletics’ director of mar-
keting, in an email.
For many restaurants up-
town, social media has been their
best friend. Eateries like Brenen’s
Coffee Café, 38 S. Court St., have
incorporated Twitter and Face-
book into their businesses.
One way they draw custom-
ers is by offering deals and free
food through contests on Twit-
ter. People who follow the café’s
account can retweet its tweets
to be entered to win free sand-
wiches and sides.
“We like to do (contests like)
that because it gives anyone that
has a Twitter account the possi-
bility to … do a little bit of ad-
vertising for us, but they also get
rewarded by a free sandwich,”
said Michael Parson, a manager
at Brenen’s and junior studying
plant biology. “We like to do that
to promote business.”
Several other businesses
have a strong social media pres-
ence, including D.P. Dough, 374
Richland Ave., and GoodFella’s
Pizza, 6 W. Union St., and many
of the uptown bars and estab-
lishments.
Parson said that he would
recommend that freshmen and
other students to be proactive
and follow their favorite places
online.
“(It’s) minimal involvement;
all you have to do is check your
Twitter account every now and
then and just retweet something
and you (could) get a whole free
sandwich that comes with a
side,” Parson said. “It’s a pretty
good deal overall.”
Bobcats take advantage
of deals, free giveaways
REBEKAH BARNES
ASST. CULTURE EDITOR
@REB_BARNES
RB605712@OHIOU.EDU
WAYS TO
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FOLLOW YOUR FAVORITE
RESTAURANTS ON
SOCIAL MEDIA
USE YOUR SWIPES
AND FLEX POINTS
ATTEND EVENTS WITH
FREE GIVEAWAYS
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accuracy or people... The Post has a spot for you
DESIGN
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EDITORIAL
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PHOTO
EMILY HARGER
EH344011@OHIOU.EDU
Though few know all the names and loca-
tions of Ohio University’s more than 240 build-
ings, there are a few no freshman can function
without. And because of OU’s 210-year history,
most of the campus’ buildings hold more than
just coursework and student files.

BAKER UNIVERSITY CENTER
Baker functions as OU’s student and activi-
ties center, as well as a connection between
College Green and West Green. Built in 2004,
the building carried over several elements of
the former Baker Center — now occupied by the
Schoonover Center for Communication — such
as Front Room coffee shop and several student
activity centers, but the old bowling alley did
not survive the move. The building does hold
Bobcat Student Lounge, Bobcat Depot — where
office and tech supplies can be purchased —
and a pair of eateries, as well as conference and
ballroom spaces that can be rented through OU
Event Services, most of which are free for stu-
dents.

CUTLER HALL
The oldest building on campus, Cutler Hall
holds the offices of the president, provost and
several other top administrators. It is the old-
est building “west of the Alleghenies and north
of the Ohio river” built for higher education.
Since its construction began in 1816, the hall
has served as a classroom, dormitory, labora-
tory and museum. The building used to play
OU’s alma mater from its bell tower at 8 a.m.
and noon.

ALDEN LIBRARY
The library was completed in 1969, at the time
holding 550,000 materials. Now it holds more than
three million, but if students can’t find what they’re
looking for, they can order them through Ohio-
Link — a material-sharing service used by many
Buckeye State libraries. Students can also study in
Alden’s Fine Arts Library, Southeast Asian collec-
tions or stacks on the sixth and seventh floors. Stu-
dents can also rent one of the study rooms located
throughout the library.
CHUBB HALL
When it was built in 1930, Chubb Hall’s three
floors were used to hold OU’s library. Now it
serves students’ administrative needs, by way
of the Registrar’s Office, the Office of Financial
Aid, Residential Housing and University College.

COLLEGE MAIN OFFICES:
• College of Arts and Sciences — Wilson Hall
• College of Fine Arts — Jennings House
• Scripps College of Communication —
Schoonover Center
• University College — Chubb Hall
• College of Business — Copeland Hall
• Russ College of Engineering — Stocker
Center
• Patton College of Education — McCracken Hall
• Honors Tutorial College — 35 Park Place
• Graduate College — Research and Technol-
ogy Building
• Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine —
Grosvenor Hall

DINING HALLS:
• Nelson Court — South Green
• Shively Court — East Green
• Boyd Dining Hall — West Green

OU CAFES/RESTAURANTS:
• Latitude 39 — Baker University Center
• West 82 — Baker University Center
• Front Room — Baker University Center
• Café Bibliotech — Alden Library
• Southside Café — Nelson Court

TEMPLETON-BLACKBURN ALUMNI MEMORIAL
AUDITORIUM
OU’s premier auditorium is named for its
first African-American male and female gradu-
ates, but most people refer to the building as
MemAud. OU hosts many of its fine arts perfor-
mances in the 2,500-seat hall, as well as tour-
ing musicals and artists such as Lee Brice and
Sara Bareilles. The side of the building holds
plaques from famous speakers who have visited
MemAud, such as Martin Luther King Jr., John F.
Kennedy, and, most recently, President Barack
Obama.

THE RIDGES
Just past the roundabout on Richland Avenue
is The Ridges — a property currently owned by
OU that served as a mental institution from 1867
to 1993. Under OU’s ownership, the complex in-
cludes Konneker Research Center, the Voinov-
ich School of Public Affairs and Leadership, the
Ridges Auditorium and the Kennedy Museum
of Art — a free museum specializing in Native
American art — as well as hiking paths and old
cemeteries. However, many sections of the com-
plex are in disrepair or blocked off, and OU tore
down one of the complex’s buildings — the for-
mer tuberculosis ward — in 2013.
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 10 THE ORIENTATION GUIDE
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SETH ARCHER | FILE PHOTO
Cutler Hall is the main building on College Green at Ohio University. The bell in its tower rings every hour.
First-time
schedulers
need not
to worry
After tumultuous year, Student
Senate faces new circumstances
Scheduling for the first time
is a stressful process, but there
are many helpful tips, which
range from academic advisors
to websites aggregating stu-
dent opinion, to make the pro-
cess easier.
Rate My Professor is a popu-
lar website that is designed to
help rate professors in a variety
of categories.
The categories are helpful-
ness, clarity, easiness, hotness
and overall. Students who have
had the teacher leave comments
about their personal experienc-
es with the professor as well.
“It allowed me to know
more about the class and what
it entailed, like how strict the
professor was and the difficul-
ty of the class,” said Wyatt Fer-
rell, an undecided sophomore.
“For the most part it was ac-
curate. There are some people
when you look that give them
the best rating just because
they have a personal connec-
tion with the professor, but
there were also a fair amount
of people that didn’t do well on
the course so they evaluated
the professor poorly.”
Whether the ratings are ac-
curate is a matter of opinion.
“I don’t know how benefi-
cial and factual the comments
on this site are,” said Karen
Deardorff, an instructor in ad-
vanced organizational commu-
nication. “My perception is that
there are two primary catego-
ries of student who post on this
site: those who are extremely
pleased with their professor
and those who are not pleased.”
Many OU faculty members
stress the site can be mislead-
ing because of the nature of
student feedback.
“I think that students some-
times rely too much on Rate My
Professor when choosing class-
es,” said Kathryn Warren, an OU
academic. “For students who are
trying to decide which classes
to take, they should reach out
to their academic advisor or
the course instructor to discuss
these classes and then decide
what would be a good fit.”
First-year students can find
it challenging to schedule, but
rest assured it is hard to butch-
er a first-semester schedule. As
a freshman there are many gen-
eral education courses that are
needed, and then specific major
courses on top of those. More
than likely whatever course is
chosen is something that can
be useful.
“As a first-year student
you have so many options for
classes to take,” Warren said.
“Whether you enter college un-
decided or with a major already
declared, you will definitely
have a complete and appropri-
ate class schedule. The general
education requirements at OU
give all students the opportu-
nity to explore new topics and
areas of interest.“
ANNA GIBBS
FOR THE POST
MARIA DEVITO
STAFF WRITER
On April 23, Ohio University’s
Student Senate wrapped up one
of its most memorable years to
date, which included negative
national headlines and a con-
troversial election. But this year
could be one of the most ground-
breaking and divisive ever for
the body, which functions as the
representative of OU students.
While there are several bod-
ies that represent students and
others at OU, Student Senate af-
fects undergraduates at OU the
most. Here’s what some of what
happened in the past year of sen-
ate, and what’s to come:
At the start of the 2013-14 ac-
ademic year, Nick Southall was
the president of senate, but by
the academic year’s end, he was
hardly seen on campus.
Southall’s presidency was
filled with public relations prob-
lems. The first came on Sept.
1 when he tweeted “Driving
through Athens at 8:30 on Sunday
morning is hilarious. I want to
stop every girl I see and say, ‘your
dress is a little wrinkly.’ ” It pro-
voked massive public backlash,
with Southall being accused of
“slut shaming.”
Southall was almost im-
peached by the voting members
of senate on Nov. 20, but escaped
by just three votes.
Southall’s presidency ended
on Dec. 24, when he resigned
after being arrested for “dis-
orderly intoxication — distur-
bance” while in Florida during a
university-organized trip for the
Ohio football team’s appearance
in the Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl.
Southall was
tasered after
drinking ex-
cessively at
the hotel, and
the fallout
spread quick-
ly, appearing
in Business
Insider, The
Hu f f i n g t on
Post and oth-
er news out-
lets.
S o u t h a l l
forfeited his
full tuition
schol a r shi p
as a result of
resigning. OU
in-state tu-
ition and fees
for last year
were $10,380.
Then Anna
Morton, sen-
ate’s vice-
p r e s i d e n t ,
stepped into
the role of
president for
the Spring Se-
mester of this
past year.
During the
second meet-
ing of the Spring Semester, three
Senate members resigned — in-
cluding the treasurer, Austin
LaForest.
Former rules and procedures
chair Mary Kate Gallagher was
elected to the vacant vice presi-
dent position after voting for the
position was
opened to the
entire OU stu-
dent body.
The elec-
tion process
to elect the
senate offi-
cials for this
a c a d e m i c
year started
on March 24.
There were
two parties
composed of
mostly cur-
rent senate
m e m b e r s ,
Action and
ONE, and an-
other party
excl u s i vel y
composed of
non - s e n a t e
m e m b e r s
called Re-
start.
R e s t a r t
called for
a complete
overhaul of
the body, ad-
vocating for
u n i o n i z i n g
students and
direct student
governing, while taking a more
adversarial stance with univer-
sity administrators, opposing
any tuition increases and a host
of university positions.
Restart was partially made
up of students from the OU Stu-
dent Union, which has protested
tuition increases and other top-
ics in the past.
Students elected Megan Mar-
zec as president and Caitlyn Mc-
Daniel as vice-president, both of
the Restart ticket, on April 17.
Marzec was arrested for protest-
ing a tuition hike at an OU Board
of Trustees meeting in 2013.
Carter Phillips of ONE was
elected as treasurer.
This is the first time in re-
cent memory that the three ex-
ecutives elected were not part of
the same ticket, said Ryan Lom-
bardi, vice president for Student
Affairs and senate’s advisor, on
election day. Restart won 21 of
the body’s 34 elected seats.
The split in senators is also
rare, which will likely lead to a
different dynamic within senate
this academic year.
However, while senate’s com-
ing year will likely be different
than the past few, Lombardi said
it might not be fair to assume
Marzec, McDaniel, Phillips and
the body will have a controver-
sial year.
“Maybe it won’t be that in-
teresting,” he said. “Do we ac-
tually know that? Just because
it was not a sweep of one ticket
or the other, does that mean
it’s automatically going to be
(interesting)?”
OU has a “shared governance
model,” meaning that
decisions are made by
OU’s president and top
administration after input
is given from a variety of
sources. There are multiple
senate bodies on campus
that provide guidance:
STUDENT SENATE
For all students, both
undergraduate and graduate.
GRADUATE SENATE
For graduate students
FACULTY SENATE
For faculty
CLASSIFIED SENATE
For hourly workers
on campus, such as
administrative assistants
ADMINISTRATIVE SENATE
For salaried, non-faculty
employees
Campus landmarks a
must-know for frosh
Some campus cornerstones have been around since
the early 1800s, while many others are relatively new.
DANIELLE KEETON-OLSEN
STAFF WRITER
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www.studentlegalrights.org
csls@studentlegalrights.org
For only $12 a semester, CSLS offers unlimited access to civil and
criminal attorneys, as well as conflict mediators, to help protect
the safety and quality of life of OU students.
The Center for Student Legal Services (CSLS) is a non-profit law office created to
educate and protect Ohio University students in matters related to identity theft,
landlord / tenant issues, alcohol consumption, contract reviews, traffic violations,
misdemeanors, and more.
“Protecting OU Students Since 1997”
www.ohio.edu/survivor/
740-597-SAFE (7233)
Visit us at:
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Email: survivor.advocacy@ohio.edu
Facebook: facebook.com/ousap
Twitter: OUSAP
Not Anymore
is an online program which educates
students about consent and bystander
intervention as well as the realities of
sexual assault, dating/domestic violence,
sexual harassment and stalking on
college campuses.
Participation in this program is mandatory
and all incoming students must take
it before they can register for Spring
2015 classes. Completion deadline is
October 15, 2014.
For questions, see an OUSAP representative
at the BSO Resource Fair!
Our mission is to create a safe campus
where victims and survivors of sexual
assault, stalking, and dating and domestic
violence are thoroughly respected and
supported.
We work to empower the campus community
to deal with these issues through confidential
advocacy, education, and resources.
www.facebook.com/NotAnymoreOHIO
RODERICK MCDAVIS
In addition to the ten years he’s
served as OU president, McDavis
spent his undergraduate educa-
tion at OU in
the College of
Education. He
earned a bach-
elor’s degree in
social sciences
in secondary ed-
ucation, making
him the second
OU alumnus to
be the university
president.
Upon earn-
ing his master’s
and doctorate
from the Univer-
sity of Dayton
and University
of Toledo, re-
spectively, Mc-
Davis taught
classes in higher
education and
worked his way
through several
administrative
positions, including provost and
vice president for academic af-
fairs at Virginia Commonwealth
University.
Recently, his time at OU has
heralded an era of reconstruction
and renovation under the Capi-
tal Improvement Plan, a tuition
guarantee program starting in
2015, a new budget method called
Responsibility Centered Manage-
ment, and the In-
terlink Alliance
— a professional
and leadership
de vel opme nt
organization for
African-Amer-
ican students
among ten uni-
versities.
PAM BENOIT
Under McDa-
vis, Benoit over-
sees academic
facets of OU, in-
cluding faculty,
curriculum and
the university’s
nine colleges.
Before coming
to OU in 2009,
Benoit spent
about 25 years in
the Department
of Communication at the Univer-
sity of Missouri-Columbia, where
she researched communication
theory, among other topics.

STEPHEN GOLDING
Golding functions as the uni-
versity’s chief financial officer,
who oversees monetary and re-
source aspects of OU, formulates
budgets and creates strategies
for the future.
He’s worked for
OU since 2010.
Prior to that he
worked as se-
nior consultant
to the president
of Cornell Uni-
versity and as a
managing part-
ner to higher
education con-
sulting group,
the 1782 Group,
LLP. He received
a bachelor’s of
arts in history
from Washing-
ton College and
a master’s in
political science
and government
from the Univer-
sity of Delaware.
RYAN LOMBARDI
Lombardi came to OU in 2008
to serve as associate vice presi-
dent for Student
Affairs and dean
of students. Lom-
bardi completed
his doctorate in
higher education
at North Caroli-
na State Univer-
sity in 2012 and
now oversees
all student activ-
ity and non-ac-
ademic student
services. He has
also served the
student body of
Duke Univer-
sity and studied
higher education
at the University
of Kansas and
music education
at West Chester
University of
Pennsylvania.

JENNY HALL-JONES
Hall-Jones has spent her entire
career in higher education at OU,
beginning with her completion
of a bachelor’s
degree in sociol-
ogy/criminology
in 1995 and con-
tinuing with her
current job over-
seeing student
experience and
activities. She’s
been employed
by the univer-
sity since 1996,
working as a
hall director, as-
sistant director
of residence life
and as assistant
to the vice presi-
dent of student
affairs, among
other titles.
JOSEPH LALLEY
Lalley over-
sees operation
of OU’s infor-
mation technol-
ogy, facilities
and risk man-
agement de-
partments. Be-
fore being hired
by OU, Lalley
worked as se-
nior director for
facilities opera-
tions at Cornell
University and
as chair of the
planning board
for Dryden,
New York. Lal-
ley also com-
pleted his mas-
ter’s of business
administration
at Cornell Uni-
versity.
DUSTIN KILGOUR
Since start-
ing as direc-
tor of golf and
tennis at OU in
2005, Kilgour
has advanced
to managing
Baker Univer-
sity Center and
overseeing all
event planning
and execution
at OU. Kilgour
also worked for
the Memphis
Redbirds as di-
rector of base-
ball and stadi-
um operations
in 2008-09 and
received a doc-
torate in higher
education from
OU in 2013.

PETER
TRENTACOSTE
Trentacoste
is entering his
third academic
year working for
OU, overseeing
all facets of resi-
dential housing
and student res-
idence life. He’s
also worked for
university hous-
ing programs at
the University
of North Caro-
lina at Chapel
Hill and North-
ern Kentucky
University, and
he received his
master’s of arts
in student af-
fairs in higher
education from
Indiana Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania.

DAVID BRIGHTBILL
In addition to serving as chair of
OU’s public trust and advisory board,
Brightbill also
serves as execu-
tive director of
the Community
Action Program
Cooperation of
Wa s h i ng t on -
Morgan County,
which he has led
since 1987. Bright-
bill graduated
from OU in 1970,
but he walked at
commencement
in 2010 because
OU canceled
classes before
commencement
in 1970 in the
wake of student
protests.
MEGAN
MARZEC
Marzec was
elected to the
position of presi-
dent on April 17.
She has never
held a position
on Senate before
but is actively in-
volved with the
Ohio University
Student Union.
She has lofty
goals for senate,
including rewrit-
ing the body’s
constitution and
opening the vot-
ing on senate
resolutions to all
students. As president, Marzec will
receive a full tuition scholarship.
She was arrested at a 2013 Board
of Trustees
meeting while
protesting a tu-
ition increase.
KEITH WILBUR
W i l b u r
serves as the
s e c ond - ye a r
student trustee
and has a non-
voting position
on the Board
of Trustees.
He goes to all
board meet-
ings and voices
students’ opin-
ions to the
board.
Wilbur was
the first OU
student trustee
to come out in
favor of stu-
dent trustee
voting rights.

SHARMAINE WILCOX
Wilcox serves as the other
student trustee, starting her
first year in the role at the June
27 Board of Trustees meeting.
She and Wilbur were both se-
lected by Ohio governor, John
Kasich.
Wilcox’s appointment as the
new trustee was announced in
April.
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IANI^AII & Ií\AI AI1
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Monday-Friday 10:30 AM-5:30 PM
Saturday 10:30 AM-5:00 PM
DANIELLE KEETON-OLSEN
STAFF WRITER
MARIA DEVITO
STAFF WRITER
@DANIELLEROSE84
DK123111@OHIOU.EDU
@MARIADEVITO13
MD781510@OHIOU.EDU
Meeting the faces
of Ohio University
Athens made headlines
throughout the state — and the
world — during Ohio Universi-
ty’s most recent academic year.
It wasn’t always for the best
reasons.
ALLEGED RAPE ON COURT STREET
During Homecoming Week-
end, early Saturday morning, a
crowd formed around two OU stu-
dents at an uptown street corner.
The male student was performing
oral sex on the female. By Sunday,
the woman showed up at the Ath-
ens Police Department saying she
had been raped.
The incident was complicated
by videos and photos taken of the
incident, which were then dis-
seminated online. Web users on
at least one website then falsely
identified one female OU student
as the alleged rape victim.
A grand jury in Athens County
found there to be no evidence that
the incident was rape, said Athens
County Prosecutor Keller Black-
burn in a news conference an-
nouncing that no felony charges
would come out of the incident.
But news of the incident had al-
ready spread throughout the nation.
Athens and OU were the sub-
ject of news reports from coast to
coast in October, when the Asso-
ciated Press wrote an article that
appeared on several newspapers’
websites, including The Wash-
ington Post, USA Today, and the
San Francisco Chronicle. The
Daily Mail, in Great Britain, also
weighed in.
PAT KELLY
INDICTMENT
Last school year saw Athens
County Sheriff Pat Kelly pitted
head-to-head with the state’s top
lawyer, Ohio Attorney General
Mike DeWine.
The beef dates back to 2012,
when Kelly was accused of as-
saulting an Albany man. DeWine’s
office was asked to investigate the
incident, which snowballed into a
larger look at Kelly’s office.
“We were asked to come in and
check out an al-
leged assault,”
DeWine said
this winter.
“Once we
got into the
case, it was
evident there
was a lot
more there.”
Kelly had
harsh words for DeWine, who
Kelly previously said has “leader-
ship (that) is not up to the kind of
honest investigation and oversight
that would lead to a clear and just
assessment of the facts presented.”
By January, Kelly was handed
down a 25-count indictment from
a special grand jury, including
charges of money laundering and
engaging in a pattern of corrupt
behavior. DeWine wasn’t the only
state official critical of Kelly. Ohio
Auditor Dave Yost said the inves-
tigation proved that “no one is
above the law.”
Kelly pleaded not guilty to all
charges and was suspended from
office in March, while news out-
lets throughout Ohio once again
set their sights on Athens. Kelly’s
trial will come later this fall, so
be sure to check back with The
Post for coverage of the case.
MISSING PERSONS
Signs and posters could be
found throughout campus last
spring, disseminated with the
hope that a 21-year-old Athens
man would be found after he
mysteriously went missing in
mid-March.
Almost six weeks later, Sam
Wiater’s body was found in the
Hocking River, about three-
eighths of a mile from where his
car reportedly was abandoned.
Wiater wasn’t an OU student,
and neither was 22-year-old Sam-
mie Donato, of Mt. Orab, Ohio,
who also was found dead in an
Athens County waterway last
spring. Donato’s body was dis-
covered just less than a month
after Wiater went missing.
Athens makes news
around the state, nation
SAMUEL HOWARD
LOCAL EDITOR
@SAMUELHHOWARD
SH335311@OHIOU.EDU
PAT KELLY
Roderick
McDavis
Ohio
University
President
2013-14
SALARY
$427,000,
received
a $62,250
bonus
EMAIL
mcdavis@
ohiou.edu
Ryan
Lombardi
Vice
President
for Student
Affairs
2013-14
SALARY:
$205,000
EMAIL:
lombardi@
ohiou.edu;
TWITTER:
@OHIOVP
Pam Benoit
Executive
Vice
President
and Provost
2013-14
SALARY:
$274,995
EMAIL:
benoit@
ohiou.edu
TWITTER:
@PamBenoit
Stephen
Golding
Vice
President for
Finance
and Admin
2013-14
SALARY:
$328,520
EMAIL:
golding@
ohiou.edu
Jenny Hall-
Jones
Dean of
Students
2013-14
SALARY:
$130,000
EMAIL:
hallj1@ohiou.
edu
TWITTER: @
JennyHallJones
Joseph
Lalley
Senior
Associate
Vice
President for
IT and Admin
Services
2013-14
SALARY:
$225,000
EMAIL:
lalley@ohiou.
edu
Dustin
Kilgour
Executive
Director of
Event
Services
2013-14
SALARY:
$82,000;
EMAIL:
kilgour
@ohiou.edu
TWITTER:
@dustykilgour
Peter
Trentacoste
Executive
Director for
Residential
Housing
2013-14
SALARY:
$109,675
EMAIL:
trentaco@
ohiou.edu
TWITTER: @
housingdirector
David
Brightbill
Board of
Trustees
Chair
Megan
Marzec
President
of Student
Senate
YEAR:
Senior
MAJOR:
Studio Art
HOMETOWN:
Avon Lake,
Ohio
EMAIL:
mm590410@
ohiou.edu
Keith Wilbur
Second-year
student trustee
YEAR:
Senior
MAJOR:
political science
and economics
HOMETOWN:
Johnstown, Ohio
TWITTER:
@Keith_Wilbur
EMAIL:
kw811410@
ohiou.edu
Sharmaine Wilcox
First-year
student trustee
YEAR: Junior
MAJOR: International business and accounting
HOMETOWN: Logan, Ohio
TWITTER: @sharmainewilcox
EMAIL: sw366711@ohiou.edu
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 12 THE ORIENTATION GUIDE
740.597.DEPO (3376)
bobcatdepot.ohio.edu
Your Campus Technology & Textbook Store
Software & Computers
Great Educational Discounts
& Extended Warranty
Hardware Accessories
Flash Drives, Cables, Cases,
Ink Cartridges & much more
Repair Services
Factory-Authorized Repair Center
for Apple, Dell, HP & Lenovo
(business-class machines only)
Student IDs
Official OHIO Apparel
University gear for gameday or
everyday! Featuring brands like
Russell Athletics, Nike, Under
Armour & more
Textbooks
Buy and sell your textbooks &
course materials online
Gifts & Specialty Items
Find the perfect OHIO item for
your friend, family & co-workers.
Seasonal items available.
COMING SOON! Baker University Center | First Floor
ADVENTURES
NEW
RECEIVE
COURSE
CREDIT!
Ohio University’s
Freshman Outdoor
Orientation Program
Boundary Waters Canoe Area
Wilderness Canoe Expedition
Wilderness Backpack
Dolly Sods
Rock Climbing
Red River Gorge
August 11 – 22
You’ll spend your first day at the Outdoor Pursuits rope course followed by a
clinic on back country camping. On day two we drive to the forested mountains
of Dolly Sods to begin our trek, setting up camp at the end of each day. The trip
wraps up on campus with a visit to our zipline to end the adventure filled week.
Your trip begins with an orientation at Ohio University before heading to
Northern Minnesota. During the seven day expedition, you’ll travel in groups of
six exclusively by canoe during the day, and spending nights at wilderness camp
sites.
You’ll start your trip with an afernoon on our ropes course and an evening of
camping clinics followed by climbing practice on our indoor wall. Then you’ll
travel to the Red River George in Kentucky to hone your skills with four days of
climbing, ending every night with camp.
August 16-22
August 17 – 22
Trip Fee: $500
Transportation
Fee: $170
Trip Fee $250
Trip Fee $360
Don’t delay! Space is limited! For more info Call 740.597.1484.
or visit Ohio.edu/recreation/outdoorpursuits/newadventures.
We know what you want...
Comfort,
Quality
& Location!
Just a 5 minute walk to Uptown Athens or OU’s West Green.
123 West Union St., Athens / Monday-Friday 9-5
Sycamore Place Apartments
...Call 740-593-6397
• 2-3 bedrooms
• A private bath per bedroom
• Appliances include: range, refrigerator,
dishwasher, garbage disposal, microwave oven
• Washer/Dryer
• Bay Windows
• Balconies
• Spacious closets and storage
• Contemporary design
• Central air and heat
• Free parking
W
hen first exploring
campus, Ohio Uni-
versity leaders hope
students will come
to recognize Baker University
Center as their home base. Here’s
a breakdown of how Baker’s five
floors offer students a place to
seek guidance, attend events,
grab fuel and study in comfort-
able, private areas:
Baker is a popular place for stu-
dents with Flex Points and Bobcat
Cash; both types of payment are
accepted in The Front Room cof-
feehouse, West 82 food court and
Latitude 39, a formal restaurant
located on the first floor.
Outside the building, any stu-
dent can reserve a spot to set up
a table and advertise their student
group, activity or event. Baker
is also one of a few “free speech
zones” on campus, meaning stu-
dents and others can protest or
demonstrate in the building.
The Apple-authorized Tech
Depot is located on the first floor,
offering computer assistance and
supplies — including clickers for
interactive class activities — for
sale. Bobcat Essentials, currently
located on Baker’s fourth floor, is
combining with the Tech Depot
over the summer to form a one-
stop shop for students’ technol-
ogy, classroom and university
spirit needs. It will be called Bob-
cat Depot.
The second floor houses the
multicultural center and a theater
that hosts movies, guest lecturers,
exhibitions and weekly improvi-
sation comedy shows.
Student Senate offices and the
Division of Student Affairs can be
found on the third floor of Baker.
Here, students can speak to a
student leader or administrator
about ideas or concerns they have.
Senate, campus’ undergraduate
student governing body, also of-
fers free “blue books” for exams.
The Campus Involvement
Center, where students looking
to join or start a student organiza-
tion can get started, and The Post,
along with other student media
outlets, are also on the third floor.
The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual
and Transgender Center provides
confidential support for students
of all sexual orientations and gen-
der identities. The center offers
students access to educational re-
sources, counseling and program-
ming that supports social justice.
One of Baker’s busiest loca-
tions is The Front Room coffee-
house, located on the fourth floor.
Serving Starbucks coffee, The
Front Room is convenient for cof-
fee on the go and also offers sal-
ads, bagels and pastries.
“The Front Room is my favor-
ite place to grab coffee,” said Ayla
Apitsch, a freshman studying stra-
tegic communication. “The atmo-
sphere is great to hang out with
friends or to get work done.”
Also on the fourth floor, just
outside Baker Ballroom, sits a pia-
no — always available for student
use — in a hallway with paintings
of OU’s 19 presidents.
“With the exception of an
event occurring in the Ballroom,
we encourage students to display
their skills on the piano,” said
Dusty Kilgour, executive direc-
tor of university event services.
“Every once in a while students
use it, however, we’d like to hear it
played more often.”
Students can find the Career
and Leadership Development
Center on the fifth floor, which
offers services to guide a career
path, resume building and devel-
opment of leadership skills. Stu-
dent Affairs staff recommend stu-
dents visit the center early in their
college careers.
Baker — built in 2005 — also
connects OU’s upper and lower
campus with six escalators.
Kilgour wants students to take
advantage of the diverse spaces
and numerous services available
in the building.
“Baker Center was designed for
our campus community,” Kilgour
said. “Its doors are always open for
you.”
Baker Center
serves students
Baker offers more than
just escalators connecting
upper and lower campus.
EMILY DAFFRON
FOR THE POST
@EDAFFFFFRON
ED830111@OHIOU.EDU
CLOCKWISE
Baker University Center is
a centralized location for
students to grab a bite to
eat or seek support from
one of the many services
available there. (KATIE
KLANN | PHOTO EDITOR)
Manuella Araujo, a recent
Ohio University graduate,
and Marcella Ferreirel relax
outside of the top floor of
Baker University Center.
(EMILY HARGER | PHOTO
EDITOR)
Yousif Almodibed, an
international student from
Saudi Arabia attending
Ohio University for the
OPIE program to learn the
English language, registers
as a student in Baker
University Center. (EMILY
HARGER | PHOTO EDITOR)
13 THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU THE ORIENTATION GUIDE
30 South Court
Convenient Uptown Location Close to Campus.
• 2 Bedroom Townhouses
• Laundromat
• Range, Refrigerator
Dishwasher and
Garbage Disposal
• Covered Parking
• Central Air/Heat
MAKE YOUR
MARK
rent fearlessly
FOLLETT'S UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
74C.593.5547 · /FollettsBookstoreOhioU
OUbobcats.com
Athens isn’t a big city by
any measure, but there’s no
shortage of public transporta-
tion options to get you from
point A to point B.
A well-known bike path,
plus a couple different bus ser-
vices, are all here to help you
get some groceries or hitch a
ride home to mom and dad.
The Hocking Adena Bike-
way is a 21-mile trail that starts
along East State Street, where
many students shop for food.
The bike path passes through
Ohio University’s campus
and continues into the woods
along the Hocking River, run-
ning all the way to Nelsonville.
If it’s pouring down rain or
sleeting, if you are in a hurry
or if you’re just feeling lazy,
Athens Public Transit is an-
other option to get you around
town.
Just $1 per one-way ride can
take you “just about anywhere
in Athens,” said Mary Dailey,
general manager for the bus
service.
Dailey said she encourages
students to enjoy the conve-
niences of the buses, noting
that they can keep both your
carbon footprint and number
of parking tickets low.
On five different routes,
busses generally start running
at 7:15 a.m. and end around 8
p.m.
Last fall, about 180 folks
rode the buses each day, ac-
cording to a previous Post ar-
ticle.
“Athens Public Transit is an
excellent source of transporta-
tion for any student. The bus
travels to all the main shop-
ping centers, grocery stores
and clinics in Athens, as well
as several stops throughout
campus,” Dailey said.
Schedules for all busses
can be found in Baker Univer-
sity Center or online.
Athens is also part of the
GoBus Intercity Bus Service,
which is an effort between the
Ohio Department of Transpor-
tation, the city of Athens and
Hocking Athens Perry Com-
munity Action Partnership, or
HAPCAP.
Carolyn Conley, the project
manager for the partnership,
advises students to take ad-
vantage of the GoBus.
“It’s a great
way to visit
friends and
family eas-
ily and conve-
niently,” Con-
ley said.
The buses
pick up stu-
dents near
The Convo
and travel to
C o l u mb u s ,
Cincinnati and
Marietta. The
bus also makes
several stops
along the way
to those desti-
nations.
The buses
run each route twice daily
with connections to Columbus’
downtown bus station and the
Port Columbus International
Airport.
One-way tickets range
from five to 20 dollars plus
tax and fees.
Many students, like sopho-
more Audrey Coyne, hop on
the GoBus to visit friends and
significant others at Ohio State
University or
the University
of Cincinnati.
“My boy-
friend goes to
school at Ohio
State, so the
bus is a quick,
easy way to
visit him,”
Coyne said.
C o y n e ,
who majors in
special educa-
tion, said she
thinks the bus
is a great way
to get to and
from places
because it’s a
safe and effi-
cient ride.
“It’s super simple; go online,
print off your ticket and be on
time to the bus,” Coyne said.
Some incoming freshmen just
can’t handle Athens after dark,
Pat McGee, managing attorney
for Ohio University’s Student Le-
gal Services, said. Those students
could receive burdensome tickets
and court dates before they even
get their first exam grade back.
Part of that, McGee said, is
simply because freshmen haven’t
yet learned that Athens isn’t
exactly the party town it’s ac-
claimed to be.
He said within the first few
weeks, many freshmen coming
in have already received a ticket
for possession of marijuana and
drug paraphernalia. He said that
most students retreat to the bike
path on South Green or over to
the golf course to light up, and are
promptly caught.
“They’re not discreet at all,”
McGee said. “You’re going to get
pulled over, especially at night.”
According to a previous Post
article, most arrests occur on
weekends between midnight and
3 a.m.
McGee said his office usually
works to ensure that the student
doesn’t receive a drug conviction.
Athens Police Chief Tom Pyle
said that uptown, most students
are ticketed for disorderly con-
duct — such as public urination,
littering and public intoxication,
to name a few.
There will be more officers on
patrol during the first few weeks
of Fall Semester, Pyle added.
“We bolster our presence in
the first two to three weeks,” Pyle
said. “We want to maintain peace
and order. We give out a lot of
warnings, but we also arrest a lot
more people because we encoun-
ter a lot more people.”
Pyle said that it takes a few
weeks for house parties to get
out of hand for freshmen, mostly
because friendships haven’t been
formed yet.
However, bar-hopping can
become an immediate issue for
incoming students.
“A lot of people make the mis-
take of running out and getting a
fake ID and going uptown to the
bars,” Pyle said. “That’s almost a
sure way to get arrested.”
Mayor Paul Wiehl said he ex-
pects underage drinking and pub-
lic intoxication to be increasingly
prevalent in the first few weeks of
Fall Semester, and that most stu-
dents will partake in the partying
early on.
“We always tell people, ‘Would
you act like this at home?’ ” Pyle
said. “If not, you shouldn’t act like
this here.”
Many citations students see
come during the beginning of
the academic year. Last year,
APD citations for nuisance par-
ties and underage drinking, as
well as calls into the station for
noise complaints, fell from Fall to
Spring Semester.
According to a previous Post
article, there were 150 underage
drinking citations issued in the
2013 Fall Semester. Spring Se-
mester saw 81 such infractions.
McGee said it’s common for
students to be arrested early on
for underage drinking and being
under the influence, but added
that most freshmen forget they
can defend themselves against
an underage drinking citation
by refusing to answer any ques-
tions from an officer besides their
name and address.
“You always have the right to
an attorney,” McGee said. “For
an under the influence citation, it
also has to be a public place. But
realize that there is no real test for
an officer to conclude that they’re
under the influence — slurred
speech, bloodshot eyes, that’s
enough.”
Legal expert: Avoiding charges
during freshman year is possible
Public transportation useful in small city
EMMA OCKERMAN
ASST. LOCAL EDITOR
LIBBY BRADFORD
FOR THE POST
@EOCKERMAN
EO300813@OHIOU.EDU
KAITLIN OWENS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
The GoBus picks up and drops off students in front of The Convo at Ohio University. The
GoBus has routes to Cincinnati, Columbus and Marietta.
“Athens Public Transit
is an excellent source of
transportation for any
student. The bus travels
to all the main shopping
centers, grocery stores
and clinics in Athens,
as well as several stops
throughout campus.”
Mary Dailey,
General Manager for the bus
service
@LIBBY_BRADFORD
EB395612@OHIOU.EDU
Upcoming Fall Events:
Homecoming Coronation Scholarship Pageant
Hispanic Heritage Month Event
Pre­Kwanzaa Speaker
K is for Kwanzaa
Native American Indian Heritage Month Event
...and MANY MORE EVENTS THROUGHOUT 
THE YEAR! 
Meetings:
Wednesdays at 6:00pm
Multicultural Center
205 Baker University 
Center 
Visit our website at:
www.ohio.edu/bscpb
For any questions, 
please contact:
Julius Smiley, President
js318709@ohio.edu
BSCPB provides social, cultural, 
educational, and recreational programs for ALL students 
at Ohio University. 
Kent Harris, President
kh260110.ohio.edu
THE POST WWW.THEPOST.OHIOU.EDU 14 THE ORIENTATION GUIDE
Whether you want to pad your
resume, give back to the commu-
nity or knock out some court-or-
dered service hours, Athens has
a number of volunteer opportuni-
ties for Ohio University students.
The Campus Involvement
Center, located on the third
floor of Baker University Cen-
ter, provides many opportuni-
ties for students to get involved
with the community.
Barb Harrison, assistant di-
rector for off-campus living and
community service, said OU pro-
vides several resources for stu-
dents interested in volunteering.
Being that Athens County is
one of the most impoverished in
the state, Harrison said it’s ex-
pected for students to help out in
any way they can.
“OU has a responsibility to
create a structure for the school
to give back, and that is what we
are trying to do,” Harrison said.
Campus Involvement pro-
vides different service opportu-
nities every week through vari-
ous Athens organizations as well
as a calendar of opportunities on
their website. Transportation is
usually provided to off-campus
organizations.
The OU Volunteer Communi-
ty Service Street Fair will be held
Sept. 16 at Baker and is intended
to help students find volunteer
opportunities in the city and
county, Harrison said.
“Students here definitely want
to give back, and Athens is such
a wonderful place for students to
learn what it is to be a leader in
the community,” Harrison said.
There are several local orga-
nizations where students can vol-
unteer their time. Some require a
weekly commitment from stu-
dents, while others can be one-
time service opportunities.
Students can volunteer to be
a “big” at Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters of Athens County, 449 E.
State St., where a student would
be responsible for organizing at
least two activities each month
to bond with his or her “little.”
“Bigs” can meet with their “lit-
tles” anywhere the parents and
match decide to travel.
Community Food Initiative,
94 Columbus Rd., is a grass-
roots organization that helps
provide equal access to fresh,
healthy food. A semester com-
mitment of 2-8 hours per week
is prefered for assisting the do-
nation station, community gar-
den or school garden.
Volunteers are welcome to
help with exhibitions, work study
and host galleries at The Dairy
Barn Arts Center, 8000 Dairy Ln.,
located near The Ridges.
For more information about
service opportunities provided
through OU, email Harrison at
harrisob@ohiou.edu, or visit
http://www.ohiou.edu/involve-
ment/communityservice.
ONE CHURCH
TWO LOCATIONS
www.centralavenue.net
CENTRAL AVENUE: a united methodist church
UPTOWN LOCATION
29 E CARPENTER ST
9:30AM
WESTSIDE LOCATION
73 CENTRAL AVE
11:00AM
facebook.com/centralave
@centralavenue
Wednesdays at 5 p.m.: Dinner and Activity
(all students welcome)
Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.
with student brunch at noon
following Worship
Pastor Lynn Miller
69 Mill St. • 740-593-3144
www.clcathens.org/about_LCM.htm
The Bridge
CAMPUS MINISTRY
connecting . . .
people to people
people to faith
faith to life
The Athens Catholic Community

Welcome Students!
St. Paul Church &
Christ the King University Parish
Office Phone: 740-592-2711
38 N. College St. & 75 Stewart Street
AthensCatholic.org
Follow us on Twitter!
@AthensCatholic
@NewmanCathComm
Join us on Facebook!
Facebook.com/AthensCatholic
Facebook.com/groups/
OUNewmanCatholicCommunity


The Episcopal Church
of the Good Shepherd
Sunday Services
10:30 a.m.
All are welcome, regardless of race, creed,
background, or orientation.
FREE LUNCH AVAILABLE
ON WEDNESDAYS
Call us at 593-6877
or email chogs@chogs.org
for more information,
Check out our website at www.chogs.org.
An open and inclusive parish
in the heart of campus.
Located near Baker Center and the library.
Welcome
Freshmen!
First
Christian
Church
Service
Times
Sunday
School
9:30 am
Worship
10:30 am
Disciples of Christ
Located at the corner of
West State and Congress
740.592.2291
www.athensfirstcc.org
www.facebook.com/AthensFirstCC
Transitioning to college life
can present many challenges for
new Ohio University students,
but avoiding the ‘Freshman 15’
shouldn’t be one. Whether you
like to walk, run, swim, skate or
move in a plethora of different
ways, OU has several facilities to
meet your active desires:
Ping Recreation Center, locat-
ed on South Green Drive, is OU’s
largest facility devoted to physi-
cal fitness.
The building houses a rock
climbing wall, five basketball
and volleyball courts, a four-lane
indoor running track and eight
racquetball courts, among other
amenities.
A variety of fitness classes
are also offered every day free of
charge to students.
Many students don’t realize
that Ping isn’t their only option
though, said Joe Wakeley, direc-
tor of OU’s Aquatic Center.
“I don’t think most realize
the availability that they have,”
Wakeley said.
The Aquatic Center, located
on West Green next to Grover
Center, features a 50 meter by
25 yard indoor swimming pool
that’s available for students, fac-
ulty and community members.
OU students can enjoy recre-
ational or lap swimming and aca-
demic classes such as kayaking
or scuba diving.
Club water polo and swim-
ming and the women’s Division I
swimming and diving team also
use the facility.
“I think that the Aquatic Cen-
ter could be a great resource to
students,” Wakeley said.
Right next to the Aquatic
Center is another facility avail-
able for student fitness: Bird Ice
Arena.
“Ping has the normal jogging,
exercise, but … skating is a good
lower body workout,” said Eric
Adelsberger, a manager at Bird
Arena.
Recreational skating is free
for students, with a skate rental
fee of $3.50 for those without
their own pair.
The facility is used for recre-
ational skating and hockey, fig-
ure skating and academic classes
among other activities.
“Skating’s not the easiest
thing to start with. … You have
to have a open mind when you’re
skating,” Adelsberger said.
As of Fall Semester, students
will also be able to use a new fa-
cility on OU’s campus.
The Walter Fieldhouse is an
indoor multipurpose facility lo-
cated next to Peden Stadium,
OU’s football facility.
The fieldhouse features a full-
size football field, a four-lane
practice track and a pit for pole
vaulting and long jump. Its pri-
mary use will be by the univer-
sity’s Division I athletic teams.
“The facility will be used for
student recreational use quite
a bit,” said Ryan Lombardi, vice
president for Student Affairs, in
an email.
The building will be used by
club and intramural sports teams
during the week from about 5
p.m. to midnight, he said.
Administrators are currently
trying to schedule time on the
weekend for student recreation
outside of organized teams,
which won’t carry an additional
cost to students.
OU’s golf course and tennis
courts are also available for use
at a discounted price to students.
The golf course, located be-
hind Ping Center, features nine
holes. A typical 9-hole session
during the week for a student
costs $10.
Four indoor and six outdoor
tennis courts are located next
to Ping, with a $5 hourly fee for
student use of the indoor courts.
There is no cost to students for
use of the outdoor courts.
OU offers a range of activi-
ties for students to stay fit, said
Wakeley.
“I would look around at all the
opportunities that are out there,
not just one area,” he said.
Students enjoy Athens’
various exercise facilities
Students
give time
to help
Uptown store to buy back all textbooks
DINA BERLINER
STAFF WRITER
DINA BERLINER
STAFF WRITER
STAN O’NEILL
FOR THE POST
HH337106@OHIOU.EDU
SN002310@OHIOU.EDU
PING RECREATION CENTER
Monday - Friday: 6:30a.m. to
12 a.m.
Saturday/Sunday: 12 p.m. to
12 a.m.
*Times are subject to change
AQUATIC CENTER
LAP SWIMMING:
Monday - Friday: 6 a.m. to 3
p.m.
RECREATIONAL SWIMMING:
Monday/Wed./Friday: 7 p.m. to
9 p.m.
Saturday/Sunday: 1 p.m. to 5
p.m.
BIRD ICE ARENA
RECREATIONAL SKATING:
Tuesday: 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Thursday: 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Saturday: 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday: 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.,
4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.
WALTER FIELDHOUSE
Schedule to be determined
GOLF COURSE
Spring, Summer and Fall:
Sunday - Saturday: 7 a.m. to
10 p.m.
Winter:
Sunday - Saturday: 9 a.m. to 9
p.m.
TENNIS COURTS
Spring, Summer and Fall:
Sunday - Saturday: 7 a.m. to
10 p.m.
Winter:
Sunday - Saturday: 8 a.m. to
10 p.m.
Forget taking out a loan for
school — these days textbooks
practically require mortgages.
Textbooks can be a very finan-
cially and emotionally stressful
necessity for many students. Con-
sidering the exorbitant prices of
most texts, it is a subject that fills
most with dread or at least resent-
ment. It is very important that stu-
dents be aware of this near-racket
industry in order to prevent them-
selves from being taken advan-
tage of by large companies.
“To me, it is important to take
price into consideration when as-
signing texts,” said Rebecca Col-
lins, an Ohio University sociology
professor. “I teach a lot of fresh-
men, and I feel that the whole
thing is very unfair. The prices are
just too high, and I worry that it
even prevents some from pursu-
ing their academic goals. I just
think that you shouldn’t have to
suffer fiscally for your education.”
There are many options in
town for students to buy books.
One of those options, College
Book Store, 50 S. Court St., is
taking a different approach this
year by offering buy-backs on all
books.
“We want to eliminate the idea
of no-value textbooks,” said Scott
Broadbent, the store’s textbook
manager. Obviously they have
value to the students who spent so
much money on them, and we just
want to get rid of the whole worth-
less book idea altogether.”
Instead of the traditional buy-
back approach, which can render
textbooks less than 5% of their
original price, the College Book
Store plans to emphasize rentals
this year in favor of the buy-back
system and will offer to buy liter-
ally any books students wish to
sell.
The rental system will allow
students to pay a reduced cost for
rental, and then return the book
without penalty no matter its con-
dition.
The rental system is highly
favorable as opposed to paying
a high price for a new book, and
then returning it for a fraction of
the original price. It is also easier
for the store to manage in terms of
record-keeping, Broadbent said.
Besides buying books in per-
son, there are myriad options
online for students who prefer
to compare many possibilities
to find the best prices. Popular
sites include Chegg, Amazon and
Bookfinder.
“I usually use online stores
because there is more variety of
pricing and rental options,” said
Hannah Lewis, a junior studying
nursing. “Chegg is my go-to, defi-
nitely, but there’s plenty of sites
out there. I just really like to con-
sider all my options, so it’s good to
compare as many as possible to
find the cheapest ones.”
@DINAIVEY
DB794812@OHIOU.EDU
JIM RYAN | FILE PHOTO
The Walter Fieldhouse features a football field, practice track and other amenities.
SETH ARCHER | FILE PHOTO
Members of St. Paul Christ the King church celebrate after putting a roof on their
home for the night at Carboard City to raise money for Habitat for Humanity.
Athens’
Spiritual
Community
Breaking news?
Call The Post at 593-4011
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from the Division of Student Affairs
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Campus Involvement Center
Campus Recreation
Career & Leadership Development Center
Community Standards & Student Responsibility
Counseling & Psychological Services
Event Services
Office of the Dean of Students
Office of the Vice President
Residential Housing
www.ohio.edu/studentaffairs
Should the stomachs of in-
coming freshmen begin to rum-
ble, even in the late hours in the
night, they need not worry.
If there’s one thing Court
Street can provide, it’s quick,
cheap and reliable food. While
there are a number of chain food
stops like Chipotle, Subway and
Wendy’s, it is the local food ven-
dors that should be of interest to
newcomers.
In particular, Big Mamma’s
Burritos, 10 S. Court St., has
provided well-priced burritos,
soups and other assortments
since 2005 and has become one
of Athens’s hottest food joints.
“Our Chipotle Ranch Mam-
ma burrito is guaranteed to
please,” said Quinn Schaller, the
owner of Big Mamma’s Burritos.
“But I also highly recommend
our sombrero dip. I know peo-
ple who have been coming here
for at least a year and have not
known about it. I guess people
just have to look at the back of
the menu.”
Moving down the street, if
one were looking for a good
sandwich, a nice cup of Joe and
somewhere relaxing to do some
work, they could stop at Brenen’s
Coffee Café, 38 S. Court St.
“We hope they see us as a
great place to get breakfast,
lunch or dinner and a place
with fast, friendly service,” said
Josh Thomas, the co-owner of
Brenen’s Café. “Hopefully they
find us also to be a large place
where they can always find a
seat to enjoy their meal and
maybe use the Wi-Fi if needed.”
Whenever freshmen stop
in either during the summer or
the fall, Thomas recommends
Brenen’s Chillers, which he
said are “great drinks for warm
weather.”
However, students don’t have
to stop inside to get something
good to eat, as there is Burrito
Buggy, located right in front
of the College Bookstore at
the corner of Court Street and
Union Street. This food truck
vendor sells inexpensive and de-
licious meals to passersby, even
into the late hours of the night.
“Freshman should know
when they eat at Burrito Buggy,
they are getting great food at
an affordable price,” said Marla
Rutter, owner of the food truck.
“We try to use as many fresh and
locally grown ingredients as
possible.”
Rutter, an Ohio University
alumna herself, noted that the
supreme burrito is the buggy’s
best seller and that the buggy
is approaching its 30th anniver-
sary.
These are just three of the
options available. Whether it is
these places, or GoodFella’s Piz-
za, O’Betty’s hot dogs or Bagel
Street Deli, freshmen can know
that they are in good hands.
Food establishments galore found
on Athens’ famed Court Street
WILL ASHTON
FOR THE POST
@THEWILLOFASH
WA054010@OHIOU.EDU
As an incoming student, col-
lege can be pretty intimidating.
It can be even more so if stu-
dents come from small towns
that lack diversity of race, gen-
der or sexual orientation.
Ohio University provides
many outlets on campus for new
students to get involved with di-
verse groups of people, includ-
ing the Multicultural Center, the
International Student Union and
the LGBT Center.
OU’s Multicultural Center
offers a variety of programs
and opportunities for people of
all races and backgrounds to
participate in with the goal of
raising awareness of different
cultures and promoting growth
of students in a diverse environ-
ment.
“We do a very good job of
exposing students to different
ways of thought and different
ways of being,” said Winsome
Chunnu-Brayda, associate di-
rector of the Multicultural Cen-
ter. “The best way to interact is
to introduce yourself first, and
then say you’re excited to learn
about them.”
Members of the Multicultural
Center, such as Julius Smiley, a
senior studying Spanish and the
outgoing president of the Black
Student Cultural Programing
Board, stresses the importance
of not basing first impression
on appearance or race when
incoming students join the Bob-
cat family. He experienced the
judgement first hand.
“When I was walking one
night, a student walked by me.
I was by myself walking home,
and they were drunk,” said Smi-
ley. “They saw me and said, ‘Hey
there’s a black kid,’ and they
went to the other side of the
street.”
The class of 2018 can also
learn more about the interna-
tional population on campus
through organizations like the
International Student Union
representing the 1,881 interna-
tional students at OU from more
than 100 countries, according to
the OU website.
“This was an opportunity
for me to still be involved in the
international community and
meet new people,” said Papa
Ndiaye, a first-year master’s stu-
dent from Senegal and graduate
advisor for ISU. “It was more of
a robust and intense continua-
tion of being involved with dif-
ferent people.”
LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual
and transgender) students are
also a group who may seem for-
eign to incoming students who
were never exposed to that cul-
ture.
Delfin Bautista, the director
of the LGBT Center, said one of
the biggest stereotypes some
incoming freshmen may face
is the thought their roommate
may become interested in them
shortly after living together.
“Just because you’re of a cer-
tain orientation doesn’t mean
you’re attracted to every single
male or female,” Bautista said.
“We all have our likes, dislikes
and what attracts us.”
Bautista urged students who
are unfamiliar with the LGBT
community to have a conver-
sation about attractions with
their roommates if they’re un-
comfortable. He mentioned that
the key to debunking miscon-
ceptions about others’ orienta-
tion begins with getting to know
them personally.
Diversity
welcomed on
OU’s campus
EMILY HARGER
PICTURE EDITOR
The Multicultural
Center, located on the
second floor of Baker
University Center, is
the central location for
multicultural events
and organizations
on campus. It is a
gathering place for
students of different
backgrounds.
TIFFANY TOUVILLE
FOR THE POST
@TIFFANYTOUVILLE
TT315212@OHIOU.EDU
Mon.-Sat. 10-6
Sundays 12-5
593-6337
43 S. Court St.
WELCOME
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O H I O U N I V E R S I T Y
S E R V I C E S
APPLY ONLINE TODAY!
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Join the Conversation — @OUDining
FLEX MEAL PLAN
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Athens may be miles away
from the entertainment of big
city lights, but Ohio University
is still able to bring in national
acts and theatrical perfor-
mances to its concert halls.
With last year’s schedule
of acts bringing in 26 perfor-
mances, there’s a show for ev-
eryone’s own style.
Lee Brice, Gretchen Wilson,
Thompson Square, Nick Offer-
man, Loni Love, Sara Bareilles
and Kacey Musgraves are just
a few well-known artists who
have visited OU in the past year.
“The best way to describe
the performing arts and con-
cert series — it’s a very eclec-
tic group of touring perform-
ers and artists,” said Andrew
Holzaepfel, associate director
of the campus involvement
center. “It’s everything from
classical to country to hip-hop
to indie to Broadway and ev-
erything in between. We try to
appeal to as many students as
we can.”
National acts pop up not
only at the university, but
also at bars for annual spring
events such as Blackout Fest
hosted by The Union Bar &
Grill and Lobsterfest hosted by
ACRN.
These performances are
often a hit, but some students
have perks beyond the actual
performance. Many are tapped
to work sound and sell tickets
at Templeton-Blackburn Alum-
ni Memorial Auditorium dur-
ing events.
“One of my favorite parts of
working at MemAud would be
finding out what new shows we
were doing,” said Jocelyn Bate-
man, a junior studying commu-
nication studies. “Selling the
shows is a nice rush also, and
then being able to get into the
shows without actually pay-
ing for them is cool too, and
the people who I work with
are great. I really enjoyed (the
playwright shows) because
they were so different. Sara
Bareilles was my favorite well-
known performance here for
last year.”
Many students enjoy them-
selves during these spectacu-
lar performances. For some,
each performance is special
for them personally.
“I’ve been a country … [fan]
for a long time, so I was re-
ally excited that Lee Brice was
coming to Ohio,” Kelly Cundiff,
a junior studying nursing, said
in a previous Post article. “I
wanted to come because I’m a
big country fan.”
OU attracts
wide range of
entertainers
OLIVIA RANEY
FILE PHOTO
Country artist Lee
Brice performs to a
full theater at Ohio
University. Brice is a
four-time Academy of
Country Music Awards
nominee and co-writes
some of country’s big
hits for performers like
the Eli Young Band and
Tim McGraw.
ANNA GIBBS
FOR THE POST
@ANNACHRISTINE38
AG836912@OHIOU.EDU
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