Kathryn Hudson 
Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards 
House of Commons 
London SW1A 0AA 
 
By email to: standardscommissioner@parliament.uk 
 
5 June 2014 
 
Dear Ms Hudson, 
 
THE FAILURE TO DECLARE PRIVATE POLLING CONDUCTED IN TWICKENHAM AND 
WELLS BY THE MEMBERS FOR THOSE CONSTITUENCIES 
 
I edit the website Political Scrapbook (politicalscrapbook.net), which has been looking into the 
circumstances of political polling commissioned by Lord Oakeshott of Seagrove Bay and 
performed by ICM Research. 
 
I am writing to draw your attention to polls in the parliamentary constituencies of Twickenham 
and Wells. The results of these polls were given to Lord Oakeshott’s colleagues, Vince Cable 
and Tessa Munt, who are the members of parliament for those constituencies. 
 
I trust you will be in agreement that what follows constitutes grounds to open a formal 
investigation into whether this polling is a registrable interest under Category 4 
(sponsorships) and/or Category 5 (gifts, benefits and hospitality) of the rules governing the 
registration of financial interests and whether the failure to declare the polling as of the latest 
available edition of the Register of Members’ Financial Interests  is therefore a breach of 
1
these rules. 
 
The original purpose of the polling 
Lord Oakeshott released a statement upon his resignation from the Liberal Democrats.  This 
2
makes clear that the poll of Twickenham was originally commissioned to “show us [Vince 
Cable’s] current position and how best to get him re­elected”. Vince Cable approved the poll 
and the sequence of questions: 
 
“Several months ago a close colleague, concerned about voting intentions in 
Twickenham, asked me if I would arrange and pay for a poll to show us Vince’s 
current position and how best to get him re­elected. 
1
 Register of Members’ Financial Interests as of 2 June 2014 
http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm/cmregmem/140602/140602.pdf 
2
 Lord Oakeshott’s statement on resignation from the Liberal Democrats 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/liberaldemocrats/10860280/Lord­Oakeshott­resignation­statem
ent­in­full.html 
I was happy to help, and Vince amended and approved the questionnaire, but at his 
request I excluded a question on voting intentions with a change of leader. 
Although Vince had excellent ratings, both as a Minister and a local MP, he was 
slightly behind the Conservatives in this poll, as the full details on the ICM website 
show. 
That poll worried me so much that I commissioned four more in different types of 
constituency all over the country and added back the change of leadership question. 
The results were in the Guardian yesterday and on the ICM website. 
Several weeks ago, I told Vince the results of those four polls too.” 
 
Indeed, in an interview with the BBC , Vince Cable stated: 
3
 
“In this particular case, Lord Oakeshott asked my election campaign manager if we 
wanted a poll done in my constituency. We said ‘yes’. It was a private local poll for 
general election planning and obviously nothing to do with national leadership” 
 
Whether the Wells poll paid for by Lord Oakeshott was originally commissioned with a view 
to possible publication is less clear. 
 
The financial value of the polling 
The polls in Twickenham  and Wells  were each conducted over the telephone, had a 
4 5
sample size of 500 people were composed of 12 questions. The Guardian’s Patrick Wintour 
puts a minimum £20,000 value on Oakeshott’s polling:  
6
 
“In politics it is often claimed that the messenger gets shot due to the unpalatable 
nature of the message they have delivered. But in the case of Lord Oakeshott, the 
messenger has spent £20,000­plus compiling the message and then shot himself” 
 
If Wintour is referring to all six polls in the public domain, this comes to a minimum of £3,333 
per poll. Indeed, my website has been been informed by a source with extensive professional 
knowledge of the commissioning of such paid research that a 500­person 12­question phone 
poll from ICM Research would come in at a minimum of £4,000. 
 
 
   
3
 Vince Cable interview with BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk­politics­27612492 
4
 ICM Twickenham polling results http://www.icmresearch.com/data/media/pdf/2014_twick.pdf 
5
 ICM polling results for four constituencies, including Wells 
http://www.icmresearch.com/data/media/pdf/2014_libdems__4polls.pdf 
6
 Lord Oakeshott: the departure leaves his political ally Vince Cable exposed, Patrick Wintour, 
Guardian, 28 May 2014 
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/may/28/lord­oakeshott­20000­liberal­democrat­peer­vince­cabl

The sequence of release for the polling 
Polling for the constituencies of Cambridge, Redcar, Sheffield Hallam and Wells formed the 
basis of an article in the Guardian newspaper on 27 May  and therefore had to be released in 
7
full by ICM under article 2.6 of the British Polling Council rules.  
8
 
But despite being the second poll to be completed, the details of the poll for Twickenham 
were only released the following day when Oakeshott referenced it as part of his resignation 
statement. This is further confirmation that the Twickenham poll was, in the words of Vince 
Cable, “a private local poll for general election planning” that was never intended for 
publication and was only divulged following an unexpected and fairly catastrophic turn of 
events from the perspective of the peer. 
 
Disclosure of the results to Cable and Munt 
Given public statements on the Twickenham poll from both Vince Cable and Lord Oakeshott, 
the results would presumably have been passed to both Cable and his election campaign 
manager shortly after they were received from ICM by Oakeshott. 
 
In his interview with the BBC, Cable also reveals that his parliamentary aide Tessa Munt was 
informed of the results of the polling in Wells by himself and Oakeshott: 
 
“In one particular case concerning my parliamentary private secretary, Tessa Munt 
from Wells, we sat down and discussed the details with her.” 
 
A ‘sit down’ meeting with Tessa Munt would suggest that the figures from the polling were 
discussed in some detail. Given the strategic value of constituency polling and the close 
political relationships between cabinet ministers and their parliamentary private secretaries, it 
would seem extraordinary for Munt not also to have been provided with either a paper or 
electronic copy of the full tabulated figures and that these would be passed to her campaign 
manager. Indeed, Munt is defending a majority of just 800 at the next election. 
 
The status of the polling under categories 4 and 5 of the rules 
On the basis of publicly available information, it is clear that: 
 
1. The polling of Twickenham and Wells was commissioned by Lord Oakeshott in a 
personal capacity and not by the Liberal Democrat federal, regional or local parties. 
2. The results of these polls were related to Vince Cable and Tessa Munt. 
3. The value of a constituency poll is certainly above the threshold for declaration under 
categories 4 and 5 of the rules governing disclosure of financial interests. 
4. The fieldwork for the Twickenham and Wells polls was finished by ICM on 16 April and 
18 April respectively, both more than six weeks ago. 
5. The polling was not declared on the Register of Members’ Financial interests as of 
three days ago on 2 June. 
7
 Nick Clegg and Lib Dems face wipeout in damning opinion poll verdict, Patrick Wintour and Nicholas 
Watt, Guardian, 27 May 2014 
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/may/26/nick­clegg­and­lib­dems­face­battle­for­survival 
8
 British Polling Council rules http://www.britishpollingcouncil.org/objects.html 
 
As you are obviously aware, the rules on Category 4 (sponsorships) state variously: 
 
“Any donation received by a Member's constituency party or association, or relevant 
grouping of associations which is [over £1,500 and] linked either to candidacy at an 
election or to membership of the House [should be declared]” 
 
“For the purposes of the Register of Members' Financial Interests, support should be 
regarded as "linked" directly to a Member's candidacy or membership of the House if 
it is expressly tied to the Member by name” 
 
It is intuitive that a poll in an individual constituency is linked directly to the candidacy of the 
sitting MP. In the case of the Twickenham poll in particular, there is absolute clarity that the 
purpose of the poll was to assist in the re­election of Vince Cable. It seems highly likely that 
the results of the poll of Wells were eventually related to Tessa Munt’s campaign manager(s). 
 
If for some reason the polling isn’t registrable under Category 4 then it would fall under 
Category 5 (my emphasis): 
 
“Any gift to the Member or the Member's spouse or partner, or any material benefit, 
of a value greater than one per cent of the current parliamentary salary from any 
company, organisation or person within the UK which in any way relates to 
membership of the House or to a Member's political activity.” 
 
This prima facie evidence that registrable interests have not been declared within the four 
week limit is clear grounds for you to open a formal investigation. Such an investigation 
should certainly examine the following issues: 
 
● On what date did Lord Oakeshott receive a copy of each poll from ICM? 
● On what dates were outcomes of the polls related to the MPs? 
● In what format was the polling data related? 
● Were the MPs provided with copies of the tabulated poll data? 
● In the case of the Wells constituency, were Liberal Democrat staff, officials or 
activists provided with information from the poll? 
 
Intention to publish: comparisons with other constituency­focused polling 
Given a possible analogy with constituency­based polling which is not required to be declared 
on the Register of Members’ Financial Interests, there is one final matter which I would like to 
address. 
 
The Conservative peer Lord Ashcroft, for example, conducts polls of marginal constituencies 
but there is no question of Conservative MPs in such seats declaring the polling on the 
Register. This is because the polls are commissioned for publication and their primary 
purpose is to inform public discussion. 
 
On the basis that the polling for their constituencies eventually entered the public domain, 
Cable and/or Munt might venture that the polling then became equivalent to an Ashcroft­style 
public constituency poll and did not need to be declared. 
 
But what should surely govern an MPs decision on disclosure under the rules is their own 
understanding, during the period of four weeks following their being furnished with the 
information, of whether the poll will remain private campaign data or be published. 
 
In the case of the Wells poll it is possible (and certain for Twickenham) that the decision to 
publish was taken after it was commissioned or, indeed, after the MPs for those 
constituencies were informed of the results. 
 
If a period of more than four weeks elapsed between an MP being given the results of what 
they understood to be private polling and their discovering that the poll would actually be 
published, then that MP is surely guilty of non­disclosure under the rules ­­ irrespective of 
whether that polling data eventually entered the public domain.  
 
It is vital, therefore, that if Cable and/or Munt advance eventual publication of the polling for 
their constituencies as a defence for non­disclosure then they should volunteer the date on 
which they were informed (or were otherwise given to understand) that Lord Oakeshott 
planned to publish the poll for their seat. 
 
In conclusion, I strongly urge you to open an investigation and look forward to hearing from 
you. 
 
Kind regards 
Laurence Durnan 
laurence.durnan@politicalscrapbook.net 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful