You are on page 1of 3

Megan M.

 Cascio 
Mr. Hill 
Biology 
Thursday June 5, 2014 
 
Freshwater Sharks 
Most people associate sharks with oceans or salt water. They feel safe swimming in a 
freshwater lake or stream but studies show there are species of sharks adapting to freshwater. 
Does this mean that more species are going to migrate into lakes and streams that are not salt 
water? Granted, only a couple of of these species live in the freshwater for long. Most of the 
sharks are only there for a short period of time 
 
For a majority of the shark species, a day in freshwater instead of salt water would be like 
throwing a human into space with no gear on. It’s not right for their body type, it’s not liveable, 
they die. The reason this is, is because a process called osmosis. Osmosis is when a fluid 
moves through a membrane from a low solute concentration to a solution with a higher 
concentration until there is an equal concentration of liquid on both sides of the membrane. 
These solutions usually are made up of sodium and chloride. Obviously as a shark is naturally 
found in salt water, their bodies are naturally saltier than most fish. More than twice as much salt 
is in their system. Because of this, the osmosis process could potentially kill the shark, but as 
the sharks adapted and evolved they overcame this and found that by peeing more often than 
normal they could balance out the process.  
 
There is a type of shark that has adapted to both types of water, the Bull Shark. 
Osmoregulation is the ability of an organism to maintain a constant concentration of water in its 
body even with its outside environment would normally cause to lose or gain water. 
Osmoregulation in a marine environment is the high concentration of solvents in an animal's 
blood as they remove excess salt from their bloodstream through urine. The skin of a shark 
constantly absorbs salt and water and as they absorb more salt they also need to get rid of 
excess salt, this is primarily ran by the kidneys. Bull Sharks can adapt their osmoregulatory 
process to survive in water that has as much salt as an ocean or as little salt as a lake. As I 
mentioned earlier with the osmosis process, this can cause organisms to either gain too much 
or lose too little water to be able to maintain their life in the water. As ironic as it is, marine 
animals have to prevent dehydration in waters that have a high concentration of salt just as 
freshwater animals must keep their salt levels lower because it’s not commonly found in 
freshwater.  
 
In 1995 a survey was taken and it was determined that 43 types of sharks live in the 
freshwater environment but there were few species that lived there for a long period of time.The 
sharks that lived in the freshwater regions longer were found to be bulkier, and more aggressive 
with an unpredictable nature. The river and freshwater shark population is dangerously low, 
close to extinction. Bull Sharks numbers have become higher because they have adapted to 
both types of water but species like the Ganges which are more adapted to freshwater are dying 
off fast. The reason is because they have to deal with natural problems like temperature, oxygen 
levels, and mineral content. They also have to deal with human made problems such as dam 
building, irrigation modifications and pollutants in the water. This also happens because in most 
sharks the adaptations to live in a freshwater region cannot happen. If they are put in a body of 
freshwater, they will absorb too much water and loose too much water to stay alive. Bull sharks 
are different because they can adapt from osmoregulation. Their kidneys can be slowly adjusted 
into freshwater, when moved gradually into freshwater (most likely by migrating) the kidneys 
remove less salt through urination.  
 
In conclusion, sharks are evolving and adapting as they are moving upstreams from 
oceans into areas of freshwater lakes. This is due to a couple of processes called 
osmoregulation and osmosis. Only a few species live in the freshwater for long, but Bull sharks 
are spotted in everyday places such as Lake Michigan, the Mississippi River and the Illinois 
River. Be careful if you drink out of a freshwater spout, you may just be drinking diluted shark 
urine.