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ISSN 1853-9610
Nº67 JUNE - JULY 2014 MENDOZA’S FREE MAGAZINE
THINGS TO DO IN MENDOZA 2014
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CHILE 898, MENDOZA, ARGENTINA
0261 420 2840
BEBER CON MODERACIÓN. PROHIBIDA LA VENTA A MENORES DE 18 AÑOS.
WINE STORE
BEST
WI NE
SELECTI ON
5
CHILE 898, MENDOZA, ARGENTINA
0261 420 2840
BEBER CON MODERACIÓN. PROHIBIDA LA VENTA A MENORES DE 18 AÑOS.
WINE STORE
BEST
WI NE
SELECTI ON
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Issue Jun - July 2014
| ISSN 1853-9610 - 10,000 Copies
Published by Seven Colors S.A.
Address: Espejo 266, Planta baja. Departamento
3. Mendoza, Argentina - Tel. +54 (261) 425-5613
E-mail: amanda@wine-republic.com
Editor: Amanda Barnes
Editorial Director: Charlie O’Malley
Publicity and Publisher: Mariana Gómez Rus:
publicidad@wine-republic.com,
mariana@wine-republic.com
Design: Circlan.com - jona@circlan.com
Printer: Artes Gráficas UNION
Contributing Authors: Amanda Barnes,
Madeline Blasberg, Joseph Gibson, Molly MacVeag,
Charlie O’Malley.
Illustrations: Donough O’Malley,
www.pencilrobot.net
Contributing photographers: Jona Conti.
Opinions expressed in this magazine are not
necessarily the editorial opinions of Wine
Republic.
www.wine-republic.com
CREDITS
CONTENTS
News Republic
Lost Weekend...........................................................
Market Friendly.......................................................
No Fly Zone...............................................................
The Bucket List
Foodies........................................................................
History Buff............................................................
Adrenaline Junkies..............................................
Souvenir Stop-Overs............................................
Green Goddesses..................................................
Party People............................................................
Mountain Moguls..................................................
Architecture Lovers.............................................
Pampered Princesses ...........................................
Winos........................................................................
Yummy Mummies................................................
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The Wine Bucket List..........................................
Vamos, Vamos Argentina
Walks And Day Hikes:
A Wanderer’s Guide
Breaking Beef In Argentina
Out & About
Bars............................................................................
Dining Out..............................................................
Winery Guide........................................................
Maps and Tips
Useful Information..............................................
Map of Mendoza City Center...........................
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NEWS REPUBLIC
yoga sessions, cooking classes, gardening workshops and live
music. The fair started as a one-off in March and has been so
successful it has been repeated since. Lets hope it continues
every weekend. Its location is in front of the Fountain of
Continents, a five-minute walk from the park´s main entrance.
No Fly Zone
Every silver lining has a cloud, especially in the skies of
Argentina. The momentous announcement that Aerolineas
Argentinas is now flying directly from Sao Paolo to Mendoza
(albeit for just 6 months and after years of lobbying) has been
somewhat soured by the cancelation of its service between
Mendoza and Santiago de Chile. This means only LAN now
run this route – three times a day and three times the price it
should be. This 30-minute flight should be as regular as the
bus to San Juan, especially in the winter when the weather
forces the border tunnel to close and strands thousands. In
general Mendoza´s potential to be a regional airline hub is
woefully undeveloped and Argentina’s airways are more
closed than North Korea’s. Recently, an executive from a major
airline did a tour of South America trying to drum up new
business and new routes. The enthusiastic welcome received
in countries like Uruguay and Chile was in stark contrast to
the cold shoulder received in Buenos Aires. The reasons are
too complex to explain in this piece but if you are curious
just Google the following – Aerolineas Argentina, insular,
protectionist, monopoly and La Campora.
Lost Weekend
“The wine route in Mendoza is a fantasy”, remarked a
disgruntled tourist from Cordoba recently. He was somewhat
miffed at driving around aimlessly on a weekend and finding
there was little or no wineries open. In fact, on a Sunday
afternoon, there are poor pickings in Lujan de Cuyo. This
sobering fact has raised the eyebrows of many a foreign
visitor as this is precisely the day when convoys of winos
are trailing the wine routes of Napa and the Hunter Valley.
The problem is more acute now as Mendoza has seen a spike
in the number of Argentine weekenders. At least the foreign
holidaymaker can plan his wine trip on a weekday but imagine
your disappointment that your only day for visiting wineries
is met with closed gates and gruff security guards. Of the 100
or so wineries open for tourism and eager to attract visitors
you think more of them would recognise they are missing out
on a steady stream of curious customers. If it is a problem with
staff and resources the solution is simple – close on a weekday
and open on the Sabbath.
Market Friendly
Hug a tree in the park with the very new and successful
Mendoza Green Market. This city’s eco credentials just
got a boost with this open-air weekend gathering pushing
everything green, healthy and sustainable. Besides stalls
selling fresh food, juice and natural products, you’ll also find
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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR FOODIES
Bife
You have to have a steak or two while you are in Argentina. It is
the quintessential dish to try. Great bifes are served up in classic
restaurants like Don Marios and La Marchiagani, as well as classy
joints like Francis Mallmann and Nadia OF. But the top place for
a Bife and Malbec combo has to be at winery restaurants. Where
else can you get a perfectly cooked steak washed down by a
great glass of wine that has rolled straight from the barrel room?
Recommended winery restaurants are Terruño at Club Tapiz,
Ruca Malen, Casarena and Melipal.
Ice Cream
The best ice cream in town is a fiercely contested title in Mendoza.
While there are many names in the running, none will disagree
that Mailho is certainly one of the top joints on the list. This small
local chain offers a wide variety of addiction-inducing Italian
style ice creams and sorbets. What should you order when you’re
there? Crema Mailhó, a creamy concoction made from almonds,
walnuts, hazelnuts, peanut butter and chocolate.
M.Moreno on the corner of Martinez de Rosas, (261) 428-6298
Churros
These deep fried sweet treats are a South American favorite and
Churrico, a Mendoza restaurant since 1969, serves them up like
no one else. The classical churro is a filled with warm pastry
dough, and occasionally piped full of melted chocolate. However,
that’s just the jumping off point. Churrico offers every possible
variety: dulce de leche, marmelades, fruit and more. They also
offer coffee and a variety of foods.
O’ Brien 120 - San José - Guaymallén (261) 445-5348
Chivito
Flame-roasted goat cooked over an open fire is a culinary tradition
celebrated annually in the Malargue province of Mendoza.
Known as Argentina’s “National Goat Festival,” during the first two
weeks of January this culinary cause attracts thousands of chefs
and foodies alike who gather together to celebrate folk music and
dancing, all over a steaming hot plate of barbequed goat.
https://www.facebook.com/FiestaChivoMalargue
Dulce de Leche
Argentina´s take on caramel is a home run for anyone with a
raging sweet tooth. However, not all dulce de leches were created
equal. Though you can find one variety or another in every kiosk
and supermarket, keep your eye on the lookout for the Vacalin
brand, with black cow spots. It’s creamy texture and subtle notes
of roasted coffee make it a delicious treat. Not to mention that
if you’re looking to bring some home with you, head over to
Mercado Central and purchase Vacalin Dulce de Leche packaged
in plastic bags.
Every year we compile our list of recommendations
for the best things to do, taste and see in Mendoza.
It’s that time again, and this time we’ve given you
a bunch of bucket lists so you can tick off all the
‘musts’ of Mendoza.
Things to do
before you fly

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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR HISTORY BUFFS
Museo Universidad de Cuyo
The purpose built Museo Fundacion in the city’s old
quarter may look good but it is thin on genuine exhibits.
Much more intriguing is the basement of the Literature
& Philosophy Faculty at the University campus in San
Martin Park. Here you’ll find a treasure trove of pre-
Colombian artefacts including the personal belongings
of an Inca princess found on the slopes of Aconcagua.
Her mummified body is unfortunately not on display but
her worn clothing and brightly colored head dress make
a visit there fascinating and poignant none-the-less.
La Rural Museum
Rutini winery in Maipu is one of the best stocked
wine museums in the World and a must do for any
amateur wine historians. The plethora of exhibits
includes Victorian era pumps and engines, and Spanish
Inquisition style bottle corkers. The star item however is
an ancient wine press which is basically a hollowed-out
cow turned upside down with the intended grape juice
made drip from the bovine anus into a leather bucket. It
makes you glad to be born in the age of stainless steel.
The San Martin Trail
Who says the past is best read about in an armchair?
Mendoza offers both history and the big outdoors
in the form of the San Martin Trail – the epic trek
across the Andes made by the main man of Argentine
history General San Martin and his invading army at
the beginning of the 19th Century. Companies such as
Trekking Travel offer 5-day packages on a saddle and
in a sleeping bag under the big sky, following the hoof
trails of the Liberator. Or you can jump in car and go
check out such historical sites as Manzano Historico (the
Historic Apple Tree) in Valle de Uco where the General
gave his troops a famous pep talk. A more curious site is
Las Bovedas, an egg shaped colonial foundry in Uspallata
used as a camp by the Andean army.
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Visit us!
join the new breakfasts
in the vineyards
enjoy beautiful sunsets in our
mirador de los andes
reserve now and ask about
our other programs!
roque saenz peña 5516
vistalba · luján de cuyo
mendoza · argentina
tel: 0054 (261) 487 72 15 · 487 70 98
tours@kaikenwines.com
facebook.com/kaikenwines
twitter.com/kaikenwines
www.kaikenwines.com
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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR ADRENALINE JUNKIES
Rafting
With more than 20 years in the business, Argentina Rafting
is the go-to guide for adrenaline seekers looking to enjoy
a little white water action during their time in Mendoza.
The company has a base camp located in Potrerillos where
guests are fully outfitted with equipment and a restaurant
overlooking the riverbed.
Amigorena 86, (261) 429-6325
Climbing & Hiking
Hotel Ayelen, located in Penitentes, offers a concierge
service to link up mountain enthusiasts with local hiking
and climbing guides. Excursions can range anywhere from
a half day to up to a week long, and can be tailored to fit
any and every fitness level. Though guides may sometimes
have extra gear on hand, it’s best to rent equipment in
downtown Mendoza before heading up to the mountains
for your hike.
Ruta 7Km 165, Los Penitentes, (261) 425-3443
Skiing
When it comes to hitting the slopes, Las Leñas is the biggest
name in the game, and for good reason. It offers downhill
skiing and snowboarding, cross country trails, and heli-ski
excursions. Located 6 hours southwest of Mendoza city,
it’s possible to make it a day trip, though most skiers opt to
crash in town and stay on the slopes for a few days.
http://www.laslenas.com/eng/index.php (+5411) 4819-
6060. 0800-222-5362.reservas@laslenas.com
Paragliding
Andean foothills make for perfect launch sites for
paragliders looking to catch the breeze and enjoy a bird’s
eye view of the city below. Parapente Mendoza is a local
company that offers tandem flights for travelers hoping to
catch a little wind beneath their wings. Mendoza’s semi-
desert climate and 300 days of sunshine offer practically
ideal weather conditions for paragliding and excursions go
out daily.
www.parapentemendoza.com.ar/ Av Zapata 389, (261) 429 1442
Horseback Riding
If you’re eager to get out into the open air but would rather
someone else’s legs did the grunt work, a horseback ride
in wine country is the perfect, gentle adrenaline hit. You
can get some more serious heights by taking a ride in the
foothills of the Andes, or you can gallop more freely and
fiercely trying a chukka or two of polo. But for those who
want the foot fancy feel of horseback without any work,
you can take a trot around the vineyards with Trout &
Wine’s tours in Nieto Senetiner.
www.troutandwine.com Espejo 266.

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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR SOUVENIR STOP-OVERS
Ayllu
If you’re looking to bring home something other than a
mass-produced argentine trinket, Ayllu offers high quality,
authentic artisanal goods from Central and South America.
Goods range from painted pottery, embroidered weavings,
woodcarvings, leather belts, clothing, house wares, and
jewelry. Prices are reasonable, but expect to pay a little bit
more than the average corner tourist trap. And before you
take the thirty-minute bus ride back to downtown, stop by
the in-store café and enjoy a bite to eat.
Ruta Panamericana 8343 Chacras de Coria – Mendoza
(261) 496-1213
Verolio
If by chance you have forgotten that Mendoza is not
only a producer of wine, Verolio is here to remind you
that local olive oils also deserve a place in the spotlight.
This small restaurant and shop is the perfect place to
pop into if you’re looking to pick up a few extra gifts.
Their knowledgeable staff will lead you through olive
oil tastings, teach you about the various olive varieties,
and help you pinpoint the bottle that is right for you. The
restaurant serves three artisan meals a day and offers
guests prime seats for people watching.
Sarmiento 720, (261) 425 5600
Las Viñas
Las Viñas is located on the corner of Mitre Avenue and
Las Heras Street, one of Mendoza City’s main drags.
The expansive shop is filled with all the most popular
trinkets, bobbles, and gaucho gear as well as a friendly
staff eager to help you find what you’re looking for.
Shelves are generously stocked with leather goods,
woven textiles, silver jewelry, wines, chocolates, olive
oil and everything in between.
Las Heras 399, 5500 Mendoza (261) 425-1520
Cueros Armando
Still searching for the perfect leather belt, bag, or
jacket? Duck into Cueros Armando, a local leather shop
in the heart of Mendoza downtown. You´ll find both
women’s and men’s leather jackets as well as a variety
of accessories in all colors – ranging from traditional
leather treatments to the more fashion-forward
varieties. Prices are generally very reasonable and
paying in cash will get you an extra discount off the
purchase price. Las Heras 415 (261) 429-9616
Capibara
Capibara pays homage to the life and style of the
Argentine gaucho, and brings the rustic elegance of
life on the range to a wide variety of personal and
household souvenirs. The store is replete with silver
jewelry, leather accessories, clothing, household decór
and more.
Perú 1090 (on the corner of Sarmiento) (261) 429-9918
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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR PARTY PEOPLE
Vendimia
Mendoza´s annual grape harvest festival takes place every
year in early March. The festivities begin months in
advance, with celebrations across the province’s 18 different
counties. However, it is most known for the final week
of events – from block party style wine tastings to beauty
pageant parades – all of which culminate in an outdoor show
held in the Frank Romero Day Amphitheater tucked into the
Andes foothills. Visitors to Mendoza can purchase tickets
through a number of local tourism agencies online.
Wine Rock
In the heart of autumn (early May), Mendoza’s hard rockers
gather together at Monteviejo Winery (of the Clos de los Siete
group) in the Uco Valley to pair great wine with live music
in the open air. The festival first began as a way to celebrate
the end of the grape harvest, and has since exploded into an
annual tradition on Mendoza’s social calendar. Tickets are sold
by various vendors throughout the city and can be purchased
to include transportation to and from the event as well.
www.winerocktour.com/ 9 2622 403692, info@
winerocktour.com
Classical Music on the Wine Routes
Every year during Holy Week, just before the Easter Holiday,
Mendoza hosts a classical music festival that brings live
music to venues throughout the city and the wine regions
beyond. Classical Music on the Wine Routes offers two
weeks of concerts and live jam sessions held in churches,
wineries and green spaces within the province. Each day’s
itineraries are packed with concerts across various locations.
Tickets for the concerts can be purchased with donated
powdered milk boxes and can be exchanged at the Ministry
of Culture in advance.
www.cultura.mendoza.gov.ar (261) 449 5800
Tango Festival
Since 2008, Mendoza has played host to the annual Tango
Festival on the Wine Routes. Every September the festival
features various local tango artists and musicians, many of
which are recognized at the international level, and each
of whom showcase their skills within Mendoza wineries,
theaters and public spaces. Tickets for the concerts can be
purchased with donated powdered milk boxes and can be
exchanged at the Ministry of Culture.
www.caminosdelvino.com/en/paginas/index/tango-por-
los-caminos-del-vino (261) 156101542
THE BUCKET LIST
FOR GREEN GODDESSES
Nuts about Nuts
Mendoza is not a vegetarian-friendly place per say, but
you won’t be disappointed with Mendoza’s delicious
pistachios and almonds. The nut to wear the crown
though is the walnut. In fact Tupungato in the Uco Valley
is the Walnut Capital of Argentina (yes, that does exist).
When you face the copious tablas and picadas, a sprinkle
of nuts, raisens and bread become your saving grace.
Vegetarian Takeaways
These are popping up almost as quickly as lomito bars,
and they offer the safest meat-free lunch option around
town. They are also rather cheap which helps. Stock
up on the salads, vegetarian lasagna, spinach pancakes,
pumpkin milanesas and the infamous pancake tower.
There are locations all over the city and the signs are
usually decorated with flowers and vegetables. Usual
operating hours are Mon – Fri, 12 – 15. Try out the one on
España between Espejo and Rivadavia for a start.
Go Vinda
Located about 10 mins out of the city centre this is a
mecca for veggies with all sorts of vegetable curries,
bakes and balls – meat-free fodor comes in all shapes,
colours and sizes here. It is so saintly that it also has a no
booze policy.
San Martin 453 (Godoy Cruz)
Sabina
A veggie takeaway (or eat-in restaurant) is a bit of an
anomaly on busy bar street Arisitides Villanueva,
however Sabina is a happy solo soldier. Salads and
veggie bakes are often heavily doused in salt, but there
won’t be a whisper of even ham on the menu.
Aristides 386
El Mercadito
Also on the immensely popular Aristides street, El
Mercadito does cool cocktails, happy tunes and a decent
steak. But while your meat-loving friends dine on
something juicy, vegetarians will also be well catered for
with a good range of serious salads and plenty of hearty
sandwiches. They also do a good carrot and orange juice.
Aristides 521, or in Chacras, Viamonte 4961.
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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR MOUNTAIN MOGULS
Aconcagua
Home to the highest mountain outside the Himalayas,
Parque Provincial Aconcagua is a world-class destination
for both hardened alpinists and weekend trekkers alike.
For those not quite ready to tackle the 6,982m peak, the
park offers single-day and multi-day hikes amongst grassy
meadows and brilliant lagoons. For more information
about the park and entry permits, visit www.aconcagua.
mendoza.gov.ar.
Tupungato
Cerro Tupungato is Mendoza’s best-kept mountaineering
secret, offering a challenging ascent to the 6,570m summit
without the crowds of Aconcagua. This extinct volcano is
located in Parque Provincial Tupungato, a protected area
characterized by its remoteness and stark beauty. Glaciers,
lagoons, and waterfalls are hidden between soaring
Andean peaks. Recommended guide service: Argentina
Mountain, www.argentinamountain.com. Lavalle 606,
Guaymallén, Mendoza
Cordón del Plata
Dotted with peaks ranging from 4000-5000m, this sub
range of the Andes is an ideal training ground for the
burgeoning mountaineer. Don’t trust yourself with an
ice axe? Check out skiing in nearby Vallecitos or multi-
day expeditions on horseback. Recommended guide
service: Cordón del Plata S.A.. www.cordondelplata.com.
Information about skiing in Vallecitos: argentinaturismo.
com.ar/vallecitos, Ski center telephone: 02622 488810.
Potrerillos
Nestled amongst the gorgeous peaks of the pre-Cordillera, this
lakeside village is a local hotspot for Sunday asados and quiet
weekend getaways. Enjoy a picnic alongside the cerulean
water, a trek in the surrounding hills, or an adrenaline-
pumping rafting adventure. More information available at
www.potrerillos.com.ar and www.argentinarafting.com.
Cerro Arco
The most accessible hike from city center, Cerro Arco is a
half-day adventure that boasts the best view of the city as
well as an alluring glimpse into the pre-Cordillera. Those
untroubled by acrophobia may opt for the quick way down
the mountain: by parachute. Cerro Arco is the launchpad for
many paragliding excursions. To get there, take the G3 114/115
to Puerta de la Quebrada. For information about paragliding,
visit Argentina Rafting on Amigorena 86 (near the Sheraton).
Las Leñas
For the snow lovers traveling to Mendoza, Las Leñas offers
some of the best skiing in the Andes. The resort touts 29
runs, with the longest stretching an impressive 7km.
Whether you’re looking to shred gnarly chutes or cruise
down some more mellow terrain, Las Leñas has got it all.
Open from June-October. For more information, visit
www.laslenas.com.
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THE BUCKET LIST
FOR PAMPERED PRINCESSES
Entre Cielos
If you really want to get polished from head to toe, you might
want to make a trip to this hammam spa where you can while
away an hour moving from chamber to chamber to steam,
sauna and scrub. The olive oil foam massage is a particularly
indulgent way to finish your session. Entre Cielos, Guardia
Vieja 1998, Vistalba www.entrecielos.com
Cavas Wine Lodge
If you want to indulge in some serious ‘me time’, this luxury
wine lodge is one of the most indulgent of all. Take your pick
of private treatments with olive oil and wine infused products
and laze by the pool in the orchards and vines being served
on hand and foot by the attentive waiters. Ruta 40, Lujan de
Cuyo www.cavaswinelodge.com
Termas Cacheuta
The original spa date in Mendoza, the thermal pools are as old
as time but in the last century they have been channelled into
a picturesque series of stone pools in this mountain retreat.
Different temperature waters offer enough fun pool hopping,
but there is also a steam room, full body mud masks and a big
buffet to entertain you. Termas Cacheuta, Cacheuta www.
termascacheuta.com
Mani Pedi
One of the best things about being in Mendoza for a lady is just
how incredibly cheap a manicure and pedicure are compared
to home. You can get those finger and totsy talons trimmed,
shaped and painted for less than $20USD. No excuses to have
hobbit feet here.
THE BUCKET LIST
FOR WINOS
Wine Tour
If you have not visited a winery while you are here, you obviously
aren’t the wino you thought you were. Get your act together (or
pay someone else like www.troutandwine.com to do that for
you) and head out to what must be some of the most spectacular
vineyard settings in the World. There are not many places on
the globe that have one thousand meter high vines, jaw dropping
architecture and ice-capped volcanoes in the background. Take
your pick between Maipu, Lujan de Cuyo and Uco Valley – there
are almost 1000 wineries at your doorstep.
Damajuana
It could almost be a bucket for its size, the damajuana is
Argentina’s demi-john - big bottle of wine that is best drunk at
a barbecue and without remorse. This should be on any winos
list to try at least once.
Vines of Mendoza Tasting Room
Your one stop shop for tasting lots of boutique wines by the glass.
This tasting room in the city centre is ideal for any oenophile
who doesn’t have the time or disposition to go to all the wineries
themself. You can taste a hundred or so wines with just one
journey here. Vines of Mendoza, Belgrano 1194.
THE BUCKET LIST
FOR ARCHITECTURE
LOVERS
Salentein
In the Uco Valley, this winery is an architect’s dream.
With a beautifully designed temple to wine, the Greek
ampitheatre shaped cellar is the central point of the bodega
surrounded by handsome chambers for winemaking and
tasting. It’s best view point though is walking from the art
gallery between the vineyards and admiring Salentein
amongst colourful desert flowers with the Andes
backdrop. Oh, and there’s a chapel, restaurant, posada, art
gallery and sculpture garden to boot.
Salentein, Ruta Provincial 89, Tunuyan. www.
killkasalentein.com
O Fournier
Like a spaceship that settled in amongst the desert scrub
of Mendoza’s winelands, O Fournier is fabulously avant-
garde. While its architectural wow factor is certainly
something, it doesn’t fail to deliver on functionality either
as this is a top down vertical processing winery. The views
are quite something too, and the restaurant is home to one
of Mendoza’s best chefs: Nadia Heron.
O Fournier, Los Indios s/n, San Carlos www.ofournier.com
Uco Valley wine resorts
The Uco Valley has recently become a playground for
the very rich. This year has seen a bumper harvest
of luxury wine resorts with The Vines of Mendoza
and Casa de Uco in particular battling it out for top
architecture points as a wine hotel. Casa de Uco has been
designed by its owner, renowned Argentine architect
Alberto Tonconogy, who has made a mini metropolis of
luxury in the middle of the Uco Valley with a unique
hotel design with private pods and bungalows, a golf
course, a heliport, stables, you name it. Nearby the Vines
is constructed under the guidance of Bormida & Yanzon
(well-known architects on the winery circuit) and is a
set of private chalets with sunset terraces overlooking
the Andes, a handsome restaurant with enormous
rock walls and a glass gym cube in the middle of the
vineyards with such beautiful views that even exercise
becomes desirable. Watch this space!
Area Fundacional
The original architecture of Mendoza, this is the only
relic that survives from what Mendoza used to look like
before the 1861 earthquake. Here you can see ruins of
the original church and also see artistic interpretations
of the city’s architecture and centre before the high rise
and apartment block was first introduced.
Emilio Civit
Easily one of the most impressive streets in Mendoza
city, this is where the important figures of recent
history all had their mini mansions built and many
still exist today. You’ll see well-maintained enormous
houses with security guards at the door as well as a
handful of dilapidated and abandoned houses, which
equally intrigue.
17
THE BUCKET LIST
FOR YUMMY MUMMIES
Plaza Independencia
Mendoza is child friendly. Whole families pack out
the pizza restaurants after midnight and the many ice
cream parlours do a roaring trade – literally. Whilst
the province lacks any big, blockbuster theme parks,
all the city’s main plazas have well-kept playgrounds,
the mother of which is located at the central Plaza
Independencia. Here you´ll find a virtual assault course
of swings, slides and climbing frames. An adjacent mini-
amphitheatre hosts the occasional clown and aspiring
boy band and the underground indoor theatre runs a
puppet show so convincing it frightens toddlers.
Parque San Martin
The city’s vast park to the west is Mendoza´s main
attraction for the buggy brigade. The provincial zoo,
children’s carrousel (la Rotunda de Calesita) and Natural
History museum are a shade down-at-heel but will
still fascinate most kids whilst the park’s many quiet
laneways and wide open meadows make it perfect for
cycling, rambling and general horsing around. Despite its
size, the park gets busy on Sundays with lounging kith
and kin, so go early if you do not want to jostle for shade.
Las Tijeritas
Mendoza´s main shopping malls have the usual brain
curdling amusement arcades and fast food strips that
fascinate kids and horrify parents. One mall outlet
however that satisfies both parties is Las Tijeritas in
Jumbo, Godoy Cruz. This is a hair salon exclusively for
kids with fun chairs, tables piled with toys and video
game consuls to entertain the little ones whilst their
barnets get a back comb.
Contributors: Amanda Barnes, Madeline Blasberg, Joe
Gibson, Charlie O’Malley.
Compiled and edited by Amanda Barnes.
Illustrations by Donough O’Malley www.pencilrobot.net
Plaza Independencia Photo by Jona Conti.
18
THE
WINE
BUCKET
LIST
We often do a wish
list of some of our
favourite bottles
that you ought to
try, but in line with
our List edition, I’ve
compiled the bucket
list of wine varieties
that you have to try
with recommended
bottles from the
best of last year’s
Wine Republic
Tasting. As you will
see, there’s more
than Malbec to
Mendoza.
By Amanda Barnes
Cabernet Franc
This has been the new variety for
quite some time now. It’s not new
anymore, but it has proved it was
worth the hype. Cabernet Franc is
producing some of the most exciting
wines at the moment. Intense,
spicy and so very different to other
Cabernet Francs in the world.
Recommended: Pulenta Estate,
Durigutti, Riglos (Gran Cabernet
Franc), Andeluna (Passionado)
Chardonnay
There are some firm believers
that Argentina can produce great
Chardonnays, and there are some
doubters too. My recommendation
is try from the top and you certainly
won’t be disappointed. The bottles
recommended below all dedicate a
lot of time and love to maintaining
the bright fruit of Chardonnay with
a flinty mineral characteristic and
a smooth and seductive nuance of
barrel aging. Serious Chardonnays.
Recommended: Cobos (Bramare),
Bressia (Lagrima de Canela), Catena
Zapata (White Bones & White Stones)
Petit Verdot
Mendoza’s odd ball in the family.
Traditionally just used as a very
small part of the classic Bordeaux
blend, like Malbec and Cabernet
Franc it has found its own solo
identity in Mendoza being used as
a single variety wine. Petit Verdot
though is a little like marmite – some
hate it, some love it. Dare you try
and see which camp you fall on?
Recommended: Ruca Malen, Decero,
Vistalba (Tomero)
Torrontes
The undisputed Queen of Argentine
wine: Torrontes is pretty, floral,
exuberant and memorable. Easy
to drink and even better to party
with. We’ve seen all sorts of trends
of Torrontes come and go, but this
wine is best when made how nature
intended: a lady’s wine. Or perhaps a
machista might refer to her beautiful
appearance, but quite simple when
you get down to it.
Recommended: Gimenez Riili, Colome,
Merced del Estero, Tukma
Cabernet Sauvignon
This classic variety has a long history
battling with Malbec as the most
esteemed wine in the country. Let’s
be honest, it lost. However there are
many advocates of Cab still working
hard to prove to the world that
Argentina can be one of the finest
producers of this, the most popular
red variety worldwide.
Recommended: Cobos, Catena
Zapata, Clos de Chacras, Kaiken
Semillon
At one stage, this was the most planted
white variety in Argentina. While
stocks may be dwindling, it is still
prominent in white table wine and is
a rather overlooked variety. A couple
of winemakers though have started
paying more serious attention to the
neglected variety and are making
some great examples that tell a story
of Argentina’s past and perhaps hint
towards the future.
Recommended: Mendel, CAP Vistalba
Tomero, Catena Zapata St. Felicien.
Bonarda
Another of Argentina’s most widely
planted grapes, Bonarda has been
the workhorse of Argentine reds
for as long as most vines remember.
It is used widely in blends and table
wines, but it also makes an incredibly
approachable and enjoyable single red:
fruit forward, lush and easy drinking.
Recommended: Passionate Wine,
Caligliori, Nieto Senetiner, El Enemigo
Malbec
Malbec was probably already on
your bucket list and it deserves to
stay there – the undoubted ruler of
Argentine wine. Whether you prefer
a light, fruity and uncomplicated
Malbec, a dense, jammy and
complex Malbec or a smooth, dark
and elegant Malbec, it’s all here. It
would be impossible to tell you the
best Malbec, but here are some of
the top producers that are personal
faves and did very well in our Wine
Republic Tasting last year.
Recommended: Monteviejo, Catena
Zapata, Altos Las Hormigas, Matias
Riccitelli, Pablo Montarrel, Renacer,
Serrera, Tapiz, Alta Vista.
Photo by Jona Conti.
19
20
Just like Diego Maradona
did in 1986, crowds
of Argentina fans are
hoping that one man in
particular can secure
World Cup success once
again. But can Lionel
Messi finally deliver on
an international stage
and lead his team to
victory in Brazil this
summer? Christopher
Davies finds out.
In the coming weeks, millions of people across the globe
will be enjoying a feast of football as Brazil plays host to
the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Even though the sport’s biggest
event is always a momentous occasion, both pundits
and fans alike are eagerly anticipating the forthcoming
tournament due to its historic, vibrant and passionate
location. Having won the World Cup five times, Brazil
are the most successful team in the competition’s history.
Therefore, it is no surprise that the nation eats, sleeps and
breathes football.
However, across the border, Argentina has an extremely
close relationship with the World Cup and arguably
loves football just as much. What’s more, La Albiceleste
(The White and Sky Blue) is the pre-tournament second
favourite (odds 9/2) to lift the 18 carat gold trophy when
the tournament concludes on 13th July. With the press
and bookmakers heavily backing the team to succeed in
addition to an expectant population, can Argentina end its
28-year wait to win the FIFA World Cup once again?
Apart from hosts Brazil, every team needs to qualify if they
want to play at the World Cup. Despite a first ever defeat
to Venezuela in the early stages, Argentina did not lose
another game until the last round of matches and ended up
winning the South American qualifying group. Along the
way, some high scoring victories against strong opposition
including Uruguay, Chile and Ecuador raised the nation’s
confidence for similar outcomes in Brazil.
Regardless of these impressive results, Argentina was
hoping for a favourable group at the World Cup final draw
in December. Thankfully, the footballing gods were looking
down on manager Alejandro Sabella and his team that day,
as Argentina were drawn against Bosnia-Herzegovina,
Iran and Nigeria, a relatively straightforward group.
Sabella said it was “a positive draw” while Buenos Aires
daily La Nación went with the headline “Argentina got
lucky.” While there are no easy matches in any World Cup,
most Argentinians will already be looking at the knockout
stages where harder opponents inevitably await.
When it comes to these ‘all or nothing’ games, attention
will surely be focused on Argentina’s unparalleled
talisman – Lionel Messi. The 26-year old from Rosario has
enjoyed incomparable success in recent years at Spanish
giants Barcelona. During his time at the Nou Camp, Messi
has claimed six La Liga titles, two Copa del Rey cups and
three UEFA Champions League winners’ medals. On top
of this, he won FIFA’s prestigious Ballon d’Or (formerly
World Player of the Year) award four years in a row from
2009 to 2012.
Despite this club and individual success, he has failed to
live up to such tremendous hype at international level.
Many people believe that if Argentina succeeds at this
year’s World Cup, it will be down to Lionel Messi. In fact,
comparisons are being drawn to the nation’s most recent
triumph in 1986, where a certain Diego Maradona won
the tournament almost single handily. While Argentina
have a much stronger squad this time around and Messi
is arguably emulating Maradona’s momentous feats, the
great man himself has insisted that his protégé should
not be held responsible should any World Cup dream not
become a reality.
“The one thing that I can say is that if we do not win
the World Cup, we should not blame Messi for it,” said
Maradona on Argentine television recently.
Therefore, other squad members will have to shoulder
some responsibility as well. Thankfully for Argentina,
talent, flair and ability is in abundance. Manchester City
forward Sergio Agüero, who at the turn of 2014 had scored
19 goals in 20 league appearances for the Premier League
team, will join Messi in attack. Napoli striker Gonzalo
Higuaín also has an impressive track record of hitting
VAMOS,
VAMOS
ARGENTINA!
21
22
the back of the net, as his 21 goals in 35 appearances for
the national team prove. Supporting these goal scorers
will be Angel Di Maria, as the hard-working Real Madrid
wide man will be the one who creates opportunities and
provides assists. This group of players has even earned the
nickname Los Cuatro Fantasticos or the Fantastic Four.
If Argentina does have a weakness, it will be in defence.
Despite having experienced cover in the form of Javier
Macherano and Fernando Gago, who have a combined
total of over 140 appearances, goalkeeper Sergio Romero
doesn’t play regularly for club Monaco while Sabella’s
first-choice back four are susceptible to leaking a few goals.
Nevertheless, with so much firepower and the best player
in the world on their side, few would be bold enough to bet
against Argentina.
Where to watch the World Cup
Even if you can’t make it to Brazil this year, you can join
in with the tension, tears and tantrums by catching
the biggest football matches at these sports bars:
Believe Irish Pub,
The Black Sheep,
The Liverpool,
Aristides bars: The busiest bar street, just wander
down the road near game time and you’ll see the most
popular picks of the game.
Watching a game in Argentina
Whether you are a football fan or not, attending a game
in South America is a quite remarkable experience that
doesn’t really compare to anywhere else in the world.
You will be surrounded by passionate supporters,
constant noise, lots of colour and even smoke from the
smuggled in flairs.
If this all sounds a bit daunting and you’d prefer to attend
a game in Mendoza with local fans that know how things
work, help is at hand. Viví el fútbol en Mendoza operates
tours to every home game of Godoy Cruz, the biggest
team in town who play in the Argentine first division.
After meeting at the gates of Parque San Martín you will
meet your fellow ‘Bodeguero’ fans, have an introductory
talk, be given a free beer and make your way to the
stadium. Local English-speaking guides know all about
football and the team, so feel free to ask any questions. On
your way to Estadio Malvinas Argentinas the atmosphere
builds. You’ll be joined by more and more supporters
chanting club songs, which if you speak Spanish might
come as quite a shock. There is even a chance to enjoy
typical football feed at one of the many choripán stalls.
Here you can leave valuables in safe hands, as any objects
that could potentially be thrown on to the pitch may be
confiscated.
After passing through a couple of security checks, you’ll
make your way to the section of diehard followers behind
one of the goals. Be prepared to jump, shout and sing, as
conductor-like fans face the crowd and encourage as
much support as possible. By the end of the match, you’ll
have no doubt become a Godoy Cruz fan for life.
Visit http://vivimza.com/ to book tickets or discover other
Mendoza tours. Tickets generally cost between 180-260 pesos.
23
When I explained to my mum (who was celebrating a big of The Bucket List for Foodies
24
Joseph Gibson takes an
amble around Mendoza’s
more accessible walking
and hiking options.
Any outdoors enthusiast who travels to Mendoza is likely
to be overwhelmed by the opportunities the Province
has to offer. Tourist information centers are chock full of
literature about rafting, high mountain treks, paragliding,
Aconcagua ascents, and other high-intensity (and often
high-budget) adventures. But for those of us who enjoy a
humble walk in the great outdoors, information about easy
and inexpensive day trips can be few and far between.
Even more, reliance on public transportation further limits
options for outdoor excursions on a budget. Don’t fear,
however, for there are many accessible walks, hikes, and
beautiful vistas to satiate your wanderlust.
Self-guided hiking in Argentina can be quite an
unsystematic affair, as public information about trails is
quite limited. Trails are often unmarked and unmaintained.
Some may be kept secret by guiding companies and
others may even be on private property. Expect to ask
for directions from locals. Consequently, it is imperative
to pack prepared with plenty of water (at least 2L), layers,
snacks, extra money, cell phone, and most importantly, a
corkscrew for that Malbec you brought with your lunch.
Always bring a travel buddy, and avoid staying out past
sundown. When you get off a bus, verify your return route
with the driver.
Cerro de la Gloria
Look on any $5 peso note and you will see on one side
General José de San Martín, and on the other, the Cerro de
la Gloria. Located on the western periphery of the Parque
General San Martín, Cerro de la Gloria offers not only
pleasant views, but also an important piece of Argentine
history. The monument commemorates the Army of the
Andes, which San Martín organized in Mendoza before
daringly crossing the cordillera to liberate Chile and Peru.
Although the ascent to this historic landmark only takes
about 10 minutes, the steep climb will leave you sweating.
At the top, you’ll be greeted with spectacular views of the
city center to the east and soaring mountains to the west.
Getting there: Take the G3 112 bus west from the city center.
Stops can be found all along Av. Sarmiento and Av. Emilio
Civit. Get off the bus when you reach the base of the Cerro,
in a parking lot that also serves as the entrance to the zoo.
Follow the paved, switchbacked footpath to the summit.
Duration: 1 hour round trip
Cerro Arco
Distinguishable by its crown of radio antennae, Cerro
Arco lies just to the west of the city amongst the looming
Andean foothills. This half-day hike offers a 360 degree
panorama of the city and the seemingly endless expanse of
land to the east, as well as a peek into the higher foothills
to the west. Easily accessible from the city center, the
hike is quite popular amongst tourist and locals alike. The
mountain also serves as the launching point for paragliding
excursions, and throughout the hike you’ll see paragliders
soaring off the summit. The out-and-back hike entails a 1.5
hour trek up the mountain on a scruffy, winding dirt road.
Expect a moderately strenuous, constant ascent. The route
is very exposed, so pack plenty of water and sunscreen.
Return to the bottom from the same route (about 1 hour).
When you get back down reward yourself with a cold
cerveza at the clubhouse. Aim to go earlier in the day and
give yourself time to return before sundown, as the nearby
area of Challao can be unsafe at nighttime.
Getting there: Take the G3 114/115 bus from Chile 987 near
the corner of Rivadavia and Chile (Plaza Independencia).
Ride the bus to the end of the line and get off at the Puerta
de la Quebrada. Another landmark for the bus stop is a
flying saucer-shaped discoteca nearby called Scanner.
Walk down a dirt road past the green sign that says
“Puerta de la Quebrada” for about 1km until you reach the
clubhouse and a small parking lot. To hike to the summit,
continue up the dirt road as it passes past the clubhouse.
Duration: 3 hours round trip
Acenso de la luna llena: For two nights every month, it
is possible to night hike Cerro Arco under the full moon
with a guided trip. The excursion costs $120 AR /person
and includes the guided trip as well as a midnight asado
at the clubhouse afterwards. For more information and
to purchase tickets, visit Cocina Poblana at calle Aristides
Villanueva 217.
WALKS AND DAY HIKES:
A WANDERER’S GUIDE
Photo by Jona Conti.
25
Potrerillos
Perched on a crystalline lake, the sleepy town of Potrerillos
is a popular destination for lakeside picnics, Sunday asados,
and romantic weekend getaways. Although the area around
Potrerillos is laced with hiking trails and campsites, few of these
backcountry trails are accessible via public transportation.
There are, however, wonderful opportunities for waterfront
wanderings and other escapades that are totally accessible
by bus from Mendoza city. Once in Potrerillos, you can easily
explore a web of multipurpose trails that run parallel to the lake.
If it’s warm enough, there are many small inlets and peninsulas
that make for great swimming spots. Be sure to pack a hearty
lunch and a bottle of wine to enjoy by the lake.
Getting there: The bus ride is about an hour from the central bus
terminal, and tickets to Potrerillos can be purchased for about
$40 pesos roundtrip. Buttini services the route, but tickets can
also be purchased at an Andesmar desk. Get off the bus at then
end of the line, at a small supermarket called “La Proveeduría”
(there is also a rafting business there). From there, walk south
back towards the town area on the road, crossing a small bridge
and curving uphill to the right (southwest). Continuing up this
road, you will pass houses, cabanas, a few stores, and a tourist
information desk. Continue south, bearing towards the lake and
shortly passing a gas station on your right. This road is an 8km
scenic byway complete with a paved sidewalk. Alongside this
road is a web of trails that weaves between the road and the
lake. There are no particular routes or circuits - just explore the
trails at your leisure!
Duration: 3-5 hours (depending on how far you want to explore)

I
l
l
u
s
t
r
a
t
i
o
n

b
y

J
o
n
a

C
o
n
t
i
To
Potrerillos
To
Chili
Cerro
La Gloria
980 mts asl
Cerro
Arco
1670 mts asl
26
I go to a college where it’s almost more radical to be a meat
eater than a vegetarian. Our dining hall is full of kale
and quinoa. Two years ago I took a course called “Animal
Life,” where we discussed the ethics of meat consumption
and learned all sorts of horrifying industrial details. My
vegetarianism followed soon after. For a while I missed
turkey sandwiches. But I’ve spent the last two years happy
with my tofu pad thai, mostly unfazed by the limited
options when dining out.
People laughed when I told them I was going to study in
Argentina. “Good luck with that,” they said, “my friend
studied there and didn’t see a vegetable for 6 months.” I saw a
facebook picture of a girl who’d studied in Mendoza looking
deliriously happy with a head of broccoli. My guidebook
had pages of vocabulary for different cuts of beef.
I steeled myself. I decided that to fully engage in the culture
of the country I’d have to eat steak. Last summer I was a
vegetarian in Spain and it felt like a constant battle against
little pieces of ham. I wasn’t going to do that again. So for
my last dinner in the U.S. we had roasted Brussels sprouts
and butternut squash and asparagus. I said goodbye to my
family. And I said goodbye to being a vegetarian.
Last night I had sausage for an appetizer and ribs for dinner.
And a tomato. Well, part of a tomato. It was an incredibly
good sausage. My host mom must have seen it on my face
because she sat across the table from me looking pleased
with herself. “Rico, no?” She asked. “Rico,” I said, “muy rico.”
In situations like that, during social meals, the transition
hasn’t been difficult. Meat, it turns out, tastes really good.
It’s the type of pseudo-revelation that’s the exclusive
privilege of recovering vegetarians. When I’m with friends
and starving because dinner doesn’t happen until 10pm,
eating meat is the easiest thing in the world.
It’s harder when I’m alone. I ate the leftover ribs for lunch,
sitting by myself in the kitchen. In the quiet I was acutely
aware that I was gnawing on a cow’s bone. I couldn’t forget
that all the gristle and sinew I was navigating had been an
important part of an animal’s midsection. I ate two ribs and
gave up in favor of a cheese sandwich.
But there’s good news for people who come to Mendoza
with similar vegetarian leanings. It’s entirely possible not
to eat meat here, especially if you’re willing to try fish every
once and a while. There are almost always vegetarian pizza
and pasta dishes, and occasionally you encounter a salad.
With a little research, you can even find dinners that are
mozzarella-less and reasonably balanced. It is possible.
And enjoyable. But that’s not to say it’s necessarily easy.
Last week I went out to dinner with two friends who are
also vegetarians back home. We had heard about a place
called Go Vinda, which specializes in vegetarian Indian
cuisine. Eventually stumped by its location in Godoy Cruz
we ended up ordering pizza at a restaurant on the Peatonal.
We thought it would have fresh tomatoes and oregano,
but we laughed when it finally arrived—it was completely
covered in ham.
See some recommended veggie spots in The Bucket List for
Green Goddesses Page 14.
BREAKING BEEF IN
ARGENTINA
Molly MacVeagh
finds through moving
to Argentina that
some habits are
easier to break than
others. Can anyone
stand on the broccoli
stick morals against the
mighty Argentine steak?
27
Andean stone and local desert wood recreate the
simplicity of Mendoza's natural surroundings with
stylish and modern comforts.
Guests realise they are in the land of wine as soon as
they arrive. A unique glass floor reveals an
underground wine cellar made from stone. A perfect
place to be seduced by Mendoza's best wines.
/laresdechacras
@laresdechacras
www.laresdechacras.com
Larrea 1266 Chacras de Coria | Mendoza
Argentina | tel/fax: 54 261 4961061
info@laresdechacras.com
Gourmet Regional Cuisine in a
Unique Atmosphere
Dinner Service, daily from 7:30 pm on.
Booking is required.
Book your table via this code
and get a Free glass of Wine!
15% OFF *On your dinner when arriving before 7.45pm
(On food. Not Combinable with other promotions).
INSIDE MENDOZA CITY
The list below has some great bars but if you’re looking to
browse, head to Aristides Villanueva Avenue, the nightlife strip of
Mendoza. It’s a continuation of Ave. Colon and is simply referred
to as Aristides by the locals. Pubs, bars, restaurants and shops
cram together from Belgrano to San Martin Park to provide you
with ample bar options. Get your shut-eye before a night out
because the clubs don’t even get started until 2am, and call a
taxi because they are all located out of the city in Chacras or El
Challao.
THE VINES OF MENDOZA
As the first and only true tasting room in South America, The
Vines of Mendoza offers the broadest selection of premium
boutique wines from Argentina. Compare the wine notes with
one of their tasting flights or choose a glass from the impressive
list of limited production wines. Chatting with their learned
bartenders and sipping fabulous flavours makes for a truly
enjoyable afternoon. Belgrano 1194, Tel. 261 438-1031. Mon-
Sat, 3pm-10pm www.vinesofmendoza.com
BELIEVE IRISH PUB
One of the few bars in Mendoza with a bar counter and high
stools to prop yourself up on. Kelly, the English part-owner/pub-
mascot is almost always there to share a chat and a smile with
BARS
the crowd; which is most likely a factor in its notable popularity
among expats and travelers. On the menu is a great collection
of draught beers, bottled beers (try the Warsteiner) and
surprisingly decent pub grub. TV screens hang in every corner
airing hit music-video montages or football games. Monday
night is International night and for their packed events DJ’s rock
the house. Colon and España 241. Tel. 261-429-5567.www.
believeirishpub.com.ar
CACHITAS
A laid back American style burger bar with a good playlist and a patio
outside, Cachitas boasts one of the best barmen in the city. Christian
from Germany has travelled the globe perfecting the art of cocteleria
and here you can sample some fab drinks that will get your night off
to a good start. Sarmiento 784. Mon - Sat, 6pm till late.
EL MERCADITO
Aristides still remains the busiest night spot in town and this
resto-bar has to be one of the coolest in town. El Mercadito
is run by three friends and it lets the good times roll with
healthy meals – including big salads, which are a rarity here
– antioxidant juices, decent brekkie, fresh cocktails and a top
music mix. Spend an evening here and you’ll hear a few beats
from across the pond and leave with a light stomach and a few
stars brightening up your vision.El Mercadito, Aristides 521.
28
DINING OUT
MENDOZA CITY
ITUZAINGO
For an intimate, unusual and memorable
evening - Ituzaingo is one of the city’s best
kept secrets. A ‘closed door’ restaurant
located in a historic house in the bohemian
quarter, Ituzaingo has been receiving rave
reviews from locals, expats and travellers
alike who relish in the warm atmosphere,
good company, unique art, and good
food all accompanied by an eclectic music
mix. The maestro in question is Gonzalo
Cuervo who likes to welcome in up to 45
people in his attractive loft conversion
house or leafy summer garden, and his
chef Francisco can delight guests with an
eight course menu of Argentine flavours
catered to an international palate, or
simply relax with a glass of wine. This
is a real place to meet the wines, food,
art, music and hospitality of Argentina. 8
course menu of argentine cuisine with 3
glasses of wine and a welcome drink, or
you can order sharing plates and wine by
the glass. For those who like to learn more
about regional culture and gastronomy
Ituzaingo has the option of an Argentinean
Cooking Class which is a lot of fun and
educational. Prices between 350 and
480 pesos per person (wines included).
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat from 8.30pm.
Reservations essential. Ituzaingo
Resto, tel (261) 15 666 5778, cocina@
ituzaingoresto.com.ar
GRILL Q
Located in the elegant Park Hyatt, Grill Q
serves up traditional regional cuisine at
a five star level. Sit back in the chic parilla
style restaurant amongst the cowhides
and local artwork, pick from one of the
many Mendocinean wines, make your
order and watch the chefs at work in the
open kitchen. They are famous for their
grilled meats and gigantic empanadas,
and serve hearty Argentine classics
such as ‘locro’ - a stew which hails
back to the early independence days.
Save room for the stunning desserts.
The Hyatt’s other restaurant, Bistro M,
offers a more gourmet evening menu
and the most exuberant ‘lunch menu’
in town. With a gorgeous buffet spread
of starters like squid and basil stew,
crispy calamari with cool gazpacho
and mezze style tapas, you’ll need to
bring your stretchy waistbands to fit in
the hearty and flavourful main options
and the sumptuous dessert buffet on
top. Put aside an hour or two for this
tempting lunch or make your way here
in the evening to try the Mediterranean
inspired dishes including delicious pasta,
fresh fish and some great cuts of meat.
Chile 1124. (261) 441 1225. Avg. meal Grill
Q $240 pesos. Bistro M Executive Menu
$270 with starter buffet, main course,
dessert buffet and glass of wine.
PATRONA
This cosy Mendocino restaurant has a
casual, rustic charm about it. A colourful
hub of activity on a quiet street, Patrona
attracts a crowd full of locals every night
of the week who come for the honest,
traditional Argentine food and friendly
and warm atmosphere. Classic dishes
like the hearty empanadas and sizzling
asado are worthy and popular fare but
the real star here is Patrona’s warm,
open sandwiches We recommend the
artichoke hearts and goats cheese;
roasted vegetables with white wine and
honey; or the more traditional pick of
rich glands cooked in lemon. A decent
wine list and some satisfying desserts
complete the gastronomy experience
but the key to Patrona is the cosy way
that they really make you feel at home.
Mi casa es Patrona casa! 9 de Julio 656.
Tel: (261) 4291057. Mon to Sat: 12.30pm
- 3.30pm and 8.30pm - close. Avg. meal
cost: $140/(including starter, main
dish, dessert+a glass of wine)
EL MERCADITO
With an attractive fairy lit patio and
terrace outside, this is the perfect spot
for Summer. Opened recently by three
friends, El Mercadito is offering something
a little bit different to Mendoza. With a cool
vibe, relaxed music and attractive waiting
staff, this is quickly becoming a favorite
hot spot for a coffee, bite to eat or evening
cocktails. Opening in the morning for
healthy breakfasts and antioxidant juices,
El Mercadito stays open throughout the
siesta with its light menu of sandwiches, big
salads and some Argentine classic meals.
Chow down to big healthy salads like the
‘Langoustine’ with huge juicy prawns,
fresh avocado and green leaves or tuck
into one of their big toasted sandwiches
like smoked salmon and cream cheese,
or jamon crudo and arugula served with
chunky chips and homemade BBQ sauce.
As the sun goes down make sure to try out
one of their yummy strawberry mojitos! El
Mercadito, Aristides Villanueva 521,
(261) 4638847. Avg. meal price: $ 150.
Chacras de Coria: Viamonte 4961, te:
4962267.
CEIBO
Offering one of the most complete cooking
and cultural experiences in Mendoza, this
intimate restaurant serves classic Argentine
countryside cuisine with a contemporary
twist as well as its daily cooking classes.
Chef Mauricio and Sommelier Eugenia
welcome you into their converted family
home and offer a 3 to 4 hour cooking class
whereby you learn the culture of ‘cocina
de campo’ as well as trying your hand at
traditional cooking techniques like cooking
in a mud oven, ‘al disco’ and learning the
art of the perfect asado as well as making
empanadas, choripan, homemade bread
and chimichurri sauce. Five courses of
traditional cuisine are paired with boutique
Argentine wines and you finish off making
fresh herb cocktails from the patio garden
and can try rolling Argentine tobacco. A
fun, cultural and culinary experience to
enrich your understanding of Argentina
and its cuisine. The restaurant is also open
every evening (except Sundays) and serve
classic Argentine dishes like a variety of
empanadas and roasted meats along with
signature dishes from Mauricio and boast a
fantastic wine list and warm environment.
Ceibo, 25 de Mayo 871 (in front of Plaza
Italia), (261) 420 2992. Avg. meal price $
170, cooking class from $100US.
Grill Q
29
LA MARCHIGIANA
As the first Italian restaurant in Mendoza,
La Marchigiana has plenty of history and
traditional recipes to whet any nonna`s
appetite. Maria Teresa Corradini de
Barbera`s family restaurant started off
with only six hearty Italian dishes but has
grown into a popular local fixture which
is always busy despite its curious lack of
ambience. The pasta is the best thing here,
maintaining original recipes from over 60
years ago; we recommend the huge stuffed
ravioli. Check out the Brad Pitt photo for
celebrity credentials. La Marchigiana,
Patricias Mendocinas 1550. (261)
4230751. Avg. meal price: $130
OUTSIDE CITY CENTER
TERRUÑO-CLUB TAPIZ
Tucked away among the sprawling Maipu
vineyards lies Club Tapiz Resort and its
lovely restaurant Terruño. This handsome
eatery boasts an elegant interior, excellent
service and a wine list that is sure to please
even the most finicky of wine snobs. Their
chef compiles a tantalising menu that
includes top notch lomo steaks, a rotating
range of salads and a savory ginger/honey
chicken dish that is second to none. If you
like what you see and taste, book a room
in one of their seven Renaissance-style
villas. Don’t forget to call ahead for dinner
reservations! Ruta 60 s/n 5517 Maipú.
AR$ 220. Tel: (261) 496 0131. tapiz.com.
Lunch, everyday, 12pm - 3pm. Dinner,
Sun - Thurs, 8pm-11pm, Fri & Sat until
12am. Avg. meal cost: $370 pesos.
BRINDILLAS
One of the best kept secrets in Chacras,
this closed-door style restaurant serves
up a seven course tasting of menu of
colourful and elegant courses packed
with flavour and originality. The owners
Mariano and Florencia travelled the
world cooking and serving in Michelin
star restaurants and you can tell by the
professional service Florencia offers
front of house and the flawless cuisine
Mariano sends out from the kitchen.
Expect Argentine re-inventions with
a Mediterranean and Asian flair. The
wine list is also very varied and highly
recommended. Guardia Vieja 2898,
Lujan de Cuyo. (261) 496 3650. Avg.
meal price $300.
CHEF MUN
If you want a bit of Asian flavour, Chef
Mun is the chef to go to. Korean born
internationally trained, Chef Mun brings
an exotic mix to the plate to spice up the
usual Argentine steak. In the restaurant
in Casarena winery, you’ll find a big
sundeck looking over the vineyards and
snowcapped Andes but here the focus is
definitely on the plate. Gorgeous flavour
combinations like sushi with Pinot Noir,
and sparkling wine with salted pannecota
and strawberry jus make it a delightful
lunch date. If you thought you’d got bored
of beef, think again - steak here comes
served with a generous serving of spicy
Korean BBQ sauce! Avg. meal: $450. Tel:
(261) 691 9732. Lunch Mon - Sat. www.
chefmun.com
LOS NEGRITOS
Right in the middle of Las Vegas (in
Potrerillos, 80kms from Mendoza) this
restaurant stems from a story of a family
who came to live in here one of the first
weekend houses constructed in the area.
They named their home ‘los negritos’ a
nickname of their two young children.
Many years later, one of the ‘negritos’
(Enrique) decided to leave the bustle of
the city, moved to the mountains and
opened a restaurant with his wife , in
Las Vegas. The restaurant serves lunch
and dinner every weekend and on public
holidays and the cuisine is flavourful and
typically Argentine with stews (such as
Tomaticán and mondongo) , milanesas,
humita and homemade pasta - many of
the recipes used are old family recipes. The
restaurant has been recognized as part of
the ‘gastronomical route’ and is noted for
its quality of cooking, architecture and
landscape. Los Olmos ST, Las Vegas,
Potrerillos. (261)155697431 . Avg: $120
La Marchigiana
30
LUJAN DE CUYO
Terrazas de los Andes
The fine wine sister of Chandon
Argentina is a beautifully restored
bodega with well-appointed tasting
room. Fav. Wine: Cheval de los Andes.
(0261) 488 0704/5. Thames and
Cochabamba, Perdriel, Luján de
Cuyo. www.terrazasdelosandes.com
Ruca Malen
Excellent food, great guiding and first-
class wines. The pairings over lunch
make for an unforgettable culinary
experience. (0261) 4138909 .R.N.7,
Km 1059, Agrelo, Luján de Cuyo.
www.bodegarucamalen.com
Chandon
The original foreign investor, French-
owned Chandon has been making
great sparkling wines in Mendoza
since the 1960s. (0261) 490 9968.
R.P.15, Km 29, Agrelo, Luján de Cuyo.
www.bodegaschandon.com.ar
Dominio del Plata
Argentina´s most famous female
winemaker Susana Balbo is creating
some rich and complex wines in
the heart of Agrelo. Fav. Wine: Ben
Marco. (0261) 498 9200. Cochabamba
7801 Agrelo, Luján de Cuyo. www.
dominiodelplata.com.ar
Luigi Bosca
The Arizu dynasty are the royal family
of Argentine wine and their seat
of operations is a handsome and
elegant 110-year old winery. Classical
architecture, ancient atmospheric
cellars and rich wines such as the Finca
Las Nobles range make for a fascinating
visit. (0261) 498 1974. San Martin 2044,
Mayor Drummond, Luján de Cuyo.
www.luigibosca.com.ar
Lagarde
Owner of the oldest white wine in
South America. Try the hand-crafted
sparkling wine made from 100 year
old vines. (0261) 498 0011 Ext. 27.
San Martin 1745, Mayor Drummond.
Luján de Cuyo. www.lagarde.com.ar
Estrella de los Andes
On a leafy road in the middle of
Lujan, this winery has a cool, retro
diner with well presented and
tasty Argentine dishes that won’t
break your bank. Open all day and
a relaxed atmosphere. Olavarria
225, Perdriel, (261) 464 9190. www.
bodegaestrelladelosandes.com
THE WINERY GUIDE
Renacer
This Chilean-owned winery creates
the label Punto Final. Small, modern
operation with tour that includes
a hands-on lesson in blending.
Brandsen 1863, Lujan de Cuyo. 261-
524-4416 or 261-524-4417. www.
bodegarenacer.com.ar
Kaiken
This rustic 80 year-old winery houses a
new venture by the prestigious Chilean
winery Montes. Big and powerful
wines, destined for fame. (0261) 524
3160. Roque Saenz Peña 5516, Las
Compuertas, Luján de Cuyo. www.
kaikenwines.com
Catena Zapata
Showcase winery designed like a
Mayan temple overlooking vineyards
and the Andes Mountains. Rich,
complex wines. (0261) 413 1100.
Cobos s/n, Luján de Cuyo. www.
catenawines.com
Melipal
Great Malbec and gourmet lunches
make Melipal one of the most
exclusive wineries to visit. (0261) 524
8040.R.N.7, 1056km, Agrelo, Luján de
Cuyo. www.bodegamelipal.com.ar
Decero
Attractive, modern facility with
spectacular views of the mountains
from the cozy tasting room. (0261) 524
4748. Bajo las Cumbres 9003, Agrelo,
Luján de Cuyo. www.decero.com
Clos de Chacras
Charming boutique operation with
nice history. A five minute walk from
Chacras plaza. Fav. Wine: Gran Estirpe.
(0261) 496 1285/155 792706. Monte
Libano s/n, Luján de Cuyo. www.
closdechacras.com.ar
Carmelo Patti
Mendoza’s most famous garagista.
Carmelo Patti himself is often there
to show you around (in Spanish). Fav.
Wine: Cabernet Sauvignon from the
barrel. (0261) 498 1379. San Martin
2614, Luján de Cuyo.
Nieto Senetiner
Located in a beautiful old winery
in Chacras, Senetiner was founded
in 1888 and makes a great range of
wines and sparkling wines and offers
horseback riding in the vineyards and
asado style lunches. (261) 498 0315,
Guardia Vieja S/N, Vistalba, Lujan de
Cuyo. www.nietosenetiner.com.ar
Bonfanti
A lovely winery in a pastoral setting.
Up close and personal tours with
the owners themselves and a tasting
room set amidst the vines. (0261) 488
0595. Terrada 2024, Lujan de Cuyo.
Viña Cobos
American winemaker Paul Hobbs
was one of the first to recognise
the possibilities of Malbec and his
Bramare label is possibly one of the
best examples of this varietal. (0261)
479 0130. R.N. 7, Lujan de Cuyo.
www.vinacobos.com
Belasco de Baquedano
Gleaming modern facility with
fascinating aroma room and
restaurant with Andean view. (0261)
524 7864. Cobos 8260, Lujan de
Cuyo. www.belascomalbec.com
Piattelli
A lovely family owned winery done
in a Tuscan style. Enjoy lunch on
a deck beside a pond.Fav. Wine:
Oaked Torrontes. (0261) 479 0123.
Cobos 13710, Lujan de Cuyo. www.
piattellivineyards.com
Cruzat
A boutique traditional sparkling wine
producer with gorgeous bubbles that
can be enjoyed from their terrace
overlooking vines. (261) 5242290,
Costa Flores, s/n, Perdriel, www.
bodegacruzat.com
Alta Vista
Masterful mix of modern and
traditional. Tasting includes
distinctive Torrontes or single
vineyard Malbecs. (0261) 496 4684.
Álzaga 3972, Chacras de Coria, Lujan
de Cuyo. www.altavistawines.com
Mendel
An old style winery ran by one of
Argentina’s most famous winemaker
dynasties the De La Motta family.
(0261) 524 1621. Terrada 1863,
Mayor Drummond, Lujan de Cuyo.
www.mendel.com.ar
Septima
A beautifully designed winery with
clear views of the mountains and a
large terrace used for sunset wine
events after 6.30pm on Thursdays.
Owned by the Spanish experts in
sparkling wine, Codorniu, they make
fab sparkling wine under label Maria.
(261) 498 9550, Ruta 7, 6.5km, Lujan
de Cuyo. www.bodegaseptima.com
31
MUSICAL PLANTATIONS
It might seems like a quiet valley
where nothing but the blow of breezes
between the vines and the whistle of
wind through the mountains can be
heard, but this last couple of months
Uco Valley has been moving to a
different beat: ROCK!
In a now well-established annual
event, Monteviejo Wine Rock attracts
a crowd of a few hundred people to
listen to a full day of rock music from
some of the most talented musicians
in Argentina. Reminiscent of any good
music festival, the crowd gets steadily
more merry and the music more
intense. Big acts like Catupecu Machu
are accompanied by solo musicians like
Rano Sarbech and Bolivian charango (a
guitar made from an armadillo) artist
Jaime Torres, and of course the band
of organizer Marcelo Pelleritti, The
Cellars.
While this weekend, Marcelo
Pelleriti is all about the music, on
Monday mornings he is better known
as a winemaker. Head winemaker of
Monteviejo and making wine in his
own eponymous label, he is renowned
in Argentina and France for his ability
in the winery. In another rock-wine
fusion, Pelleriti and one of Argentina’s
most respected musicians Pedro
Aznar (who also played at Wine Rock)
have just launched their own label of
wine ‘AbreMundos’ where they both
combine their love of good music and
good wine together.
As part of The Vines of Mendoza’s
winemaker village project, Pelleriti
and Aznar are the first to release
their wines in what is going to be a
collection of winemakers with their
own passion projects. While the focus
of the agronomy will be on respecting
the terroir and making wilder, natural
plantations in a goblet-trained vineyard,
the focus in the winery will be producing
good vibrations while the wines are
aging in the barrel. Pelleriti and Aznar
are already planning their music studio
right next to the cellar room!
Closer to the city, in Lujan de Cuyo,
another winery owner is combining
his two passions of music and wine.
Hernan Pimental from boutique
Caelum winery is now hosting weekly
music nights at the new winery on
Ruta 7 to combine the pleasure of
wine drinking, with the pleasure of
listening to live music.
It’s not just winemakers that are
indulging in this timeless combination,
the local government has organized
wine and music festivals for years with
the Classical Music and Tango festivals
along the wine routes. Twice a year
you can hear live classical musicians
(in April) and tango musicians (in
September) in a handful of wineries
across the region in one of the most
atmospheric music festivals.
If you haven’t caught onto this new
wave of music and wine in Mendoza,
it’s time to tune in.
By Amanda Barnes
Restaurant
Lodging
Driving time from Mendoza
City
Pulenta Estate
Cool minimalist design and rich
complex wines make this a winery
with finesse and style. Fav. Wine:
Cabernet Franc. (0261) 155 076426.
Ruta 86, Km 6.5. Lujan de Cuyo.
www.pulentaestate.com
Tapiz
Great wine lodge Club Tapiz, high-
end restaurant Terruño and an
instructive wine tour including barrel
and bottle tasting. (0261) 490 0202.
Ruta Provincial 15, Km 32. Agrelo,
Luján de Cuyo. www.tapiz.com
Norton
Old-style cellars contrast with a high-
tech production line. Tank and barrel
tastings,and jug fillings on Thursdays
are popular with the locals. (0261)
490 9700. R.P.15, Km 23.5. Perdriel.
Luján de Cuyo. www.norton.com.ar
Benegas Lynch
Rich history and richer wines. Lovely
old bodega with lots of character.
Fav. Wine: Cabernet Franc. (0261) 496
0794. Ruta 60. Cruz de Piedra. www.
bodegabenegas.com
Dante Robino
Founded in 1920, an atmospheric
old-style winery with a modernist,
light-filled tasting room with excellent
view of mountains and vines.
(0261) 488 7229 Ext. #2. Callejón
Maldonado 240, Perdriel. www.
bodegadanterobino.com
Dolium
A completely underground winery
with innovative design and top notch
Malbecs. (0261) 490 0190. R.P.15, Km
30 s/n, Agrelo. www.dolium.com
Caelum
Modern, medium size winery on the
main road to Chile just before the
mountains and has a nice family
feel to it. Fav. Wine: Rosado. (0261)
156 439564. R.N.7 km 1060, Agrelo.
www.bodegacaelum.com.ar
Navarro Correas
The closest winery to Mendoza city,
easily accessible Navarro Correas is a
modern winery with great sparkling
wines and fun tasting options. (0261)
4597916. San Francisco del Monte
1555, Godoy Cruz. www.ncorreas.com
LOCATIONS REFERENCES REFERENCES
Luján de Cuyo
Maipú
Mendoza City
San Martín
Valle de Uco
Foto Pelleriti and Aznar playing in Uco Valley
32
THE WINERY GUIDE
Achaval Ferrer
Modern boutique close to Mendoza
riverbed. Big concentrated wines.
(0261) 488 1131. Cobos 2601,
Perdriel, Lujan de Cuyo. www.
achaval-ferrer.com
Vistalba
Tasting room where one entire wall
is a subterranean cross section of
the actual vineyard clay, roots and
rocks. Fab restaurant. Fav Wine:
Petit Verdot. (0261) 498 9400. Roque
Saenz Peña 3135, Vistalba. www.
carlospulentawines.com
Familia Cassone
A charming, family owned winery in
a beautiful setting. Try the jasmine
tinted rosé amidst the pastoral
splendour of the owner’s expansive
garden.
Anchorena y Terrada. (261) 424 6301.
www.familiacassone.com.ar
MAIPU
Trapiche
Argentina’s biggest winery is a mix
of old and new, traditional and
industrial, and has the old train
tracks leading up to it. (0261) 520
7666. Mitre s/n. Coquimbito, Maipú.
www.trapiche.com.ar
Flichman
Steeped in history and tradition.
Charming, pink-hued, colonial-style
bodega, set in the leafy vineyards of
southern Maipu. (0261) 497 2039.
Munives 800, Barrancas, Maipú.
www.flichman.com
Tempus Alba
A fine modern winery set in the rural
lanes of southern Maipu. The rooftop
terrace overlooks the vineyard.
(0261) 481 3501. Perito Moreno 572,
Maipú. www.tempusalba.com
Familia Zuccardi
A professional, far-sighted operation.
Attractive restaurant amidst the
vines, famous for its asado-style
lunches and generous wine pourings.
(0261) 441 0000. R.P. 33, Km 7.5,
Maipú. www.familiazuccardi.com
Lopez
Popular, old-style winery with two
museums on the wine. Restaurant
offers gourmet cuisine with a
panoramic view. (0261) 497 6554.
Ozamis 375, Gral Gutiérrez, Maipú.
www.bodegaslopez.com.ar
Rutini / La Rural
Well-stocked museum with invaluable
antiques like cowhide wine presses
and buckets. Giant oak tanks stand in
large, cavernous halls.
(0261) 497 2013 Ext.125. Montecaseros
2625, Coquimbito, Maipú. www.
bodegalarural.com.ar
Cecchin
A family winery using organic and
biodynamic principles where you
can see the entire process from the
beautiful green vineyards to the
minimal intervention winery.
(261) 497 6707, MA Saez 626, Maipu,
www.bodegacecchin.com.ar
Carinae
Small, charming, French-owned
winery offering personal tours and
well-honed wines. Surrounded by
vineyards and olive trees.
(0261) 499 0470. Videla Aranda
2899, Cruz de Piedra, Maipú www.
carinaevinos.com
Cepas Elegidas
Making real ‘vinos de autor’, US born
Brennan Firth makes his limited
production wines in a small winery in
Maipu. Exclusive and ultra high end
wines, a visit and tasting is with the
winemaker himself.
To visit Cepas Elegidas, call Brennan
on (0261) 467 1015.
Familia Di Tommasso
Officially the second oldest winery in
Mendoza and still run by Argentine
hands. Their charming and rustic
restaurant looks onto the vineyard,
just two steps away. (0261) 524 1829.
Urquiza 8136, Russell, Maipú. www.
familiaditommaso.com
AMP Cava
Premium wines made from different
terroirs but all by renowned
winemaker Karim Mussi Saffie.
Technical tastings and a close
proximity to the city make it a
recommended visit.
Gómez Adriano 3602. Coquimbito.
Maipú - (261) 4813201/4668048
VALLE DE UCO
Andeluna
The old-world style tasting room
looks upon dramatic views of
vineyards against mountains.
(02622) 423 226 Ext 113.R.P. 89, Km
11, Gualtallary, Tupungato. www.
andeluna.com
Finca La Celia
One of the valley’s oldest wineries.
They conduct excellent tours and
tastings. (02622) 451 010. Av. de
Circunvalacion s/n, Eugenio Bustos,
San Carlos. www.fincalacelia.com.ar
La Azul
Simple, small production winery
with not so simple Malbecs and a
small traditional restaurant. (02622)
423 593.R.P 89 s/n. Agua Amarga,
Tupungato. www.bodegalaazul.com
Salentein
Designed like a temple to wine,
this ultra-concept winery includes
a modern art gallery, lodge, and
chapel set high in the Andean valley.
(02622) 429 500.R.P 89 s/n, Tunuyan.
www.killkasalentein.com
Clos de los 7
In the heart of gorgeous Vista
Flores, you can visit premium French
owned wineries Monteviejo, Rolland,
Diamandes and Cuvelier de los andes
in one visit for tastings, horseriding,
art and lunch. (0261) 156 687680.
www.clos7.com.ar
O. Fournier
Most architecturally innovative
winery with rich, concentrated wines.
Excellent lunches in the modernist
visitor center. (02622) 451 088. Los
Indios s/n, La Consulta, San Carlos.
www.ofournier.com
Gimenez Riili
A brand new family run affair, part
of the exciting Vines of Mendoza
project. This is a modern winery in
a stunning setting. 0261-156317105/
0261-153470392 - Ruta 94 (s/n),
Tunuyán. www.gimenezriili.com
Atamisque
This Uco winery has some great
white wines, a unique stony roof and
they breed their own trout which is
served in the charming restaurant.
(0261) 156 855184. R.P. 86 (Km
30), San Jose, Tupungato. www.
atamisque.com
SAN MARTIN
Familia Antonietti
A family winery in San Martin where
you can have a tour with the owners,
try some of their sparkling wines and
stay for a homecooked lunch. (0261)
4390964/155688905. Pizarro s/n
esq. Zalazar, Chapanay, San Martín.
33
USEFUL INFORMATION
AIRPORT Tel: 5206000 Accesso Norte s/n. El Plumerillo. SHIPPING WINE Ordinary post will not ship wine and a courier can cost at least
U$ 30 a bottle. The most economical way is send it with your checked luggage in a special styrofoam wine box, available at most wine
stores or at Trout & Wine, Espejo 266. CRIME Be alert. Mendoza does have crime. Hold on to purses on the street and at restaurants.
Avoid carrying valuables. Hostel lockers are not safe. Danger spots: bus terminal and internet cafes. BIKE TOURS IN MAIPU The most
economical way to do a wine tour in Mendoza. Take bus (171, 172 or 173) from Catamarca and Rioja to Urquiza street (see below)
where you’ll find several bike rental companies. Some are notorious for dodgy bikes. Check and double check you get a good mount
as a puncture can cause a mini nightmare. Head south, as north of Maipu is urban and not pretty. Recommended wineries: Rutini,
Tempus Alba, Di Tommasso and certainly Carinae. When returning have a late lunch at the excellent Casa de Campo. NIGHTCLUBS
In most nightclubs you have to queue twice for a drink which can get slightly exasperating as the night wears on. It is wise to buy
several drink tickets at once for an easy, unimpeded flow of alcohol. Bathrooms are usually ill equiped so bring your own toilet paper.
Many nightclubs are 200 light years away in Chacras which can cause problems getting home. Clubs rarely get going before 2am.
MENDOZA EXPATS CLUB An organization which enables Expatriates to meet each other. www.mendozaexpats.org. HAIR DRESSER
English speaking and eccentric hairdresser Haisley will do your hairdo right. Paso de los Andes 997 (esq. Julio Roca), tel (261) 641 6047.
CHANGING DOLLARS - “Cambio, cambio” shout the arbolitos (money changers) outside Galeria Tonsa (San Martin 1173), the place to
go if you want the best street rate. Larger denomination notes are preferred. To make sure you are not getting ripped off check the
current rate of the “dolár informal” on www.ambito.com. The Mendoza rate is generally 30 centavos less.
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