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Design Methodology of Structural Modules

APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 INTRODUCTION
...........................................................................................................................
4
2.0 CODES, STANDARDS, AND REFERENCES
...............................................................................
5
3.0 MATERIALS
..................................................................................................................................
5
3.1 STRUCTURAL MODULES
................................ ................................ ................................ .................
5
3.2 FORM MODULES
................................ ................................ ................................ .............................
5
4.0 DESIGN LOADS AND LOAD COMBINATIONS
........................................................................
5
4.1 DESIGN LOADS - STRUCTURAL MODULES
................................ ................................ ........................
5
4.1.1 Hydrostatic Loads
..................................................................................................................
6
4.1.2 Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) Loads
...................................................................
6
4.1.3 Subcompartment Differential Pressure Loads
........................................................................
6
4.1.4 Hydrodynamic Loads due to the Safe Shutdown Earthquake
................................................
7
4.1.5 Thermal Effects
......................................................................................................................
7
4.1.6 Concrete Placement Loads
.....................................................................................................
8
4.2 DESIGN LOADS - FORM MODULES
................................ ................................ ................................ ...
8
4.3 LOAD COMBINATIONS - STRUCTURAL MODULES
................................ ................................ ............
8
4.3.1 Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) Loads
...................................................................
8
4.3.2 Concrete Placement Loads - Structural Modules
...................................................................
9
5.0 ANALYSES
......................................................................................................................................
9
5.1 GENERAL
................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......
9
5.2 ANALYSES FOR SAFE SHUTDOWN EARTHQUAKE (SSE) FORCES
................................ ........................
9
5.3 ANALYSES FOR AUTOMATIC DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEM (ADS) FORCES
................................ ........
9
6.0 DESIGN OF FORM MODULES
....................................................................................................
9
7.0 DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL WALL MODULES
.......................................................................
10
7.1 STRUCTURAL WALL MODULES WITHOUT CONCRETE FILL
................................ .............................
10
7.2 STRUCTURAL WALL MODULES WITH CONCRETE FILL
................................ ................................ ...
10
7.3 STIFFNESS OF STRUCTURAL WALL MODULES WITH CONCRETE FILL
................................ ...............
10
7.4 DESIGN OF TRUSSES
................................ ................................ ................................ ......................
10
7.5 DESIGN OF SHEAR STUDS FOR STRUCTURAL MODULES
................................ ................................ ..
11
7.6 DESIGN OF BASE CONNECTIONS (LATER)
................................ ................................ ....................
11
8.0 DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULES
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11
8.1 DESIGN ASSUMPTIONS, BASIS, AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS
................................ .......................
11
8.2 DESIGN PROCEDURES
................................ ................................ ................................ ...................
12
8.2.1 Floor Module Design for Vertical Downward Loads
...........................................................
12
8.2.2 Floor Module Design for Vertical Upward Loads
...............................................................
12
8.2.3 Floor Module Design for In-Plane Loads
............................................................................
13
9.0 THERMAL CONSIDERATIONS
................................................................................................
13
10.0 EVALUATION FOR THERMAL LOADS
..................................................................................
14
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
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TABLES
TABLE 1 - YIELD STRENGTH AND MODULUS OF ELASTICITY VERSUS TEMPERATURE 15
TABLE 2 - SHEAR AND FLEXURAL STIFFNESSES OF STRUCTURAL MODULE WALLS 16
TABLE 3 - EFFECTIVE PLATE WIDTHS FOR STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULES 17
FIGURES
FIGURE 1 - STRUCTURAL MODULES IN CONTAINMENT INTERNAL STRUCTURES 18
FIGURE 2 - TYPICAL STRUCTURAL WALL MODULE 19
FIGURE 3 - TYPICAL STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULE 20
FIGURE 4 - LOCATION OF STRUCTURAL MODULES IN AUXILIARY BUILDING 21
FIGURE 5 - EFFECTIVE SECTIONS FOR STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULES 22
FIGURE 6 - TYPICAL BASE DETAILS FOR WALL MODULE 23
FIGURE 7 - IRWST TEMPERATURE TRANSIENT 24
FIGURE 8 - CONTAINMENT TEMPERATURE EQUIPMENT QUALIFICATION CURVE 25
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
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1.0 INTRODUCTION
This document describes the methods and procedures for design of the structural and form
modules used in the containment internal structures and part of the south side of the auxiliary
building of the AP1000 Nuclear Island.
The containment internal structures are designed using reinforced concrete and structural steel.
At the lower elevations conventional concrete and reinforcing steel are used, except that
permanent steel forms (form modules) are used in some areas in lieu of removable forms based
on constructibility considerations. These steel form modules consist of plate reinforced with
angle stiffeners and tee sections. The angles and the tee sections are on the concrete side of the
plate.
Walls and floors are concrete filled steel plate structural modules as shown in Figure 1. The
walls are supported on the mass concrete containment internal structures basemat with the steel
surface plate extending down to the concrete floor on each side of the wall. The steel surface
plates of the structural modules provide reinforcement in the concrete. The structural modules
are anchored to the base concrete by mechanical connections welded to the steel plate or by
lap splices where the reinforcement overlaps shear studs on the steel plate.
Structural wall modules consist of steel face plates connected by trusses. The primary purpose
of the trusses is to stiffen and hold together the face plates during handling, erection, and
concrete placement. The nominal thickness of the steel face plates is 1/2 in. The nominal spacing
of the trusses is 30 in. Shear connectors are welded to the inside faces of the steel face plates.
The structural wall modules are anchored to the concrete base by reinforcing steel dowels or
other type of connections embedded in the reinforced concrete below. After erection, concrete
is placed between the face plates. Figure 2 shows the typical structural wall module.
Floors above elevation 98 in the containment internal structures consist of steel tee sections
welded to horizontal steel plates stiffened by transverse angle stiffeners supported by deeper
beams and girders. After erection, concrete is placed on top of the horizontal plates and the
upper part of the beams. A typical structural floor module is shown in Figure 3.
Structural modules are also used in parts of the south side of the auxiliary building. These
modules include the spent fuel pool, fuel transfer canal, cask loading pit, and cask washdown
pit. The structural modules in the auxiliary building are similar to the concrete filled structural
modules described above for the containment internal structures. Figure 4 shows the location of
the structural modules in the auxiliary building. The structural modules in the auxiliary building
extend from elevation 66'-6" to elevation 135'-3".
Walls and floors exposed to water during normal operation or refueling are constructed using
stainless steel plates.
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2.0 CODES, STANDARDS, AND REFERENCES
2.1 AP1000 Civil/Structural Design Criteria, APP-GW-C1-001, Rev. 0
2.2 American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), "Specification for the Design,
Fabrication and Erection of Steel Safety Related Structures for Nuclear Facilities,"
AISC-N690-1994.
2.3 American Concrete Institute (ACI), "Building Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety
Related Structures," ACI-349-01
2.4 American Concrete Institute (ACI),"Formwork for Concrete," ACI SP-4, 4th Edition
2.5 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) , ASME Boiler & Pressure
Vessel Code. 2001 Edition, through 2002 Addenda, July 1, 2002.
2.6 Design Guide for Reinforcement in Walls and Floor Slabs, APP-GW-S1-008,
Rev. 0
3.0 MATERIALS
3.1 Structural Modules
The principal materials for the structural modules are in accordance with Section 7 of Reference
2.1, and as identified below.
The structural steel modules are designed using A36 plates and shapes. Nitronic 33 (ASTM
A240 Type XM-29, UNS designation S2400) stainless steel plates are used on the surfaces of
the modules in contact with water in the refueling canal, the in-containment refueling water
storage tank, the spent fuel pool, the fuel transfer canal, the cask loading pit, and the cask
washdown pit.
3.2 Form Modules
The form modules are designed using A36 plates and shapes. Nitronic 33 (ASTM A240, Type
XM-29, UNS designation S2400) stainless steel plates are used on the surfaces of the reactor
vessel cavity.
4.0 DESIGN LOADS AND LOAD COMBINATIONS
4.1 Design Loads - Structural Modules
Design loads for the structural modules shall be in accordance with Reference 2.1,
supplemented by the following:
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4.1.1 Hydrostatic Loads
Hydrostatic loads shall be treated as dead loads and shall be based on water levels defined
below.
Design water level in the In Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) is
elevation 132'-3" (Section B.4 of Reference 2.1).
Design water level in the refueling canal is elevation 134'-3" (Section B.4 of Reference
2.1).
Design water level in the spent fuel pool is elevation 134'-3".
Design water level in the cask loading pit and cask washdown pit is elevation 134'-3".
Design water level in the fuel transfer canal is elevation 134'-3".
4.1.2 Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) Loads
Boundaries of the IRWST shall be designed for the following loads associated with the Passive
Core Cooling System. Loads due to operation of the spargers shall be considered as live loads.
Two cases are specified as described below.
ADS hydrodynamic load (ADS1)
This ADS transient is associated with blowdown of the primary system through the spargers
when the water in the IRWST is cold and the tank is at ambient pressure. Condensation during
sparger discharge results in high frequency pressure oscillation, primarily in a frequency range of
40 to 60 Hertz. This transient results in positive and negative hydrodynamic loads on the tank
walls that are less than 5 psi,.
ADS pressurization (ADS2)
This ADS transient is associated with blowdown of the primary system through the spargers
after prolonged operation of the passive RHR, which heats up the water in the IRWST. Since
the flow through the sparger cannot fully condense in the saturated conditions, the pressure
increases in the IRWST and steam is vented through the IRWST roof. The IRWST
pressurization is specified as an equivalent static pressure on the floor, walls and roof of 5 psi.
4.1.3 Subcompartment Differential Pressure Loads
The structural wall and floor modules in the Containment Internal Structures shall be designed
for subcompartment differential accident pressures of 5 psi per Appendix B of Reference 2.1.
The tunnel in the CVS room inside the containment shall be designed for an accidental pressure
of 7 psi.
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4.1.4 Hydrodynamic Loads due to the Safe Shutdown Earthquake
Hydrodynamic loads due to the safe shutdown earthquake on the walls of the IRWST, spent
fuel pool, cask loading pit, cask washdown pit, and fuel transfer canal due to water inertia and
sloshing shall be determined in accordance with Section 5.2.
4.1.5 Thermal Effects
4.1.5.1 Thermal Transients for Containment I nternal Structures
1. Normal Thermal Transients
The following IRWST transients are expected to occur a few times during the life of the
plant and shall be considered as normal thermal conditions in the design load
combinations. They apply to the boundaries of the IRWST. They shall be assumed to
initiate from a condition with the containment at 50
o
F.
Passive RHR operation from 50
o
F
This transient is associated with blowdown of the primary system through the spargers
after prolonged operation of the passive RHR, which heats up the water in the IRWST.
For structural design an extreme transient is defined in Figure 7 starting at 50F since
this maximizes the temperature gradient across the concrete filled structural module
walls. Prolonged operation of the passive RHR heat exchanger raises the water
temperature from an ambient temperature of 50F to saturation in about 5 hours,
increasing to 260F within about 11 hours. Blowdown of the primary system through
the spargers may occur during this transient and occurs prior to 24 hours after the
initiation of the event. Since the flow through the sparger cannot fully condense in the
saturated conditions, the pressure increases in the in-containment refueling water storage
tank and steam is vented through the in-containment refueling water storage tank roof.
The in-containment refueling water storage tank is designed for an equivalent static
internal pressure of 5 psi in addition to the hydrostatic pressure occurring at any time up
to 24 hours after the initiation of the event.
2. Accident Thermal Transients
The DBA and MSLB temperature transients, shown in Figure 8, shall be considered as
accident thermal conditions in the design load combinations. They shall be assumed to
initiate from a condition with the containment at 50
o
F. They apply to all structures in
the containment. It is assumed that the IRWST has drained and that the loop
compartments are flooded to elevation 107'-2". The temperature of the containment
atmosphere shows a peak temperature of 370
o
F and reduces below 260
o
F at 10000
seconds (= 2.78 hours). Short term temperature transients do not affect the structures due
to the thermal inertia of the concrete and the IRWST water.
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4.1.5.2 Thermal Transients for Spent Fuel Pool Structures
1. Normal Thermal
The boundaries of the spent fuel pool, cask loading pit, cask washdown pit, and fuel
transfer canal shall be designed for a normal water temperature of 120
o
F with an air
temperature of 50
o
F inside the building and -10
o
F outside the building. The spent fuel
pool is always full of water. The other pits may be either full or empty. The
temperature gradient across the wall shall be assumed linear.
2. Accident Thermal
The boundaries of the spent fuel pool and fuel transfer canal shall be designed for the
following transient postulated to occur with a full core offload and loss of normal
cooling. Initial conditions are steady state with the water temperature at 120
o
F with an
air temperature of 50
o
F inside the building and -40
o
F outside the building. The water
heats up linearly to 212
o
F in about 3 hours and remains at 212
o
F long enough to
establish a steady state linear gradient across the walls. The water cools down from the
steady state accident temperature at 31
o
F/hour.
4.1.6 Concrete Placement Loads
The face plates and the trusses of the wall structural modules shall be designed to support a
concrete placement pressure of 1050 lbs per square foot. The pressure is based on Table 5-4
of Reference 2.4 for a maximum concrete lift height of 7 feet or at a placement rate equal to or
less than 6 feet per hour at 60F Fahrenheit.
The design loads for the floor modules shall include the weight of the wet concrete combined
with the other loads.
4.2 Design Loads - Form Modules
The form modules shall be designed to support a concrete placement pressure of 1050 lbs per
square foot based on criteria described in Section 4.1.6.
4.3 Load Combinations - Structural Modules
Load combinations for the design of the structural modules shall be in accordance with
Reference 2.1, supplemented by the following:
4.3.1 Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) Loads

ADS1 - shall be combined with the SSE by square root of the sum of the squares

ADS2 - this is an equivalent static pressure and shall be included algebraically with
other normal loads and then combined with plus/minus SSE loads
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To reduce the number of design load cases in the structural design, the ADS2 loads may be
treated as positive and negative and considered both with and without thermal loads. This
loading then envelops both the ADS1 and ADS2 loads.
The ADS loads shall not be combined with the subcompartment differential pressure loads.
4.3.2 Concrete Placement Loads - Structural Modules
The stresses induced in face plates of the wall structural modules by the concrete placement
shall not be combined with the other loads.
5.0 ANALYSES
5.1 General
The structures which comprise the structural modules shall be analyzed for the loads and load
combinations discussed in Section 4.0. Methods of analyses used shall be based on accepted
principles of structural mechanics and shall be consistent with the geometry and boundary
conditions. Either computer analysis or hand calculations may be utilized. In certain cases, the
nature of the loading or complexity of the structure may dictate the type of analyses required.
5.2 Analyses for Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) Forces
Member forces for the SSE are obtained from the equivalent static acceleration analysis at the
hard rock site of the 3D fixed base, three dimensional, finite element models, modified to
account for accidental torsion and SSI effects. The equivalent static seismic load for the
direction of excitation is defined as the product of the component mass and the seismic
acceleration value at the natural frequency of the wall from the applicable floor response
spectra. A load factor of 1.0 is used. If the frequency is not determined, the peak acceleration
from the applicable floor response spectrum is used. In frequency calculations, one-half of the
water mass to the opposite wall shall be included. Out-of-plane forces on the walls due to the
impulsive and convective forces of the water shall also be calculated.
5.3 Analyses for Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) Forces
The detailed dynamic analyses of the IRWST are performed and the results used to confirm the
adequacy of the design of the structural modules.
6.0 DESIGN OF FORM MODULES
The form modules generally serve neither safety nor structural function other than as temporary
formwork for concrete placement and they are designed only for concrete placement pressure
specified in Section 4.1.6. The form modules are designed and built to the requirements of
AISC-N690 (Reference 2.2). Welded studs, or similar embedded steel elements, may be
attached on the concrete face of the permanent steel form where surface attachments transfer
loads into the concrete. Where these surface attachments are seismic Category I, the portion of
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the steel form module transferring the load into the concrete is classified as seismic Category I.
7.0 DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL WALL MODULES
7.1 Structural Wall Modules Without Concrete Fill
Structural wall modules without concrete fill are designed as steel structures, according to the
requirements of AISC-N690 (Reference 2.2). The west wall of the in-containment refueling
water tank (IRWST) is such a wall.
7.2 Structural Wall Modules With Concrete Fill
Structural wall modules with concrete fill are designed as reinforced concrete structures in
accordance with the requirements of ACI 349 (Reference 2.3). The face plates are considered
as the reinforcing steel, bonded to the concrete by headed studs. Design Guide Reference 2.6 is
followed.
7.3 Stiffness of Structural Wall Modules with Concrete Fill
Table 2 summarizes in-plane shear and out-of-plane flexural stiffness properties of the 48-inch
and 30-inch walls based on a series of different assumptions. The stiffnesses are expressed for
unit length and height of each wall. The ratio of the stiffness to the stiffness of the monolithic case
is also shown.

Case 1 assumes monolithic behavior of the steel plate and uncracked concrete. This
stiffness is the basis for the stiffness of the concrete-filled steel module walls in the nuclear
island seismic analyses.

Case 2 considers the full thickness of the wall as uncracked concrete. This stiffness value is
shown for comparison purposes. It is applicable for loads that do not result in significant
cracking of the concrete and is the basis for the stiffness of the reinforced concrete walls in
the nuclear island seismic analyses.

Case 3 assumes that the concrete in tension has no stiffness. For the flexural stiffness this is
the conventional stiffness value used in working stress design of reinforced concrete
sections. For in-plane shear stiffness, a 45-degree diagonal concrete compression strut is
assumed with tensile loads carried only by the steel plate.
7.4 Design of Trusses
The purpose of the trusses is to provide a structural framework for the modules, maintain the
separation between the face plates, support the modules during transportation and erection, and
act as "form ties" between the face plates when concrete is being placed between them. After
the concrete has cured, the trusses are not considered to contribute to the strength or stiffness of
the completed modules.
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The design of the trusses include the following considerations:
1. The projected area of the trusses should be a minimum in order to avoid forming
vertical crack planes within the modules. Such crack planes would lower the in-plane
shear stiffness of the modules.
2. During concrete placement, workers and inspectors will be inside the modules.
Therefore, diagonal members in the trusses are undesirable because they would inhibit
movement between the trusses.
The trusses are designed for the following two load conditions:
1. Concrete placement loads of 1050 psf.
2. Dead load self-weight. This is a postulated load case, which occurs before erection,
when the submodule is lying on its side. It is assumed to be supported only at the ends,
which are taken to be 48 feet apart. If the length of the submodule exceeds 48 feet, it
shall be picked up at two points. An impact factor of 1.25 is applied to the self-weight.
The trusses shall be designed according to the requirements of AISC-N690 (Reference 2.2)
using normal allowable stresses.
The two load conditions described above do not necessarily cover all the loads that will occur
during fabrication, handling, transportation, and erection. All of those loads will be evaluated.
7.5 Design of Shear Studs for Structural Modules
As discussed above, the wall structural modules shall be designed as reinforced concrete
elements, with the face plates serving as reinforcing steel. Since the face plates do not have
deformation patterns typical of reinforcing steel, shear studs shall be provided to transfer the
forces between the concrete and the steel face plates. The shear studs will make the concrete
and steel face plates behave compositely. In addition, the shear studs will provide anchorage
for piping and other items attached to the walls.
The shear studs shall be sized and spaced in accordance with Section Q 1.11 of AISC-N690
(Reference 2.2) to develop composite action between the concrete and steel face plates.

7.6 Design of Base Connections (LATER)
8.0 DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULES
8.1 Design Assumptions, Basis, and Related Requirements
For vertical downward loads, the floor modules shall be designed as a composite section,
according to the requirements of Section Q1.11 of Reference 2.2. Composite action of the
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steel section and concrete fill is assumed based on meeting the intent of the requirements of
Section Q1.11.1 for beams totally encased in the concrete. Although the bottom flange of the
steel section is not encased within concrete, the design configuration of the floor module
provides complete concrete confinement to prevent spalling. It also provides a better natural
bond than the code-required configuration.
For vertical upward loads, no credit is taken for composite action. The steel members are relied
upon to provide load-carrying capacity. Concrete, together with the embedded angle stiffeners,
is assumed to provide stability to the plates.
Floor modules shall be designed using the following basic assumptions and related requirements:
Concrete provides restraint against buckling of steel plates. The buckling unbraced
length of the steel plate, therefore, is assumed to equal the span length between the fully
embedded steel plates and shapes.
Although the floor modules which form the top (ceiling) of the in-containment refueling
water storage tank are not in contact with water, stainless steel plates shall be used for
the tank boundary.
The floor modules shall be designed as simply supported beams.
For steel members subjected to temperature higher than 100F, appropriate changes in
the modulus of elasticity and allowable stress shall be considered the same as discussed
in Section 9.0.
8.2 Design Procedures
8.2.1 Floor Module Design for Vertical Downward Loads
The floor modules shall be designed as a one-way composite concrete slab and steel beam
system in supporting the vertical downward loads.. The effective width of the concrete slab shall
be determined according to Section Q1.11.1 of Reference 2.2. The effective concrete
compression area shall be extended to the neutral axis of the composite section. The concrete
compression area shall be treated as an equivalent steel area based on the modular ratio
between steel and concrete. Figure 5 shows effective composite sections. The steel section
shall be proportioned to support the dead load and construction loads existing prior to
hardening of the concrete.
The allowable stresses for the various load combinations shall be according to Table 4 of
Reference 2.1.
8.2.2 Floor Module Design for Vertical Upward Loads
For vertical upward loads, the floor modules shall be designed as non-composite steel
structures. The effective width, be, of the stiffened face plate in compression shall be determined
considering the buckling strength of the plate. The effective width is shown in Table 3 and Figure
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5 for floor beams spaced 48 inches apart with fully embedded angles spaced 18 inches apart.
The allowable stresses for the various load combinations shall be according to Table 4 of
Reference 2.1.
8.2.3 Floor Module Design for In-Plane Loads
In-plane shear loads acting on the floor modules are assumed to be resisted only by the steel
face plate without reliance on the concrete for strength. The stresses in the face plate due to the
in-plane loads are combined with those due to vertical loads. The critical stress locations of the
floor face plate are evaluated for the combined normal and shear stress, based on the von Mises
yield criterion:
For the particular case of a two-dimensional stress condition the equation is:
(1)
2
- 1 2 + (2)
2
= (fy)
2
where 1 and 2 are the principal stresses and fy is the uniaxial yield stress.
For the face plate where normal, , and shear, , stresses are calculated, the principal stresses
can be expressed as follows:
1 = (/2) + (
2
/4 +
2
)
1/2
Therefore, the condition at yield becomes:

2
+ 3
2
= (fy)
2
For the design of the structural floor module faceplate, the allowable stresses for the various
loading conditions are as follows:
Normal condition

2
+ 3
2
= (0.6fy)
2
Severe condition

2
+ 3
2
= (0.6fy)
2
Extreme/abnormal condition

2
+ 3
2
= (0.96fy)
2
9.0 THERMAL CONSIDERATIONS
For face plates subjected to temperature higher than 70F, appropriate changes in the yield
strength (Fy), design stress intensity (Sm), tensile stress (Su), and modulus of elasticity (E) shall
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be considered in the design. Table 1 gives the material properties at various temperatures.
10.0 EVALUATION FOR THERMAL LOADS
The effect of thermal loads on the structural wall modules with and without concrete fill is
evaluated by using the working stress design methods for load combination 3 of Table 5 from
Reference 2.1. This evaluation is in addition to the evaluation using the working stress design
method of AISC N-690 or the strength design method of ACI-349 for the load combinations
without the thermal load. Acceptance for the load combinations with normal thermal loads,
which includes the thermal transients described in Section 4.1.5, is that the stress in general
areas of the steel plate be less than yield. In local areas where the stress may exceed yield, the
total stress intensity range is less than twice yield. This evaluation of thermal loads is based on
the ASME Code philosophy for Service Level A loads given in ASME Code, Section III,
Subsection NE, Paragraphs NE-3213.3 and 3221.4.
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TABLE 1 - YIELD STRENGTH AND MODULUS OF ELASTICITY VERSUS
TEMPERATURE
Temp
0
F A - 36 Nitronic 33
F
y
x10
3
(psi)
Sm x 10
3
(psi)
Su x 10
3
(psi)
E x 10
6
(psi)
F
y
x10
3
(psi)
Sm x 10
3
(psi)
Su x 10
3
(psi)
E x 10
6
(psi)
70 36.0 19.3 58.0 29.5 55.0 33.3 100.0 28.3
100 36.0 19.3 58.0 55.0 33.3 100.0
150 33.8 48.3
200 33.0 19.3 58.0 28.8 44.2 32.7 97.7 27.6
250 32.4 40.6
300 31.8 19.3 58.0 28.3 37.5 30.2 91.1 27.0
400 30.8 19.3 58.0 27.7 32.9 28.9 87.3 26.5
500 29.3 19.3 58.0 27.3 30.2 27.1 85.1 25.8
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TABLE 2 - SHEAR AND FLEXURAL STIFFNESSES OF STRUCTURAL MODULE
WALLS
Shear Stiffness
(1), (2)
Flexural Stiffness
(1), (2)
Case Analysis Assumption 48" Wall 30" Wall 48" Wall 30" Wall
GA
x 10
6
lbs Ratio
GA
x 10
6
lbs Ratio
EI
x 10
9
lbs. in
2
Ratio
EI
x 10
9
lbs. in
2
Ratio
1 Monolithic section
considering steel plates
and uncracked concrete.
For shear stiffness this is
(A
c
G
c
+ A
s
G
s
).
83.5 1.0 55.8 1.0 47.5 1.0 13.6 1.0
2 Uncracked gross concrete
section (full wall thickness
considering steel plate as
concrete)
73.9 0.89 46.2 0.83 33.2 0.70 8.1 0.60
3 Transformed cracked
section considering steel
plates and concrete (no
concrete tension stiffness)
25.0 0.30 22.6 0.41 22.1 0.47 8.0 0.59
Notes:
1. The shear stiffness, GA, is calculated for the full thickness of wall. The flexural stiffness is calculated
per unit length of the wall.
2. Stiffness calculations are based on the following material properties: E
c
= 3,605,000 psi, n = 8, vc
= 0.17,
vs
= 0.30
3. These values documented in AP600 calculation GW-SUP-005, Rev 0
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
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TABLE 3 - EFFECTIVE PLATE WIDTHS FOR STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULES
Thickness
in.
Carbon Steel Nitronic 33
3/8 40 in. 31 5/8 in.
1/2 46 3/4 in. 39 5/8 in.
5/8 47 1/2 in. 43 1/4 in.
Notes:
1. The values in this table are documented in AP600 calculation 1100-SMC-002, Rev 2.
2. The effective width applies to floors with beams spaced at 48-inch centers and with fully embedded
angles spaced at 18 inch centers.
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
18
FIGURE 1 - STRUCTURAL MODULES IN CONTAINMENT INTERNAL STRUCTURES
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
19
FIGURE 2 - TYPICAL STRUCTURAL WALL MODULE
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
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FIGURE 3 - TYPICAL STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULE
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
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FIGURE 4 - LOCATION OF STRUCTURAL MODULES IN AUXILIARY BUILDING
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
22
FIGURE 5 - EFFECTIVE SECTIONS FOR STRUCTURAL FLOOR MODULES
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
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FIGURE 6 - TYPICAL BASE DETAILS FOR WALL MODULE
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
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WGOTHIC IRWST Heatup
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
0 4 8 12 16 20 24
Time (hours)
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e

(
F
)
IRWST CMT Room
FIGURE 7 - IRWST TEMPERATURE TRANSIENT
Taken from DCP APP-GW-GEE-009, Rev 0
Design Methodology of Structural Modules
APP-GW-SUP-001, Rev 0
02/17/03
25
FIGURE 8 - CONTAINMENT TEMPERATURE EQUIPMENT QUALIFICATION CURVE
Taken from DCD Figure3D.5-8 (sheet 1 of 2)