Function of “HAVE” & “HAS” 
Have + s = Has 
1. Tense of have/has 
 
 
 
 
 
He has gone to Delhi.            I have a pen. 
 
      He has been living here for the last six years. 
 
2. Have and has show three different tense: 
i. A little past tense. 
ii. A little present tense. 
iii. Past tense + Present tense. 
 
3. Although ‘have’/‘has’ show a little past tense and a little present tense, they are neither pure 
present tense nor pure past tense. They are NOT EXACT equivalent of either the pure past tense or 
pure present tense. 
 
4.  An action is in pure past tense when time lapse (T/L) can be mentioned, as in the following case… 
 
I saw him yesterday. 
       
As  ‘have’ & ‘has’ do NOT show pure past tense TIME LAPSE can never be mentioned with them. The 
following sentences, therefore, are incorrect, as TIME LAPSE (T/L) has been mentioned. 
i. I have seen him yesterday. 
 
ii. I have seen him five minutes ago. 
 
iii. He has come to India last week.    
 
“Today” and “now” show the present, hence following sentences are correct. 
 
i. I have seen him today. 
 
ii. He has come here just now. 
 
PAST  PRESENT 
HAVE/HAS 
PAST + PRESENT 
T/L 
x
x
x



 
5. Function In the PAST 
A. Action already over in the past but TIME LAPSE not mentioned. 
 
i. He has gone to Delhi. 
ii. We have finished our work. 
iii. He has studied in this school. 
 
 
6. Function in the Present Tense. 
a. Shows ownership or Possession in the present. 
i. I have a pen 
ii. He has a bike 
iii. They have a new‐house. 
 
b. Shows Compulsion or Coercion in the Present. 
i. I have to go home early today. 
ii. He has to reach his office before 10 O’clock. 
Note: “to” is always used immediately after “have” or “has” in case of compulsion. 
 
7. Function in Past + Present 
Shows that an action begins in the PAST and Continues in the PRESENT. 
i. He has been living here in this house for the last six years. [also, for six years 
now] 
ii. They have been studying in this school for five years now. 
Note: (i) Whenever we use “have” or “has” to show “past + present” we must mention 
the word “the last” or “now” in order to establish the link between the past and the 
present. Without such words there will be no relationship between the past and the 
present and the sentence will show ONLY PAST and NOT “past + present”. Then the 
sentence will be incorrect, as in the following case. 
He has been working here for six years.  
In the example cited above “for six years” shows “T/L” and as “T/L” cannot be 
mentioned with “have” or “has” the sentence becomes incorrect. 
The correct form can be shown by using pure past tense (because T/L can be mentioned 
with pure past tense) as in the following. 
 
T/L  NOT 
Mentioned 
x

 
 
He lived in this house for six years. 
 
When  we mention “the last six years” we do NOT show T/L, but the continuation of 
time from the past into the present. 
Note (ii) – PAST + PRESENT can also be shown by using, “have/has + past participle” 
(and NOT only by using “have/has + been + verb+ing” as we have seen so far) as in the 
following case.  
i. He has lived in this house for the last six years. 
ii. He has studied in this school for five years now. 
In examples above “the last” or “now” must be mentioned in order to establish the link 
between the past and the present. 
Note (iii) “Have” and “has” are used for showing PAST + PRESENT using the word 
“since” (point of time). 
i. I have been waiting for you since the last one hour.  
  
 
 
   
Pure past 
T/L 
x
Period of time, use “for” instead of “since” 

 
Functions of “Shall Have” and “Will Have” 
 
1. Possession or Ownership in the future by a point or period of time. 
 
a. I shall have a new car by the end of the year. 
b. He will have a house of his own by next year. 
 
2. Compulsion or Coercion in the future by a point or period of time. 
 
a. We shall have to repay the loan within six months. 
b. We shall have to finish this work latest by tomorrow. 
Note:  “to” is always used immediately after “shall have” or “will have” in the case of 
compulsion. 
3. Action Already Over in the future by a Point or Period of time. 
 
a. He will have left for his office by the time we reach his house. 
b. We shall have finished our work by next week. 
c. He will have worked in this office for two years by next month. 
 
 
4.  
 
 
 
 
Action began in the PAST, continues through the PRESENT into the FUTURE up to a point or period 
of time. 
i. He will have been working in this office for three years by June 2012. 
 
 
 
 
   
PAST  PRESENT FUTURE
Point/Period of time in the future 

 
Functions of “HAD” 
 
“Had” is NOT the past tense of “have” or “has” because “have” and “has”, themselves show past 
tense and therefore we cannot have the past tense of the past tense itself. 
“Had” has a past tense of its own which is not related to the tense of “have” or “has”. 
 
1. Tense of “HAD” 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  “Had” shows “More Past” 
More Past, However is possible only when there is another action in “Less Past” in other 
words there must be two actions whenever “had” is used ‐ one action (A/1) in more past 
and other action (A/2) in less past, as in following cases. 
i.   He had left his office before we reached there. 
ii. She had finished the work before we contacted her. 
 
iii. We reached Ranchi after he had left for Delhi. 
 
Note: i) L/P is usually shown by PAST TENSE, however, it must be borne in mind that L/P is 
shown by past tense only when both A/1 & A/2 are already over in past. 
ii) Sometimes L/P is shown by using “have” or “has” as shown bellow. 
  Science has progressed in a way we had never imagined. 
 
L/P is shown by “have/has + past participle” when A/2 beings in the PAST & Continues 
in the present. 
iii)  Sometimes L/P is also shown by “could +verb”… 
   
He had left his office before we could reach there. 
 
L/P is shown by using “Could + verb” when A/2 is attempted but not completed (on time). 
HAD 
MORE PAST 
A/1 
 
HAVE 
HAS 
PAST 
(LESS PAST) 
A/2 
 
PRESENT 

M/P‐A/1  L/P‐A/2 
M/P‐A/1 
M/P‐A/1 
L/P‐A/2 
L/P‐A/2 
L/P‐A/2 
M/P‐A/1 
M/P‐A/1  L/P‐A/2 

 
2. Used in the sense of “if” or with “if” 
 
Used in the sense of ‘if’ :‐ Had I known that you were here I would have brought your book 
along with me. 
 
Used with “if” :‐ If I had known that you were here I would have brought your book along 
with me. 
Note: Whenever “had” is used in the sense of “if” or  with ‘if’ then L/P is shown by “would 
have” or “could have” or “should have” or “might have”, depending upon the sense to be 
conveyed  + past participle. 
Could have     ability 
Should have    obligation 
Might have    possibility 
Note: Whenever “had” is used with “if” or in the sense of “if” neither A/1 or A/2 actually takes 
place. The Situation here, therefore, is purely hypothetical. 
    
3. Function of “HAD” in past tense. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
i. Possession        i. Possession 
ii. Compulsion        ii. Compulsion 
(+TO) 
As shown above “had” is the past tense of “have” and “has” in the case of possession and 
compulsion because in these two cases “have/has” are in present tense and it is always 
possible to have the past tense of a verb which has a present tense. 
e.g.   i) He had a motor‐cycle when he was a student. 
    ii) He had to obey his father’s order(s). 
  Note: “to” is always used immediately after “had” in the case of compulsion. 
 
 
HAD 
MORE PAST 
 
 
PAST 
 
 
HAVE/ 
HAS 
 
 
PRESENT 
Past 
Tense
Present 
Tense 
Possession in the past 
Compulsion in the past 

 
Summary:‐ 
Sr. 
No. 
More Past 
(M/P) 
Less Past (L/P)  Past 
Tense 
Condition 
1.  Had  Past Tense  X 
When A/1 & A/2 are already over in 
the past. 
2.  Had 
Have/has +  
past participle 

When A/2 begins in the past and 
continues in the present. 
3.  Had  Could + verb  X 
When both A/2 & A/1 attempted but 
not completed (on time). 
4.  Had 
would/should/might/ 
could have + past Participle 

When “had” is used in the sense of “if” 
or with “if” 
5.  X  X 
had 
had + (to) 
Possession in the past 
Compulsion in the past 
 
Function of “have had” “has had” and “had had” 
1. Structure – have/has/had + past participle (except in cases of i. possession and ii. compulsion) 
 
2. Present    Past    Past Participle 
have/has    had    had  (in case of i. possession & ii. compulsion) 
 
3. According to rule 1 above, we can say: 
i. I have taken my breakfast. 
ii. He has finished his breakfast 
 
4. Combining rule 1 & 2 above, we can say:‐ 
i. I have had  my breakfast. 
ii. He has had  his breakfast. 
 
5. On the same principle we can say:‐ 
i. We have had to obey the orders of our superior. 
ii. He has had to leave early for his office today. 
 
6. Similarly according to rule 1, we can say:‐ 
i. He had taken his breakfast before he went to college. 
 
7. Combining rule 1 & 2, we can say:‐ 
He had had his breakfast before he went to the college 
 
Similarly, we can say: 
He had had  to obey his father as there was no alternative. 
 
2  3


M/P 
P/P  LP‐A/2 
M/P  P/P  LP‐A/2 
LP‐A/2 


 
Have/has/had had or have/has/had had to can be used ONLY in cases of possession and 
compulsion (because “had” is the participle of have/has only in these two cases). 
 
The function of “have/has had to” can also be performed more simply by “had to” as shown:‐ 
 He has had  to obey his father. 
OR 
He had  to obey his father. 
 
 
Have + s = has /Had = did + have 
Sr/No.  Uses  Function  Tenses 
1.0  Do you have a pen?  Do + have => Possession/ No emphasis (question)  present 
1.1  Yes I do have a pen.  Do + have => Possession/emphasis (statement)  present 
1.2  Yes, I have a pen.  Possession/Normal (statement)  present 
2.0  Does he have a pen?  Does + have => Possession/No emphasis (question)  present 
2.1  Yes, he does have a pen.  Does + have => Possession/Emphasis (Statement)  Present 
2.2  Yes he has a pen.  Possession/Normal (statement)  Present 
3.0  Did he have a pen?  Did + have => Possession/ No emphasis (question)  Past 
3.1  Yes he did have a pen.  Did + have => Possession/emphasis (statement)  Past 
3.2  Yes he had a pen.  Possession/Normal (statement)  Past 
4.0  Do you have to work?  Do+have to => Compulsion/No emphasis (question)  Present 
4.1  Yes I do have to work.  Compulsion/emphasis (statement)  Present 
4.2  Yes, I have to work.  Compulsion /Normal (statement)  Present 
5.0  Does he have to work?  Does+have to => Compulsion/No emphasis (question)  Present 
5.1  Yes he does have to work.  Compulsion/emphasis (statement)  Present 
5.2  Yes he has to work.  Compulsion /Normal (statement)  Present 
6.0  Did he have to work?  Did+have to => Compulsion/No emphasis (question)  Past 
6.1  Yes he did have to work.  Compulsion/emphasis (statement)  Past 
6.2  Yes he had to work  Compulsion /Normal (statement)  Past 
Note: “Has” is NEVER used with “do”, “does” or “did” 
Sr/No.  Uses  Function  Tenses 
1.0  Have you got a pen?  Have + got 
Has + got 
present 
1.1  Has he got a pen?  present 
1.2  Yes I have got a pen  Possession  present 
1.3  Yes I have a pen  Possession  present 
1.4  Yes he has got a pen  Possession  present 
1.5  Yes he has a pen  Possession  present 
2.0  Have you got to work?  Have + got to 
Has + got to 
present 
2.1  Has he got to work?  present 
2.2  Yes I have got to work.  Compulsion  present 
2.3  Yes he has got to work.  Compulsion  present 
 
P/P 


Past tense 
Possession 
Compulsion 

 
Use of “had got” and “had got to” 
1. “Had got” and “Had got to” are used on the same pattern as “have got” and “have got to”. Here 
only the tense changes to “More Past”, as in the following: 
 
i. He had got a pen for himself before we could provide him one (possession in M/P) 
 
ii. He had got to leave for his office early as the prime minister was to visit there. 
Compulsion in more past 
2. Although the use of “have got” and “have got to” is fairly common, the use of “had got” and 
“had got to” is not popular. Their use should, therefore, be avoided. 
 
3. It should always be borne in mind that the function of “have got”, “have got to”, “had got” and 
“had got to” are performed by:‐ 
i. have (Possession) 
ii. have to (Compulsion) 
iii. had (Possession) 
iv. had to (compulsion) 
“do”, “does” and “did” are NEVER used with “had”. 
   
MP‐A/1 
LP‐A/2 
MP‐A/1  LP‐A/2 
10 
 
Function of “Been” 
1. Present tense       Past      Past Participle    Future Tense 
i. am/is      was      been      shall be/will be 
ii. are        were      been      shall be/will be 
 
2. Always used with “have/has/had” 
3. NEVER used with “am/is/are” or “was/were” because “been” is the past participle of 
“am/is/are/was/were” and a past participle cannot be used with its OWN present tense or 
past tense. 
 
4. Shows “Already Visited” 
i. I have been here before. 
ii. He has been to England. 
 
5. Shows “Passive Voice” when used with another past participle… 
i. He has been beaten by his father. 
 
ii. He had been beaten by his father before he went to school. 
 
6. In “Passive Voice” the subject is Passive (without any action or motion) as in the example in 
Rule 5. Whereas in “Active Voice” the subject is Active (Showing Action or Motion) as in the 
example given bellow. 
i. His father has beaten him (A/V) 
ii. His father had beaten him before we went to school (A/V) 
 
It is obvious from the example given above that A/V is better than the P/V because the former is 
brief, simple and direct. However, there are certain situation which can be expressed ONLY in 
P/V, such situation are usually those where it is not possible to say who has done the work, as in 
the following cases: 
iii. The road has been repaired. 
iv. Power has been restored. 
 
7. When used with “have/has” and “v+ing” it shows that an action began in PAST and is still 
continuing in the PRESENT. 
i. He has been living in this house for the last six years. 
 
8. When used with “had” and “v+ing”, it shows that an action was continuing in More‐Past. 
 
He had been living in this house before he shifted to his own flat. 
 
  
PP/1  PP/2 
PP/1  PP/2 
M/P  L/P 
11 
 
Special Rules on Verbs 
1. A verb is a word which shows Mental or Physical action. 
i. He is a good boy (M/A) 
ii. He walks fast (P/A) 
iii. He just dreams (M/A) 
 
2. It is impossible to have a sentence without a verb. 
i. Birds fly 
ii. (you) come 
 
3. The number of verbs in a sentence depends upon the number of actions in it 
S =  A/1   +   A/2   + A/3 + ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
   
4. The verb in a sentence are used with either according to the rule of 
i. Same Time Frame (V‐ S/TF), Or 
ii. Different Time Frame (V‐D/TF), Or 
iii. Corresponding Time Frame (V – CR/TF) 
 
5. The verbs in a sentence are in the Same Time Frame when the actions take place in the 
same time frame. 
i. I get up early in the morning, go for a walk, come back then take a bath. 
 
ii. Yesterday I got up early in the morning, went for a walk, came back and then took a bath. 
 
6. The verb in a sentence will be in Different Time Frame when actions take place in different 
time‐frames. 
i. He is late today but he came on time yesterday. 
 
ii. I am present today, but I shall be absent tomorrow. 
 
7. The verb is in a sentence will be in Corresponding Time‐Frame, when the action takes place 
in corresponding time‐frame. 
i. He says   that he  will work hard. 
 
ii. He said   that he  would work hard. 
 
iii. He thinks   that he  can do anything. 
 
iv. He thought  that he could do everything. 
V/1  V/2  V/3 
A1‐V/1  A2‐V/2  A3‐V/3  A4‐V/4  V‐S/TF  V‐S/TF 
A1‐V/1  V‐S/TF 
A2‐V/2  A3‐V/3  A4‐V/4 
V‐S/TF 
A1‐V/1  A2‐V/2  V‐D/TF 
A1‐V/1 
V‐D/TF  A2‐V/2 
A/1‐V/1  V‐CR/TF  A/2‐V/2 
A/1‐V/1  V‐CR/TF 
A/1‐V/1  V‐CR/TF 
A/2‐V/2 
A/2‐V/2 
A/1‐V/1  V‐CR/TF  A/2‐V/2 
12 
 
v. They say that they may not come to the party. 
 
vi. They said that they might not come to the party. 
The rule of CR/TF is valid only in the cases of  
i. will (or shall)/ would  
ii.   can /could 
iii. may/might 
 
 
 
Function of “May” and “Might” 
1. Tenses of ‘may’ & ‘might’. 
may       Past Tense      might 
 
May I come in, Sir?   He said that he might go to Delhi the following day  
 
 
He says that he may go to Delhi tomorrow. 
 
He might have gone to Delhi 
  He said that he might work hard. 
Possibility 
He says that may pass the exam.  He said that he might pass the exam. 
Permission 
May I come in Sir?  Might I come in sir? (extreme request) 
Blessing 
May god bless you!   X 
May you always be happy  X 
Purpose 
We study so that we may pass.  X 
 
 
   
A/1‐V/1 
A/2‐V/2 
V‐CR/TF 
A/1‐V/1  A2‐V/2  V‐CR/TF 
Present/Future 
Past/Future
CR/TF
(future from the past)
CR/TF 
(future from the present)
(past)
(future)
(present) 
13 
 
Function of “Can” and “Could” 
 
1. Tense of “Can” & “Could” 
 
CAN                COULD 
 
I can walk fast. (Present)  I could walk fast when I was young. (past) 
I  can to there tomorrow. 
 
He said that he could go there the following day. 
Ability (to do something) 
He can work hard.  He could work hard when he was healthy. 
 
 
Function of “Should” 
 
1. “should” is NOT the past tense of “shall”. “Should” cannot be the past tense of “shall” because  
it has a meaning that is completely different from that of “shall” (It is well‐known that the 
meaning of word doesn’t change when its tense changes). “should” shows “ought to” whereas 
“shall” shows future tense. 
i. We shall help the poor (in the future) 
ii. He should help the poor (we are obliged to help the poor/ we ought to help the poor) 
 
2. The tense of “should” is the same as the tense of “may” and “can”  i.e. (present/future) 
i. We should help the poor now (present) 
ii. We should help the poor tomorrow. (future form the past) 
 
3. The past tense of “should” is shown by “should have + past participle” 
i. We should have helped the poor. 
 
 
   
Present/Future  Past/Future 
(future from the present)  (future from the past)
14 
 
Function of “Shall”, “Will” and “Would” 
 
Shall/Will        Past Tense      Would 
 
 
 
Shows future from the present: 
i. We promise that we shall help you. 
 
ii. He says that he will work hard. 
Shows future from the past: 
i. We promised that we would help you. 
 
ii.  He said that he would work hard. 
 
I/We – shall 
You – will 
He/she/it/this/that/one – will 
I/we – would 
You – would 
He/she/it/this/that/one‐ would 
I/we – will 
You – shall 
He/she/it/that/this/one – shall 
 
i. We promise that we will help you no 
matter what happens (D/F/P) 
 
 
 

 
 
We promised that we would help you no 
matter what happens (D/past/Future) 

Shows habitual action in the past: 
He would sit in this office and talk the whole 
day. 

Although some people use “would” as the 
equivalent of “shall” and “will” it is always 
better to avoid such a use. “would” is the past 
tense of “shall” and “will” and therefore 
should not be used as the equivalent of “shall” 
& “will”. 
 
 
How to use “shall/will/may/can” and “should/would/might/could”: 
 
1. Shall/will/may/can/ 
should/would/might/could  
 
i. I shall go there tomorrow. 
ii. I can swim well 
iii. We should help the poor. 
iv. I would work hard if I were you. 
v. I could swim well when I was young. 
vi. He may come here tomorrow. 
vii. He said that he might come the following day. 
 
Present/Future 
Past/Future 
Present 
Present 
future
future 
Past future 
Past future 
Normal 
future 
tense 
Normal 
future  
from PAST 
Determination 
in future from 
present 
+  Only Verb  Always in Present 
15 
 
2. Shall be/will be/ may be/ can be/ 
should be/would be/might be/could be 
 
i. I shall be studying in my room when you come there tomorrow. 
ii. He may be sleeping in his room. 
iii. He will be happy to receive this give. 
 
iv. I shall be pleased to meet you. 
 
v. You should be studying in your room instead of playing. 
 
Note:  A particle is a verb which performs the task of an Adjective. 
 
How to use “am/is/are” and “was/were”: 
 
“am/is/are” and “was/were” are used on the same principle as “shall be/will be/may be/can be” 
 
“am/is/are” 
“was/were” 
 
i. I am studying/happy/pleased. 
ii.   I was sleeping in my room when the bell rang. 
iii.   You were working in your office when I went there. 
It is essential to mention the context in the cases of past continuous tense and future continuous tense 
in order to complete the sentence logically. 
i. I was studying in my room when the bell rang. 
ii.   I shall be working in my office when you come there tomorrow. 
NO context, however, is required for the Present Continuous Tense because it is already understood. 
i. I am studying 
ii.   He is sleeping. 
+   ‘V + ing’ or ‘Adjective’ or ‘Past Participle’ 
adjective 
Past Participle 
+   ‘v + ing’ or ‘Adjective’ or ‘Past Participle’ 
V+ing      ADJ   P/P 
context 
context 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful