FOR BUSINESS

VOLUME 13, ISSUE 3
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THE EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: CELEBRATING…PROMOTING…INFORMING BUSINESS
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Track
Hayward Field’s global standing
boosts Eugene’s economy
On
Features
16
Why coaches, athletes and fans
across the country are applauding
the decision to hold the NCAA
Championships in Eugene.
17
The IAAFWorld Junior Championships
coming to Hayward Field this July,
elevating Eugene’s track reputation at
the international level.
18
Hayward Field is awarded a gold medal
– although not for an athletic event.
19
Can the runners participating in the
Eugene Marathon, Half Marathon,
5K and 1K be converted to
ticket-buying track fans?
Columns/Departments
4
Chamber @Work
6
Four Questions
26
Last Call
by Dave Hauser
ADVERTISER INDEX
PUBLISHER
David Hauser, CCE
EDITOR
Susan G. Miller,
Director of
Publications &
Information Systems
EUGENE CHAMBER
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Sheryl Balthrop,
Chair
Gaydos, Churnside &
Balthrop PC
Tom Herrmann,
Chair-Elect
Gleaves Swearingen LLP
Marvin Re’Voal,
Past-Chair
PBP Insurance
Cathy Worthington,
Treasurer
Worthington Business
Services
ADVERTISING
Eugene Area
Chamber of Commerce
541.484.1314
DESIGN/LAYOUT
Asbury Design
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PRINTING
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541.687.1214
EUGENE AREA
CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
1401 Willamette St.
Eugene, OR 97401
541.484.1314
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EugeneChamber
Open for Business:
Apublication of the
Eugene Area Chamber
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(USPS-978-480).
Open for Business is
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Cover story
10
HowEugene’s reputation as “Track
Town, USA” has put Hayward Field
at the front of the global stage and
boosted Eugene’s economy.
On the cover: Vin Lananna, president of
TrackTown USA, Inc.
Photography by David Loveall
www.loveallphoto.com
Art Direction by Asbury Design
www.asburydesign.net
THIS ISSUE
J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 4
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15 Asbury Design
21 Chambers Productions
8 Energy Trust of Oregon
27 Eugene Airport
25 Eugene Emeralds Baseball
22 Evergreen Roofing
23 EWEB
6 Feeney Wireless
24 Harrang Long Gary Rudnick PC
5 Hershner Hunter LLP
19 Isler CPA
28 Kernutt Stokes
14 Lane Transit District
23 LCC Small Business
Development Center &
Employer Training Services
18 McKenzie-Willamette Medical
Center
2 Moss Adams
2 Pacific Continental Bank
25 Parr Lumber
16 Shelton Turnbull
22 Summit Bank
9 TrackTown, USA
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(541) 686-1040 WWW. MOSSADAMS. COM Acumen. Agility. Answers.
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FOR BUSINESS
VOLUME 13, ISSUE 3
USA $3.95
CANADA $6.95
THE EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: CELEBRATING…PROMOTING…INFORMING BUSINESS
JUNE/JULY 2014
Track
Hayward Field’s global reputation
boosts Eugene’s economy
On
4 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Twenty-six graduate
from Chambers’
leadership program
For nearly three decades,
the Eugene andSpringfield
chambers of commerce have
sponsoreda comprehensive
community leadership-training
programcalledLeadership
Eugene-Springfield. In May, 26
graduates fromthe 2013-14
programjoinedthe nearly 700
alumni who have graduated
since the program’s launch in
1986. Graduates have usedthe
information andconnections
providedby the programto
serve in key volunteer leadership
positions across the region.
Recruitment for the 2014-2015
programis nowunderway.
Contact Brittany Quick-Warner,
541.242.2354, for more
information.
Chamber members weigh in on
mandatory sick leave ordinance
Winners announced at Willamette Angel Conference
Energy Storage Systems is developing cost-efective,
environmentally friendly battery flow techchnology.
CHAMBER@WORK
On May 8th, the Willamette Angel Conference LLCmade
an investment of $265,000in Energy Storage Systems,
a Portland-basedstartupdeveloping safe, cost-efective,
reliable andenvironmentally friendly all-Iron flowbattery
flowtechnology. Over the last six years, the Willamette
Angel Conference (WAC) has brought more than $1.5 million
in investment to Oregon andWillamette Valley startups.
OrchidHealth, a hybridDirect Primary Care model, won
the hearts of the audience in the Concept Stage Round,
receiving a prize package of cash andservices valuedat
more than $5,000.
Through partnerships with state andlocal governments,
business development agencies, private business, andthe
entrepreneurial community, our region continues to position
itself as a place where startups thrive.
The WACis a collaboration of the Eugene/Springfieldand
Corvallis/Albany communities. For the past three years, the
Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce has undertaken the
task of organizing the conference as part of its support for
start-ups throughout the region.
The Eugene City Council is currently considering an ordinance which would
require all businesses with six or more employees to provide mandatory paidsick
leave. Asurvey was sent out to Chamber members in April. Here’s what you said:
83%
Percent of respondents didnot
support mandatory sick leave.
54%

Percent of
respondents
provide paid
sick leave
75%
Percent of
respondents
who provide
paidtime of.
79%
Percent of respondents who ofer their
employees paidsick leave do not believe
the City Council shouldmove forward
with this ordinance.

43%
Percent of respondents who ofer paid
sick leave to their full time employees
also ofer paidsick leave to their part
time employees.
It’s not just our current mantra; it’s a belief that has guided us for years. Ever since Jim and Dave
set the example by charting a dramatic new course for Hershner Hunter back in the 1970s. It’s why,
today, we’re ahead of the game, having developed strong talent to take over for our seasoned,
Baby Boom Generation attorneys. And it’s why you can be assured that our legal expertise is
guaranteed to be around for another generation. Or two or three.
Our future is bright and getting stronger. You can rely on the strength of our next generation
as you develop yours. 541-686-8511 | hershnerhunter. com
J UNE /J ULY 2 0 1 4 | OP E N FOR BUS I NESS 7
James Houghton
Level 32 Racing
1. What prompted you to begin Level32?
After many years of participating in running events of all
kinds & distances, I had the pleasure of meeting William
Wyckof of Eclectic Edge Events. Our conversation at a
small networking event, over eight years ago, quickly turned
into a discussion about running. Tat previous July, he had
just completed his frst year as Race Director for the OTC’s
Butte to Butte, and was in the process of building his busi-
ness in Eugene, after many successful years in the greater
Denver, CO area. I was working my frst race with Eclectic
Edge within two weeks of that chance meeting.
Six years later, the portfolio of events William was
producing began to fourish! I was able to quit my regular
day job in the hospitality industry and work full time with
FOUR QUESTIONS
We asked two Eugene-area professionals to respond to four questions
that give insight into their lives and their work.
feeneyman.com
HALF MAN, HALF INTERNET. ALL DUCK.
FEENEY MAN
MASK
Displays metrics directly to his cornea;
including espresso absorption rates and
current pollen count.
ARM BAND
His favorite gizmo. Tracks pace and
heart rate and changes music streaming
according to running tempo.
SKYUS BELT
Powered by kinetic energy, the Skyus™ belt is
the cellular hub of this running machine.
HEADBAND
Aside from being super stylin’, the headband calculates
hydration needs through perspiration sensors.
SHOES
Track speed, distance, and
geo coordinates with alerts
on nearest cofee shops
during energy lows.
Piper Ruiz
Pink Bufalo Racing
1. What prompted you to begin Pink
Bufalo Racing?
It all started in California when I was
22 with a humble t-shirt printing com-
pany called Piper Joy Apparel. It was then
that I knew I was an entrepreneur. Later,
I opened Pink Bufalo Racing to provide
unique run/walk experiences for our com-
munity. Pink Bufalo Productions LLC
is our overarching company that gives us
freedom to expand the scope of our work
in the future.
2. What did you want to be when
you grew up?
When I grew up I wanted to be
many things – kind, bold, courageous
and generous. Professionally, I dreamed
of being an ice skater, actor, attorney
and advocate for human rights. Since
then, I’ve taken ice skating classes at a
university, I perform locally with Te-
atre for Change, and I write plays that
address national government policies
concerning human rights. And, I love
my work as a race director!
3. What’s your best customer
story?
Two months before our 2012 Eu-
gene Holiday Half & Hustle, a young
lady contacted us to ask permission to
participate in the 5K. She explained that
she had brain surgery earlier that year
and she was learning how to walk again.
She said she might have to sit down on
her walker to take breaks. Tis would
Continued on page 8
Continued on page 8
8 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
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Welcome the World_Eug Chamber_Globe Hands_8.5x11_4C.pdf 1 3/17/14 10:46 AM
be her frst 5K since brain surgery. We
encouraged her to participate and when she
crossed the fnish line, participants, volun-
teers, spectators and friends cheered her in.
4. What has chamber membership
meant to you?
My chamber membership has provided
me incredible opportunities to work with
local business owners and professionals.
Most signifcantly, chamber members
support each other in profound ways by
encouraging each other, becoming custom-
ers and clients, volunteering at events, and
reciprocating referrals.
Eclectic Edge for those events, along with
many client events that contract various
services. Level 32 Racing now produces
a portfolio of events that were previously
produced by Eclectic Edge. It was a reor-
ganization idea of William’s that prompted
the new business of Level 32 Racing. We
continue to collaborate on all facets of mak-
ing these events succeed. I still work many
events with Eclectic Edge Events, outside of
what I’ll produce with Level 32 Racing. It
continues to be an amazing friendship, and a
wonderful partnership that was meant to be!
2. What did you want to be when you
grew up?
I wanted to be a doctor, or work in the
medical feld in some capacity. A close second
would be a professional athlete, but becoming
a race director was in my top three things I
wanted to do.
3. What’s your best customer story?
Being in the running event production/
management business allows me to interact
with both men and women of all levels of
ftness. It’s so hard to pinpoint a best cus-
tomer story. One of the highlights of being
in this business is getting to see determined
folks not only compete, but reach goals they
have set out to accomplish, whether it’s to
just be active, lose weight, place in their age
division or outright win a race! Over the
years I’ve witnessed many people transform
before my eyes with their athletic abilities.
Seeing some of the same loyal faces at
multiple races per year, and seeing the com-
munity genuinely enjoying themselves at a
Level 32 Racing event brings a huge smile
to my face and warms my heart.
4. What has chamber membership
meant to you?
Being involved as a Eugene Chamber
of Commerce member has allowed me to
network with a wide variety of business
professionals. Being an active member has
assisted me with being able to tap into a
huge audience of potential sponsors, volun-
teers, caterers, and even boost participation
at the races! My Chamber membership also
allows me to be seen, and receive both name
and face recognition at many events in this
community. It’s so much easier to approach
like minded folks when you’re a familiar
face. Tank you Eugene Chamber!
Ruiz, continued from page 7
Houghton, continued from page 7
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
J UNE /J ULY 2 0 1 4 | OP E N FOR BUS I NESS 1 1 1 0 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
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TRACK
COVER STORY
B
ack in 1972, when the Oregon Track Club put together its
successful bid to play host to the U.S. Olympic Track &
Field Trials at Hayward Field, it turned out to be a game-
changing event.
At the time, the meet generated record profts of
$187,000, and it attracted the highest attendance in Trials’
history with a total of 141,100 spectators. Both of those
fgures far exceeded the expectations of meet organizers.
More important, however, it galvanized the community with an
overwhelming spirit of cooperation and civic pride.
By the conclusion of the 1972 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials,
Eugene had cemented its status as the “Track Capital of the World,”
prompting Robert Newland to write in his 1974 report presented to
the Round Table Club: “Everywhere we turned, the community was
turned on, excited, and wanting to be a part of the Trials …it was truly
a memorable event that touched the hearts of many.”
Tose sentiments still hold true today.
Sure, the moniker that frst described the city’s passion for the sport
of track and feld has been modifed to “TrackTown USA.”
And, there were certainly some lean years prior to the resurgence
of the sport’s popularity with the hiring of Vin Lananna as associate
athletic director and director of track and feld at the University of
Oregon in the summer of 2005.
But the essence of what made the 1972 Olympic Trials such a stun-
Hayward’s global reputation
as the premiere venue for track and feld
has been a game-changer for business
Vin Lananna has been
credited with providing
the spark to ignite a
track and field revival
at Oregon that has
reverberated worldwide.
J UNE /J ULY 2 0 1 4 | OP E N FOR BUS I NESS 1 3 1 2 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
ning success are still at play as Oregonians
prepare to celebrate the latest string of
major events coming to Hayward Field –
the NCAA Championships through 2021,
the 2016 U.S. Olympic Track & Field
Trials, the 2015 USA Outdoor National
Championships, and this July, for the frst
time on U.S. soil, the IAAF World Junior
Championships.
TrackTown USA even extended its foot-
print outside of Eugene when it landed the
bid to play host to the 2016 IAAF World
Indoor Championships at the Oregon
Convention Center in Portland.
One has to think that this is exactly what
the original fve members of the Emerald
Empire Athletic Club – Bill Bowerman,
John Jaqua, Ray Hendrickson, Wayne
Atwood and Newland – had in mind when
they mapped out the future for staging
championship meets in Eugene at their his-
toric inaugural meeting in the dining room
of the Eugene Hotel in 1957.
Tat group, which would later change
its name to the Oregon Track Club as
membership grew, believed in certain core
principles: a reliance on volunteers, hir-
ing the best ofcials possible, sticking to a
strict meet schedule and creating a positive
atmosphere for the athletes so they could
perform up to their capabilities.
Of course, it didn’t hurt that meet of-
cials could always rely on a packed house of
enthusiastic and engaged spectators.
Here’s what Tom Cushman, writing in
the Philadelphia Daily News, had to say
about the Hayward Field faithful following
the 1971 National AAU Outdoor Track &
Field Championships.
“What the crowd does is applaud ev-
erybody. Tere may have been two dozen
standing ovations Saturday. Virtually every
winner was aforded one. Te fans are at
all times aware of what is going on, even in
the feld events, cheering each good jump
or throw and bringing those oft-forgotten
people back into the scene.”
Track and field ‘good for business’
All of those ingredients, which continue
to be nurtured and embraced under today’s
leadership, have enabled TrackTown USA
to undergo other “game-changing”events in
recent years which has solidifed its global
reputation as the spiritual home for the
sport of track and feld in this country.
And that, without a doubt, is good for
business.
“Not everybody is a track fan,” said Kari
Westlund, president and CEO of Travel
Lane County, the area’s primary marketing
frm for local tourism.
“But whether you like track or not, it’s
good for business. We are head and tails
above any other community in the country
when it comes to this unique attribute. It
ofers a window into the community that
shows a polished gem. We couldn’t do any
better than we’ve done with this element,
and it deserves to be heralded by one and
all. Most destinations would do anything
to fnd a niche, such as track and feld, that
shines as bright as it does for Eugene and
Springfeld.”
The numbers certainly add up.
UO professor Tim Duy, senior director of
the Oregon Economic Forum, said the best
economic indicator in terms of dollars spent
during major track and feld events in the
Eugene-Springfeld community can be traced
to the total amount of out-of-town visitors.
“By having enough of these big track
and feld events, it’s supporting the tourism
industry as a whole,” he said. “Tey actually
impact the supply of hotel rooms, the supply
of restaurants, and other recreation activities
in the community …
“We’re not going to get a huge response
By the Numbers
0 Number of times IAAF WorldJunior Championships have been heldin
the U.S.
212 Number of National Federations fromaroundthe globe which belong to
the IAAF
900 Number of volunteers neededfor IAAF WorldJunior Championships
37 million Number of dollars generatedin local economy by 2012U.S. Olympic Trials
12 Number of full-time stafmembers employedby TrackTown USA, Inc.
1,600 Number of athletesexpectedtocompeteat IAAFWorldJunior Championships
3 Number of cities, including Eugene, filing letter of intent to bidfor 2019
IAAF WorldChampionships
141,100 Attendance at the 1972U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene
9,000 Number of participants in 2013Eugene Marathon, upfrom4,000in
inaugural 2007 event
9 Number of consecutive years the NCAAOutdoor Track &Field
Championships will be heldat HaywardFieldthrough at least 2021
.02 Margin of victory in hundredths of a secondat the 2014NCAAIndoor
Championships when the Oregon women’s 4x400relay teamedged
Texas to clinch the national title
22 Number of NCAAChampionships won by Duck men andwomen in
cross country, indoor track andfield, andoutdoor track andfield
from a single event. But there is an impact
from aggregate sporting events that attract
out-of-area residents. We might not build a
hotel based on a single event, but knowing
there is a steady stream of events will tend
to expand that factor.”
Duy also alluded to the economic
“multiplier,” in which numerous other local
businesses are often called upon to meet the
demand of these out-of-area visitors, which
brings more money into their pocket books.
Westlund, who recently completed her
frst Boston Marathon, has been pleasantly
surprised by the economic boost produced
from both the 2008 and ’12 U.S. Olympic
Track & Field Trials.
“When we projected what we thought
the economic impact would be, we always
gulped at how large a number that was,” she
said. “But each time we hosted and came
out the other end, the numbers have been
even stronger.
“It’s very gratifying to secure those
events that are, without question, economic
generators, as well as building a reputation
as a destination for hosting signifcant
events. We hear it in the market place and
at trade shows all the time. People recognize
that the Olympic Trials and other major
national meets are held here, and that lends
credibility to the community as a destina-
tion for other events.”
So, what were those numbers in terms of
dollars?
According to Westlund, the projected
$20 million impact from the 2008 Trials
measured out at $28 million. Similarly,
with the addition of more seats at Hayward
Field, and the hammer throw being moved
to the Nike campus in Beaverton, the 2012
projection of $31 million penciled out at
$37 million.
Tere were also more realistic com-
munity expectations in terms of business
volume and tourism dollars between those
two events.
Making connections
Clearly, TrackTown USA isn’t just any
community, and Lananna isn’t just any
COVER STORY COVER STORY
TrackTown USA Events 2014
n June 11-14- NCAAOutdoor
Championships
n July 5-6–USAJunior National
Championships
n July 22-27 –IAAF WorldJunior
Championships
TrackTown USA Events 2015
n June 10-13–NCAAOutdoor
Championships
n June 25-28–USATrack &Field
Championships
TrackTown USA Events 2016
n March* –IAAF WorldIndoor
Championships
n June 8-11 –NCAAOutdoor
Championships
n July 1-10–U.S. Olympic Team
Trials –Track &Field
*dates to be determined
In 2008 (above) and 2012, Hawyard Field hosted the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials and will do so again in 2016.
“Whether you like
track or not, it’s good
for business. We are
head and tails above
any other community
in the country when it
comes to this unique
attribute.
– Kari Westlund
President and CEOof Travel Lane County
J UNE /J ULY 2 0 1 4 | OP E N FOR BUS I NESS 1 5 1 4 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
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visionary.
Much like Bowerman was the catalyst
behind the bid for the 1972 U.S. Olympic
Trials, Lananna has been credited with
providing the spark to ignite a track and
feld revival at Oregon that has reverber-
ated worldwide.
Te frst game-changing event under
his guidance was breathing new life into
a stalled bid for the 2008 U.S. Olympic
Trials, which ultimately, with strong private
sector support, brought that event back to
Eugene after a 28-year absence.
“To me, that was our coming of age mo-
ment,” Lananna said.
He continued to focus on connecting the
dots between all of the Oregon stakehold-
ers: the UO men’s and women’s programs,
the Oregon Track Club, the post-collegiate
Oregon Track Club Elite, the local com-
munity, the state, and Hayward Field, the
birthplace of Nike sealed with a handshake
between Bowerman and UO alum Phil
Knight.
As a result, just two years later, the 2010
NCAA Outdoor Championships played
to a sold-out crowd on the fnal two days
of the meet, breaking all of the previous
attendance records, and representing yet
another game-changing event.
“Every community needs a building
block,” Lananna said. “Every community
needs something to rally around … and
track and feld, as Bowerman did so well,
is basically a connecting point. Today, a lot
of business gets done at track meets. If you
are someone who wants to get community
support and engagement, the place to be is
Hayward Field. All of the business leaders
are there.”
In the summer of 2012, midway through
the Olympic Trials – an event highlighted
by Ashton Eaton’s world record of 9,039
points in the decathlon – Lananna relin-
quished his UO coaching duties to focus on
the next game-changing roll call of events.
He handed the reins to his top assistant,
Robert Johnson.
“Te business of hosting events and
extending our brand globally is a full-time
job,” Lananna said. “I can’t do that if I’m
trying to coach athletes. We needed to split
those positions, so TrackTown USA could
solidify itself.”
At the same time, Lananna recognized
that the business of securing and organizing
events, and providing support to the UO,
was not a one-person job.
Tus, he formed a local, non-proft
organization – TrackTown USA, Inc. –
which now operates with a year-round
professional staf of 12 full-time and
three part-time employees. Lananna is the
president of TrackTown USA, Inc., with
Michael Reilly serving as the CEO and
Sam Lapray as COO. Te company has
also hired nine UO interns as it ramps up
for the NCAAs and IAAF World Junior
Championships in June and July.
Besides serving as the local organizing
committee for the major events, TrackTown
USA, Inc., is dedicated to promoting and en-
COVER STORY
Local
Business
Keeps Us
Moving
Ron Kilcoyne
General Manager
Thank you for
supporting Lane
Transit District!
Both LTD and the
community are
stronger because of
your contribution to
local transportation.
ltd.org
541-687-5555 (voice)
7-1-1 (TTY-Oregon Relay)
The Best Way
to Connect
The 2008 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials proved to be a huge success.
hancing the sport of track and feld by build-
ing partnerships, creating global awareness,
celebrating diversity, integrating sustainability
and developing youth initiatives.
In terms of engaging youngsters, it’s sim-
ply a matter of reaching back to their roots.
Bowerman was the driving force behind
the frst youth all-comer’s meets in Eugene,
and he’s the one who introduced the concept
of jogging to the U.S. Today, the recreational
running boom brought 36,000 runners to
the Boston Marathon, and another 60,000
to the New York City Marathon.
“Tere are a lot of things happening in
the world, from recreational running to the
Olympic Games, that have Bowerman’s fn-
gerprints on them,”Lananna said. “It started
here and it’s something this community can
be proud of, and that’s exactly why all of the
businesses should be on board.
“Track and feld is a galvanizing commu-
nity engagement event. For it to be sustain-
able, and accessible to the masses, we have to
make sure we maintain the integrity of not
only the physical facility, but the emotional
and spiritual connection. For all of these
businesses here, whether it’s a hotel, a res-
taurant, or something else, when they attach
to this, just as we attach ourselves to the UO
and Nike, it’s a winning combination.”
Transformational moment
Lananna has one more game-changing
message.
Te U.S. has long trumpeted its status
as the world’s No. 1 team in track and feld,
yet with the exception of the Olympics and
a handful of other meets such as the Penn
Relays, Drake Relays and Prefontaine Clas-
sic, those athletes seldom have a chance to
compete at home in front of their own fans.
He wants to change that dynamic.
Te frst step was taken back in mid-
April when Eugene was one of three cities to
submit a letter of intent to the International
Association of Athletics Federations – the
world’s governing body for the sport of track
and feld – to play host to the 2019 IAAF
World Championships.
Te other two cities are Barcelona, Spain
and Doha, Qatar.
Te signifcance of this bid cannot be
overstated. In the history of this prestigious
event, which dates back to 1983, the IAAF
World Championships have never been
held in the U.S.
“We are raising our hand, and saying, ‘yes,
we want to do this,’” Lananna said. “Tis is a
great opportunity for the U.S., as the world’s
No. 1 team, to rally behind a community, a
state, and a region, that is saying we can do
track really well in this country. We should
all be standing up and asking, ‘How do we
do this?”
Tat’s not much diferent than the ques-
tion posed by Bowerman 43 years ago when
he asked the Oregon Track Club if it wanted
to put in a bid for the 1972 U.S. Olympic
Track & Field Trials.
Tat was a transformational moment in
the history of TrackTown USA.
Are we ready for another one?
COVER STORY
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
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IAAF World Junior Championships
coming to Hayward Field in July
Tis summer, the world is coming to the University of
Oregon.
From July 22-27, the IAAF World Junior Championships
will be staged at Hayward Field, the frst time ever on U.S. soil.
Te meet showcases the world’s best track and feld athletes
under the age of 20.
Tese are the Olympians of tomorrow.
More than 1,600 athletes from as many as 212 diferent
countries will arrive in our community and be housed in an
“athlete’s village” at selected UO dorms. Tey will be accompa-
nied by another 600 team ofcials and coaches.
Te UO is working hard to make this event a unique and
memorable experience through several academic connections.
Last fall, the UO instituted a student-ambassador program,
in which more than 100 volunteers with specifc language and
cultural competency skills will be utilized to assist visiting athletes
and ofcials. Te plan calls for a UO student-ambassador to be
embedded with each national federation that attends the meet.
On July 18-21, the weekend prior to the IAAF World
Junior Championships, the UO will sponsor an International
Sports Science Symposium on Performance Enhancement
and Technology. Te symposium will bring together experts
from the international sports science community to present
cutting edge research and conduct panel discussions on the ap-
plication of science in today’s competitive sports environment.
At least one session will be open to the public.
IAAF protocol requires that host countries of its cham-
pionship events display the fags of all participating member
federations. Due to the distinctive confguration of Hayward
Field, UO students in the architecture program were tasked
with fnding new and innovative ways to fulfll that require-
ment. Te best ideas will be incorporated into that fnal display.
Te UO Global Studies Institute will install digital in-
teractive maps of the world on large, touch-screen displays
dispersed throughout the event venues. Click on a country and
information pops up on that region, plus specifc UO expertise,
research, faculty and students from that area. Te maps will be
repurposed after the competition for UO marketing, develop-
ment and public outreach.
Vin Lananna, UO associate athletic director and president of
TrackTown USA, said these programs will enhance the overall
experience of the worldwide visitors during their stay in Eugene.
“Te World Juniors takes what we do and puts it on a global
stage,” he said. “Kids from all over the world get to experience
what Hayward Field is all about. What a great message we’re
sending to the youth from 180 countries.”
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
Hundreds of Eugene-area children marched into Oakway Center’s courtyard waiving flags from around the world
to celebrate the World Junior Championships coming to Hawyard Field.
TRACKTOWN
Hayward welcomes world’s best
Hayward solidifes standing as best venue for track
Coaches, athletes and
fans support bringing
NCAA Championships
to TrackTown USA
When Texas A&M track and feld coach
Pat Henry heard that the NCAA Outdoor
Track & Field Championships would be
held at Hayward Field on the University of
Oregon campus through the year 2021, he
took immediate action.
Henry, now in his 28th season of coach-
ing, called his real estate agent.
“I wanted to make sure I had some
kind of property out there,” Henry said.
“Since I’m going to be there for the next
eight years, I might as well invest some
dollars.”
Henry was joking, of course, but it didn’t
take away from his belief, one that is shared
by numerous other coaches, athletes and
fans, that the NCAA made the right call
in awarding the NCAA Championships to
TrackTown USA from 2015 to 2021 last
December.
Te 2014 NCAA Championships were
already slated to be held at Hayward Field
on June 11-14.
“I’m happy for the people of Eugene,”
Henry said. “I’m happy for the University
of Oregon. I think it’s well deserved. It’s
not something that anyone gave them. Tey
earned it, and there’s a diference, in my
opinion.
“At this time, Eugene has shown itself
to be the best place to run a track meet in
this country, and my hope is that it remains
great. I think it was the right decision by
the NCAA.”
Te long-term deal between Oregon and
the NCAA was based on the rich tradition
and history of the sport in TrackTown USA,
plus the unwavering support and enthusi-
asm shown by the knowledgeable fan base
at Hayward Field, where every performance
is cheered, and not just those by athletes
wearing the “O.”
Besides making the NCAA meet bigger
and better with each successive season, the
eventual goal is to elevate and transform
collegiate track and feld, much like the city
of Omaha has transformed college baseball
by turning the College World Series into a
“must-see” event.
“We’re excited that Hayward Field will
remain the dream destination for every
Division I track and feld athlete,” said Vin
Lananna, UO associate athletic director and
president of TrackTown USA. “Our plan is
to turn the NCAA Championships into the
hottest ticket in the sport.”
TRACKTOWN
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
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Program aims to convert
amateur runners to
track event attendees
So, exactly what is “Run TrackTown?”
It’s a celebration of running unlike any
other, and it will happen at the intersection
of two major sporting events in TrackTown
USA this July – the IAAF World Junior
Championships and the Eugene Marathon
and Half Marathon.
Te idea is to bridge the gap between
people who run and people who are track
and feld fans. More people participate in
running in the U.S. than any other sport,
yet track and feld remains somewhat of a
niche sport.
In an efort to chip away at that discon-
nect, the Run TrackTown concept was de-
veloped to bring those two groups together.
Te hope is that the thousands of runners
participating in the Eugene Marathon,
Half Marathon, 5K and 1K will become
track fans once they’re able to witness the
passion and excitement of a meet at Hay-
ward Field.
Te Eugene Marathon and Half
Marathon begin at 6 a.m. on Sunday, July 27,
which is also the fnal day of competition for
the IAAF World Junior Championships.
“We plan to connect the dots between
little kids that run, top-end competitions
like the IAAF World Junior Champion-
ships, and all the various events that hap-
pen leading into the Eugene Marathon,”
said Vin Lananna, president of TrackTown
USA. “It’s going to be a fantastic weekend.”
Te six-day IAAF World Junior Cham-
pionships, which showcases the world’s
best track and feld athletes under the age
of 20, will be held July 22-27 at Hayward
Field, the frst time ever on U.S. soil.
On Friday, July 25, the Health and Fit-
ness Expo begins its two-day run at Mat-
thew Knight Arena. Hours of operation are
1-6 p.m. on Friday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
on Saturday.
Tere will be non-stop action at Hay-
ward Field on Saturday. Here’s the schedule
of events:
Te frst race will be the 1K Duck Dash
at 7:45 a.m. Te Run TrackTown 5K fol-
lows at 8 a.m. Both races feature a 200-me-
ter fnish on the track in front of the West
Grandstand at Hayward Field.
Te Oregon Track Club’s youth all-
comers meet (ages 12-and-under) will be
held from 9 a.m. to noon at Hayward Field.
Te IAAF World Junior Champion-
ships will showcase seven event fnals
during its session from 2:30 p.m. to 5:45
p.m. Te action closes with the men’s and
women’s 4x100-meter relays.
A one-hour High-Performance profes-
sional track and feld meet will be held
from 6-7 p.m. Entries and events have not
yet been fnalized, but there will be a world-
best attempt in the 4x800m relay, headlined
by a team from Oregon Track Club Elite.
Te day closes with the Youth League
Championships from 7-10 p.m. Te top
three fnishers in fve events – 100m, 400m,
1,500m, long jump and turbojav – from
seven statewide regional competitions ad-
vance to the special championship meet at
Hayward Field. Te Youth League is open
to kids in grades three through eight.
Sunday’s grand fnale begins with the Eu-
gene Marathon and Half Marathon at 6 a.m.
Once again, participants will be able to fnish
on the home stretch of Hayward Field in
front of family and friends. Te fnal session
of the IAAF World Junior Championships
begins at 3 p.m. and ends with the closing
ceremonies at 5:30 p.m.
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
Connecting athletes and fans of track Hayward Field gets even greener
The Olympic Track and
Field Trials earn a gold
medal – for sustainability
Te concept of sustainability is deeply
rooted in the DNA of TrackTown USA.
In the past two years, three events at Hay-
ward Field were “green”enough to be certifed
by the Council for Responsible Sport.
Te 2012 U.S. Olympic Track & Field
Trials received a gold medal, which means
the 10-day event earned 75 percent of the
total available credits in meeting specifc
social and environmental criteria for ofcial
certifcation.
In addition, the 2013 University of
Oregon outdoor track and feld season
earned a silver medal, and the 2013 NCAA
Outdoor Track & Field Championships
merited basic certifcation.
To date, the Council for Responsible
Sport has certifed 110 events worldwide:
34 basic certifcation (45% of total credits);
25 silver (60%); 11 gold (75%); and three
evergreen (90%).
Te goal for the IAAF World Junior
Championships, July 22-27, at Hayward
Field is to achieve evergreen status, the
highest possible ranking awarded by the
Council for Responsible Sport.
“We exceeded expectations in 2012,”
said Vin Lananna, president of TrackTown
USA. “We will continue to pursue even
greater sustainable measures at all future
events at Hayward Field.”
According to Ethan Nelson, Waste
Prevention and Green Building Manager
for the city of Eugene, there are fve pillars
of sustainability: planning and communica-
tions, procurement, resource management,
access and equity and community legacy.
TrackTown USA embraces each of
those areas which, in turn, help strengthen
the local economy, build future capacity
for sustainable events and inspire people
to develop active, healthy and sustainable
lifestyles.
“We lead in the nation in responsible
sporting events,” Nelson said. “Our legacy
is measured not only in kilowatts saved and
tons of waste reduced, but by the accom-
plishments of a new generation of youth
participating in sport, physical activity,
personal and community health, and local
volunteering.”
TRACKTOWN TRACKTOWN
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
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Promotions/
New Hires
Photos appear left to right from top.
Libby Tower has
joined Asbury Design
advertising agency and
design consultancy
as account manager.
Tower brings more
than 20 years experience as an manager,
planner and strategist in the public,
private and non-profit sectors.
www.asburydesign.net
Deborah Mersino has joined Oregon
Community Credit Union as Chief
Marketing Ofcer and will oversee all
aspects of marketing and strategic
communications. Ethan Nelson has been
promoted to Vice President of Lending.
www.oregoncommunitycu.org
Pacific Continental Bank welcomes
Michael Dunne, public information ofcer.
Dunne will be responsible for public
and media relations nationally and in all
local markets. The bank also announced
the promotions of Joe Carmichael to
commercial banking ofcer; Kathryn
Bruebaker to regional service manager
and Halie Henderson to assistant
controller.
www.therightbank.com
Directors Mortgage is pleased to
announce the hiring of Karen Norton as
a Reverse Mortgage Specialist. Karen’s
experience includes over 30 years in
mortgage lending, with the last 10 years
focused solely on reverse mortgages.
www.directorsmortgage.net
The law firm of Gleaves
Swearingen LLP is
pleased to announce
that attorney Dan
Webb Howard has
joined the firm. Dan
practices employment law, providing
general advice, risk management, and
litigation services to employers. He is
fluent in Spanish.
www.gleaveslaw.com
The Eugene Family YMCA is pleased
to announce the addition of three new
members to the Board of Directors:
Shannon Poynter, Hey Bayles! farm; Joe
Carmichael, Pacific Continental Bank;
and Ben Nye, JP Capital Management.
www.eugeneymca.org
KPD Insurance is
pleased to announce
the following
promotions: Ken
Price to operations
manager; Alyssa
Weller to employee
benefits director and Charlie Vermilyea
to account marketing manager II in the
Employee Benefits department.
www.kpdinsurance.com
Funk/Levis &
Associates is proud
to welcome Joyen
Pendowski, account
manager, to their
growing ofce.
www.funklevis.com
New Horizons In-Home Care has
promoted Kathileen Wagner has
been promoted to human resources
assistant manager and Nikki Smartt to
community relations assistant.
www.eugeneinhomecare.com
Angela Andress, Young at Heart
Balloon Art owner, recently won
a scholarship to attend the World
Balloon Convention. While at the
convention Andress earned the industry
designation title of Certified Balloon
Artist and worked alongside Team
Taiwan to win 3rd place in the large
sculpture competition.
www.UAHBalloonArt.com
Craig Norton has
joined ShelterCare
as the new director
of programs. Norton
will be responsible for
program supervision
and support for ShelterCare’s 12
programs, quality and performance
improvement, strategic planning and
new program development.
www.sheltercare.org
Abraham Chavez
joined the SELCO
Insurance Services
team as an insurance
specialist. Chavez will
be located in SELCO’s
Springfield Gateway Branch.
www.selco.org
BUSINESSNEWS BUSINESSNEWS
Chamber membership has given us the opportunity
to build relationships with other businesses.
We’re committed in our partnership with the Chamber
in making this region a great place to live and work.
After all, a community worth living in is a community
worth improving. Wouldn’t you agree?
– Sheryl Balthrop
Gaydos, Churnside & Balthrop, P.C.
Join the Eugene Area
Chamber of Commerce
541-484-1314 | www.eugenechamber.com
J UNE /J ULY 2 0 1 4 | OP E N FOR BUS I NESS 2 3 2 2 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
InfoStructure, a provider of voice and data
services, has acquired Rio Networks, a
facilities-based communications company.
Scott Hansen and Jef Rhoden are
managing partners.
www.infostructure.net
Jenette Kane, dean
of Lane Community
College Continuing
Education, Downtown
Campus, Titan Court
Student Housing, and
Cottage Grove Campus, has been named
to the board of the National Council
for Continuing Education and Training
(NCCET). Kane has been with Lane for 10
years.
www.lanecc.edu
Kudos
The Union Pacific Foundation assists
nonprofits in 22 states. Four Eugene
nonprofit organizations were selected to
receive grants for 2014: Friends of Trees,
St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County,
Trauma Healing Project, and the Willamette
Farm and Food Coalition. To apply for a
2015 grant visit www.up.com/aboutup/
community/foundation and follow the
online application instructions. The
application deadline is August 15, 2014.
Court Appointed Special Advocates
(CASA) has received the following
foundation grants to train and support
new volunteer advocates: Central
Lutheran Foundation ($1,000); Herbert
A. Templeton Foundation ($5,000); Juan
Young Trust ($5,000); McKay Family
Foundation ($10,000); Trust Management
Services ($10,000); Chambers Family
Foundation ($20,000); Home Federal
Foundation ($2,000); Northwest Natural
Gas ($2,500); Serbu Fund of The Oregon
Community Foundation ($30,742); The
Autzen Foundation ($5,000); Trillium
Community Health Plan ($1,000); W.L.S.
Spencer Foundation ($1,000); Plum
Creek Foundation ($4,000); and Wheeler
Foundation ($5,000).
www.casa-lane.org
BUSINESSNEWS
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Small Business Management
Learn more about how the Eugene Water & Electric Board
can assist your business with financing options including
facility loans, special electric rates for expanding facilities,
and energy efciency rebates at eweb.org/growthretention
Every dollar counts when growing a
business. EWEB worked with us on
facility upgrades and operating costs
and helped make our expansion possible.
Thanks in part to
EWEB’s programs, our
local facility expansion
was a success.
Trillium Community Health Plan has
awarded $1 million in Transformation
Grants to the following organizations:
PeaceHealth Johnson Unit; Oregon
Health & Science University Institute on
Development Disability; Lane County
Health & Human Services; ShelterCare;
Trillium Convened Community
Committee; Center for Family
Development; HIVAlliance; Looking
Glass Youth & Family Services; and Good
Samaritan Society.
www.trilliumchp.com
New Members
When you join the Eugene Area Chamber
of Commerce, you become part of a
vibrant and prosperous community of
creative entrepreneurs, forward-thinking
innovators and visionary business
leaders. We’re pleased to welcome
these new members who have chosen to
take advantage of the Chamber’s tools,
resources and expansive network to grow
their businesses.
Acquire Real Estate
www.acquirealestate.com
Agate Alley’s Laboratory
www.agatealleylaboratory.com
Benefitmall
www.benefitmall.com
Billy Macs Bar & Grill
www.billymacsgrill.com
Comfort Keepers #970
eugene-970.comfortkeepers.com/
Decor~N More
Deus Machine LLC
www.deusmachine.com
EconoLodge
www.EconoLodgeEugeneOr.com
Eden Advanced Pest Technologies
www.edenpest.com
Imagine Solutions For Business
www.goimagineusa.com
Lithia FIAT of Eugene
www.lithiafiateugene.com
Continued on Page 25
BUSINESSNEWS
J UNE /J ULY 2 0 1 4 | OP E N FOR BUS I NESS 2 5
harrang.com
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PORTLAND EUGENE SALEM
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Lee Lashway
Business Formation, Transactions, and Securities Compliance Attorney
lee.lashway@harrang.com
Lee regularly assists business owners with
business formation, transactions, and
securities law compliance (capital formation).
He also represents issuers in sales of warrants,
convertible notes, and equity interests.
As a long-time Eugene resident and attorney,
Lee is excited about being part of HLGR’s
expanding business law practice in the
region - helping facilitate growth and success
of Oregon businesses.
Rick Larson
Business & Estate Planning Attorney
richard.larson@harrang.com
Rick has over 30 years of experience and
is well regarded in the Eugene community.
He regularly assists clients with all aspects
of estate planning and his business practice
includes the formation (or restructuring)
of businesses, fnancial transactions, and
commercial leasing.
“Decisions about structuring your company
or creating a will or estate plan are some
of the most challenging choices a person
can face,” Rick said. “I enjoy alleviating my clients’ concerns around these
processes by helping them articulate their goals and developing legal
documents that achieve their desired outcomes.”
Vaden Francisco, Jr.
Business & Estate Planning Attorney
vaden.francisco@harrang.com
Vaden’s practice focuses on business and
aviation law, as well as estate planning and
veteran’s benefts. He regularly advises
clients in a variety of industries regarding the
formation of business, succession planning,
contracts and agreements, and other legal
business transactions.
As a former business owner and manager,
Vaden brings a unique perspective to his
practice of the law and is truly passionate
about helping businesses and individuals
succeed.
BUSINESSNEWS
Lyoness
www.lyoness.net/us/
McKenzie Commercial Contractors,
Inc.
www.mckenziecommercial.com
Northwoods Property Management
www.northwoodspm.com
Oregonian Media Group
www.oregonianmediagroup.com
Peak Mortgage
www.peakmtg.com
PH-Plume Red & Heritage Dry Goods
wwww.plumered.com
Reign Inc.
www.reign-inc.com
Rural/Metro Ambulance
www.ruralmetroeugene.com
Science Factory Children’s Museum &
Exploration Dome
www.sciencefactory.org
Sterling Graphics, Inc.
www.sterlingdisplaygraphics.com
Structures Plus
Swedish Engineering West
www.swedishwest.com
Tannerite Sports LLC
www.tannerite.com
UnitedHealthcare
www.unitedhealthcare.com
Urban Waxx
www.urbanwaxx.com
EUGENE • 4170 West 1st Avenue • 541.345.7277
Mon - Fri: 7:00am - 5:00pm • Closed Sat & Sun
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throughout the Northwest since 1930. No mater what the project, you
can have confdence that you’ll receive the same quality products, service
and expertise that professional contractors have relied on for decades.
Business News covers promotions,
hires, awards, business giving and
business news. E-mail items to
businessnews@eugenechamber.
com.
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
2 6 OPEN FOR BUSI NESS | EUGENE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
T
his issue of Open for Business highlights the important role that track and feld plays in our
regional economy.
2014 will be the biggest year yet in a remarkable run for the sport in our community. In
addition to the Oregon Ducks’ regular-season competitions, our region will play host to the
annual Prefontaine Classic May 30-31, the NCAA Outdoor Championships June 11-14, the U.S. junior
championships July 5-6 that will coincide with the Eugene Marathon and then the 2014 World Juniors
Championships July 22 - 27. A remarkable
accomplishment by the combined forces of the
University of Oregon, Tracktown USA, Travel
Lane County, Lane County and a host of pivotal
public and private partners.
Beyond its many contributions to the region’s
brand and civic self-esteem, track and feld is a
growing economic force. A limited summary of the
positive fnancial infuence includes:
• Te economic impact of the 2008 Trials was
about $28 million, and more than $31 million in
2012 after more seating was installed at Hayward
Field.
• Each of the eight years of the NCAA
Championships will generate an estimated $6.5 million in local spending – a total of $52 million.
• Te 2014 IAAF World Junior Track & Field Championships have been estimated to have $50 million
economic impact within the region.
In order to secure the NCAA Championships, Travel Lane County and the Eugene Area Chamber of
Commerce were asked to support the region’s proposal. Our organization’s commitment involved raising
funds from the local business community over the next seven years to support the efort. Tis is an ambitious
commitment, yet one we believe is important to support the outstanding work that is being undertaken here
in our community. Over the coming months we’ll be reaching out to businesses to enlist their support for
this important endeavor.
John F. Kennedy once said, “Tings do not happen. Tings are made to happen.”Te business community of
Eugene/Springfeld has the opportunity to provide critical support to the eforts that are being made to make
things happen in track and feld and its connection to the image and economic prosperity of the region.
LAST CALL BY DAVE HAUSER
Eugene’s biggest year
in a remarkable sport
EugeneArea Chamberof Commerce
Nonstop flights resume
June 7, 2014
Aloha Honolulu!
PO Box 1107
Eugene, OR 97440-1107
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