Conceptual Models

Conceptual Models

Here are a few of the models that inform my thinking. Some are mine; others were pilfered. I believe in authenticity and transparency. I share what I can. Use whatever you find useful so long as you say where it came from. Am I afraid people will steal these ideas? No, I hope they. These are recipes in my mental cookbook. You want a great meal, call a chef.

Jay
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Topics
Learning Timing Work Networks & Web 2.0

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Learning
Evolve Massive Change Adapt or Die or Learn

Tony O’Driscoll

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Learning

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Learning
The Learning Mixer

Formal
Control Delivery Duration Content Timing Author Time to develop
Top-down, strict, tight Some self-directed

Informal
Bottom-up, peer-to-peer, laissez-faire Conversations, learnscapes, Pull 3 minutes max

Courses, LMS, Push

Workshops

Hours

15 minutes

Curriculum, what they say Before or after work

Class + OJT

Discovery, what learner needs

In between work

During work

Instructional designer

SME

Learner

Months

Days

Minutes

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Learning

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Dan Pink
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The Varieties of Learning Experience Person
Emotional Cognitive Physical Sensory Social/EI

World
Know who Know how Know where ...
Co-creation

DNA, innate, inherited Learning is adaptation.

For example: • learning to talk • learning to crawl • learning your ABCs • learning to fear the number 13 • learning to meditate • learning to speak French • learning the way to the store • learning who to trust • learning with my pal Sally • learning how to sell • learning Ruby on Rails • learning where the answers are • learning to negotiate • learning to play piano • learning to rollerblade • learning to taste wine critically • learning to cook bread • learning to lead effectively DRAFT

JSB

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Learnscape
Two sides of learning
Individual
Learning dashboard Personalize learning environment Performance support Relevant experience

Organization

Learnscape
Culture Network infrastructure

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Keyhole View of Learnscape
Customers, partners

Co-creating knowledge

Private net
internet Internet

Searching Consuming knowledge

Worker/ learner

Partner net
Conversation

Learnscape

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Timing

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How Buildings Learn

Peter Merholtz’s cleanup of Stewart Brand’s model.

Work

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Work/Life
Jay’s Personal Learning Environment: 1980

Jay’s Personal Learning Environment: 2008
internet

Work/Life

Work
Value migrates to intangibles Tangibles
Market Value S&P 500

Intangibles
1982 1999

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McKinsey – new worker

McKinsey – by industry

McKinsey -- performance

Learning the work
How Workers Acquire Knowledge
Novice Old Pro

Explicit

Tacit
1.1

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Going up the stack...

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Value Network Analysis

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Networks, web 2.0

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JSB

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Networks, web 2.0
Network evolution

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Networks, web 2.0

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Networks, web 2.0
From hierarchy to flatland
Silos

Boundaries open up Communication goes viral Unified enterprise

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Networks, web 2.0

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Knowing Knowledge (Geo. Siemens)

Eight broad factors define the characteristics of knowledge today: 1. Abundance 2. Capacity for recombination 3. Certainty…for now 4. Pace of development 5. Representation through media 6. Flow 7. Spaces and structures of knowledge organization and dissemination 8. Decentralization

George Siemens

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Knowing Knowledge (Geo. Siemens)

Knowledge comes from systems and integrated structures. Better quality networks and connections result in better quality knowledge sharing. Forming effective networks is as important a challenge as utilizing the networks for our knowledge needs. While building our networks, we cannot unearth knowledge by only focusing on one domain. To exclude social, emotional, or spiritual dimensions is to grey the picture. The wider the lens of our perception, the brighter (and more complete) the image.

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Knowing Knowledge (Geo. Siemens)
Experience has long been considered the best teacher of knowledge. Since we cannot experience everything, other people’s experiences, and hence other people, become the surrogate for knowledge. ’I store my knowledge in my friends’ is an axiom for collecting knowledge through collecting people. Karen Stephenson

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Knowing Knowledge (Geo. Siemens)
a bricolage of cognition, emotion, intuition, doubt, and belief.

Change is shaping a new reality under the fabric of our daily lives. Seven broad societal trends are changing the environment in which knowledge exists: 1. The rise of the individual; 2. Increased connectedness; 3. Immediacy and now; 4. Breakdown and repackaging; 5. Prominence of the conduit; 6. Global socialization; and 7. Blurring worlds of physical and virtual.

When the rate of change outside exceeds the rate of change inside, the end is in sight. Jack Welch

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More than one cloud in the sky

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Groups vs. Networks (Downes)
Groups vs. Networks • • • • Groups Groups Groups Groups require require require require unity; networks require diversity. coherence; networks require autonomy privacy or segregation; networks require openness. focus of voice; networks require interaction.

Stephen Downes

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Participatory Culture

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O’Reilly

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Peter Morville
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End of this set

Jay Cross jaycross.com

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