comments by patrick 

mcevoy­halston


Original Article:

Salon’s Patton Oswalt peace summit

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2015 4:00 PM

Guilty aging liberals don't just smack down regressives, they smack down liberals 
who are too free­ranging and playful. They come to prefer youth who lack 
personality ... who seem a bit love­starved: If they can never repent enough for 
having lived a fulfilling life, they can at least help shepherd in a generation where 
it's hard not to mistake one for another.  

Brittney Cooper isn't like that. But she's probably being kept along in case they 
decide there's nothing for it but ragnarok. Jeffrey Taylor isn't like that either, but 
maybe he's old, and maybe he's around just in case we end up needing a war so we
can all fly away from wracking inner anxieties.

What is it like to get up in the morning and know that part of your cause is to 
make sure Katie McDonough doesn't become too interesting? ... can't be confused 
for Jenny Kutner, or Erin Keane, or Katie somethingoranother? That distinction is 
kept to old birds, like O'Hehir and Miller, who lurk above the other writers like 
tenured over TAs, even if they would have it otherwise? Those with fat on their 
bones and known a lot of the couch, over a rattled lot everyone's encouraging to 
pick up pitchforks, for highly suspect reasons. 


Permalink

Your cable company hates you: Why
Comcast abuses its customers
Original Article:

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2015 3:26 PM

Aunt Messy Monica T. He would differ: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mdudg­CoQwk

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2015 1:23 AM

Tigriel Many atheists are people who stopped believing in God because they felt 
hostility toward their fathers, and toward other father figures or authority figures 
because of that; and they especially disliked the idea of an all­powerful, all­
knowing authority figure who would punish them for their sins. So they had a 
psychological motivation for pretending that God does not exist.

Most atheists have less authoritative parents, and thus the idea of an all­powerful 
God has no emotional appeal. If you mutilate yourself before Him, you can't 
imagine your own parents thereby being appeased. You just bleed, pointlessly, 
which ranks rather far behind being a party animal in terms of fun.

An all­powerful male God, however, comes in handy when you're really 
concerned about the enormity of your early experiences with your all­powerful 
mother, who you spent most of your time with in your first years of your life. Then
it's a phantasm you cling to pretend that true Titanness had met her match! 

If you've come out of that environment, where Mother loomed large and shamed 
and humiliated you because she needed to gobble you up to make up for the fact 

that she emerged out of female­hating culture, you become repellant of anything 
that smacks of your once compromised state. You come to hate homosexuals for 
their ostensibly effeminate, their ostensibly compromised, nature. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2015 1:10 AM

Tigriel Benthead Taylor isn't all about the pursuit of pleasure. Read his piece, he's 
admonishing everyone who isn't willing to show guts and stop capitulating to 
evil ... all those like Obama who kind of want to step to the side. You read what 
he's expecting of us, all the vigilance and stridence, and you infer as well that he 
hardly wants us to be party animals, who danced ­­ I'm sure he would accuse us ­­ 
while "freedom" was lost.

I'm glad though that we're still thought of as party animals. When people are in the
mood to feel pure, everything they see as vile actually represents human 
fulfillment. How this can remain so with the U.S., given its culture of work­hard 
and its depraved social stratification, is beyond me ... but it's encouraging that 
somehow this far from our heydey we're still redolent of it. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2015 12:55 AM

Keyboarder I should have qualified this.  I meant if you broaden the awareness of 
people who've emerged out of unloving environments, where they were bad every 
time they didn't do exactly as their parents willed, it'll eventually lead them to feel 
abandoned by their parents, as having lost their respect and love, and they won't be
able to take it. They'll regress. If you broaden the awareness of people outside of 
these environments, it's all good, of course. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2015 12:52 AM

Brighid of the Forge Tigriel But if this stuff was everywhere, it'd be silencing, 
would it not?

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2015 12:46 AM

Keyboarder It is fear of difference, and the punishments for harmless acts like 
these aren't some kind of fake Islamophobia. 

Fear of difference suggests that if somehow everyone could lose their ignorance, 
we'd live in a peaceful world. Attend to the tone in someone like Taylor ... does he
really seems like someone who could possibly want to dissuaded from going on a 
crusade? 

If the removal of ignorance leads to greater opportunity, new ways of 
understanding your world, which might make you happier, it gets nullified, just 
like Western "spoils" eventually get rejected by affluent Muslims who'd in their 
youth indulged. Greater opportunity leads to greater guilt, a greater sense that you 
are bad/spoiled, which must be projected onto other people for you to feel pure 
again, for you to feel once again worthy of being loved. 

People feeling this need can't be shown how dispossessed of vile properties other 
peopleactually are, for these other people have become full of their own 
projections, which they know are very, very bad! 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 10:18 PM

ConradSpoke KatLib49 Liam Bently It's not just giving us courage, it's chastising 
us if we don't "speak up". Your bit ­­ "have allowed themselves to be cowed into 
silence" ­­ is implicating, is chastising us too. We didn't allow ourselves to be 
cowed; we just didn't take the war bait. 

Lending us ... well, maybe not courage but encouragement, would be to let us 
know that we can acknowledge that compared to the most progressive people out 
there ­­ whether they are actually found in Sweden, as some of us are supposing, 
or not ­­ everyone is regressive, and it doesn't hurt us to point this out rather than 
fear our current world necessarily must crumble the very moment we overtly 
acknowledge this fact. If we feel in our hearts that everyone deserves to be equal, 
we're not shaming anybody if we notice inadequacies; if we see, squarely, who'll 
be driven to try and kill the kind of provisioning world we want to enjoy that 
ostensibly makes people selfish and spoiled­rotten ... and doesn't Tayler himself 
sound like someone who'd like to take a swipe at our ostensibly conflict­averting, 
soft­hearted, defeat­deserving effeminate world?

The world is built out of a lot of people who for awhile ­­ good for them! ­­ were 
going progressive. As many of them do the inevitable and slip away, our thoughts 
shouldn't be on how to punish them but how to reconstitute so the next time we 
allow ourselves to move beyond conservative norms, we're ready to take 
advantage and help.  

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 8:57 PM

Aunt Messy Patrick McEvoy­Halston I thought it was pretty good. Did you hear 
about the evil nun mentioned elsewhere ... "evil wimmins" can be pretty scary!

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 7:27 PM

Benthead Good post. What I noticed is how he is ready to humiliate us for our 
cowardice ... if we are brave, we'll spill our guts and fight; if we "stand to the 
sides," we're opting for capitulation, and jettisoning our precious patrimony, and 
don't deserve to be free. This is a scolding he's hearing in his own ears ­­ "to come 
back with his shield or on it" ­­ and its won him over. 

What troubles about religion isn't religion per se, but the unstable mindset that 
leads one to be emotionally attracted to belief systems that encourage scary ideas 
concerning purity and sacrifice. He's advertising a path towards our being pure, 
worthy of praise and love, and it doesn't involve any of the manners we normally 
assume appropriate to our cosmopolitan society. We don't stand vigilant, we 
discourse. If things get heated, we do step aside ... and begin again, respectfully, 
when this tide has subsided. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 5:51 PM

le vieux renard When I asked the punishing  nun in fourth grade about, "Thou 
Shalt not kill", during WW11 and soldiers she looked at me with that haughty look
of holiness and said simply soldiers go straight to heaven.

That's what soldiers believe. Which is why the point isn't just to kill but for grand 
suicide. Why else would Germany wage war against all the world?

I hope you do very little in your life where you could imagine that nun approving 
of you ... it'd mean you were living an actualized life. 

lets have the talk and avoid a generation of death where the bottom 1% of us die 
to protect the hegemony of the top 1%

The "generation of death" isn't where you see this 99% vs. 1% split ... Hitler's 
Germany was one where being more German added more to your status than being
rich ­­ any ignorant ass could daunt the professor, if his/her bloodline was more 
pure. To add to the prowess of the Volk, you couldn't be starving. 

We're seeing healthcare reforms and some move to living wage reforms, all while 
under the blanket of 99­vs­1 rhetoric. It could be that at some level we need to 
believe our age is fundamentally denying, in order to okay reforms that will 
eventually lead us out. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 5:38 PM

Andy W Patrick McEvoy­Halston Registered Citizen LARMARCH5

Getting in just before people were in the mood "to be lead" by Hitler, would've 
been possible if we were all more cognizant on how little those of punitive 
childhoods can handle progressive periods like the Weimar. 

Yes, abusive parenting leads one to project one's "badness" into others ­­ see them 
as the vile "other". And eliminating them means in effect eliminating all one's own
"badness" out of the world, leaving you completely "pure". 

The enemy is also made to represent all the split­off elements of one's parents ­­ 
you bond with a father­mother country which is all virtue, and their "nation" is 

made possessed of all things prowling, mean and cruel ... of everything that lead to
terribly abusive things being done to you. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 5:26 PM

Andy W Patrick McEvoy­Halston Registered Citizen LARMARCH5 I addressed 
it. Getting in before, while they hadn't developed into a massed army, would have 
been better. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 5:23 PM

Daniel Thron Too add: the two most powerful things that move people to violence 
are suffering, like poverty (a form of violence in itself), or fear of violence.

Suffering can actually calm people down ­­ if they're suffering, they're not spoiling
themselves, not being bad ... no need to project one's "badness" onto others and 
obliterate. 

Ongoing societal growth draws people to remember their own childhood 
suffering ...  they do in a sense begin to cling to it, out of fear of being abandoned. 
They do get in mind to want to revenge themselves for it. 

The fear of violence owes to childhood memories as well. Paranoia arises not from
the world as it exists today, but out of well­founded knowledge/awareness that in 

your childhood there were things there to sting you, to scare you, to shame and 
humiliate you.This is the world that is now perennially before you. Phantoms, 
ghosts, madness. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 5:14 PM

Daniel Thron Americans were simply too happy and fat, and no amount of 
preaching from the good book about the enemies of God would get them off the 
couch.

How much do you want to bet that the next president wins because s/he tells 
Americans that they'd become "too happy, too fat, too lazy to get off the couch." 
Then, in conjunction with austerity and most of them counting amongst the 99 % 
struggling to survive, they'll see that yet more will be offered to show how 
deprived and repentant they'd become ... like perhaps in mass submitting 
themselves to a traumatic war environment ­­ PTSD as an acquisition, to shame 
those still just shopping and Burger Kinging.  

After some grand sacrificial war, it is true that for awhile people are hard to shove 
off their good times. But then they start feeling guilty and abandoned, and start 
chasing down people they know will put an end to it ... people who'll implement 
Depression­ensuring, growth­killing "hard money," and policies like that. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 4:38 PM

LARMARCH5 Patrick McEvoy­Halston Love­deprived people, not "a­holes." 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 4:37 PM

Andy W Registered Citizen LARMARCH5 Interesting response Andy. It still 
remains true that if we could understand that cultures that have awful childrearing 
can't allow themselves progress for long before they'll feel the need for a 
sacrificial purge, we'll ensure we intervene before they shuck off their 
cosmopolitan growth for regressive provincialism. 

So if the rest of Europe, realizing their childrearing was nowhere near as abusive 
as Germans', stepped in as soon as Germans starting finding the idea of the "volk,"
the mythic collective, appealing ­­ that is, well before they started targeting Jews 
and killing "useless eaters ­­ this would've been a model for what we should do. 

We'd understand that the first priority of these primitive peoples was now to lose 
their independence and bond with a large group entity of some sort, which would 
be followed soon after by their waging war against all the remaining progressive 
peoples out there ­­ the educated, the liberal, the commercial and freedom­
enjoying.

I'm not quite sure what we'd do with them at this point, because at some level 
they'd be done. Maybe just house them well, and give them ­­ as lovingly as 
possible ­­ whatever palliatives that'd help them imagine they were effectively 
cleansing the world of sin ... some kind of grand scale virtual environment, maybe.
It's their children we'd need to focus our attention on ... add that much more 
kindness, so they'd be nothing at all like their parents. 


Permalink

Anti-vaxxers are not the enemy: Science,
politics and the crisis of authority
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 4:16 PM

Ktimene Patrick McEvoy­Halston

We're not so much left open for fraudsters as we are inspired to chase them down. 
If you're the sort of person who not only is capable of interpreting and evaluating 
but freely chooses to use these skills, you're the kind of person bent on making a 
better life for yourself, making a better world. Too many Americans can only see 
this attitude as sinful, and so try and obliterate their all­too­transparent sanity ­­ 
their call for a more sane, and opportunity­permitting world ­­ by expanding the 
concussive thunder of demagogues. They're hoping to park a tank by the 
intellectual, to shut them the hell up!

It's not actually possible, but if somehow we could be people who were terribly 
poor at interpreting and evaluating but nevertheless weren't afraid of a progressing
world, fraudsters would be recognized for their emotional depravity, instantly, and
we'd find ourselves willy­nilly listening to those of higher­order intellectual and 
emotional capacities. 

Permalink

It’s time to fight religion: Toxic drivel,
useful media idiots, and the real story about faith and
violence
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 3:23 PM

We should not toss aside Ockham’s razor and concoct additional factors that 
supposedly commandeered their behavior. The Charlie Hebdo killers may have 
come from poor Parisian banlieues, they may have experienced racial 
discrimination, and they may have even been stung by disdain from “the dominant
secular French culture,” yet they murdered not shouting about any of these 
things, but about “avenging the Prophet Muhammad.” They murdered for Islam.

I like this. But what drives them isn't a chance to be loved by "Islam," but by their 
mothers. They are committing themselves to destroying that which are avenues of 
progress ­­ Charlie Hebdo's sanctioning the importance of critiquing anything 
which cows. What inspires this is a knowledge that when they inhibited their own 
self­growth and let themselves be passive vehicles for their mothers' pleasure, they
received love from their mothers. When they instead strove and enjoyed Western 
freedoms, they came to feel hopelessly abandoned and bad. 

Their childrearing was incredibly bad. Their mothers, abused so badly, re­inflicted
the abuses upon their children, and absolutely required them to serve as 
stimulants/anti­depressants. When they instead focused on themselves, they were 
rejected ... and the children knew, then, that there was no greater evil in the world 
­­ one cows completely before "God," and thereby, maybe, you'll be graced by that
gigantic world of heaven known as your mother's approval. You resist and enter 
the world of freedom and balking your parent's needs for your own, and very soon 
you won't be able to take the feeling of absolute rejection ­­ the sense that your 
mother has absolutely had it with you! ­­ and you'll go Jihad to slay true "bad 
children" and die on a field tended by your mother's soothing balm. 

About how abused mother's raise their children, about the origins of terrorism, go 
here: 

http://psychohistory.com/books/the­emotional­life­of­nations/chapter­3­the­
childhood­origins­of­terrorism/

http://psychohistory.com/books/the­origins­of­war­in­child­abuse/chapter­1­the­
killer­motherland/

But, the thing is, there are a whole lot of people who are being bypassed by the 
kinds of freedoms society is increasingly allowing, the kinds of prejudices that are 
no longer enfranchised/allowed. Denied society as sort of an exoskeleton in which 
to work out inner psychic troubles and thereby the living of a becalmed everyday 
life, they're going to go berserk ­­ kill­people, berserk. The only thing that will 
stop this is if we all commit to a war where a gigantic number of "bad boys and 
girls" are slaughtered, surrendered as sacrifices into the angry maw, which we 
don't want. 

So, we're going to have to get used to it. As much as possible, we need to maintain
the temperament appropriate for progress­enjoying people, which is an 
advancement of the "polite and commercial" that ruled in the 18th­century, but 
along the same lines: it's not excited, heated, but playful, sifting, and calm. To do 
this while bombs are going on all around us is going to be difficult, but I 

understand that Jane Austen managed as much, however much some have 
disparaged her for it. 

Our problem may not just be extremes. We need to remember that sometimes a 
whole people can decide they've had it with their progressing selves and suddenly 
turn provincial, crude and extreme: it's the story of what happened to the Weimar 
Germans, who went from participating in modernizing, cosmopolitan Germany ­­ 
however insufficiently and nervously compared with German Jews ­­ to eschewing
it for some "truer" German folk past. 

But even if suddenly all of Islam and great swaths of Christians and, even, a 
discouraging number of previously level­headed liberals, start seeing "bad 
children" everywhere and suit up for war, progressives need to remind themselves 
that these are all the victims of unloved childhoods and child abuse: as much as 
possible they need to be stopped, but they certainly deserve no hate. What they're 
doing was inevitable owing to the fact of their childhoods, and the fact that there is
still in this world a will to make things better. 

We need to keep up the temperament of a cosmopolitan populace, which this 
colourful and enjoyable article is still mostly ramped up against. 


Permalink

Anti-vaxxers are not the enemy: Science,
politics and the crisis of authority
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 1:32 PM

 It has extended life and cured disease and improved agriculture, and it has 
brought us eugenics and the Tuskegee experiments and Hiroshima and Zyklon­B 
and a whole host of amazing pesticides and herbicides and preservatives and 
plastics that have permeated every square millimeter of the planet’s surface and 
the bodies of all its creatures, and whose long­term effects are not known but 
don’t look that great.

The book Zuckerberg picked for discussion in his book club is Steven Pinker's 
"The Better Angels of Our Nature." The book is a reminder that the number of 
people who have died owing to murder/slaughter has been decreasing over time ­­ 
just previously our most progressive citizens rejoiced in them, but it is 
nevertheless true that primitive societies, our earliest historical origins, were a 
nightmare of slaughter, even compared to American Civil War/WW1 levels. 

We let go magical thinking and went science in the first place because, owing to 
gradually improving childrearing, more children were growing up less demon­
haunted: the landscape was less one where scary demons were all over the 
place, in every place/everything, and they could view things a bit more denatured. 
This meant more societal growth ... and our childrearing has not reached the level 
where this is something we can completely allow for ourselves. 

Societies use such things as science initially to grow and better provide and then 
start feeling guilty for it, hopelessly abandoned. They begin to shuck their growth, 
grow provincial and turn against the progressive elements in their society, and 
bond into some kind of regressive group ­­ they could become suddenly more 
nationalistic, for example. They then project all their negative attributes into some 
"other" and prepare to slaughter them ­­ eugenics, Hiroshima. When enough 
people have died, people feel the skies are cleared again and such things as science
progress, much less spared accompanying evil. 

There are a good number of people alive whose childhoods were good enough that
they would use science completely benevolently ­­ they are entirely divorced in 
emotional/psychic makeup from those who'd suddenly see some absolutely valid 
need to evaporate an enemy and cleanse ourselves of our "weakest." Earth wins 
when they're the majority. 

Permalink

Anti-vaxxers are not the enemy: Science,
politics and the crisis of authority
Original Article:

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2015 1:09 PM

 it’s absurd to assert that questioning the Catholic Church or the National 
Football League is good, but questioning the name­brand institutions of the 
scientific world is bad.

Questioning the Catholic Church and the National Football League is done 
by society's more progressive people. They want to see a reduction in self­
flaggelant philosophies and activities.

Questioning science is generally done by society's more regressive. Ongoing 
societal advancement ­­  which to them is a bad thing, since to them people who 
live healthily and enjoyable are being sinful ... i.e. are ignoring "God": their 
demanding, needy, love­starved parents ­­ means to them that more children need 
to be punished and hurt. 

They displace their own "badness" onto children ­­ so well representing their own 
"guilty" growing, striving selves ­­ and encourage their death through disease, 
economic deprivation and war.  This way, spurned, angry "parents in the sky" are 
felt to be somewhat ameliorated. 

Questioning name­brand institutions of the scientific world, done by those who 
can be trusted, is of course being done by progressives who also question the 
Catholic Church and the National Football League. The more hippieish of them 
realize that institutions, degrees, professionals admonishing themselves within a 
"guild," is still about keeping the phantasm Chaos at bay ... it's better than magic, 
alchemy and a projection­full world, but it's not that evolved/projection­dilluted ... 
we can let these "authorities" go too. 


Permalink

“Jupiter Ascending”: Channing Tatum in
Spock ears fights lizard men, but not for laughs
Original Article:

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 3:39 PM

bigguns Adventus Adding yet more weight to Hollywood impetus, is creation, or 
getting a gut ready to burst? Isn't it bested by the critic immediately by the sheer 

fact that they discern, that they can spot it out, and be angered by its stupid 
massing? How much is even the "creative's" own inspiration, rather than their 
simply laying out the next sequence in a narrative drama all the somnambulants 
amongst us are expecting our lives to be lived by?

Immersing yourself within that matter, distinguishing what might have worked 
from what should be ignored, isn't risky? isn't work? mightn't itself be potentially a
bit of genius that might inspire creative efforts from someone else? 


Permalink

“Jupiter Ascending”: Channing Tatum in
Spock ears fights lizard men, but not for laughs
Original Article:

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 2:48 PM

bigguns Aren't we all just churning over what we experienced, and coming up 
hopefully with something novel to say?


Permalink

White male temper tantrums: What the
“political correctness” debate completely misses
Original Article:

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 7:21 PM

Benthead Patrick McEvoy­Halston I hear you. Mind you, in presence of chivalric 
liberal Chait, about to do battle in support of 18th­century liberal ideals(!) it's okay
.... perhaps more than okay, to remind that people can be Quixotic, strange, as 
bizarrely motivated as Freud held all humanity to be. 

Different cultures owe entirely to different childrearing. You can make all the fuss 
you want about reactionaries across different cultures, but if they sound the same 
in tone ... if they're equally aggressive, then they properly belong grouped with 
one another, however much their decorating aesthetics may sort out. Historical 
change owes to gradually improving childrearing. People believe they deserve a 
better life, and they invent belief systems that help enable it to be so. 

The nature of geopolitics depends on the norm within our own families. If we 
cooperated there and addressed each other as equals, this will prove the same 

when we engage with one another at the UN. If we fought bitterly, constantly 
trying to shame and humiliate ... then when one, say, shucks off austerity, our 
reaction will be angry and punitive. Germany's childrearing was the worst in 
Europe in the first part of the 20th­century; I wonder where exactly it stands now. 

I appreciate the comments you make here, Benthead, the good that you do. Freud 
rules!


Permalink

White male temper tantrums: What the
“political correctness” debate completely misses
Original Article:

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 6:40 PM

Benthead

I'm a lefty, but I still roll my eyes at some PC excesses.

So what are you like a governor who administrates the excesses and brilliance of 
the young? I'm speaking, of course, as someone who is routinely accused of being 
excessive in my Freudianism ... and all I see is the beautifully opened vision that is
being forestalled by those who recognize me in a way which means the least 
adjustment as possible. 

Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 3:09 PM

AtavistEsquire Rashomons Baby That would depend on how 
progressive they are. If they're bullies, then yes; if they're evolved, 
then no.

Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 3:07 PM

BlarBlarBlar Salon employs both of them because "they" think 
they're both fine journalists ­­ fine political journalists. 
I do think there are some on staff who sort of agree with you, 
though ... but these are people who hold perhaps an older 
conception of what a proper journalistic piece is supposed to be. 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 2:59 PM

Rashomons Baby dcer then you may be missing an opportunity 
to find (and potentially diminish) the shadow of the oppressor 
buried deep within yourself (to paraphrase Audre Lorde).
A lot of people want to recognize themselves as possessed of sin ­­
are you advertising to it? 
The point shouldn't be to gather as many people together as 
possible who agree that at some deep level we're all bad, and go 
out on a purifying crusade against those still enjoying lattes, Lena 
Dunham, and who feel pretty much wholly alright with 
themselves. 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 2:52 PM

della street Patrick McEvoy­Halston It seemed implicit that if they 
failed they deserved blame ... isn't this how this rhetoric of rewards
and punishments goes? 
Personally, I don't they deserve recognition or blame. If we, if the 
state, provisions you the way "you" deserve ­­ which is amply ­­ a 
good outcome is guaranteed. If you're left destitute by your parents
and the state is nowhere to help, no god­miracle happens: 
guaranteed, you'll raise very mentally disturbed children. 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 2:44 PM

della street  If anything, the life of the single Black mother, who 
manages to raise good kids despite huge challenges, should be 
venerated.
And the ones who don't manage this miracle should be ... 
disrespected? These millionaire rap performers don't do this, but 
they do distribute it with great enthusiasm amongst the rest of the 
female populace. 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 2:13 PM

overcat Patrick McEvoy­Halston Moses got to be God's favourite, 
but that still didn't stop him from believing God's ten 
commandments were a good idea ­­ so no. 
What would have stopped it is if there was nothing in her 
relationship with her mother and father that made her able to relate 

to the idea that if you suffer for your God, then you're a good 
person. 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 2:10 PM

Splint Chesthair But racism, sexism, heterosexism and every other 
ism are bigoted and illegitimate.
Some of us aren't sure exactly what's going to get identified as 
racism, sexism, heterosexism, and thus worthy of thorough 
censure. If like Brittney, who is a person of deep faith, the people 
who decide this actually hold suspiciously conservative traits, it 
can be a means by which actual progress is inhibited or canceled. 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 2:01 PM

BlarBlarBlar BeansAndGreens You're trying to bait 
BeansAndGreens to dump Jenny Kutner/Brittney Cooper identity 
politics for Thomas Frank economic/international affairs? Doesn't 
this to you sound a little bit like keeping female talk hidden while 
the boys smoke cigars? 
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 1:55 PM

Chaemera Patrick McEvoy­Halston BeansAndGreens A beacon's 
only duty is to shine brightly. We should remember it wasn't 
Fitzgerald's fault that "Great Gatsby" went out of circulation in the 

1930s, but the populace's ­­ the idiot middle ­­ who willed him out 
of view. The middle is lost; to me its obvious the direction they're 
headed. 
Our concern is to embolden progressives that the right attitude is 
one which recognizes no authority simply because they're an 
"authority"; to deflate any impulse on their part to base their self­
esteem on rectitude by showing clearly that those who live best 
and most freely and most enviably can hardly give a damn if 
they're ignored for being trash, or praised for dressing princely. 
These sites do this inspiringly. They inspire and embolden me.  
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 1:29 PM

BeansAndGreens If Salon wants to help society engage in 
discussions of race and privilege, it should elevate the discourse, 
not drop it down to Fox News levels.
This is Gawker/Jezebel level, not just Fox, and Gawker is a 
powerful progressive voice ... it unsettles. Fox would talk a lot 
about the need to elevate the discourse too, but you'd never hear 
such a thing from these sites ... Are you sure you know through 
exactly which discourse, the liberal fight is finding its most vibrant
avenue?
Permalink

Original Article: White male temper tantrums: What the 

“political correctness” debate completely misses
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2015 1:17 PM

pavioc16  In this regard he relegates our intellectual and political 
contributions to the terrain of unruly and excessive forms of 

embodiment and emotionality, which he rhetorically constructs as 
mutually exclusive from the terrain of enlightened reason.
This bit strikes me as right. Brittney is however a person of deep 
faith, which means that the idea of a pure God and his sinful 
children means something to her. I suspect her ultimate inevitable 
bent to be a kill­joy will arise mostly out of the kind of parental­
child relationship she was born into which gave birth to this 
perversity. 
Chaif is a kill­joy as well. He supported the Iraq war which killed 
millions and drained billions that could have gone into social 
programs ... into things which would have opened up better health 
and more joy. Right now he seems to be encouraging liberals to 
imagine themselves knights to "lady liberty" ­­ to counter the 
"evil" females, the witches, which may in his mind mostly be 
large, grasping black women ­­ and can more readily see this 
leading to combat and stalled progress rather than academic 
creativity. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 6:14 PM

bootknife stephened ornwen Didn't mean this to read as an insult to
you, btw. I meant that all parents should see their children as an 
opportunity to give them more love than they themselves received. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 6:12 PM

Cooper53 Kronosaurus Booblay Ownership of children? I think 

not. Parental rights until you abuse them and then the community 
steps in to assure humane treatment of your child.
I'm not even sure about this. If the community is more evolved 
than the particular family, it should be there from the start. 
Otherwise, it'll just be another republican/libertarian bent on 
hurting the vulnerable. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 5:56 PM

jonvaljon Patrick McEvoy­Halston okay. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 5:56 PM

DMichael Hoyt Yes, shushing is you being the authoritative parent
to their being the inferior child. When you shush, you're actually 
entering the mindset of your own regressive parents, who did that 
to you. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 5:54 PM

bootknife Patrick McEvoy­Halston stephened ornwen okay. maybe
also opportunity ... to raise children more emotionally evolved than
you are. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 5:36 PM

stephened bootknife ornwen Please, go ahead and give your 
children all the non­infectious diseases you like since they are, 
after, your property.
You think children are parents' property?
Permalink

Original Article: Rand Paul needs to be shushed: Why the 

confrontational brat is not ready for prime time
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2015 5:27 PM

 The state doesn’t own your children. Parents own the children. 
And it is an issue of freedom and public health.
Ron Paul doesn't actually believe this. If he got elected, he'd 
suddenly find all kinds of excuses for the state meddling with 
progressive childrearing within families. You'd be part of Alfie 
Kohn's "no homework" movement, part of anyone's "no spank" 
movement, and you'd be deemed guilty of raising weak, spoiled 
children, presenting no warrior resistance to ISIS. 
Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 7:33 PM

Blueflash Maybe it was purity, the physical desire to feel purified, 
rather than idealism ... which to me makes people seem all bookish
Thomas Jeffersons. To feel free of sin yourself, and to be 
righteously attacking it all on the outside, could come near to 
motivating hundreds of thousands, perhaps even now. 
And when they felt the country was being betrayed, their founding,
perhaps they weren't (at the deepest level) thinking of what 

happened a hundred years before but more of early personal 
experiences akin to what "American Sniper" showed ... the young 
learning early how good it feels to stick up for, to "sheepdog," your
family.  
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 7:03 PM

bernie4366 A whole country doesn't want Isquith? I'm sure he 
doesn't know what to make of that ... it's a bit like being told the 
moon doesn't like you, and  sure enough, looking up to see the 
moon deeply frowning ­­ which would be surreal but also kinda 
awesome! 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 6:54 PM

Blueflash So hundreds of thousands of ordinary white Northerners 
rushed to give up their lives because their Southern neighbours 
weren't sufficiently democratic? Very reasoning and noble of them.
But isn't that too a bit preposterous? How about they did it because
all of a sudden they stopped seeing Southerners as neighbours ­­ 
however inferior ones, wed still too much to sheep­thinking and 
aristocratic values ­­ but as dangerous vipers who near literally 
threatened to poison the body public? What was the imagery like? 
How were Southerners portrayed? In a clear­visioned fashion or in 
ways that smacked of heavy mental disturbance and delusion?
Permalink

Original Article: The “American Sniper” cultural moment:

How Iraq became the new Vietnam

SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 6:30 PM

others adjourn to the wine shop or coffeehouse to celebrate the 
meaninglessness of everything and discuss the new episode of 
“Girls.”
Nelson Fox: Perfect. Keep those West­Side liberal nuts, psudo­
intellectuals... 
Joe Fox: Readers, Dad. They're called readers. 
Nelson Fox: Don't do that, son. Don't romanticize them. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 6:12 PM

Jack Burroughs Patrick McEvoy­Halston Kevin J Cunningham
Rolling Stone was intuitively persuaded that the UVA rape accuser
was telling the truth. 
My intuition tells me that you think men are under attack by 
female schemers and their hapless male minions. My sense is that 
you gloried in this rebuke. My intuition tells me that all proof of 
this I would subsequently pro­offer you, wouldn't gain your ascent,
even if Athena herself came down to weigh all evidence on my 
side. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 6:06 PM

susan sunflower I think they suspect that the world's greatest threat
right now is the seductiveness of us all going us vs. them. If 
"Charlie Hebdo" gets recontextualized, it's defused as a "tea in the 

harbor," linchpin event and becomes one that has its complicated, 
nuanced aspects. Our complex, liberal society gets to continue, as 
our corpus callosum smacks our reptilian matter right in the face. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 5:57 PM

theglove Patrick McEvoy­Halston Jack Burroughs Kevin J 
Cunningham I know, but he's become especially militant right 
now, and you sense that given a choice between the two (as an 
opponent), Islam is his preference. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 5:55 PM

Jack Burroughs Patrick McEvoy­Halston Kevin J Cunningham
If you "sense" something nefarious about someone, you still have 
to back up your suspicions with substance. If you fail to do that, 
then you're engaged in character assassination. 
You sound like someone mansplaining the world­turned­upside­
down damage female intuition leads to. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 5:39 PM

Jack Burroughs Kevin J Cunningham For instance, how many 
times has Salon, and many of its commenters, basically accused 
Bill Maher and Sam Harris of racism and other bigotries for their 

substantive, good faith criticisms of Islam?
Many, because they're not done in "good faith." Good faith would 
mean that if there was some means of making the world more 
progressive which didn't mean their isolating Islam as an opponent 
worthy of a crusade, they'd have chosen it. We sense their need for 
people to be crushed, guiltlessly, probably because an ever­
evolving world actually makes them feel nervous and jumpy ­­ 
surely, for all this progress, some group has to be made to pay for 
our collective sins ­­ and this is why Salon attacks them. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 4:16 PM

Hal Ginsberg
From Socrates to Thomas Paine to David Hume to John Stuart 
Mill to Jeremy Bentham to FDR to MLK to Bernie Sanders, 
liberals are just about always right.
A lot of men on this list. It's what's appealing to Chait ... this sense 
of time­travelling back to the 18th­century, when it wouldn't have 
occurred to anyone to have listed a woman ­­ on anyone feminine 
­­ on a list of who's right. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 4:12 PM

DailyAlice Blueflash I think if we explored history we'll find 
ample examples of just­former neighbours suddenly hacking the 
hell out of one another. People can be getting along amiably and 

then suddenly switch, and no longer see kindly Joe or Sue but 
demons that mean to submit everyone to their servitude. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 4:04 PM

gerryquinn I think he's trying to masculinize liberalism, and cast 
everyone else as enfeebling ... I think it's about his own feeling 
weak right now, feminine. I find his vision is becoming 
mythological. I fear that a whole lot of people will appreciate the 
kind of "armour" he casts over them when he dresses them as lady­
liberty protectors. Their absolute immunity ­­ in their heroic 
chivalry ­­ to doubt and contestations.
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 3:37 PM

The problem for me is really just fundamentalism ... peoples whose
childhoods were repressive enough that they feel a need to stop 
growth, that they feel good boys and girls in doing so. 
There are plenty of people who associate with the left but who are 
actually quite conservative in values­­Brittney Cooper, I find, is 
one of them; and it should be interesting to see what happens when
some of her fellow writers at Salon get plunked into her category 
of racist villains. I think that many of these people are aware that 
sometimes in stopping people from saying and exploring things, 
they're not stopping something absent of sensitivity and that 
encourages bigotry, but that encourages growth ­­ something that is
actually a good thing. 

With these people, we have to be sensitive that what motivates 
them is not villainy/evil but a shallower, more punitive and cowing
childhood; we have to delay our reaction by getting inside them 
and experiencing the world from their perspective; but we do have 
to recognize them nevertheless as obstacles ­­ they are that. 
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 2:55 PM

Blueflash Yeah, reason was really king when before people could 
hardly see the world for it being so coated with their projections ­­ 
so 1500 to 1900 or so. Clear vision, reason, came out of being 
more empathically raised as children. 
Those still clinging to the word/concept now experience it as a 
(perhaps patriarchal?) bulwark against feelings, makes them feel 
coated in armour ­­ it's autistic, in a way ­­ and are hardly our most
evolved sort.
Permalink

Original Article: Political and incorrect: Why Jonathan 

Chait’s attack on p.c. culture is so flawed
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 2:43 PM

When Chait supported the Iraq War, I'm sure if you'd have seen 
him you'd have spotted something wild in his eyes. There's 
something wild in his demeanour right now, and it scares me. 
To the limited degree that the humanity of African­Americans was 
recognized by U.S. government and society in the 19th century, it 
came through the thrust of a bayonet and the barrel of a gun. 
Is this what happened in Britain when they turned against the slave

trade? Abolitionists started wading about and spearing every 
conservative in sight? 
Maybe what enabled the recognition of the humanity of African­
Americans, was slowly better childrearing. More empathy in 
childhood means less projection of your own "badness" onto others
in adulthood. The war just suited those who required that progress 
be met with a huge hoard of sacrifices to the maw ... then we'd be 
allowed to keep it.  
Permalink

Original Article: California takes on the NFL: New bill 

would force teams to pay cheerleaders minimum wage
SATURDAY, JANUARY 31, 2015 12:50 AM

It'd be nice if some of the players spoke up for them. Such a staple 
of the game, and paid nothing. 
Permalink

Original Article: “I don’t like to fight”: Brittney Cooper 

on life, God, childhood & mortality
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015 5:53 PM

susan sunflower Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead
becomes a way to erase Brittney and what she's saying in factor of
making her and it somehow the product of pathology. 
Brittney herself has argued that who children end up becoming 
depends a great deal on how they were raised. She argues that 
childhoods where obedience is obtained out of fear, "curtail 
creativity ... and breed fear and resentment between parents and 
children that far outlasts childhood." She's not the product simply 
of pathology; I think she's right that there was love there, however 
much I think her need to keep her mother holy means she 
overstates it. 

I listen to her, catch a tone that suggests to me she'll actually prove 
someone who shortchanges progress, ongoing self­expression, 
growth, and, I think, I point to her childhood, to origins, to help 
clarify what might otherwise people might be distracted from. 
"What you sense in her owes to her as a child being abandoned and
punished for trespasses, and her ongoing need to make her parents 
right and avoid punishment by ultimately serving to inhibit 
freedoms and demonize those more progressive than she." 
Permalink

Original Article: “I don’t like to fight”: Brittney Cooper 

on life, God, childhood & mortality
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015 5:22 PM

susan sunflower MWH Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead
It might also be useful to look at this column: 
http://www.salon.com/2013/11/29/lay_off_michelle_obama_why_
white_feminists_need_to_lean_back/
where she backs off feminists claiming that Michelle Obama had 
become a "English lady of the manor, Tory party, circa 1830s," 
saying that,
"The fact that she is ride­or­die for Barack makes us love her all 
the more. And that struggle between supporting your man and his 
vision for the nation versus being the full, forceful expression of 
your black womanhood is a struggle that black feminists know all 
too well, and are uniquely poised to sit with, not uncritically, but 
rather in a productive space of discomfort."
which sounded a little bit to me like the sort of "contentment" 

1950s women of all colours were supposed to "sit with." And I'm 
wondering if her perspective, informed by masochism and, I think, 
somewhat suspect respect for victims ... witness her claim that Bill 
Cosby should always be a hero to black people, owes to the 
particular nature of her childhood. 
Permalink

Original Article: “I don’t like to fight”: Brittney Cooper 

on life, God, childhood & mortality
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015 4:55 PM

MWH Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead I'd like to see if there is 
a difference in how they were raised as children, between feminists
being attacked via the solidarityisjustforwhitepeople hashtag, and 
those feminists doing the attacking. 
Permalink

Original Article: “I don’t like to fight”: Brittney Cooper 

on life, God, childhood & mortality
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015 4:46 PM

susan sunflower Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead I think 
progressives are being managed so that putting blocks up against 
regressive thinking, is not their being sane but their being 
prejudiced. So I fight against this disaster. 
Permalink

Original Article: “I don’t like to fight”: Brittney Cooper 

on life, God, childhood & mortality
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015 4:39 PM

Benthead Well, she's said that it has been traditional in many black
families to raise children to be obedient, disciplined, to give them 
spankings, and that this is something she's hoping to unlearn. She's 
written that in her childhood, parents who thought their children 
were too good to be spanked were ostracized. She's written that 

while she's seen many white children "yelling" (talking back?) at 
their parents, being received calmly, gently, soothingly, she can't 
recount a time when she saw a black child yell at her mother in 
public. Never­­such a child would be dead meat. 
Gotz Aly recently described the different attitudes towards children
between German and Jewish families in the first half of the 20th­
century, with the Germans being disciplinarian, not tolerating any 
dissent, and quite frankly beating the hell out of their children, and 
the Jewish being more progressive, raising children so they were 
unafraid to take risks and who were actually known to talk back to 
teachers­­something German children never did. 
Aly doesn't say much praise about the Germanic childrearing 
culture, but rather attacked it for inspiring envy and hate. Cooper 
claims that black parents are able to discipline their children in a 
wholly loving way­­she believes it's misguided and has terrible 
consequences, but it's always done out of love and care ... and 
thereby is considerably different from disciplinarian cultures of the
past. 
Do you believe her? What kind of voice are we giving rise to? The 
one that would flatten any child who behaved too freely or who 
didn't shepherd properly exactly who one was permitted to quarrel 
with? Or one that "usefully" challenges such "totalitarian" ideas, 
like that children should be talked to rather than spanked, and that 
parents aren't always right? 
Permalink

Original Article: When “political correctness” hurts: 

Understanding the micro­aggressions that trigger Jonathan 
Chait
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2015 8:07 PM

Brittney Cooper has written that she came out of a home where 
obedience was valued, and that this no doubt stifled her ability to 
think creatively. It seems to have affected her ability to think of 
creativity, of "discovering the world anew," as necessarily entirely 
virtuous­­perhaps it can't be detached from a selfish colonizing 
impulse? 
If whatever group you belong to raises its children progressively, 
when you're targeted, it's going to be because you're doing what 
their parents cruelly crushed them for. It's going to be out of envy, 
and to show themselves the good boy or girl who's still devoted to 
his/her authoritarian parents.  
Permalink

Original Article: Hollywood’s political ignorance: What 

Cosby, “Selma” & Hebdo reveal about white liberal 
consciousness
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2015 10:49 PM

Brittney Cooper said she grew up in a community which insisted 
on kids learning to be absolutely obedient. You never spoke up 
against your parents. Never ... or you'd get a whooping. She said 
that within her community, children who did something "wrong" in
other people's homes and were beaten there for it, could expect to 
also be spanked upon returning home for showing disrespect to a 
neighbour.
Is her problem that Charlie Hebdo is actually the "person" she 
wanted to be but was scared away from fully becoming ... someone
small taking on institutions that insist on being revered? Someone 
small behaving absolutely liberally? Is being liberal just a bit too 
permissive for her? Is she inclined to see us as spoiled 
conquistadors and in need of a whooping, when we'd dare shrink 
something as grand as an established religion into something just 

kinda regular we could presume to hold to account? 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far 

beyond religion and free speech
MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2015 5:51 PM

J.C. Miller If Jews in France argued that they were hated by some 
elements in their country owing to their success, would this be 
reality­based? Would the people who hate them be close to what 
we think of as fundamentalist ­­ i.e. highly conservative? Or do 
you think everyone who hates them naturally has in mind 
Israel/Palestine?
Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far 

beyond religion and free speech
SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 3:25 AM

esstee Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead Signe_S So Muslims 
cannot express themselves as Muslims, but others can berate them 
quite viciously with impunity.
Is this what is happening when they wear their apparel ­­ 
expressing themselves? I would hope so, but somehow that seems 
what a progressive person might apply to their experience. In any 
case, I'm sorry they weren't simply respected and nurtured ­­ what 
they deserved ­­ but full fruition of a culture can be no more than 
what we'd see when something regressive is allowed the same. 
And personally I think the most important repression they want 
revenge from is what they experienced from their parents: being 
berated viciously with impunity ... is the norm for any culture 
which still believes in absolute obedience in a god, I assure you. 

There was terror there ­­ abandonment and infanticide was what 
was offered "you" if you disobeyed your parents. Revenge, you'd 
never overtly direct against them but against some other in the 
social sphere. 
Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 3:02 AM

FreeQuark Benthead unless he or she thinks ethnic turmoil, militarism, classism, 
consumerism, and environmental destruction represent progress
Consumerism might be. Do you mean like the characters in "Girls" who still love 
shopping in New York? ... I'm not sure how many people parading against them 
are really all that progressive.

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 2:31 AM

esstee Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead Signe_S What is the geopolitics? Some 
people out there feel great when they take down those who still feel permitted to 
engage in debate and ridicule authority. We focus on what regressives have done 
to them ­­ Bush et al. ­­ but all progressives needn't to have done to ensure the 
same was just keep being comfortable with societal growth. They are the freedom­
exploring child they were abandoned for trying to be. 
If you were attacked by the regressives of another culture but were yourself the 
product of nurturing parents, you won't see the world as one where you might 
procure righteous revenge. You'll know that what everyone has suffered too much 
from is humiliation and you'll do what you can just to increment a bit the love. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 2:12 AM

Benthead Patrick McEvoy­Halston Signe_S "Geo­politics" sounds sober .... what 
"adults" do. The miracle of what Freud does is to help break this fortress: the adult
world isn't beyond the childish but fully informed by it ­­ how mommy and daddy 

loved, or did not love, us. You'll admit this would require a brave step for an adult 
­­ to admit that they're still settling out their grievances, their being owned by, 
their parents, when it's Wall Street, Angela Merkel, international relations, and the
latest whatever that Atwood and McEwan have pumped out?

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 2:01 AM

Benthead Patrick McEvoy­Halston Signe_S Freud had the punitive God as really 
just the castrating parent projected ... was he just frolic in your more sober­
important world of geo­politics as well?

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 1:43 AM

Signe_S Patrick McEvoy­Halston Stephen Stralka What is going on in the world is
that that some people still haven't quit being those who challenge, debate and 
grow, while whole hosts of others have. Those who keep on valuing growth have 
had a certain kind of parents while those trying to shut it down, have had others. 
The proper locus of attention is on the individual and how s/he is allowed to know 
the world: on you, the next person, and I. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 1:39 AM

Signe_S Stephen Stralka Patrick McEvoy­Halston The only history you need to 
know is one's personal history: how did your parents react to your efforts to grow 
and individuate from them? If they (parents) were well­loved enough to respond 
enthusiastically, self and societal growth comes easy to you: growth and self­
attention never meant abandonment for you. The only thing that will stop you 
about your generational history is if it wasn't one of those where each generation 
found means to improve upon the parenting they themselves received. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 1:34 AM

Benthead Signe_S Patrick McEvoy­Halston If the lower classes can resent, why 
do you not allow that it is THEY who allow themselves to be ruled? In any case, I 
don't worry so much about resentment but about those who feel virtuous ­­ loyal to
their parents ­­ in taking down the more progressive elements in society. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 1:25 AM

Signe_S Patrick McEvoy­Halston In my judgment, what is happening is what will 
keep on happening, so long as some "cultures" continue to value progress. We 
outpace what a lot of people can allow for themselves, and they feel loyal to their 
parents' values in launching themselves at us. I don't care how big a hoard they 
become, I think any turn on our part to focus mostly on our "inevitable" need to 
factor them in primarily, will be a sign of our own now uneasiness with ongoing 
change, our displacement (and implicit ridicule) of our predecessors' attitudes and 
expectations for us. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 1:20 AM

TXJew Sure, because Jews tend to more progressive than other people. They 
"embody" all the freedoms that less well­loved people can't allow themselves. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 1:05 AM

Signe_S Patrick McEvoy­Halston It gets pulled down by those who can't stand the
growth progressives keep on pushing for. Our current situation is to find some way
to make the emphasis the daily enjoyments still available to us, the progress ­­ 
now including, finally, such things as a living wage ­­ coming out of liberal 
governments, rather than whatever wants to make war, suspicion, settling matters 
­­ hate ­­ what we should be focusing on. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 2015 12:52 AM

Signe_S How many people do you know who don't identify as multiculturalist that
are actually peace­loving? Some of us identify as multiculturalist because  this is 
where many of the more respectful and loving people "are." I personally champion
other cultures because it's "where" I can "applaud" my love and appreciation for 
people everywhere. People who hurt other people were brutalized by their unloved
parents when they were infants ... so how can I wish them any ill­will? When 
you're speaking to them, you may not always be learning from them, but you're 
always hoping for them: I really wish, at least, they could be what they deserved to
be ­­ those I would have as much to learn from as they do from me. 
In truth, however, the only people we should be attending to to learn something 
from are those of the most progressive attitudes. If Seattle and San Fran no longer 
can stand living amongst people who can't afford groceries and so insist on a 
decent living wage, let's look at places like that to  actually learn, for instance. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why the Charlie Hebdo attack goes far beyond 

religion and free speech

SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 2015 11:45 PM

oregoncharles ilkim And that's from an atheist who thinks religion is ultimately 
harmful.  It's nonetheless part of the human condition, so I salute the work and 
courage of those who seek to make it helpful, instead. 
How is bowing to a superior entity natural to anyone other than those still 
unfortunately raised by parents who expected obedience and deference? 

Permalink

Original Article: “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”: Peter 

Jackson’s long goodbye to Middle­earth

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2014 3:30 AM

I have no problem with any of this. Jackson is a great director who is ebbing in his
power. But still as such, you know there's always a chance he'll do something you 
haven't seen before, something done without your consideration first in mind. 
Genuine leadership, like Ridley Scott ­­ both of whom nevertheless are 
approaching the point you may decide not to witness at all. They've been built 
great out of a previous time, but they're ebbing in their ability to say something 
meaningful to our own. It begins to seem even criminal, like you ought to be 
Joaquin Phoenix, strangling them for being incommensurate, and having to 

content "yourself" with your more minor abilities that possess the virtue of at least 
being able to be put in play.    

Original Article: NFL’s next “woman problem”: Why 

domestic abuse is only the beginning
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2014 3:41 PM

MargoArrowsmith Patrick McEvoy­Halston Cultures that value 
hard work are also those that insist on paying people a low wage. 
Therefore, within these cultures, we don't assure people economic 
gains by pointing out how hard they are working. 
Permalink

Original Article: NFL’s next “woman problem”: Why 

domestic abuse is only the beginning
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2014 3:38 PM

MargoArrowsmith Patrick McEvoy­Halston kiel Your reason for 
why cheerleaders is what, exactly? Try and be imaginative. 
Permalink

Original Article: NFL’s next “woman problem”: Why 

domestic abuse is only the beginning
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2014 3:29 PM

MargoArrowsmith There is a reality TV show about the Dallas 
Cowboy cheerleaders.  They work as hard as the players do.
Why is this relevant? We all know that McDonald workers work 
hard but this hasn't stopped a lot of us from thinking they get what 
they deserve. The preference for working hard is linked to our 
insistence on paying a low pay­­it has a masochistic element, 
where we're eager to show how worn we are. 
Permalink

Original Article: NFL’s next “woman problem”: Why 

domestic abuse is only the beginning
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2014 2:20 PM

kiel Historically women cheered and jeered men to prove their 
manhood by sacrificing themselves in battle. At some level of the 
football fan's imagination, these are not simply beauties but terrors 
insisting on their blood .... "come back with your shield or on it." 
Women might compete for the role because their relationship to 
the players might be a bit maternal ... the players become their 
boys sacrificing all and accruing accomplishments for them. 
Permalink

Original Article: Lena Dunham’s biggest lesson: Why 

survivors’ stories alone will not end our rape crisis
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2014 7:41 PM

It isn't just hearing about other stories, though. Freud heard plenty 
of stories of child sexual abuse­­in fact so many he gauged it 
essentially the Austrian norm­­but it didn't lead him to think of its 
damage. He estimated that since people seem to be still 
functioning, it couldn't be that harmful. 
What we are ultimately depending upon was touched upon by 
Brittney Cooper early this year when she discussed how 
childrearing has changed from her grandmother's time, to her 
mother's, to her own, with what had been prevalent ­­ beating the 
hell of children to imprint discipline ­­ becoming spare and on the 
very of disappearance (within her particular generational string): 
Cooper pledges herself against physical assault of children 
entirely. We are dependent upon all those millennials out there 
whose parents gave their children more love than their own parents
will able to provide them. These lot will simply care more. They'll 
hear of abuse and pledge themselves instantly to stopping it. 

Children from unloving families can hear of abuse and instantly 
put themselves into the position of the perpetrator­­they'll see the 
victim as deserving it. It was their parents' position towards them, 
and they internalized it, implemented it as an alter within their 
heads, very early on to keep their parents as they required them to 
be: right, just, and ultimately protective so long as the child learned
to behave. 
As such, re­education requires coaching them to be able to brace 
their parents' rejection, which'll come to mind every time they're 
put in the position of defending the vulnerable­­that is, their being 
abandoned as infants to the cold and surely to death. It'll pit you 
against their superego and you'll probably lose. 
Original Article: From hefty histories to chick lit: What I 

learned from reading two decades’ worth of NYT Notable 
Books lists
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2014 1:19 AM

susan sunflower Sorry you had a bad week, Susan. 
Permalink

Original Article: “It makes me really depressed”: From 

UVA to Cosby, the rape denial playbook that won’t go 
away
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2014 2:49 PM

Katie has elsewhere argued that most women have a story where 
they were forced into sex. That would mean that, what, maybe 20 
percent of the men out there are rapists? This could be true. 
Charles Barkley and Brittney Cooper have both argued that most 
black parents beat their children ­­ not just with hands, but with 
belts and switches. Both tried to say that this was done with good 
intentions, for the ostensible benefit of the child, but this is the 

standard rationalization of those who've been abused, so we can 
read it the right way: most black parents physically abuse their 
children. As Brittney says, to imprint discipline into their skin.
Abuse is THAT prevalent in our society. Because it's so often at 
the hands of our parents, we have trouble deciding that abusers 
were wrong. It would make us feel permanently abandoned by 
them; it would make us feel set to be infanticided by them. Freud 
knew the prevalence of children's sexual abuse in Austrian society 
but decided it couldn't be that big a thing because everyone would 
be hysteric. I think we can look around at society and see that the 
results of early abuse shows plenty. Men revenging themselves 
against maternal incest through repeatedly attacking women. 
Women returning the abuse they themselves suffered onto their 
children. Projections onto "others" who represent our own bad 
selves. People seeing victims and believing they deserved what 
they got. 
Permalink

Original Article: “It makes me really depressed”: From 

UVA to Cosby, the rape denial playbook that won’t go 
away
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2014 2:23 PM

As a culture, we are overwhelmingly inclined to think that victims 
are lying when they say they have been raped.
I am not sure about that. I think it's just that we as a culture still 
subconsciously want there to be abused people out there, and for 
them to flail about without recompense. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Rock’s economic bombshell: What

his “riots in the streets” prediction says about the American

Dream
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 9:12 PM

alterego55 Righteous anger is never based on existing realities, but
on early­suffered childhood abuse. My vote goes for those who 
point to the health reforms, the increases in minimum wages, gay 
marriage, the legalization of marijuana, and sees a block to the idea
that what we need most is violent revolution. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Rock’s economic bombshell: What

his “riots in the streets” prediction says about the American
Dream
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 8:40 PM

DaveL Bladernr1001 But you're right. Progressives are always the 
best loved in their societies, the most evolved. They believe less 
that there are "bad children" out there who deserve to be 
abandoned and pained. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Rock’s economic bombshell: What

his “riots in the streets” prediction says about the American
Dream
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 8:39 PM

DaveL Bladernr1001 This is great. But it's not intelligence that is 
key, but emotional health. I know you know this, but every time 
we say intelligence suddenly a cold chess game comes to mind; not
enough the delight in seeing people everywhere enjoying life, fully
provided as one can imagine. 
Permalink

Original Article: Jian Ghomeshi’s quiet accomplice: Why 

the CBC must be investigated, too

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 7:50 PM

Ellemm Christopher1988 sam louise Aranka Aunt Messy 
When women are sexually harassed they're not admired for 
standing up to the powers that be. 
There's a certain drama about Christopher's description of adult 
society that strikes me as worth exploring. He describes it as 
knocks and blows, and if you can weather it you're an adult and if 
you can't you're a coward. 
What he is describing here though is not so much what is 
intrinsically adult as what has traditionally been typical for male 
children, who are engaged less by their mothers, and thus 
experience fears of abandonment much greater than female 
children do. Almost immediately, they come to crave showing 
bravery in testing fields ­­ it's bravado; a testing of fears and 
showing you can master them. As an adult they crave perpetuation 
of just such an environment. It's not adult, but the perpetuation of 
the atmosphere of early childhood neglect. 
"Adult" really ought to be nurturing; it's what our long climb 
through generations has been about ­­ to create a less traumatizing 
and more attendant and loving world. So "adult" to me is someone 
like Alfie Kohn, who dislikes the whole testing narrative and 
thinks people perform best when given support and love. If we 
were living in his "adult" environment, those claiming they were 
abused would never be faced with the ramifications our own 
childhood­neglect built need to believe we've been tested and 
proven ourselves victorious. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Rock’s economic bombshell: What

his “riots in the streets” prediction says about the American
Dream
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 7:22 PM

 That dynamic won’t change until more Americans realize that the 
American Dream today is just an empty promise.
At some level they know this, but they are atoning and so want to 
be a Depression people who showed nobility and dignity through 
suffering. During the Great Depression, they continued their faith 
in working hard, at some level knowing that whatever parental 
perpetrators in their life would be pleased in their unwillingness to 
point fingers at abusers. 
After enough suffering, they collectively felt they were allowed 
things again, and so the rich/poor divide collapsed, plumbers 
making more than lawyers, the rich taxed at 80 percent. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Rock’s economic bombshell: What

his “riots in the streets” prediction says about the American
Dream
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 6:47 PM

RoloTomassi Patrick McEvoy­Halston I'm not sure if this was 
scribbled on the front page of Freud's Interpretation of Dreams, it'd
be a total winner. Then again, psychoanalysis, while still a big deal
in France, is less and less a thing in this great sophisticated land of 
ours, so maybe Freud'd be owned.  "Shake ... and bake! my 
Austrian friend, shake and bake." 
Permalink

Original Article: Jian Ghomeshi’s quiet accomplice: Why 

the CBC must be investigated, too
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 5:17 PM

glorrierose Patrick McEvoy­Halston We do live in a rape culture. 
But more than this, we live in a culture where we are sacrificing 
broad swaths of people, which includes the poor and the young.
By this I'm perpetuating rape culture? Maybe you're perpetuating 
sting culture ... going at people you don't know like a wicked wasp 
and then leaving them to recover.
Permalink

Original Article: Jian Ghomeshi’s quiet accomplice: Why 

the CBC must be investigated, too
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 3:25 PM

Christopher1988 Aranka Aunt Messy
I think the smart person would look around at our society and 
really understand that we are living in a period of sacrifice, where 
people seem to actually want a lot of people to suffer without 
remedy. Your action will depend if people will want to see you as 
one of those who's role is just to suffer. So if you're a student, take 
a pause. If you're a woman ­­ take a pause ... are you rich, someone
successfully leaning in? Or can you be categorized as someone 
mid­level who's job is never safe? 
If you're the latter, the narrative society will want to see is your 
fall. You presumed to speak against abuse, and to society, you 
represent the vulnerable child speaking up against adult 
prerogatives. Right now, we see such a child as simply self­
indulgent, selfish, bad.
It would probably strike one that in such a society, when someone 
suggests they take action which could be discomforting and scary 
but which after all is what adults do, they might being conned. For 
how much more ripe a sacrifice is one who after being humiliated 

and shamed, gets lead to hope by another huckster who sets her up 
so a whole court can authorize her being discombobulated? 
If it could, would such a society give such a gifted huckster a gold 
key to the realm? He after all gets them naivety akin to virgins. 

Permalink

Original Article: Chris Rock’s economic bombshell: What

his “riots in the streets” prediction says about the American
Dream
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 2:38 PM

Benthead These people as children knew their parents were 
happiest with them when they didn't complain that while they were
being neglected, their parents busied themselves on gorging 
themselves. The rich are projections of their own parents; those 
living in squalor are their own good childhood selves, who are 
being "good" by not complaining. 
They understand the totality of what is going on. We just don't 
appreciate the weird things children will do to feel worthy of their 
parent's love. 
Permalink

Original Article: Jian Ghomeshi’s quiet accomplice: Why 

the CBC must be investigated, too
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 1:55 PM

I'm not sure if the problem is best described as rape culture. I think 
we're going through a time where people at some level understand 
certain people are being designated as being able to get away with 
anything ­­ fixed in lofty position, regardless of behaviour ­­ and 
others whose role is to suffer without there ever being a remedy. 

Living in an age where for so long we tolerated minimum 
wage/part­time jobs for so many people, or the endless testing and 
hundred thousand dollar debts for students, without any 
guarantees, suggests to me that most of us regretfully need to see at
least one large delegated group serve as our snuffing out. 
Something monstrous and awful is freely forging on them, before 
our eyes, and interminably, and we just can't bear to attract its 
notice by speaking out. 
Permalink

Original Article: Jian Ghomeshi’s quiet accomplice: Why 

the CBC must be investigated, too
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2014 1:09 PM

Let's hope someone wrote the equivalent article in Canada.
Permalink

Original Article: I am utterly undone: My struggle with 

black rage and fear after Ferguson
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2014 2:05 PM

everready voltairespen Patrick McEvoy­Halston If they're black, I 
would tell them that there are swaths of people who, owing to 
being unloved/hated as children, will project onto people and 
actually enjoy hurting them. I would warn them that in America 
many white families are unfortunately some of the most unloving 
in the world, and those they have traditionally projected on have 
been blacks. I would tell them to take care, and move into regions 
where people are generally more lovingly raised. Check out where 
twitter showed the most outrage to this verdict, to inform your 
decision as to where to head. 
About cops, I would tell them that as we as a nation increasingly 
grow and provide our citizens with healthcare so fewer suffer, and 

change institutions so they work less to enfranchise bigotry, we're 
moving towards a society where cops seem an anachronism ­­ 
especially those with guns. You should expect, that is, with society
moving more and more in a direction that does not satisfy the 
psychological needs of those who usually apply for the police 
force, an enormous amount of erratic behaviour, cops gone crazy. 
You could be being decent and good, and some cop will project all 
his personal demons onto you and see someone that needs twelve 
bullets to be stopped. 
Permalink

Original Article: I am utterly undone: My struggle with 

black rage and fear after Ferguson
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2014 1:47 PM

voltairespen Patrick McEvoy­Halston I would recommend they 
make sure that those who pledge them relief from mediocrity by 
putting themselves on the front lines, get full scrutiny. 
Permalink

Original Article: I am utterly undone: My struggle with 

black rage and fear after Ferguson
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2014 1:36 PM

voltairespen  "They are lining up, linking arms, and being locked 
up for justice. They are listening to those who have something to 
say, and shutting down shit when forced to listen to anyone who 
doesn’t. They are choosing their leaders, their griots, their truth­
tellers, their strategists, their elders.  Showing up matters most. 
Putting one’s body on the line is the order of the day. They are 
undignified, improper, unabashed, impolitic, unapologetic, 
indefatigable.
More than 3000 new registered voters move among them.They 

have collected these new registrations like so many arrows in a 
quiver.
And Barack Obama is a broken symbol, a clanging cymbal, unable 
to say and do anything of use.
This moment is about all of us. About what kind of America we 
want to be. About what kind of America we are willing to be, 
willing to fight for. About whether we will settle for being 
mediocre and therefore murderous to a whole group of citizens. 
About whether there are other versions of ourselves worth fighting 
for.
Don’t sleep. Millennials, it seems, are the ones we have been 
waiting for.  Fearless and focused, the future they are fighting for 
is one I want. It is high time to awake out of sleep. Stay woke."
 (Britney Cooper)
She is advocating for warriors. She is urging millennials, that is, 
young people, to lay down their lives. There is a narrative she is 
hoping for which very much includes a fantastic number of young 
people busted and beaten and killed, as they purge themselves of 
their mediocrity and become their best selves. This is war talk. 

Permalink

Original Article: I am utterly undone: My struggle with 

black rage and fear after Ferguson
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2014 11:45 PM

Xanthro RoloTomassi omglolbbq Force, or calling for charred 
White flesh, will never help Black society, because all it does is 
drive away potential allies, while reinforcing negative stereotypes 

that Black people are inherently violent and unpersuaded by facts.
Except we see a lot of evidently progressive people expressing 
themselves just as forcefully right now, so I don't find your 
argument persuasive. What's happening there is people reacting to 
being hit by taking an assertive step forward: it thrills! 
Brittney Cooper, though, has talked about a need for young people 
to get ready to sacrifice themselves, to actually die for this cause. 
She's talked about them forgetting about living enriching lives, 
living better, more comfortably than their parents, and become 
more like the elders who literally spilt blood and who realized it 
wouldn't be for them, their own benefit, that it was spilt. This is a 
problem. This is young soldiers into WW1 talk. 
Permalink

Original Article: I am utterly undone: My struggle with 

black rage and fear after Ferguson
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2014 11:28 PM

RoloTomassi Patrick McEvoy­Halston
What I know is that this powerful internet reaction owes entirely to
the fact that more and more Americans are being raised with more 
care and love. So they're not racists ­­ racists being those who were
brutalized by their parents making them project their own "bad" 
selves onto other people and take enormous pleasure when they're 
humiliated and destroyed. 
Evolved people like this need to know that the narrative of 
sacrifice is ultimately about purging too. Never, ever, encourage 
young people to see virtuous status as accruing to them if they 
subject themselves to the battlefield. Never make love and respect 
something owing to those who accumulate scars.

What do we do now? If we have the momentum, we'll "carpetbag" 
the more racist parts of the world and stop they're having any 
agency: they're after all only to be about seeking righteous 
vengeance themselves, possibly forever ­­ especially if the overall 
temper of our society continues to evolve, leaving them without a 
societal exostructure to help them "handle" their madness. 
If we don't, we'll probably realize that we've got enough for a 
country in all these progressive voices we're hearing, and double­
down on our efforts where we rule. 
Ultimately, anything we do that means more love accruing to the 
next generation, will be the most powerful thing we do to work 
against societal racism. 
Racists were brutalized as children; they're the victims of sexual 
assault and abandonment. If you have to go longterm it really helps
to remember this. They're what happens to those that get 
neglected. 
Permalink

Original Article: I am utterly undone: My struggle with 

black rage and fear after Ferguson
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2014 10:23 PM

RoloTomassi kilfarsnar Nothing is gained without sacrifice, and 
desperation without a viable alternative process is usually the 
mother of such sacrifice.
Targeted action requires sacrifice: you end up looking nothing like 
a warrior; you can't imagine your enemy beaten to a pulp, 
thoroughly humiliated. 

Plenty is gained without sacrifice. The fact that so many 
Americans are upset about this verdict owes to them having had 
parents who enjoyed their children's company more than previous 
generations did, making them project less and love more. 
In my judgment, any time someone mentions sacrifice in pursuit of
a goal the real goal ends up being the purge, the sacrifice. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Cosby’s media inferno: On 

journalists reporting justice — and believing victims
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2014 10:12 PM

J. Nathan Patrick McEvoy­Halston You're welcome, J. Nathan. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Cosby’s media inferno: On 

journalists reporting justice — and believing victims
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2014 7:33 PM

pjwhite I have seen rape survivors go from being perceived as 
pitiful and damaged to being seen as the courageous heroes they 
are for speaking out.
I'm glad they had the self­esteem to speak out, but I'm not 
especially happy about calling them courageous. All the others that
historically DID NOT speak out, weren't (guiltily?) lacking what 
the others managed ­­ that is, a show of courage against bullies. 
They were just products of backgrounds that weren't going to fuel 
them the self­worth to power on through; the abuse they suffered, 
corroborated the sense of their worthlessness that their parents 
installed in them. 
Speaking out would not just make the abusers but their own 
parents wrong, and you've got to have received a considerable 

amount of love to readily manage that. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Cosby’s media inferno: On 

journalists reporting justice — and believing victims
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2014 7:26 PM

Operation Enduring Boredom Patrick McEvoy­Halston OEB, I've 
never had a sense that you actually wanted me on this site, 
regardless of length of my posts. I personally could do without 
interacting with you; I find you corrosive. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Cosby’s media inferno: On 

journalists reporting justice — and believing victims
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2014 3:55 PM

Part two:
We have “accumulating” two different psychoclasses, two broad 
swaths of very different people ­­ one more lovingly raised, one 
less. If the “less" wins, mostly determines the emotional temper of 
our next number of years, everything progressives have done to 
expand our awareness of how many abusers there are out there can 
be used to justify a pre­existing desire to cleanse the world of 
"bad" people. If Katie McDonough's argument that almost every 
woman has their own rape story becomes “understood” ... that 
there are that many men out there who are rapists; if we come to 
understand that so many of us were victims of sexual and physical 
assault as children ... if we as people who no longer need to 
safeguard the abuser can look at our society and recognize just 
how much our society is coloured by sadism, the terrible defining 
destruction wrecked on our fellow human beings, and we 
ultimately lose, we've laid ground which the other side will 
takeover.  Saying, “you're right, but let me show you where this 

evil you’ve agreed exists in plenty and must in this moment of 
clarity be urgently vanquished, is actually most concentrated…”  
And you'll have America involved in righteous bigotry. You'll 
have Americans going from feeling compromised to instantly pure 
again, forgetting all the self­improvement they needed as all their 
“issues” become transplanted onto the outside. Chastising 
progressives will lose their effect, and blamed, for not thinking 
their issues through — at the cost of lives.  And the women “we’ll”
be standing up for, those accosted in cultures everywhere that 
progressives have ostensibly drawn back from incriminating but to 
keep their own cosmopolitan egos intact, will be in their own 
minds childhood perpetrators they'll feel enormous joy in 
protecting. 
They can't be guilted, is what I’m getting at. That self they'd begun
to recognize that should feel shame and guilt in denigrating 
vulnerable people, that increasingly uncomfortable, caught­out self
that recognized how much it wanted women to know pain, would 
be gone as they know themselves to in fact be willing to sacrifice 
their very lives to keep their mothers from being pained at their 
children’s ability and presumptuous willingness to see them plain 
— to destroy them, Meghan Daum, truly progressive, matricidal­
style. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Cosby’s media inferno: On 

journalists reporting justice — and believing victims
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2014 3:54 PM

Why did the responsibility change? 
Historically, the most powerful and important perpetrators in our 
own lives were our parents. Since as children we absolutely had to 

imagine them as people who could love us, be our protectors, our 
brains went quickly to work making them right to have abused us, 
and ourselves wrong for doing whatever we did. Since we actually 
didn't do anything and were just attacked by our parents when they
switched into the brain states of their own perpetrator parents and 
saw as full of their own projections, we are left to conclude that it 
was just our vulnerability, our absolute neediness, that was bad. To
keep our parents, the ur­perpetrator, "right," perpetrators become 
automatically good and the vulnerable deserving of abuse. 
This is why the last people you should expect automatic empathy 
for victims from is actually people who've been abused as children.
That interview we all saw where that CNN interviewer drew his 
interviewee back into her moment of sexual abuse and then tried to
show her how the facts show that even there she was being bad ­­ 
"why didn't you bite his d­­k off? ­­ is about what one should 
expect. By humiliating her, by drawing her back into shame and 
latching onto her there some hard­to­shake­off scold of self­blame,
he was at work, not protecting/shielding Cosby but the primary 
childhood abusers in his own life ­­ his own parents ­­ and thereby 
experienced a pat of approval so meaningful your reproof of him 
would have little chance. 
When perpetrators like Cosby (himself, guaranteed, a victim of 
sustained child­abuse) are losing their protections it's because 
some substantial part of our population has begun to have 
childhoods where their parents stopped or lessened their inclination
to see their children as bad sh­ts that needed discipline, terrors, 
abuse to be corralled into being good. Some substantial part of our 
adult population has known more loving childhoods, and don't as 
much see their own childhood vulnerable selves as somehow 
having deserved whatever abuse suffered. They then witness the 
perpetrator and don't so much cow away but demand dethroning, 

while mostly in fact thinking of the victims and empathizing into 
the shamed states the brutalized had been pitched into 
experiencing. 
Brittney Cooper discussed recently how she was separating herself 
from the long tradition she’d grown up amongst that accepted 
"spanking" ­­ read, physical assault on the child ­­ as the preferred 
way to raise children. We’re, our society’s, experiencing 
something like that, but writ large. When there's enough of us, 
those in the media who'd like to have written something twenty 
years ago but who really would have been eviscerated if they'd 
tried then, now have the way in — we’re the audience who’s 
ready. Even if we still can't shake that in going after outside 
perpetrators we’re still involved in a discourse that's ultimately 
going to implicate our own parents — again, the ur, the original, 
the archetype perpetrator, for all of us — more of us have had 
sufficiently less abandoning and terrifying childhoods that we can 
withstand a rattling of what previously only beckoned oblivion. 
Andrew O'Hehir just wrote an article where he sees perpetual 
stasis in an awful, hellish, late­capitalist society, as our ongoing 
reality. Next presidential election, more of the status quo, 
whomever gets elected. But we should understand the downing of 
Cosby as evidence that people are changing, not just in attitudes 
but in their well­being, their make­up, their constitution. And 
systems change when human nature changes, when better­loved 
people grow beyond systems that were emotionally satisfying to 
their less emotionally evolved, more pointless­punishment 
accepting/unconsciously desiring, predecessors. Capitalism moves 
from late to socialism when people stop needing for there to be 
shelved amongst us — losers; when we stop feeling satisfaction in 
such numbing, dream­deflating, tempering categories like 
products, producers and consumers. The sign that we may be 

moving towards something profoundly good is more to be found in
this new response to abusers than I think in the apocalyptic anger 
we'll likely also see a lot of in upcoming years.
This anger, I fear, will be fuelled by revenge against childhood 
perpetrators as well — its ur­source — but its constituents will not 
be like those repelled by Cosby ... it will not be fuelled by those 
who knew less abuse, who knew more love, but rather those who 
received so much they still will feel the need to protect perpetrators
and destroy victims. Their ur and all­infiltrating source of 
“perpetrator,” their parental terrorizers, will be split into two, so 
only part of this parent is actually attacked while the other part 
actually clung to ever­more loyally — its destructive aspects, 
wholly denied; one’s own fierce anger at them, just as much so. 
They'll be the equivalent of soldiers who destroy encroaching 
predatory countries, lead by an evil mastermind with a — to 
borrow from Sam Harris — “mother­load” of feminine qualities, 
but who cling to their approving nation like a knight­protector. 
And all the "troops" destroyed ... will be full of projections of their 
own childhood selves, their "sh­t selves," still horribly bad, and 
worthy of any other name you’d be inclined to call them. We'll see,
in short, the 1930s, a move towards mass action, mass 
participation, which could see threatened elites and worried big 
businesses (hurray!), but also collective agreement on the 
righteousness of bigotry — much of the world is simply cretinous 
and bad, and in need of urgent purging. 
This new unwillingness to excuse the perpetrator for a great reason
is being matched by a very bad one. Because we're seeing it of 
course in the slowly mushrooming anti­Muslim movement ... 
amongst even progressives — there, the New Atheism; people are 
feeling an increasing desire to project onto others and destroy, and 
so are grabbing on. If it was built out of the same energy you 

wouldn't have a progressive, you wouldn’t have Camilla Gibb, in 
the same article where she writes of how she left anthropology 
because she couldn’t handle how aggressively harassing Middle 
Eastern cultures were, conclude only how she was going to stand 
up in future against future Ghomeshis, but rather of course with her
standing up against something that would look to have her more 
associating with the New Athiests — those ostensibly standing up 
against the larger broad swath of abusers, whole cultures, in 
whole continental regions: those, in their own minds, more 
consistent, those being even more brave. That is, it would of had 
her finish where her article obviously looked to be directing her 
before she tightened it down only onto those she’d find within her 
vicinity at a gala. She chastised her own letting loose because it 
drew to mind phantoms of those legions also standing up right 
now, but whom she knows just aren’t up to what she is up to. Not 
at all. More the opposite. More along the lines of Germans in the 
30s. 

Original Article: Meet the “experts” using bogus science
to prop up nationwide abortion restrictions
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2014 3:56 PM
If the nation starts to have qualms about abortions, if the
nation as a whole tilts that way, it'll be because they
sense women being burdened by mouths they cannot
feed, and like the image.
That is, they'll want them to have children so to be
properly overwhelmed and depressed -- what we expect
of people in this time of sacrifice, of self-flagellation, of
purging ourselves so to be worthy of love once again.

We'll take photos of them, their blank faces, barely
surviving in the inner city or out on the plains, with
children wandering about them everywhere, in true
Walker Evans-style, and, say, "what noble sufferers!"
Permalink
Original Article: Animals that kill their babies have
bigger balls
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2014 3:08 PM
gerryquinn The_Pragmatist Not amongst human beings.
When a woman has a child she is in a sense branching
off from her own mother -- her love, in future, will be
towards her own children rather than her mother. As
such, it can arose powerful feelings of being rejected, of
allowing yourself something unallowed. The result is
that women often switch into their own angry mothers,
find themselves possessed -- a phenomenon we call
post-partum -- where they can end up killing their
children. No accident; deliberate.
The worse the childrearing, the more infanticidal -child-hating -- the
culture: http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/eln07_evolu
tion.html
Permalink
Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 8:41 PM

Our brains form in the company of our mothers, by the
nature of our attachment to her. Doesn't it seem strange
to be asked to prove how later behaviour towards
women might be largely determined by the nature of
your relationship with her? Wouldn't you be wondering
what is going on with this person that they could doubt
this?... indeed that they find it so unlikely that when no
one else brings it up as a possibility in later violence
towards women, this doesn't bother them at all?
Wouldn't you be guessing that you're probably dealing
with someone who is being determined by their own
mother's wish/insistence that she not see her straight,
that she would be punished, abandoned for doing so?
Wouldn't you suspect that you're dealing with someone
largely under the control of their superego, or rather, the
terrifying maternal alter they've implanted in their right
hemisphere specifically to ensure they do not repeat
behaviour that earned them rejection from their mothers
in early infancy?
You're not dealing with someone who's going to let
scientific proof have any real chance in this matter,
because what's at issue is one's own brain turning
against itself -- to see your mother adversely, would
make you a terribly bad child, once again worth being
abandoned. You don't have the psychic makeup for truth
when along with it will be a rejection that will
degenerate your whole sense of worth; make you want

to suicide yourself.
So what you do is wait for those who accept the
common sense aspect of what you're saying ... as if the
task, obviously, would be to prove the highly likely
thing you're asserting isn't true. Such a person had a less
punitive mother, a more permissive mother, and though
seeing her mother fully straight-on would still be
understand as a no-no, it'd be something that could be
born by the fact that "you" knew she loved you enough
that she'd want you to move past even her own
allowances, and by the fact that outside courage could
buoy you past the pain of her rejection.
Permalink
Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 7:37 PM
They're being intellectually dishonest is saying they
need evidence, because no amount of evidence is going
to convince them. If I'd offered it, they'd of refuted it
regardless ... and finished with a heckle: because if they
don't the internal representation of their own mothers
they keep in their heads wouldn't be sufficiently
persuaded that "you'd" allied sufficiently against seeing
the damage she deliberately did to you straight.
If there was some register that what I was saying
seemed like common sense -- neglected and abused

women make for terrible mothers; and being the "all"
for infants and young children, their imprint will
determine them for life -- I'd recognize that I was
dealing with someone who'd shaken the commandment
-- do not be aware! -- and might put forth a study of
some kind, or link to someone who's assembled them.
But really, that person, having broken through, would
realize the issue is that too many people don't dare raise
the ire of those they were most dependent upon as
infants for love and support. Doing so, they'll feel
they've lost their claim to it forever, and be hopelessly
abandoned.
I repeat, because the war being fought is people's
willingness to admit to themselves the damage owing to
unloved mothers. Some people hearing it put forward
enough times, will pledge fidelity to that part of
themselves that won't be broken from truth.
Permalink
Original Article: Bill Maher’s slippery slope: Why his
war on Islam could hit closer to his own home
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 6:28 PM
Bill Maher seems to think that the Muslim religion is at
fault for acts of terrorism committed in the name of
Islam. But, in fact, it’s the radical Imams who are
“cajoling, pressuring and bribing” young disaffected
men to commit violence in the name of Islam — which is

not all that different from what the FBI is doing, is it?
It’s not the idea or the book or the religion that’s
encouraging them to make these bad decisions — it’s
older men in authority manipulating younger men to
carry out their plans.
So the book doesn't influence because these older men
play a much larger part in these boys' lives -- it's
ephemeral, in a way. Well, no one plays a larger part
than do their mothers and grandmothers -- they grow up
mostly before them (in the women's quarters), not the
men. And these brutally treated women re-inflict their
own tortures upon their children, and abandon them
when they try and self-activate, because this means their
no longer serving and instead their (ostensibly
deliberate) abandoning them.
They may well be cajoled (but also by the women?), but
these boys don't really need to be cajoled into terrorism.
Terrorists kill those they've projected their own "bad
boy" status onto -- those who are enjoying unallowed
freedoms and personal pleasures. Thereby these often
young adults who, owing to tasting adult independence,
we're feeling completely abandoned of their mother's
approval and love, once again feel pure and accepted.
http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/eln03_terrorism.htm
l
Permalink

Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 4:53 PM
goeswithness We can handle ideas, but no way should
we put up with hate speech and threats. Meet us with
ideas, not insults. Is it that hard to understand the
difference?
I think this is mostly right; right-thinking women are
being projected upon. But when I argue that male hatred
towards women, men's "irrational" fear of domineering
women, owes to their having had mothers who were
thoroughly abused and neglected in the patriarchal
cultures they grew up in but who did dominate and
abandon their children, I usually don't feel I'm being met
by people eager to engage with ideas but by those
launching dismissive insults.
Permalink
Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 4:27 PM
AmusedAmused Hopeful Cynic I agree with you about
mansplaining -- it's worked to back off some gross
behaviour. But in feminist circles (discussed in the
Nation's piece, "Feminism's Toxic Twitter Wars"), white
feminists are being charged with whitesplaining, and are
complaining that the corrosive effects of this is having

them disengage from online feminism:
Now, it’s true that white people need to make an effort
not to be racist. And there are countless examples of
white feminists failing women of color and then hiding
behind their good intentions....
But the expectation that feminists should always be
ready to berate themselves for even the most minor
transgressions ...creates an environment of perpetual
psychodrama, particularly when coupled with the
refusal to ever question the expression of an oppressed
person’s anger.
http://www.thenation.com/article/178140/feminismstoxic-twitter-wars?page=0,0
My point being, we have to always do a double-check to
make sure that we're supporting the more emotionally
evolved side. Many of the white feminists that are being
charged as racists and are dropping out of the discussion
(i.e., are "stopping), are going to count amongst them
some of the more evolved people alive.
Permalink
Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 2:54 PM
Shivas Andrew Sullivan: Or is it simply that WAM

believes that women cannot possibly handle the roughand-tumble of uninhibited online speech?
You: I for one wish that women would shelve the
delicate flower form of feminism as it may seem to
accomplish incremental goals but it does so at the
expense of a lot of other potential gains. Women cannot
achieve equality by presenting themselves as frozen in
fear, unable to make intelligent choices, incapable of
expressing themselves, and unwilling to stand up for
themselves.
The rough-and-tumble world is one boys know as
children owing to greater abuse and distancing by adults
and being subject to demands to "grow up," "be manly,"
and "not be a cry-baby" and not need attachments. In
this early environment what they are is frozen in fear,
entirely powerless, and so through life they crave
environments where they defensively prove they are not
powerless in these situations.
That is, these rough-and-tumble worlds might feel like
they enable quality, extensions by the proven into a new
future; but what they mostly enable is bravado, restaging/repeats of the past by those afflicted by
childhood terrors.
What we need are not more women warriors, unafraid of
the blasting storm, but more men permitted to know

more affection in their delicate, past, boyhood forms,
without feeling shame.
Permalink
Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 2:08 PM
MBMorris Woody Brown Greywolf Borealis The
movement is good. It'll be lead by some of the
progressive types that are the exact opposite of the
personality types described by Woody Brown. I agree
with Katie that this will be about expanding the
conversation not shutting it down.
But his, or, sorry, the "daft male's" fear he was (merely)
illustrating, that lingering behind "the female" is
someone irrational and domineering comes out of
experience. Women who were abused through life and
who become mothers, will be this to their children.
Their girls will be dominated, but their boys will be
mostly abandoned -- which is far worse for the psyche
(and the origins of the male "instinct" towards bravado
-- defensive disprove of fears ... all alone on the
battlefield). Plus, irrationally but understandably, the
boys will represent the sex that abused her through life,
and will be partly hated/rejected for this.
Permalink

Original Article: Artie Lange’s lame downfall: What
daft men still don’t understand about speech
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 12:43 PM
This isn’t the dawn of the age of “creeping misandry”
or a “censorship field day,” it’s the embryonic stage of
a conversation about abuse, accountability and free
speech that’s been long overdue.
This conversation has been a thrill to see arise. But
again, if so many men owe this desire to humiliate
women owing to having been damaged, abandoned and
abused by their insufficiently loved mothers -- who
don't, regardless of how they are treated in life,
magically turn loving once with children -- this too is
something that needs more air without being crushed by
being called creeping/lingering mother-hate.
Those films we're seeing bringing awareness to how
much harassment women endure on the streets ... we
need to exposure to more video showing how young
boys are raised in comparison to how girls are. Mothers
look at them less, and attack them more. The result is
male autism (defensive shells), and rage against the
perpetrator -- male violence against women.
Permalink
Original Article: You don’t protect my freedom: Our
childish insistence on calling soldiers heroes deadens
real democracy

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2014 10:00 PM
AmusedAmused Geministorm So fathers who make
sure they don't go off on long trips, effectively
abandoning their children, are heroes.
Permalink
Original Article: You don’t protect my freedom: Our
childish insistence on calling soldiers heroes deadens
real democracy
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2014 9:57 PM
AmusedAmused Geministorm Heroes are people who
give their children more love than they themselves
received. The mother and father spending more time
with their children, talking with not hitting them,
respecting their differences and helping them become
whomever they want to be, are on the way to create a
generation that will have no psychic need to project all
their "badness" onto others and obliterate them in war.
Permalink
Original Article: More men need to take paternity leave
— even if it hurts their careers
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2014 7:41 PM
We may want to reconsider the importance of careers.
What I mean is, if careers are about making a world
better, the best way of doing that is making sure the next
generation of children are better treated than the
previous.

This may be the reason that the worst-reared children in
Europe, the Germans who became the good boys and
girls they always wanted to be by projecting all their
"badness" onto others during the 1930s and 40s,
apparently managed a dramatic improvement
afterwards, with no repeat required: a huge generation
gap between pre-war and post-war, all owing to more
love in childrearing.
http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/childhoodHolocaust.
html
As a society, if we somehow decided to make our
number one priority to put most of our resources into
helping families, enabling lengthy periods of maternal
and paternal leave and such, declaring this our concern
more than anything else, our national product resulting
out of this would be the one Lawrence Krauss thinks is
possible: a generation that'd outgrown the need for war,
religion, nationalism -- all the evils that are the
derivatives of lack of love in childhood.
Maybe we should stop asking people what they do.
What they might primarily do is simply in the way
they're relating to people, which may occur in their
careers or perhaps mostly outside of them -- as good
parents, or as engaged neighbours; decent people on the
streets.

Published comments
Original Article: The Jian Ghomeshi effect: I plan to 

speak up now
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2014 2:12 AM

The street harassment was constant. I was hissed at, groped, 
ground against in streets and buses, driven into dark alleyways by 
cab drivers, ogled by men with their penises in their hands.

It was only when an Egyptian friend and I were walking back to 
our university campus in Tahrir square that I began to question it. 
She yelled at one man: What are you, a dog? Show some respect. 
Don’t you have a mother? A sister? 

As a budding anthropologist, I knew I couldn’t live or work in a 
major Middle Eastern city ever again. 

But your new attitude is to confront, right, be a friend to other 
women. And if most peoples studies by anthropologists hold 
women in disrespect, you'll be advocating for anthropologists not 
just to study and learn about other cultures but to intervene and 
change them ­­ Hey guys, there is a much better way; let me show 
you. 

You won't let yourself be cowed into agreeing that at the heart of 
this new impulse is the delegitimization of the idea of culture, of 
the idea that all peoples are possessed of an intrinsically beautiful 
character you may as an outsider sometimes need to back away in 
order to appreciate. The treatment of women is pretty abhorrent in 
every culture anthropologists have traditionally been concerned to 
learn from and study. It would make you racist and not 
"multicultural" to be seeming to be going back to the viewpoint 
that it's an inescapable fact that we're dealing with too many 
"dogs" who have no respect for their mothers and daughters, but 
this now won't deter you ­­ back into the kennel, you beasts! It's the
simple fact of the matter, and you plan to step in ­­ anthropologists,
multiculturalists, shielders of brutality be damned!

Or were you only planning to offer sass that backs off predators 
preying on scared women when it won't incriminate you in any 
way. If it'd make you someone not invited to substantial parties 
where you could deflect women from the next Ghomeshi, you'd 
back down and live with the fact that at some level you're still 
living in fear. 

Permalink

Original Article: The one thing that could save the world: 

Why we need empathy now more than ever
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2014 10:52 PM

 In “The Better Angels of Our Nature,” Pinker points out it was 
rooted in ‘the rise of empathy and the regard for human life’, 
underpinned by the ‘reading revolution’ as literature opened up 
imaginations to previously hidden lives. 

Pinker seems to find going beyond arguing that we all have a 
collective nature ­­ and therefore, self­flagellantly/mockingly, 
always a dark side ­­ would be unaccountably hubristic. He refers 
however in his book to the work of Lloyd DeMause, who doesn't 
limit his reach owing to such fears. 

DeMause argues that what has happened to encourage empathy is 
gradually increasing love in childrearing: people across time can 
almost meaninglessly be said to possess the same nature, since 
their upbringing went from appallingly awful (regular infanticide; 
regular sexual abuse) to (in some families now) genuinely helpful. 
Better­loved children become interested in literature that takes us 
into the consciousness of other peoples that worse­loved/more 
abused and neglected will never really be much moved by (a 
reminder, many Republican leaders are voracious readers, reading 
thousands of books about the lives of people of different time 
periods; they still vote to deprive children everywhere.). 

Check out psychohistory.com; read the "Emotional Life of 
Nations" and "The Origins of War in Child Abuse." 
Permalink

Original Article: Democracy on the critical list: How do 

we escape this toxic political cycle?
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2014 8:29 PM

Historically, we only get a society where both those of more loving
childrearing ­­ i.e. progressives ­­ and those of worse agree to 
collectively allow themselves a society substantially better than 
what their parents knew, after periods of massive sacrifice ­­ tons 
of lost wealth; tons of wasted, destroyed lives. After Depression. 
After World War. The progressives are allowed to lead, and people
who as children knew parents who perennially scolded/abandoned 
them for being spoiled sh_ts, for some time allow themselves huge 
advancements in income and entitlement over what their parents 
knew ... without feeling it'll earn them some horrible apocalyptic 
punishment. The angry, punitive gods are cleared out of the sky. 
People spoil; people swing, relax and play. And the skies remain 
blue and clear. 

Outside these times, getting the divide we're witnessing now isn't 
the worst of things. It means the regressives are way past their 
ability to tolerate "selfish" societal advancement, and are going 
amok as society refuses them the specific exo­structure they need 
to split off and "handle" their childhood trauma­based need to 
punish "bad children" everywhere; but also that there are plenty of 
progressives around who still want it bad. 

It is encouraging to hear amidst this Republican takeover that that 
other great story we've been hearing about ­­ progressives cities 
insisting on a certain standard of life for all of its citizens ­­ rolls 
on. We aren't now just left with wondering how hawkish our 

democrats must become; but that whatever their pose, surprises of 
wonderful enlightenment are showering confidently around us. It is
encouraging to hear of cities, rather than nations, because 
somehow it bespeaks the consciousness of the progressive who's 
outgrown the need for a nation and has joined progressive peoples 
in cities/cultures everywhere who've insisted on the same thing. Is 
the citizenry of San Fran and Seattle "American," or do they seem 
more those who've eluded the nation to sip tea and share civility 
with urban Tokyo, Paris and Stockholm?  

If we haven't yet suffered through a period of mass carnage where 
regressive elements took full control of society, and we hear that 
the split between political parties is waning, this will not mean the 
bottom's being pushed up but everyone's experiencing a regressive
slide. Society is growing beyond almost everyone's ability to 
tolerate, and everyone is feeling abandoned and terribly guilty. 
Everyone begins to insist on pledging loyalty to ostensibly less 
selfish, more self­sacrificial old ways, and for the spoiled 
narcissists of society who keep unrepentantly pushing for more to 
get their comeuppance. Their grouping together will be their 
returning as good boys and girls to the hearth of their long­
neglected, all­good mother. All their "badness" will be projected 
onto others; as will all their mothers' actually very much existing, 
terrible, terrifying aspects.  

So if Hillary becomes this all­powerful leader this won't owe to 
astute self­attentuation, malleability ... to being able to adroitly fit 
herself according to needs. It'll owe to the fact that she like the rest 
of the nation is experiencing a psychic change where that part most
of us possess which obliges us to project onto others and hate, is 

taking up more and more of our daily life. That psyche, amygdala­
based and built out of early­suffered child neglect/abuse, that we 
switched into here and there, has more or less taken over. 

This hasn't happened, but we can already look around and see 
some considerable signs of collusion with the regressive mindset ­­
specifically, deflation economics. If all progressives were of the 
emotional makeup of Paul Krugman, we wouldn't have the whole 
world agreeing to insanely staunch their growth by agreeing to 
high interest rates. Many are already wobbling in their ability to 
not feel guilty as society advances, and so cannot be shaken out of 
seeing, in feeling, reason in deflationary economics: with this, they
unconsciously understand, will follow a whole field of broken, 
stilled lives; unrealized dreams ... the sacrifices that must be 
produced for any kind of societal advance to feel permitted at all.

We should note we can also see here on this website some signs of 
regression. Brittney Cooper's recent article where she says she's 
woken out of a mindset that had her thinking life should be about 
self­entitlement/enrichment, and admiring youthful Obama as 
exemplifying this goal, to return to long­spurned elders who'd 
lived self­denying lives of sacrifice, is worrying. She talks enough 
of this and how different is she from anyone who sees the bleak, 
wasted face of the Great Depression­sufferer, and seeing someone 
who now can be loved? How different is she from the person who 
hears of someone working the 14­hour days Andrew refers to, and 
not immediately feeling outrage but of someone virtuous, someone
innocent of sin. 

And of course MEW's just saying bakers should be allowed the 
legal right to refuse gay and lesbians, is of someone who's being 
unconsciously driven to move our society towards one where 
classes of people can become the "bad children" we have full right 
to express vile hate for. I ignored everything she said in 
preamble ... all that stuff where she insults the bigots to death 
before ultimately stepping confidently onto their side.

Permalink

Original Article: Forcing people to bake for you is a bad 

idea
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2014 5:14 PM

This stance, that the person who accepted the modest occupation ­­
the farmer, the baker, the merchant ­­ is the one being 
compromised, is one always to be associated with bigotry. It's 
origins lie in a childhoods where fealty (to parents) is expected and
rewarded, and where becoming an artist or leaving for the big city, 
fully exploring your sexuality ­­ fully individuating ­­ means 
spurning parental expectations; being "bad." 

People who ground their outrage in the fact that they served, that 
they obliged and sacrificed, that they moderated their ambitions 
(and thus now finally some entitlement!), have to some extent 
subscribed to the parents' point of view. They are those who end up
hating that part of themselves that wanted more; they're those 
who'll see progressives as their own bad selves who wanted to 
spurn servitude for a more individuated (to them, read: egoistic) 

life. 

To them, those "who left for the big city" (been bad) have gone 
completely awry in now returning to infiltrate their spoils all 
through the staunch homesteader's ardent ways (this too reminds 
them of their childhoods where every effort to maintain some 
ground against having to wear their parents' emotional states was 
doomed to failure). They'll be looking for a hero. 
Permalink

Original Article: Forcing people to bake for you is a bad 

idea
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2014 4:05 PM

Baker, blacksmith, leather­worker, innkeeper ... it's key I think 
here that the "antagonized" imagines him/herself part of some 
stoic, solid traditional occupation, indisputably associated with 
modest village life.  

They may be shortchanged in world reach, but one they do have is 
a certain self­respect, propriety. They do honest work and God has 
portioned them a small sliver of his kingdom all their own. They 
can choose to serve, or not to. This has been earned.

If they're forced, it's because their lords have grossly enfranchised 
themselves, forcing their "serfs" into droit du seigneur ... being 
forced to shamefully offer their services to the lord's protected, 

bloated, smarmy and spoiled "sons." 

This is why bigots gain by publicity of this baker's case: it has to 
do with an image that is being superimposed upon the gay and 
lesbian community. They become the spoiled favoured that end up 
biting it someway along the way of Willy Wonka's factory tour. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss: Religion 

could be largely gone in a generation
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2014 12:29 PM

beninabox Patrick McEvoy­Halston gasorg For one thing it would 
presuppose that 85% of humanity has been subject to child abuse.

I'm okay with that figure, though I think it's actually more. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss: Religion 

could be largely gone in a generation
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2014 11:58 PM

Adventus Cosmology could more or less go, though. It looks like 
terrible vacation land, cold space and a few pointless rocks. If it's a
match for your being alone, your being afraid and abandoned as a 
child, I get it; but otherwise I could definitely see a generation 
arrive that isn't so stoic not to prefer more agreeable landscapes. 

It's tough to say this in the face of well­loved people like Kraus 
and Sagan, but still so. 

Mind you, the same could be said for nature. I've always found 
poets and novelists that show us how we experience nature more 
profoundly worth my time than nature itself. If it's just nature, 
there is no warm presence behind it all; just happenstance. Doesn't 
make me hate it, or feel uncomfortable about it; but it's just at a 
huge loss for it. 

Human beings came into being; at first they were barely empathic 
and loving, but improved into some who are astoundingly so. They
are now just so much better than everything else that molecules 
came together to forge that I think I'd be mostly interested in what 
they created ­­ their supplanations over the nature that existed 
before them. Whatever they engage with gets my rapture.  
Permalink

Original Article: Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss: Religion 

could be largely gone in a generation
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2014 11:25 PM

Adventus Patrick McEvoy­Halston gasorg I'm glad you never 
raised a hand to her. Human sin ...silly idea to you? Human 
badness?

Or did your child know ­­ and was terrorized by ­­ that apocalyptic 

abandonment loomed if she behaved selfishly (i.e. didn't comply, 
followed her own path, stuck to her own guns)? Her desperately 
needed parents ­­ though maybe not consciously aware of it ­­ 
could suddenly be lost to her if she was bad. So human brain gets 
changed; an alternative system is installed full of these most 
important memories, which religion and nationalism speaks to 
powerfully. 

When all that's not part of you, parental gods become an obvious 
anachronism. Worship becomes the child placating the adult 
abuser, modifying herself into a form that parent is prepared to 
accept rather than one she might on her own prefer to be. 

Honestly, you go far enough, I'm not even sure what Kraus does 
would make sense to you. Do we really need to care about the 
origins of the universe? Why spend so much time exploring 
essentially nothing, when human beings, their creations, are so 
rich?Maybe Kraus's own children will grow out of that. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss: Religion 

could be largely gone in a generation
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2014 11:05 PM

gasorg As long as there are human beings, there will always be 
believers, unbelievers, and those who are not certain what they 
believe.

Unless of course Kraus is right and religion has something to do 
with incurred child abuse. We can get rid of that. 

I would propose that in many of these progressive families which 
no longer spank, sham their children, where they encourage them 
to think of themselves as entitled to make their imprint on the 
world rather than as those sinful who need foremost to keep in 
mind their wickedness, the "religious instinct" is increasingly gone 
from them. They do not possess in their adulthood still a terrorized 
childhood self that things like nationalism and religion play to ­­ 
something more primal, more real, more meaningful than the 
everyday.  
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 8:56 PM

gootserdaddy What's happening is "switching," literally a switch 
into using different brain pathways, associated with early 
childhood abuse. It isn't the woman before her that makes him 
snap, rather in a sense he "snaps" first and projects childhood 
demons onto the person he's driven to destroy. He literally is not 
the same person he was beforehand, just like someone with 
multiple personalities isn't when they switch into their alters. 

It's discussed here: 

http://primal­page.com/psyalter.htm

http://www.psychohistory.com/originsofwar/03_psychology_neuro
biology.html

Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 7:51 PM

nodarksarcasm Patrick McEvoy­Halston Ktimene The mother 
could have been abused by the father

The mother was inevitably abused by her husband. This barely 
empathic father, however, was certainly not one of those modern­
day ones in progressive parts of the world everywhere, where both 
partners spend about equal time with the child. Rather, the father 
was absent from the child's life; the mother was the child's "all." 
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 7:47 PM

gootserdaddy Okay. 

Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 7:46 PM

magistra To deceive yourself into believing that a 'progressive' 
label immunizes or separates you from membership in a racist, 
classist and yes, misogynistic culture shows an utter lack of self­
awareness. 

It does separate you. Owing to warmer, more truly helpful 
childrearing, progressives don't need society to act as sort of an 
outside sandbox where all their grievances can get expressed. They
don't need a misogynistic culture to take revenge against childhood
abusers. So what they do is become the only ones who can label 
what others simply see as normal as in fact an abusive, primitive, 
misogynistic society. It requires no effort; they don't 
psychologically need a misogynistic society, so the misogynistic 
culture they come in contact ­­ no matter how in plenty ­­ doesn't 
play on any base, so it slides off easily. 

What they do is become the only ones who push others as much as 
possible into reforms. And if that fails, historically they cease 
trying and simply group amongst themselves and move. 
Permalink

Original Article: America’s catcalling madness: What 

Michael Che & co. keep on missing
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 5:53 PM

rj857694 Patrick McEvoy­Halston

I do not see the poor reasoning in arguing that we should naturally 
be drawn to explore the possibility that our very first caregiver, the
one we primarily relate to to establish the very structuring of our 
brains, has more influence on our lives than anything else. I do not 
see the poor reasoning in suggesting that abused women, 
disrespected and denied in the patriarchal societies live in, will 
make use of their children to fulfill their unmet needs ­­ i.e. abuse 
them ­­ rather than love them. I do not see the poor reasoning in 
suggesting that we should therefore explore later adult male 
violence towards women as a means of revenge against one's own 
mothers. 

You think my brain is disintegrating; I think your own won't let 
you be aware, lest you lose your mother's ­­ an alter you've 
installed in your right hemisphere ­­ approval. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 5:39 PM

magistra Patrick McEvoy­Halston do you really think we can study
'typical behavior within misogynist cultures' from the outside, like 
anthropologists?

We feel no compunction in examining misogynist families/cultures
within the U.S. Yet, the progressives who are doing so are really 
not of that culture ­­ they're on the outside. The culture 
progressives belong to is not associated with a nation ­­ which 
really is an outdated, primitive concept for them ­­  but with an 
attitude, a level of care, that's spread in different "cultures" around 
the world.

Every progressive New Yorker who feels more at home in London 
or Stockholm than they do in the Bayou, knows what I'm talking 
about. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 5:28 PM

Ktimene Patrick McEvoy­Halston It's nobody's fault. Hurt people 
hurt people. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 5:28 PM

@Tristero1 @Tristero1 What is dangerous about arguing that more
societal resources needs to be put into ensuring that the mother­
child matrix is given much better support? Included in this, would 
also be living wage reforms.

What is ridiculous to me is that people whose brains are literally 
different from yours, vastly damaged owing to early childhood 
stress, abandonment, abuse, are nonetheless to be held 
accountable. 

Maybe we like the bravado of the idea that no matter your past 
circumstances you can will yourself past them, but I think that just 
serves to help deny the true impact of our own pasts, as well as re­
live it: the harsh world where you're ultimately on your own, is the 
one the abandoned child knows. 

The idea that we actually have potency in this situation, choice, 
feels great when the truth in our childhood was just to suffer. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 3:16 PM

@Tristero1 @Patrick McEvoy­Halston Because I think that's a 
cold response to what was in my judgment inevitable behaviour 
patterns. Our prisons are full of the mentally­ill, not those who 
could have chosen otherwise but instead wilfully chose evil. 

You know those progressives who argue that the particular nature 
of a child's first three years will for the most part determine who 
they become ­­ I'm one of those. You issue in a maltreated life 
form into the outside world, and when it behaves grotesquely, we 
further smash it to pieces ­­ filth! creep! scum!? No, nothing less 
than loving therapy ­­ redress. 

Those he attacked need just as much respect and care. But along 
side that progressives need to show the cause as early child abuse, 
at the hands of unloved mothers and grandmothers (the fathers in 
these families are easily as abusive but nowhere near as present) 
and urge more tax money towards supporting mothers, not just 
societal education of grownup/late­adolescent (i.e. mostly 
determined) men.
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 2:24 PM

Ghomeshi's parents are of Iranian descent. I'll be interested in 
seeing if we learn this is typical behaviour within misogynist 
cultures (for some sense of it, go here: 

http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/eln03_terrorism.html) ... and a 
conviction of him something that ends up playing into the hands of
anti­muslims, war­cravers. 
Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional creeps, 

from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 2:03 PM

jane Jones Just the fact of lacking "male modelling" doesn't 
explain, not his behaviour, but his rage, though. You don't see 
violence (in video games) and necessarily want to hurt and degrade
someone. You have to want to degrade someone badly, exult in 
revenge, and that means that that single mother would have to have
used their boys ­­ essentially incest­incest. The problem isn't so 
much the missing father as an unloved mother making use of her 
children to satisfy her own unmet needs. 

If the single mother was well­loved she wouldn't so much need a 
partner. The boys would come out fine. That for me is key, not two
parents.   
Permalink

Original Article: The Ghomeshi syndrome: Delusional 

creeps, from Clarence Thomas to Gamergate
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 1:54 PM

The origins of the "disease" are being maltreated by all the legions 
of disrespected, unloved mothers out there. Ghomeshi, to have 
been able to be someone who could be genuinely progressive in so 
many areas, to be so unCanadian in being un­afflicted in being a 

star, must of had a mix ­­ a mother who'd received enough love in 
life that she could be very attendant and respectful ­­ engendering 
­­ but also still possessed of the default of all women who became 
mothers who'd known a world of disrespect and abuse: she used 
her child, a sort of incest ­­ like incest­incest. These women he 
raped later in life were those he displaced his rage onto, no doubt 
in a dissociated state  ­­ different brain patterns are being accessed 
­­ as you suggest. 

Furthermore, just to be clear, if he were into extreme rough sex or 
BDSM and his partners had all been willing participants, I’d be in
the chorus telling people to mind their own damn business

This strikes me as safe. Ghomeshi might not be forgotten because 
he might be an avenue to explore what exactly goes on in BDSM. 
Most progressives have decided to herd it into a Green World 
category of play or as a cultural identifier, a source of pride. When 
people (including maybe many secretly lapsing progressives) 
unconsciously want to undermine the legitimacy of progressive 
"moralizing," to fine­tune their targeting of the gay/lesbian 
community, all they might have to do is take a closer look and 
decide that, no, there are people damaging one another here; and 
"consensus" is a canard in the way it is with the truth that 
prostitutes can feel they gain some control over past abuse they've 
suffered in doing their tricks: marginal therapy at best, and clearly 
deserves to be done away with. Why, they'll ask, have progressives
dissociated themselves from what was going on? Was it only so to 
keep backwater ways they have a legitimate right to intrude upon, 
located in ... backwaters? Rather than these glorious, intriguing 
GWs?

He emanated progressive values, cultural sensitivity and 
Torontonian sophistication, and was well known as a supporter 
and ally of LGBT cultural figures.

He's a better man than many, and if he did as accused, he is a 
rapist; he degraded a lot of people. This should concern us. If less 
evolved people aren't behaving like he is is it because they've 
found another way to disassociate their rage, something more 
established, more societally routine? Perhaps by counting 
themselves of the chorus ­­ a huge chorus, that involves the whole 
concept of being a nationalist ­­ that, unlike him, enthrals to bomb 
other nations and rape the environment and the world.  

Permalink

Original Article: America’s catcalling madness: What 

Michael Che & co. keep on missing
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014 10:57 PM

@rj857694 @Patrick McEvoy­Halston  Also, fyi, when I was 
reading through your little blurb I kept asking myself why the 
father wasn't doing anything to help support the kid.

Boy, you don't like me ... you want to make think I'm worth your 
barely getting your brain in gear. The reason I don't mention the 
father is because he isn't there ­­ because he is largely indifferent to

the child. He is terrible, a horror as a person ­­ but because he had 
abominable childrearing. He doesn't choose this, just like the 
mother doesn't choose to use her children to try and stimulate 
herself out of depression. If you were poorly nurtured you will use 
your kids and lose interest when they start focusing on themselves. 
If you were loved, then you become the kind of woman or man 
who will choose to get actively involved in the child's life, offer 
real love. It'll comes naturally to you. 

There is no one to blame. You are, in my judgement, simply 
determined by the nature of the generational chain you belong to. 
Our origins are akin to these New Guinea tribes, who are barely 
beyond primates in the amount of love they've known and the 
amount they can transmit. 

You discounted factoring in the influence of the mother in creating
later male violence, apparently because it used to be used to 
engender hate towards women (really? feminists used to argue it). 
There is no way you can argue, however, that it is only neglected, 
abused women, living within patriarchies ­­ societies that devalue 
and deny them ­­ that will inevitably incestuously use their 
children and somehow afterwards fight your way at the end to 
actually blame them. 

You're arguing that it is out of their control; and you're evidently 
favouring society going along the course Katie would have, that is,
of providing more support and societal resources to women 
everywhere, not further harming them (for Christ's sakes!). They 

deserve it. They deserve to lead as rich a life as anyone out there. 
Plus, if they have children their children will less serve to satisfy 
their huge unmet needs, denied to them not so much by anything 
other than our collectively horrid, unloving past (i.e history). 

Our mothers incubate us as we come to know the world. She is our
"all" as our brains form and our expectations shape. I bring this up 
as the factor in considering later hatred of hatred of women, and 
your response isn't, don't overstate it, but rather, this canard 
again? ... let's look instead at frats, when boys are eighteen rather 
than infants, because this is clearly where they are most 
susceptible/vulnerable. Current studies prove it; keep up. Maybe 
the world will collude in agreeing with you, but to me that's 
insane. 

We don't explore "mother" because it brings our very own mothers
into examination. If we've drifted away, as you're arguing, it's 
because we've lost courage, psychology has lost courage ­­ some 
period of latitude is over. Part of our brain has been built to make 
sure we keep her saintly and slay those who seek to see her actual 
influence straight, and it's in charge, ruling over every study where 
mother might possibly be factored in. 

Permalink

Original Article: America’s catcalling madness: What 

Michael Che & co. keep on missing
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014 6:18 PM

rj857694 Patrick McEvoy­Halston I did not realize that the concept
that the primary caregiver (i.e the mother), the one we literally use 
to format our brain through countless interactions early in life, 
when abused throughout life, will not be loving but will inevitably 
use their children, was once accepted as an explanation for later 
male violence towards women. You'd never know it here, where I 
seem to be the only one suggesting this explanation. 

Did science prove this out of date?; or did researchers ­­ like all of 
us ­­ back away when we realized just how pissed our own mothers
got that we were willing to see them as they are rather than as they 
insist on being seen? Don't think their won't be retaliation for what
you're saying about me ...
Permalink

Original Article: America’s catcalling madness: What 

Michael Che & co. keep on missing
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014 2:51 PM

cont'd

Children are experienced by mothers as extensions of their bodies, 
and any separation or independence is seen as rejection of the 
mother, as reminders of the severe rejection of the mothers' own 
childhood. Mothers do not allow others to nurse their children, 

saying their milk is "poison," and even do not allow their one­ to 
two­year­olds to visit their relatives for fear they would "poison" 
them. When a mother dies, often the "infant would be buried with 
her even if perfectly healthy," and if the infant dies, "the mother 
remains secluded with it for days, wailing, attempting to nurse it," 
blaming it by saying "I told you not to die. But you did not hear 
me! You did not listen!" When infants begin to show any sign of 
independence, they are either wholly rejected and ignored or 
forced to stay still. Typical is the Wogeo child, who Hogbin 
describes as often being "put in a basket, which is then hung on a 
convenient rafter...or tree" and "discouraged from walking and not 
allowed to crawl...[forced to] sit still for hours at a time [and only] 
make queer noises" as he or she is immobilized to avoid even the 
slightest movement of independence from the 
mother. Anthropologists regularly see these ubiquitous New 
Guinea baskets and net bags in which the infants are trapped and in
which they are often hung on a tree as "comforting," even though it
means that the infants often live in their own feces and urine and 
can neither crawl nor interact with others. Only Hippler describes 
them as a function of the mothers' pattern of "near absolute 
neglect" of her child when it is not being used erotically. Parental 
rejection in preliterate cultures is often overt it is what Boyer found
was called "throwing the child away." Boyer discovered that "a 
great many mothers abandon or give children away; babies they 
have been nursing lovingly only hours before," when he and his 
wife were offered their babies, a practice he ascribed to the 
mothers' "shallow object relations." Few anthropologists have seen
the high adoption and fosterage rates in the New Guinea area­some
as high as 75 percent as rejection, but of course that is what it is. 
Child rejection is widely institutionalized in various forms, usually 
after weaning, when the infant has stopped being useful as an 
erotic object. In the Trobriands, for instance, "the transfer of 
children who have already been weaned from true parents to other 

parents is a frequent occurrence..." Anthropologists usually see 
giving away a child as evidence of parental love. Kasprus, for 
instance, says the Raum really "love and like children," but that 
"although they love children they may readily give one away..." 
Mead describes the giving of a child away by her parents as a 
"happy" event. The occasion is a family giving a seven­year­old 
girl to the family of her betrothed, an older man: The little girl is 
taken by her parents and left in the home of her betrothed. Here her
life hardly differs at all from the life that she led at 
home....Towards her young husband, her attitude is one of 
complete trust and acceptance....He calls out to her to light his 
pipe, or to feed his dog...she becomes warmly attached...I asked 
her: "Did you cry when you first went to Liwo?" "No, I did not cry.
I am very strong."Rejection of the child when off the breast is 
ubiquitous in New Guinea. Small children are rarely looked at or 
talked to. Whereas in American families an average of 28 minutes 
of an average hour is spent talking to and interacting with the child
(including an average of 341 utterances per hour), in at least one 
New Guinea study mothers were found to interact with their 
children only one minute out of each hour. The millions of looks, 
communications, admirations, mirroring and emotional 
negotiations between mother and child the "emotional dialogue 
that fosters the beginnings of a sense of self, logical 
communications and the beginnings of purposefulness" are simply 
missing for the New Guinea child. The result is that the early self 
system in the orbitofrontal cortex has no chance to develop, and 
since "the orbitofrontal cortex functionally mediates the capacity to
empathize with the feelings of others and to reflect on internal 
emotional states, one's own and others," when these emotionally 
rejected children grow up they are unable to empathize with others 
or have much insight into their own emotions. Since to the 
infanticidal mother, as Hippler puts it, "the child is an unconscious 
representative of [her own] mother, his autonomous actions are 

seen by the mother as abandonment. The response on the part of 
the mother to this 'abandonment' by her infant...is anger" and 
rejection. Mothers throughout the South Pacific are said to "hold 
their small infants facing away from them and toward other people 
while the mother speaks for them rather than to them."Obviously 
the infant is an extension of the mother's body, not an independent 
human being at all. "No one says very much to babies,"and when 
they begin to walk, they are felt to be abandoning the parent and 
are emotionally rejected. As Hippler puts it, I never observed a 
single adult Yolngu caretaker of any age or sex walking a toddler 
around, showing him the world, explaining things to him and 
empathizing with his needs. While categorical statements are most 
risky, I am most certain of this. 
This emotional rejection and lack of verbalization has been widely 
noted among infanticidal mode parents in simple societies. When 
the baby stops being a breast­object, it simply doesn't exist. In my 
New Guinea childhood files, for instance, I have over 1,000 photos
from books and articles showing adults and children­including one 
book of over 700 photos of Fore children taken randomly so as to 
capture their daily lives.Virtually all the photos capture the adults 
continuously caressing, rubbing, kissfeeding and mouthing the 
children's bodies, but only two show an adult actually looking at 
the child. Not a single one shows a mutual gaze between the adult 
and child which Schore contends is the basis of formation of the 
self. The photos illuminate Read's description of the "customary 
greeting, a standing embrace in which both men and women 
handled each other's genitals...hands continually reaching out to 
caress a thigh, arms to encircle a waist, and open, searching 
mouths hung over a child's lips, nuzzled a baby's penis, or closed 
with a smack on rounded buttocks."This emotional abandonment is
further confirmed by Boram, who recorded every detail of a typical
day of one six­year­old Ok girl. Interactions or talking to the 

mother were found to be rare, while the child spent the day going 
about looking for food, hunting frogs and cooking them, 
"fondling" babies and pretending to nurse piglets from her breast. 
Boram concludes that for Ok children "most of the day is spent 
simply in killing time..."It is not surprising that he also mentions 
that tantrums are frequent and suicide is high among these 
children, and that he observed many "episodes of insanity" in Ok 
children. 

(Lloyd DeMause "Childhood and Cultural Evolution)")
Permalink

Original Article: America’s catcalling madness: What 

Michael Che & co. keep on missing
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014 2:51 PM

I think this is a good education. Truly. But so too is this bit about 
how children get raised from the least­loved, most abused women 
in the world (boys from well­loved mothers are never going to take
pleasure in intimidating women), which I think goes towards 
explaining why some men feel such rage towards women, and why
simply getting angry at their predatory/violent behaviour is 
actually "unfair" ­­ you're getting angry at people who were highly 
neglected as children. So imagine this was all filmed, and then 
afterwards a film segment on how they as adult males were 
perennially bent on gaining revenge on women: 

The "love" of the infanticidal mode parent is mainly evident when the child 
is useful as an erotic object. When children are off the breast or otherwise 
not useful, they are rejected as emotionally meaningless. The infanticidal 
parents' emotional bond does not really acknowledge the separate existence 
of the child, whose main function is to provide "bodily stimulation [that] 
helps the mother to come alive, and she seeks this from the 
child...countering her feelings of lethargy, depression, and deadness."As 
with all pedophiles, the child is a "sexual object...that must show a readiness 
to comply, lend itself to be manipulated, used, abused [and] 
discarded..."There is never just "incest" it is always "incest/rejection." 
There are many ways New Guinea parents demonstrate that when the child 
cannot be used erotically, it is useless. One is that as soon as infants are not 
being nursed, they are paid no attention, and even when in danger are 
ignored. Anthropologists regularly notice that little children play with knives
or fire and adults ignore them. Edgerton comments on the practice: "Parents 
allowed their small children to play with very sharp knives, sometimes 
cutting themselves, and they permitted them to sleep unattended next to the 
fire. As a result, a number of children burned themselves seriously...it was 
not uncommon to see children who had lost a toe to burns, and some were 
crippled by even more severe burns." Langness says in the Bena Bena "it 
was not at all unusual to see even very small toddlers playing with sharp 
bush knives with no intervention on the part of caretakers."But this is good, 
say the anthropologists, since when "children as young as two or three are 
permitted to play with objects that Westerners consider dangerous, such as 
sharp knives or burning brands from the fire, [it] tends to produce assertive, 
confident, and competent children." Children, they explain, are allowed to 
"learn by observations...e.g., the pain of cutting oneself when playing 
carelessly with a knife." As Whiting says, when he once saw a Kwoma baby 
"with the blade of a twelve­inch bush knife in his mouth and the adults 
present paid no attention to him," this was good for the infant, since in this 
way "the child learns to discriminate between the edible and 
inedible." Margaret Mead is particularly ecstatic about the wisdom of 
mothers making infants learn to swim early by allowing them to fall into the 
water under the hut when crawling and slipping through gaps in the floor or 
falling overboard into the sea because they were "set in the bow of the canoe
while the mother punts in the stern some ten feet away."

Published comments
Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 9:17 PM

Rex Harrison contessakitty SarahWestofToronto Maybe. But some
art we've left by the wayside for good. Progressives have always 
wrestled with what you're wrestling with, and not always come to 
your conclusion. All great art gets produced during periods of 
latitude, where all of a sudden latitude, transgression, "the new" 
isn't just stomped on but allowed some life. This is why all great 
art sings so much ... it's all conveys human promise. 

But there is a psychological limit to how much anyone who feels 
the need to stigmatize and hate can realize, and eventually all their 
"truths" begin to seem insufficient ­­ "someone" is still watching 
over them. This could still be the fate of Shakespeare. 

And if he goes, thank you so much, Mr. Shakespeare! But along 
we go on this great human ride, embracing different voices!
Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 9:09 PM

contessakitty SarahWestofToronto I'm glad to hear of people 

giving up artists when they realize just what harm they did to other
people in their lives. But the thing is, we get maybe a couple of 
periods every century where we allow enormous transgressive 
growth. However flawed, however angry and demon­possessed the
people living during those times, they're going to go on a really 
productive ride.

Then it closes down. Maybe their children are healthier, overall 
more evolved, but their art may well be thinner. I'll wait to 
completely dismiss Cosby, Allen et al. after our sacrificial 
depression is over and we allow our society a restart. Otherwise, 
I'll be dismissing what we'll all just subsequently be using as our 
base. Remember, during the Great Depression Fitzgerald was 
wilfully ignored; you couldn't find Gatsby in the bookstores. That's
the equivalent of the time we're in now. 
Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 9:00 PM

JustMe2 Maybe you "stretch your own heart and mind" by not 
taking so pleasure in the dismissal and shaming of a whole crowd 
of people. Enjoying your intimacy with Brittney is tainted if it 
depends on whole crowds of others not being as special. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 7:43 PM

Jack Burroughs I think we do like to keep a shadow assembly of 
women who get humiliated without redress. I think a lot of women 
don't speak out because they sense that their society expects their 
category of women ("hangers­on to a celebrity") to remain 
powerless ("your" role is to allow yourself to be filled with our 
hate and disregard), and will get angry if they speak up. If we 
suddenly start listening to them, it's either because we've evolved 
or because we want this celebrity tested, maybe rejected (ala 
Clinton and Lewinsky). My sense is that if all this came up even 
last year, the women would have been in for it ­­ in no way were 
we ready for the fall of Ghomeshi. Maybe because for a Cdn he 
seems a bit too "ego," too full of himself, we want to see him 
tested and maybe totally disposed of right now. 

Whatever Strombo has been up to won't really matter. If he had the
same problems, the women wouldn't be safe to air their abuses. 
Somehow he seems to us less pretentious, more self­chastising; 
and any attack on him would be on the average Cdn who'd be 
willing to serve up his life for his country ... a non­ego "ego." 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 7:08 PM

Barbrady777 Patrick McEvoy­Halston They do want the attention, 
and caregivers who have most of their own needs already attended 

will be up to it. Their children will not be resentful. 

Children who had caregivers who were not able to well attend to 
their children because their children existed too much to supply 
their own unmet/unaddressed needs for attention, will be pissed. 
They'll dominate to show they can be the ones in control; for 
revenge. 

Your theory makes the problem over­needy kids, which may not in
your case but usually is about victim's blaming themselves (and 
agreeing with the abusers' point of view) to keep those they depend
upon sacrosanct. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 7:01 PM

@elbe @Patrick McEvoy­Halston This is just factually not true.  
The majority of people who abuse women were raised in 
households where men were abusive.

I agree, but the men weren't there anywhere near as much, and the 
women, the mothers, were just as abusive as the fathers.

After being raised in an environment where there were only two 
possibilities modeled (being abused or being abusive), they 
subconsciously identify with their abuser because they don't want 
to identify with the abused.  T

They subconsciously identify with the abuser ­­ again, 
predominately the mother ­­ because not identifying with her 
would mean knowing she didn't really love you. To guarantee 
yourself that you in fact have a mother who loves you, you deem 
your own vulnerable, innocent self "guilty" ... she had reason. So 
in life what you do is you support governments which deny/destroy
the innocent. 

You revenge yourself against mothers as well ­­ the terrifying 
strong (that's how we as infants knew our mothers ­­ Titanesses, 
Gods) ­­ but sort of sneakily. Nothing we do to hurt women in the 
world will be allowed to feed back as our anger at our mothers. So 
we'll be completely loyal to our mothers, defend her against 
everybody. We'll be completely loyal to our (mother) countries, be 
willing to defend Her against everybody. But we'll war the hell out 
of other women we can displace all her negative aspects onto; 
women, we collectively agree, who "deserved" it. 

Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 6:44 PM

I can only say: do you really see no problem with this way of 
thinking? I'm afraid it's wildly flawed as a mode of reasoning.

I'm arguing that our earliest years are most formative. I'm arguing 
that if you knew a life of hate and abuse you will not magically 
become nurturing to your children: they will exist to satisfy your 
own unmet needs; you will have difficulty not projecting onto 
them; you'll find it impossible to not hurt and neglect them 
(especially when their growth seems to threaten the same 
abandonment you've known all too much in life). 

So wildly flawed "reasoning"? No, if we weren't so dependent on 
defending our own mothers this would just come across as 
obvious; as something in need of a very serious effort in order to 
disprove.  
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 6:38 PM

Barbrady777 Patrick McEvoy­Halston Sonya001 ashley Yes, I 
believe if you had a mother who was one of the fortunate in having
been mostly respected and cherished in life, you'll be immune to 
hatred of women. You'll have no base of profound shame others 

will inadvertently play into, or who'll you'll force into playing into 
as part of re­staging. 

I'm not even sure if what we mean by that emotion ­­hate ­­  will 
apply to you at all .... your attitude towards someone like Rush 
Limbaugh might not even be to simply stop him, but more to help 
him (get better, and live a truly enjoyable and beneficent life). Not 
above others, of course; but still after stopping his current efforts, 
your primary concern. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 6:26 PM

@Barbrady777 @Patrick McEvoy­Halston Okay, so is your 
argument actually that the only reason men engage in abusive 
behavior towards women is that they were themselves abused by 
women?  

Not "women" ... by their mothers: those all­important giants in 
their lives. Primary reason, not only ...but so important compared 
to it the rest doesn't much matter. 

Because it initially sounded like you were suggesting that any 
existing systemic bias against women arose from the fact that 
women abuse men.  

... comes from the fact that unloved, neglected, abused women 
abuse (make use of; wantonly abandon; hate) their boys. Yes, this 
is where systemic bias against women arose from. For our species, 
children likely owed their initial survival owing to the fact that 
they released pleasing hormones in their mothers; this got them 
their needed attendance, not their being loved and respected (we 
started off nearly exactly red and tooth in claw). The repercussions 
of this are the hundreds of thousands of years where human beings 
basically didn't grow; no adventure, just survival ­­ or rather, the 
enduring and re­inflicing abuse we see in aboriginal cultures.

History has fortunately been about some women discovering the 
ability to give a little bit more love to their daughters than they 
themselves received, and daughters of these mothers grouping 
together (moving if they have to) to create more progressive, more 
advanced societies. 

Nothing is more important that Katie's primary cause to eliminate 
hatred of women, to support women. The hate will ensure women 
get less love, and society will regress; become more mean and 
brutal.  

Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 6:12 PM

elbe When people recognize that good friends can also be 
criminals, more and more people will be more inclined to trust the 
victims.

That's optimistic. Many of us are perfectly good ol' boys in regular 
life, but persistently elect in regressive governments to rape and 
pillage other people. "We" split off our strongly felt but 
unappetizing needs, and are only going to go so far in accepting 
this twin nature in ourselves. 

What we'll probably hear is that ..."he was such a well­behaved, 
quiet, good­natured boy," and it'll get lost into mythology.  
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 6:04 PM

Barbrady777 Sonya001 ashley To me what I am saying is so 
obvious (early childhood abuse by women is the only thing that 
could produce later intense desire to rape, humiliate, destroy 
women) it's like being asked to show proof that the sky is blue ... 
something else is amiss in those who need proof that no 
subsequent onslaught of studies will serve to allay. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 5:56 PM

Barbrady777 Patrick McEvoy­Halston Do you think that the 
majority of people in our society suffer abuse at the hands of their 
mothers?

No. Any person you know who is genuinely feminist will have 
suffered no substantial abuse. Their mothers were those fortunate 
to come from a lineage where the women received progressively 
more support and love than others in their societies did. 

We focus on the father defensively. It is the mother who spends 
most of the time with the children, however much this is changing 
with more progressive couples.
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 5:49 PM

Rocket88 Patrick McEvoy­Halston This does not make you a 
misogynist.

You're right. For example you could be someone who knows just 
how prevalent child abuse still is in society, someone who realizes 
that no one savagely hurts other people unless they've been terribly
neglected/abused as children, and very easily love everybody ­­ be 
delighted by aspects of every person when they're not being 
motivated by the terrors they endured but by the love they received
early in life and later through good people along the way. 

However, it could just be that they ARE misogynist, and "you" like
them always in part because they're administering the hate you 
can't express yourself. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 5:41 PM

Rocket88 It is not insane. They knew all the rumours and remained
friends ... it's perfectly reasonable to suggest that they did so not 
despite but rather because. 

How prevalent is this desire to hurt and humiliate women. Will 
many dump Ghomeshi to deny from their conscious awareness 
their own long­possession of this powerful urge? 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 5:35 PM

@ashley @Patrick McEvoy­Halston What I wish you were 
concerned about is that most progressives would be willing to 
seriously consider that a child's earliest years are most formative. 
You could show them studies that show what child neglect/abuse 
does to the forming brain, and they'd be right with you. They'd also
be with you in judging that the primary caregivers in families of 
abuse are those where the father ­­ however much a battering 
demon ­­ is mostly absent. But if you start suggesting that societal 
rage against women (patriarchy, what have you) owes to unloved 
mothers making use of their children (to supply their own unmet 
needs) rather than loving them, all your previous efforts dissipate. 
Suddenly you're just a demon guilty of mother­hate, and they go 
on retributive attack. 

There is no idea we're all more bent to defend than the idea of the 
loving mother ­­ for most of us, literally part of our brains are on 
watch to make sure we never see our own (unloved) mothers' 
abuses quite clearly. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 5:22 PM

Christopher1988 Rocket88 They remained friends because at some
level they were glad the women were being victimized. They 

disown now so to deny themselves of their own raging desire to 
revenge themselves upon women. It's in Ghomeshi, (so) not in 
them. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Jian Ghomeshi is my friend, and Jian 

Ghomeshi beats women”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 5:18 PM

But what it amounts to, and this is what Pallett and Bady both 
made clear, isn’t the presumption of innocence or a respect for 
due process, but a process through which we can ignore what’s in 
front of us to protect ourselves, to protect the ideas we have about 
our friends, the ideas we have about rape and the kinds of men 
who hurt women.

We protect ourselves from what the source of a man's need to 
rape/hurt has to be. You don't get "there" because the society you 
live in has been built to degrade women and salute men. That 
would heavily play on that kind of extreme rage towards women, 
but not in my judgment create it entire. That kind of rage has to 
built on early child abuse, some huge ongoing humiliation, terror, 
when your brain was still forming ... at the hands of a woman; your
mother. 

Feminists protect themselves from an obvious truth to protect their 
idea of the mother. Namely, women who've been abused, grown up
in a patriarchal society that degrades them, don't magically become

loving mothers. Rather the opposite. But Katie, who I believe has 
recently argued that every woman has a story where they were 
coerced into sex that left them shamed (i.e. raped), never makes the
connection that patriarchy begins as a defence; a defence against 
abused women who as mothers couldn't help but re­inflict their 
abuse upon their children. The patriarch is clung to out of fear of 
that all­powerful, terrifying, needy, abandoning and incestuous 
mother. 

Some men may appear to be feminists but are showing support out 
of fear. Fearing that society is being hovered over by a spurned, 
angry, retributive matriarch ("Gone Girl"), that they themselves 
have been guilty "bad boys," they cling to her defensively. If you 
explore their behaviour in any depth you'll likely notice that while 
they've kept "her" sacrosanct they've displaced all her negative 
aspects onto some "other." Some "other" you'll find it impossible 
to suppress their intentions to revenge themselves upon. 

Of course, those who protect the abuser and shame the victims are 
defensively identifying with their own parental abusers as well, 
who were surely right ­­ their brains by necessity have concluded 
­­ to have humiliated their own terribly vulnerable selves as 
children. 

Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 2:56 PM

jazztrans Patrick McEvoy­Halston JustAGuest2 nothung The 
latter. Context showed that, though, no? I like the poetry of what I 
said, but with your prompt, it would have been more clear and still 
poetically intact if I'd said ..."the fact that to move beyond your 
parents you're going to have to brace (against) their formidable 
ire." 

Thanks for the input. 
Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 1:48 PM

JustAGuest2 nothung I'm fine with moving beyond "Cosby." On 
his show he always had the advantage over his kids; he was the 
patriarch, the bemused know­it­all. "Family Ties" had more of the 
family dissonance, the suggestion that kids might know better than 
parents. The fact that to move beyond your parents you're going to 
have to brace their formidable ire. I'd prefer we built off that 
instead. 
Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 1:35 PM

nothung Patrick McEvoy­Halston Helpful. Thank you. 
Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 1:30 PM

nothung Patrick McEvoy­Halston Brittney says she's concerned to 
dispose of both the patriarch and the matriarch. I think that is a 
great idea. However, I don't know where we could possibly find a 
matriarch since apparently women who've known abusive 
relationships with their husbands, don't become matriarchs when 
they've got their kids all to themselves. As Brittney says about her 
own mother, once she was free of her violent husband she was 
simply ... saved.

I'm suggesting it's possible that Brittney might not find herself 
strong enough to free herself of the matriarch once the patriarch is 
disposed of. In order to do that, you have to be capable of an 
honest opinion of your own mother, what she did to you, not just 
what your father did to you. 

If you can't do that then the patriarch is killed and you're left 
wallowing back in the matriarch's spoiled earth, without a 
language that'd help yourself get unstuck. 

Permalink

Original Article: We must abandon Bill Cosby: A broken 

trust with women, black America
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 1:13 PM

My father was a complicated, brilliant, hilarious and violent man, 
and my home life and childhood were infinitely better after he left 
our home. His leaving and his alcoholism cost me a father. But it 
saved me a mother.
...
So I argued that we ought to slay our patriarch and matriarch and
make room for some new ideas about what black life and black 
family can be in the 21st century.

What new idea of the family is being made available when the 
mother who is free of the useless, no­good father ... doesn't 
become the matriarch that too needs disposal? If we need to slay 
the patriarch, we know where to find them. But if even highly 
abused mothers, no longer beset upon by their oppressors, bear 
halos, where could we possibly find this clearly fictional idea of 
the "matriarch" ­­ the oppressive mother­ruler of the clan? 
Permalink

Original Article: Richard Dawkins is wrong: Religion is 

not inherently violent
MONDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2014 2:41 AM

@Benthead  It's altogether possible that the achievements of 
western "progress," from industrialism to technology and 

capitalist accumulation of wealth, is going to be the destruction or 
near­destruction of the species ­­ and not in the far distant future, 
either.

Well, not according to 
Krugman: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/11/magazine/11Econ
omy­t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

The progressives I like are those who don't feel that human beings 
are inherently flawed or sinful ­­ have a terrible dark side. They 
don't get angry or highly irritated when human beings are 
proclaimed unflawed, of unlimited potential. The people who 
annoy me are those who are going to superimpose evidence of 
human beings' ostensible dark side, regardless if their activity was 
damaging the planet to extinction or not. They want people to be 
humble, because they learned that when they were children and 
they thwarted their own needs in deference to their parents', their 
parents finally showed some approval, some desperately needed 
attention and love. 
Whatever else religion is, it has been functional for humankind: it 
has met the human need for meaning. That need is just as real for 
our species as the physical needs of food and shelter.
History is a nightmare we're gradually waking from. Childhood 
was a terror; earliest "cultures" didn't advance for thousands of 
years because they spent all their time fiddling with their disastrous
childhoods. As childrearing got a bit better ­­ spanked, beaten, 
tightly swaddled and sexually assaulted for their inherent 
"sinfulness," but not simply starkly abandoned or killed ­­ the 

nature of spirituality and religion changed too. 
Religion speaks to and engages what is most meaningful about our lives, our
earliest years, and the question that nags: why didn't mommy and daddy love
me?; what can be done to reclaim their love ­­ sacrifice our own selves? 
hate everything "bad" they abandoned us for ­­ self­attendance, self­love ... 
perhaps even our sheer vulnerability?  
Permalink

Original Article: Richard Dawkins is wrong: Religion is 

not inherently violent
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2014 10:26 PM

Dr Stan Concerning the WW1 soldiers, "God" is actually parental 
­­ it's their mothers, their primary caregivers. They die on the 
battlefield, sacrifice their lives, which otherwise would have been 
about individuating from her, i.e. becoming an adult, they imagine 
themselves instead forever embraced by her. That's why there was 
such enthusiasm, "pointless" charging into sure­slaughtering 
gunfire. 
Permalink

Original Article: Richard Dawkins is wrong: Religion is 

not inherently violent
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2014 10:09 PM

Well, history, as Steven Pinker ­­ after Lloyd DeMause ­­ made 
clear, is increasingly war­prone (increased deaths owing to murder 
per capita) the further back you go. I know Shakespeare et al. lurks
back then, but it's still not the kind of territory I much want to 

wade. And I admit that as much as I should just judge those who 
just trough on through as built of sterner stuff, I actually think 
they're deliberately obfuscating from their conscious awareness 
just how much of their ostensibly only civil pleasure is built on 
relishing just how many more brains are being bashed, children 
raped, the further back they delve in their "travels." 

So I suspect all historians have a bias ... there's a limit to how 
progressive ANY of them can actually be. I'm not going to look to 
them as the ideal people not to be unconsciously moved to be 
apologists for abusers. 

My own sense of religion is of people imagining themselves not 
just small but sin­full before some almighty parental essence/god. 
Wretched way to want to imagine yourself, but if this was all ... 
well, it's just your life partially wasted; not war. The thing is that 
the child "you" who believes themselves sinful so to make their 
abusive parents "right" ­­ and still therefore possible as a protector
­­ is going to want to project all this sin onto other peoples at some 
point so to feel thrillingly pure. 

A lot of "sinful" progressive societal growth ­­ even (actually, 
especially) meaning just people buying a lot of things, and 
enjoying them ­­ is going to serve as the prompt for that. Which is 
why we're hearing now of people abandoning Western ways and in
a hurry becoming as conservative as their grandparents were, 
joining ISIS and the like. There's some of that happening here at 
Salon ­­ witness Brittney Cooper's recent work: as she declares, 

our long­disparaged  and ignored (spanking) elders were actually 
right!!! 

If these "evil" people, full of our "sins," get eradicated, then all of 
our own "badness" is out of the word: and who amongst us self­
haters, fearing apocalyptic rejection and punishment, can resist a 
lure as strong as that?

When improved childrearing, more love from parents to their 
children, means no more drive to humiliate and kill other people, 
religion as we've historically understood it will cease entirely. 
Meaning will come from spreading our own known love upon the 
world, in John Updike­style ... but a bit plus. A lot of the religious 
are doing that too; but it'll be spared their relapses and the 
depressing wattering­downs of this thrilling inclination.  
Permalink

Original Article: White menaces to society: Keene State 

and the danger of young drunk white men
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2014 9:57 PM

RoloTomassi GreenWoman Maybe when you stop seeing us as the
"you" you're trying to spurn, you'll be more interested in our 
arguments. If the whole category of us are racists (and it appears 
that we are), that is, containers of evil, that'll strike some of us as 
fundamentally still a deep south way of needing to see the world. 
Permalink

Original Article: White menaces to society: Keene State 

and the danger of young drunk white men
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2014 5:57 PM

voltairespen Patrick McEvoy­Halston I always avoid all public 
transport because my fear is to be trapped with strangers 
eyeballing my little girl thinking she is just an entitled little brat 
instead of a child for whom sitting was a difficult task that we 
spent 5 years working on. 

Go on buses where people aren't prone to see children as "entitled,"
nor as "brats." 
Permalink

Original Article: White menaces to society: Keene State 

and the danger of young drunk white men
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2014 5:54 PM

RoloTomassi Patrick McEvoy­Halston I'm reminding progressives 
that this portrayal, of the problem of out­of­control children, 
pissing on other people's sensitivities, getting to do what they can't,
is usually how everyone else in society views them. 

We should really, really worry when the consensus becomes that 
we're all part of a spoiled civ. that deserves any smack down 
coming. I'm hearing a lot of it right now; and I'd like to hear as 
little as possible from progressives ... because it'll mean they too 
are far away from the Krugmans out there in the world that still see
so many positives, and are adopting an elder point­of­view that 

sees growth, genuine growth, as transgressive. 
Permalink

Original Article: White menaces to society: Keene State 

and the danger of young drunk white men
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2014 5:33 PM

Brittney Cooper has admitted she gets irked by freedom in children
in general: 

In college, I once found myself on the D.C. metro with one of my 
favorite professors. As we were riding, a young white child began 
to climb on the seats and hang from the bars of the train. His 
mother never moved to restrain him. But I began to see the very 
familiar, strained looks of disdain and dismay on the countenances
of the mostly black passengers. They exchanged eye contact with 
one another, dispositions tight with annoyance at the audacity of 
this white child, but mostly at the refusal of his mother to act as a 
disciplinarian. I, too, was appalled. I thought, if that were my 
child, I would snatch him down and tell him to sit his little behind 
in a seat immediately.

She has written that it was the "freedom dreams" of her own 
generation that lead them astray, put them to sleep ... that what 
they need to reclaim now is their elders' willingness to think of the 
group first, to sacrifice themselves. 

My point is that there is a certain kind of person who can come to 
see anyone acting freely has being insultingly self­indulgent; 
"bad," because undisciplined. And so if you explore their psyche 
enough not just partying teenagers but progressively raised 
children playing freely in a playground, garner their ire. 

They see these kids and they don't (at least at first) see the "other," 
but rather the way they wanted to act and behave before being 
disciplined (read: frightened) into rooting themselves in place ­­ so,
rather, actually themselves. Since their parents deemed that person 
bad and possibly did the like of spanking the shit out of them for it,
and since for survival needs children mostly make their parents 
right, the tendency is to fuse into the parent's perspective any time 
they see anyone "guilty" for being too free.  

That child speaking freely at the dinner table, disrespecting older 
generations' sensitivities, will be in for a whopping just as much as 
if she'd stood on the table and pissed on the food. That child ... that
was on the path to embody what being a progressive really is. 

Permalink

Original Article: Why this Iranian­born writer fears for 

America’s soul
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2014 11:17 PM

Sometimes it takes an outsider to see us plain. 
Here, however, is where Nafisi calls Americans — left and right 
— to account for abandoning a glorious cultural legacy to wallow 
in materialism, narcissism and groupthink. (Laura Miller)

Western culture feels guilty and ill at ease. It traded in God for 
Snooki, swapped transcendent meaning and social cohesion for a 
vision of Enlightenment that started out bubbly and gradually went
flat, like a can of week­old Mountain Dew. (Andrew O'hehir) 

For we have awakened from a long, fitful slumber. Lulled there by 
our parents and grandparents, who marched in Selma, sat down in 
Greensboro, matriculated at Black colleges, and argued before the 
Supreme Court, they convinced us to adopt their freedom dreams, 
impressed them into our bodies, in every hug, in every $25 check 
pressed into a hand from a grandmother to a grandchild on his or 
her way to bigger and better, in every whispered prayer, in every 
indignity suffered silently but resolutely in the workplace.
We slept so long our dreams have become nightmares. 
In Obama’s place, Cornel West has re­emerged, the wise and 
fearless elder, the one who we tried not to listen to. (Brittney 
Cooper)

Maybe what we’re so agitated about is the possibility that some 

law­and­order killjoy might bring the Age of Enron to a close. 
Maybe, for all our fond talk of the untainted republic of the 
Founders, the Texas of Ken Lay is where we really long to be. So 
let the next scandal ruin our neighbor, let it black out entire regions
of the country, let it throw millions out of work — as long as we 
get a chance for our turn at the trough. (Thomas Frank)
­ ­ ­ ­ ­
So apparently at Salon it's time to revere our elders ­­ to admonish 
ourselves for abandoning them ­­ to stop playing with our toys, 
and, I guess, to get involved in something that makes us feel less 
like we're wallowing and more like we've awoken. 

And, oh, to finally start hating Paul Krugman.

Great, we're longing to be on a purity crusade. We'll punish 
everyone we've projected our own "bad" "spoiled" selves onto ... 
which sounds like what Nafisi is doing.  
Permalink

Original Article: The right’s Lena Dunham delusion: 

Anger, misogyny and the dangers of business as usual
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2014 2:34 PM

If I'm understanding this article right, we're to understand that most
women have been forced to have sex without their consent, that is, 
raped. This could well be possible. The millions of men who do 
this, though, do this, not because of evil DNA but because they 

themselves were used in a terribly shameful way by their own 
mothers. The other girls ­­ experience their revenge. That's what 
happens to women who are abused in life; when they become 
mothers, they re­inflict upon their own children. 

Parents who spank their kids aren't just practicing a different style 
of childrearing but physically abusing their kids. The number of 
people still doing this is in the millions as well. As Brittney Cooper
says, most black parents still spank their kids. We have enough of 
them in jail. 

I think the solution is to make it clear that these ostensibly normal 
practices are abusive. They have to be changed. But after that we 
simply have to adapt therapeutic means of addressing it. We make 
it against the law; but we have to have more of a sense that what 
you'll have at your door are therapists empowered to stop the abuse
but driven to heal and help, not so much cops, punishment and jail 
time. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cornel West was right all along: Why 

 America needs a moment of clarity  now
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014 10:58 PM

dwamikayla Patrick McEvoy­Halston Take a break, read some 
Proust, and gather some patience. We've just had a progressive 
saying elders are right and that we need to wake up and go to war 
(put yourself on the line, above all) under their guidance ... you'd 

admit, usually the provenance of the conservative. 

In other words, these are strange times. Something weird might be 
happening. Rather than skip to the Readers Digest version ­­ aka, 
everything we know already ­­ let's perhaps be willing to work 
through the perhaps poorly expressed but perceptive of the 
regression. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cornel West was right all along: Why 

 America needs a moment of clarity  now
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014 6:44 PM

Bob On The Pacific Coast When people are fusing with their 
elders and repudiating their sins, "parents" are just implicitly right. 
If you want to get at the actual reasons, it would be for thinking the
worst about children nowadays. "We" were; but are no longer. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cornel West was right all along: Why 

 America needs a moment of clarity  now
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014 6:36 PM

Incidentally, here we have discussed a sudden awakening where a 
whole people who had been in a slumber are suddenly turning into 
a warrior culture, ready, eager, to put their lives on the line. 

Personally, those who want to counter the war impulse of the New 
Athiests better consider that their current defence ­­ 99% of a 
people are not radicals ­­ can become a joke in a hurry. Whole 
peoples who just a day before were simply ordinary folk enjoying 
all the freedoms, can fuse into a powerful, a seemingly enchanted 
group, in a hurry. 

You should expect it in any people whose youth have bypassed 
their punitive elders for a freedom­tolerant culture. It may indeed 
go around the globe. 
Permalink

Original Article: Cornel West was right all along: Why 

 America needs a moment of clarity  now
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014 6:21 PM

Showing up matters most. Putting one’s body on the line is the 
order of the day. 

Young people are listening to the commands of elders, and what is 
paramount is that they be willing to sacrifice themselves. 

I'm sure this is all sane, but it is worth noting that this is exactly 
what goes on just before wars, periods of fusion with elders, 
repudiation of "weakening" commercial culture, and mass sacrifice
of the young ­­ a period of total insanity. 

Before wars, periods of mass sacrifice, people begin to feel guilty 
for all the growth they've accrued. Here, that would be all the 
actual living of the "freedom­dreams," the spending of all the 
$25 dollar cheques, rather than the equivalent of the 
"marching in Selma, sitting down in Greensboro."

They begin to feel abandoned, like they've been rejected by their 
elders.  
These elders are unconsciously understood as not simply wanting 
their youth to be free and prosperous, but as demanding respect 
and attendance. When they haven't received it, when they've been 
forgotten, they abandon their children in turn. Here these elders 
would be the "Cornwell Wests," who as Brittney Cooper 
admits, the youth were "guilty" of forgetting while they danced
merry with Obama. And they wouldn't be the permissive ones 
described here ­­ all the hugs ­­ but all the spanking ones 
Cooper described in a recent article, who saw children as sinful
beings who needed to be beaten to be good. 

By showing they're ready to sacrifice themselves for their elders, 
and have rejected the younger, sexier Obama, they feel the 
"Cornwell Wests" ­­ their regressive spanking parents and 
grandparents  ­­ love them again. They feel a fusion high. 

The other version of yourself is the one who is a favourite of your 

elders rather than the one who had forgotten all about them, at 
some level even hating them for all their "chafing of your hides." 

Brittney Cooper's article dissing elder­spank: 

http://www.salon.com/2014/09/16/the_racial_parenting_divide_wh
at_adrian_peterson_reveals_about_black_and_white_child_rearing
/
Permalink

Original Article: 5 stupid, sexist things expected of men
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2014 7:02 PM

@KaizerSozhe but I also know how to take care of business in 
ways that a lot of guys my age (I'm 36) flat­out don't.

You're establishing yourself as an alpha. And after you've done 
that, you can be a guy who's comfortable talking about his 
emotions; crying in front of his girlfriends. You admit this is all 
pretty safely macho. 

About the puncher's chance ... are you sure she wouldn't just prefer
that you both come out of it safely ­­ something that might actually
be at risk if at that moment you're thinking of the desired finish: 
he, storm; you, port that breasted him. 

The killer look in your eyes ... Hitler had those. He admitted 
himself that they were his mothers. The origins of male power to 
brag of, may owe to a maternal source. 

Permalink

Original Article: 5 stupid, sexist things expected of men
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2014 6:46 PM

HappyJack Like it or not, we are animals first and humans in 
civilization second.

We are animals who are powerfully affected by our attachment to 
our parents ­­ remember Harlow's monkeys.

Most boys end up being more poorly attached to their mothers than
girls are. They're looked at less, abandoned more, hit more. So as 
early as four years old they're already forming a defensive 
"toughness." It's not culture telling them to be like this, that is. Nor 
biology. And they're going to need to be like this ... owing to the 
particular nature of how they were attended (poorly) in their early 
childhoods. 

Change this, and we all end up seeing so disparate from "red in 

tooth and claw" that more experts will be questioned when they 
refer to the barbarism that is ostensibly an inevitable part of our 
DNA. The person who says that the civilized sense of man is most 
false, becomes the person who still needs to punish/humiliate the 
effete ... those who we want to contain our own vulnerable, 
defenceless selves. 

When he revers to the rape­prone alpha ape ... experiences a sense 
of re­assuring grandiosity, someone who stands above the other 
cowardly apes. And temporarily forgets the boy inside of him who 
knew plenty of shameful cowering to terrifying and overpowering 
parents, the boy who couldn't possibly be "resilient" but only 
frightened and weak. 

Permalink

Original Article: Richard Dawkins: Religion isn’t the 

problem in the Middle East
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2014 5:57 PM

I think vengeance is a hideous emotion, but it is one that does have
a biological basis.

Let's think about this a little bit. Doesn't it feel like when someone 
says this that something as powerful as revenge is being located 
into a realm where it can be explored without evoking any 

emotional response? That the purpose of locating it within biology 
is so that it can be denatured, by people who aren't sure they have 
control of their own emotions?

If one where to say instead that vengeance has its origins in 
childhood abuse, you'll know that your own sometimes feeling for 
revenge have something to do with your particular childhood ... 
which is more rising. If one where to say that your adult desire for 
vengeance owes to your own mother (Sarah, Mary, Susan) and 
father (John, Greg, Bill) abusing you in your childhood, suddenly 
you're maybe remembering exactly what she or he did to you, the 
abandonments, the rejections, the dismissals, the physical attacks, 
and you're back experiencing the helplessness, the shame, part of 
your brain had directed you to do everything to not revisit again.  

I can imagine adult desire for revenge owing to be being abused as 
a child, but it comes rather harder to imagine as something with a 
biological basis, with, I guess, purpose. How about instead it has 
no purpose, and it's not inevitable to human beings. If you weren't 
shamed and attacked by your parents, if you're of the new 
generation that has parents where both partners are involved, 
where they're permissive, never spank or belittle, and instead 
support, help and encourage, no desire for vengeance will ever 
come out of you ... at all. You'll instantly see even in the 
regressives in your society, the lack of love, the child abuse that 
procured their hatred of pleasure and progress, and will staunch 
their influence but not try and squash and destroy them. Pretty 
cruel thing to do to people who've known being loved so 
deploringly little, after all. 

Mothers who come out of cultures where they are deemed polluted
do not magically become loving mothers. They use their children 
­­ maternal incest; they re­inflict the abuses they endured upon 
them. They slap, strike, whip and trash; they constantly shame and 
humiliate. And the ascetic results of this upbringing are children 
who cannot allow themselves to self­activate for it means they lose
the approval of the parents in their heads. When there's been any 
unpermitted growth, they fuse with their terrifying parents, project 
their own "bad selves" into others, and righteously inflict all the 
childhood humiliations they suffered upon them. 

Permalink

Original Article: Richard Dawkins: Religion isn’t the 

problem in the Middle East
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2014 3:34 PM

Here's an account (by Lloyd DeMause) where the problem lies not 
with foreign policy but in the extremely abusive childrearing of 
the terrorists.

The ascetic results of such punitive upbringings are predictable. 
When these abused children grow up, they feel that every time they
try to self­activate, every time they do something independently for
themselves, they will lose the approval of the parents in their heads

—mainly their mothers and grandmothers in the women's quarters.
When their cities were flooded with oil money and Western 
popular culture in recent decades, fundamentalist men were first 
attracted to the new freedoms and pleasures, but soon retreated, 
feeling they would lose their mommy's approval and be "Bad 
Boys." Westerners came to represent their own "Bad Boy" self in 
projection, and had to be killed off, as they felt they themselves 
deserved, for such unforgivable sins as listening to music, flying 
kites and enjoying sex. As one fundamentalist put it, "America is 
Godless. Western influence here is not a good thing, our people 
can see CNN, MTV, kissing…" Another described his motives 
thusly: "We will destroy American cities piece by piece because 
your life style is so objectionable to us, your pornographic movies 
and TV." Many agree with the Iranian Ministry of Culture that all 
American television programs "are part of an extensive plot to 
wipe out our religious and sacred values," and for this reason feel 
they must kill Americans. Sayyid Qutb, the intellectual father of 
Islamic terrorism, describes how he turned against the West as he 
once watched a church dance while visiting America:
"Every young man took the hand of a young woman. And these were the 
young men and women who had just been singing their hymns! The room 
became a confusion of feet and legs: arms twisted around hips; lips met lips; 
chests pressed together."

Osama bin Laden himself "while in college frequented flashy 
nightclubs, casinos and bars [and] was a drinker and womanizer," 
but soon felt extreme guilt for his sins and began preaching killing 
Westerners for their freedoms and their sinful enticements of 
Muslims. Most of the Taliban leaders, in fact, are wealthy, like bin 
Laden, have had contact with the West, and were shocked into 
their terrorist violence by "the personal freedoms and affluence of 
the average citizen, by the promiscuity, and by the alcohol and 
drug use of Western youth …only an absolute and unconditional 
return to the fold of conservative Islamism could protect the 

Muslim world from the inherent dangers and sins of the West." Bin
Laden left his life of pleasures, and has lived with his four wives 
and fifteen children in a small cave with no running water, waging 
a holy war against all those who enjoy sinful activities and 
freedoms that he cannot allow in himself.

From childhood, then, Islamist terrorists have been taught to kill 
the part of themselves—and, by projection, others—that is selfish 
and wants personal pleasures and freedoms. It is in the terror­filled 
homes—not just later in the terrorist training camps—that they 
first learn to be martyrs and to "die for Allah." When the terrorist 
suicidal bombers who were prevented from carrying out their acts 
were interviewed on TV, they said they felt "ecstatic" as they 
pushed the button. They denied being motivated by the virgins and 
other enticements supposedly awaiting them in Paradise. Instead, 
they said they wanted to die to join Allah—to get the love they 
never got. Mothers of martyrs are reported as happy that they die. 
One mother of a Palestinian suicide bomber who had blown 
himself to bits said "with a resolutely cheerful countenance,
"I was very happy when I heard. To be a martyr, that's something. Very few 
people can do it. I prayed to thank God. I know my son is close to me."

Like serial killers—who are also sexually and physically abused as
children—terrorists grow up filled with a rage that must be 
inflicted upon others. Many even preach violence against other 
Middle Eastern nations like Egypt and Saudi Arabia "for not being 
sufficiently fervent in the campaign against materialism and 
Western values." If prevention rather than revenge is our goal, 
rather than pursuing a lengthy military war against terrorists and 
killing many innocent people while increasing the number of 
future terrorists, it might be better for the U.S. to back a U.N.­
sponsored Marshall Plan for them—one that could include 

Community Parenting Centers run by local people who could teach
more humane childrearing practices—in order to give them the 
chance to evolve beyond the abusive family system that has 
produced the terrorism, just as we provided a Marshall Plan for 
Germans after WWII for the families that had produced Nazism.

Full 
article: http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/eln03_terrorism.html
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014 6:30 PM

sunone If you as a small, vulnerable child knew your caretakers as 
even sometimes terribly predatory, dangerous, you never shake this
memory ­­ nor your sometimes being totally ruled by it. It's stored 
in your amygdala brain system, maybe most of the time out of the 
way, but as society progress continues and you start feeling out of 
control, you can lapse completely into it as you restage early 
childhood traumas. 

It's delusional, these actually most powerful of groups/nations 
suddenly believing they're terribly vulnerable, surrounded, and 
unless they take military action immediately, surely doomed; but 
for a long time in their early childhoods, they very much did know 
this threat. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2014 6:12 PM

How on earth can any human being not notice that if you treat a 
child with love and respect, he or she turns out substantially 
differently than those whose immature parents denied them these 
things? 

For me, the difference in what happens to a person through how 
they are treated in the first three years is such that the ape in us is 
hardly something I refer to anymore. If we're loved, we're simply 
different­brained than those who were constantly abandoned and 
abused.

My science on this 
matter: http://psychohistory.com/htm/eln07_evolution.html
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s horrible excuse: Why his 

defense of Islamophobia just doesn’t make any sense
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 7:29 PM

bobkat DanielGree Look into whatever might stall a woman from 
giving more love to her children than she herself received ... 
footbinding (using the foot as a maternal breast) stalled China for 

centuries. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s horrible excuse: Why his 

defense of Islamophobia just doesn’t make any sense
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 6:37 PM

Hoyt If we engage in some big war, neither side will see their own 
as a mother of bad things, but of all good. It'll be the other that's 
possessed of the foul­laden one we'll take pleasure in f**cking. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s horrible excuse: Why his 

defense of Islamophobia just doesn’t make any sense
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 6:33 PM

magistra Patrick McEvoy­Halston Because there's no evidence to 
suggest that abuse is any more common in Methodist, 
Episcopalian, Roman Catholic or other denominations than it is in
the general population. Abuse and domestic violence are a 
HUMAN problem, and religion is used as a justification, but it is 
not its cause

The liberal New Yorker who works with his/her partner to nurture 
their children, spends lots of time with them, facilitates their own 
interests rather than coerces them to follow their own, will raise a 
child who will not be part of the human problem you describe. 
They're out. It is extremely unlikely they will be religious; if 

they're, say, Christian, they'll be one of those Christians you notice 
who's practice seems so far gone from the bible you can't help but 
feel it's one generation away from dying away entirely. They're 
essentially atheist, as the atheist Ian McEwan described his friend 
John Updike. 

Evidence I can't refer to right now, but loads and loads of it, from 
what I've seen and noticed as I go about my life, is responsible for 
my certainty in this. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s horrible excuse: Why his 

defense of Islamophobia just doesn’t make any sense
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 6:22 PM

Benthead How about ...

C): Athiests who are secretly sick of growth work with everyone 
else who is secretly or overtly sick of it too, to end our period of 
(more­or­less) ongoing peace and social advancement for war. 

Feeling out of control, we regress and sacrifice our adult world as 
we re­stage childhood traumas where "Bad selves" get executed ­­ 
lots and lots of children. So too, dominating mothers: the evil 
opponents gets portrayed as a dangerous, infanticidal woman (a 
witch), and in fact contains all the split off characteristics of our 
Terrifying Mothers. We all feel grandiose and wonderful as we've 

fused back with our now "all good" mothers, are loyal to her, 
prepared to sacrifice our lives for her. Knights to lady Liberty! 
Warriors against corrupt modernism! ... Whatever.

The progressives who aren't at all sick of social advancement and 
don't feel the least bit of anomie (abandonment), find themselves 
out of the conversation. All the blindspots they've had towards 
peoples they've meant all good things for, are shown up again and 
again and again, and they come to look preposterous. They come 
to look as disassociated from realities as the well­meaning, 
aristocratic Robin Hood from "Time Bandits" was, with his fond 
thoughts for the the peasantry... "lovely people." 

This might seem unconventional but hopefully not irrational. This 
is the world stage as I know it. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s horrible excuse: Why his 

defense of Islamophobia just doesn’t make any sense
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 4:10 PM

In any conversation in which American values are being 
discussed, Islam is the image against which America constructs its
own civility, the bogeyman against which to contrast American 
greatness and  American Muslims are the unwitting casualties of a
struggle which persistently dismisses them as the unalterable 
“other.”

The psychoanalytic perspective would be that Americans project 
their own unwanted, their own "bad" aspects onto Muslims, 
leaving them feeling virtuous and good. It's important this be 
pointed out. 

But, still, any time a progressive is dealing with someone who is 
religious, s/he is dealing with someone who had to have 
experienced some abuse within their families, and possibly a lot: 
thus their belief in a powerful god to defer to; thus their belief in 
bad children who sin and who must be punished for their sins. 

It's annoying when academics try to make everyone but themselves
unworthy of comment, because history, full context, is something 
only they've got packed away on their shelves. 

No, the layman who understands how powerfully her peers project 
their own demons, their own "bad selves" onto others, but still 
can't be fooled into thinking anyone who came out of truly 
permissive family is going to even want to tussle with an 
abandoning god, let alone defer to it, has got it on the scholar. 

The scholar, we should note, who for some reason chose to obsess 
over peoples who projected out into the universe, perpetrators they 
knew in early childhood. Myself, I would have spent the time 
reading Atwood or Updike. 

Published comments
Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 2:39 PM

Alvin M Yeah, I like that your challenging the idea that ideas and 
context can somehow make a human being want to f**ck a 9 year 
old. It's total nonsense. If you were raised out of a loving 
household, no matter how much your culture's version of the media
told you that children's bums are an alternative to your wife, you'd 
be the oddball that'd be repulsed by it, by your culture, and start 
finding others like you to begin reforms. Later historians would 
say you were influenced by a new way of understanding of 
children that began in the ­­ century, probably ascribing the change
in view to economics or some such. 

What does is sexual abuse. And this doesn't mean you conflate 
sexuality with children, but since the perpetrator was your parents 
or relatives ­­ those you need to keep as protectors ­­ instead that 
you internalize their view, their voice, their personality (in your 
right hemisphere), periodically fuse with it, and go on the hunt for 
vulnerable children just like you to punish and humiliate.  
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 2:14 PM

Benthead It's not people getting used to modernity. If one's 
childrearing doesn't change, if you're still being abandoned in mass

by indifferent parents, sexually abused in mass by sadistic and 
lonely parents/relatives, no matter how surrounded you are by 
other cultures' skyscrapers and empowered women, your God will 
be stern and strict, your role towards him will be deferent and 
meek, and the social sphere will be where you frequently re­stage 
your traumas, revenging upon some "other" you've projected all 
your own bad aspects and all the terrifying aspects of your parents 
onto.

If however your childrearing has gradually been improving, as 
happened in the West, the social sphere loses more of its demons, 
people start seeing the world more sanely, and the religious seem 
that much more disparate from the texts they're still not 
emotionally evolved enough just to stop worshipping and drop for 
good. 

They get there, though, the moment parents stop afflicting their 
children's psyches so, that the child sanely knows that bloody 
demons ARE real enough, even if for safety sakes their brains have
to displace them away from their true source. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 2:43 AM

esstee Patrick McEvoy­Halston Benthead Hopeful Cynic LaCourt 

I don't think you'd really be given the creeps by someone who 
admired and loved art, but mostly past 1920, would you?
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 2:41 AM

@beninabox @Hopeful Cynic @Benthead @LaCourt That was 
one day off a week to purge ourselves of all the sinful growth we 
accrued the rest of the week. Moaning and groaning about all our 
devilish sins, then back to the work week. 

The true legacy of religion is not in that one day off for "leisure," 
but our tendency to punish ourselves by allowing ourselves fewer 
days off than the rest of the Western world. 

We accrue damage to our home lives, and terrible wear and tear to 
our health, and God finally notices and has sympathy. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 2:20 AM

Benthead Hopeful Cynic LaCourt Sorry, sheer nonsense. You're 
aware that for centuries, art and drama were religious, right? 
They have only been (partially) separated for less than 200 years, 
and that's only in the West.

All that art and drama that is religious gives some of us the 
creeps ... no matter how much invention and self­expression and 
individuality was permitted, what latitude away from "man as 
sinful" temporarily permitted it, we still feel in it a purge. 

Maybe that's why some of us will deem someone trying to paste on
religion as necessarily affiliated with art, as lacing onto our lovely 
structure a horrible noose. We got rid of "you" 200 years ago, and 
our arts are the better for it. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 2:02 AM

Hopeful Cynic Benthead LaCourt Excellent. Funny thing about the
"other" is that it's actually us, our bad selves, that we're in a hurry 
to disown so to re­acquire God's (i.e., our parents') love. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2014 1:27 AM

@Benthead @Graham Clark A lot of us don't think religion has a 
social function ­­ the sociological sense of it as respect­worthy, 
legit. Rather, if you grew up with parents who dominated you at 
home, you'll think of yourself as sinful before an all­powerful god 
in the social sphere. You're replaying and restating childhood 
traumas/deficiencies in the sandbox called society. And there will 
be "bad selves" to war against and purge; always. 

Once that family, through increased love from mother to daughter 
over the generations, no longer abuses and abandons their children,
you have no religion, and also no anomie. The anomie you get 
with cultures midway, who've progressed in their childrearing so 
that parents are more permissive towards their children's 
independence; but eventually leads to a sense that you've gone to 
far and have found yourself isolated and alone ­­ abandoned. Then 
you hear the words "cohesion" and "transcendence," and hunker 
for "home." 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism, Islam and liberalism: This is 

what we are really fighting about
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2014 11:40 PM

Despite all its remarkable accomplishments, Western culture feels 
guilty and ill at ease. It traded in God for Snooki, swapped 
transcendent meaning and social cohesion for a vision of 
Enlightenment that started out bubbly and gradually went flat, like

a can of week­old Mountain Dew.

Well, the people I'm on the look out in this world are people 
who've come to this conclusion about the West. That is, that the 
West not only feels guilty, but should feel guilty. We had a male 
god and social order, and have lapsed to the company of a 
deranged, run­amok woman and her gaudy and gross flat.

No culture endlessly tolerates modernization; at some point growth
exceeds what the average citizen can handle, and what is still 
growth becomes coloured as sick and gross ­­ and as an out of 
control woman, by the by. Explore how late Weimars described 
their culture ... who we know later got all their transcendence and 
social cohesion back (lucky us!).

We feel guilty when we accrue more than we think we deserve. 
The origins of this is in our early childhoods, where so many of us 
had insufficiently loved caregivers who expected us to satisfy their 
unmet needs. When we focused on ourselves, they interpreted us as
yet another who did not love them, who abandoned them; and 
abandoned or "attacked" us in retribution. 

The result of this ­­ to the child ­­ apocalyptic occurrence is the 
instillation of the super­ego, a protective device which ensures we 
never do the things ­­ self­attendence ­­ that brought such a 
cataclysmic experience upon us. It becomes sinful. Good times, 
growth, commercial society ­­ sinful. When we as a society start 

enjoying ourselves too much, part of our brain tells us to 
experience it as fetid. We feel hopelessly abandoned, and beat a 
retreat back to a less "selfish" culture to feel like we're worthy of 
being in the company of early caregivers again. 

We dump our "junk" culture and fuse back with our early 
caregivers: cohesion. We feel grandiose as we become the 
favourites we always want to be in real life: transcendence.
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher and the liberal conundrum: 

Progressives, religion and extremism
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2014 3:23 AM

UnderTheHedgeWeGo 

People who embrace bad ideologies should be condemned for 
their poor choices

There's a lot of punishment that seems to go along with you 
noticing ­­  merciless punishment: they embraced; they choose 
poorly. Given this, it might do well to consider if you should take 
notice. 

I think people are the products of how much love they received 

from their parents ... if lots, they'll be progressive and good; if 
little, they'll have little capacity for empathy and will behave 
monstrously. The people you mention, the ones who can choose to 
be on the right path (probably hard) or the wrong one (probably 
easy), I have personally never encountered. 

Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher and the liberal conundrum: 

Progressives, religion and extremism
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2014 2:17 AM

NancyDL It's also a nation which has begun it's climb towards 
guaranteed healthcare, to legitimize gay marriage, to decriminalize 
drugs, to question the sanctity of its violent sports, to graduate 
more women from college and to accept as the norm more female 
CEOs. To maturely accept that it's not even close to number one. 

I don't think you can understand this current drive amongst certain 
liberals for a war culture unless one accepts that America, despite 
all the awful things its doing to its youth and its poor, has in certain
powerful ways just kept on growing/advancing. Like their 
conservative peers, they find this growth destabilizing, more than 
is allowed, and they long to put it to a stop. 

For a read favouring what has gotten better, perhaps check out 

Krugman's latest: 

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/in­defense­of­obama­
20141008?page=2.
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher and the liberal conundrum: 

Progressives, religion and extremism
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2014 12:54 AM

 There is a way to stay true to liberal ideals while also remaining 
respectful to Islam.

The progressives we really want part of the conversation aren't 
assuaged by this sort of language: they're not trying to be loyal 
knights to Lady Liberty; they want calm and ongoing modernism. 

Yes, it is Islamophobic to say that Islam is a religion of violence 
and extremism, because it is not. There are 1.5 billion Muslims on 
planet Earth and the vast majority are peaceful and respectful. 
Only a small minority are terrorists and jihadists.

Western countries are full of people who go about their everyday 
peacefully, but have armies which periodically obliterate a lot of 
vulnerable people. If we judged that everyday citizens had 

delegated their own terrible desires to the army, so personal 
responsibility could be denied and the carnage inflicted without 
guilt, then we'd have to say that Western cultures are violent and 
extremist. However much they've been slowly weeding out of their
psyches the need to periodically punish other people for their own 
ongoing "sinful" growth, warring less, per capita killing less, it still
fairly categorizes them. 

We also know that Western nations can be going about peacefully 
and then all of a sudden desire the grandiosity of being a warrior 
culture, loyal to motherlands. It's what we do before world wars. 
Peaceful and commercial, then all of a sudden wiping out 
neighbours as millions get sacrificed.

We don't need to argue that the vast majority of people are 
intrinsically peaceful and respectful, because this works against 
understanding ourselves better than we now do. What we need is to
ensure that the most progressive members of our society, those 
who truly want modern reforms to continue in their own countries 
and abroad, continue to have influence. There's no success in 
what's happening now, this "conversation"; only the possibility that
our most progressive members are going to find themselves 
undermined, and perhaps out of the conversation, for being, 
ostensibly, arrogantly and perhaps criminally oblivious to facts. 

As I've said elsewhere, the most progressive, the most evolved 
human beings alive still insist that tribal cultures are as loving as 
any in the world; yet in truth they are the most infanticidal in 

existence ­­ the opposite. This dissonance exists elsewhere, 
amongst other groups progressives have been trying to protect 
from those bent to use them instead as "poison containers" for 
unwanted aspects of their psyches, from racists, from societal 
regressives. 

There's a sense that progressives have sort of set themselves up for 
a KO if less evolved members of their own "tribe," secretly tired of
ongoing growth, and desirous of a "cleansing" war, decide they're 
not being traitorous but mature when they undercut so many 
presumptions, so many pillars, thought perhaps to be the basis of 
their movement. This can be managed easier when people like 
Maher and Harris keep peppering Muslims, making it seem 
acceptable, an actual option, for liberals to paint whole other 
cultures as suspect. It can be managed easier when the progressives
attitudes we've gotten used to over the last number of decades 
becomes only a type of progressivism ­­ one determined by the 
white and affluent, which has in its own way belittled and 
infantilized and misrepresented those they've tried to "protect." 

Our actual best can be made to seem people mostly interested in 
being in charge, as they get asked again and again, in a different 
climate, why they've been so obtuse to facts on the ground ­­ 
ostensibly their strong point ­­ for so obstinately long. 

"Good things still got done. It worked for awhile. But a suddenly 
more deadly serious world requires a tougher and less self­
indulgent sort of liberal," will be said. Then poof!!! Those we need

to hear from most will be left without an effective voice. 

Permalink

Original Article: Reza Aslan strikes back: “A real lack of 

sophistication” in Bill Maher debate
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2014 2:21 PM

firstpersoninfinite By participating in its rituals, you mean joining 
in on beating Jews on the streets. 

They didn't submit to this, but eagerly partook. The cause is that 
when nations with terrible childrearing grow too much (all the 
Weimar freedoms), beyond what their childhoods allowed, they 
"switch" into their parents' point of view and find some group of 
"bad children" to re­inflict all of their own childhood tortures and 
punishments upon. 

That sense of belonging, of being the Volk, is the fusion with a 
nation, a group, imagined as a maternal entity. "You've" forsaken 
your adult independence and committed yourself back to your 
mother, ready to die in mass for her. It feels great because you 
become the favourite you always wanted to be in real life. 

http://www.psychohistory.com/originsofwar/06_childhoodOrigins.
html

http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/childhoodHolocaust.html

I own Fritzsche's book; it's excellent. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 9:36 PM

cas42677 cas42677  Somebody else said this. The person saying 
this is being tolerant and encouraging, but nevertheless 
establishing a people as about seven hundred years behind us: 
calling them, however well­temperedly, medieval. 

The nature of our religions corresponds with the nature of our 
childrearing. If you can greatly improve the childrearing within 
one generation, what took one culture 700 years to accomplish can 
be done historically instantly. 

Proof of this is what occurred in Germany during the 20th­century.
They went from the country with the worst childrearing in Europe, 
which had them turn away from Weimar freedoms and re­inflict 
tortures upon designated "shit­babies," "useless eaters," that they 
themselves experienced in their childhoods, to people who could 

embrace Goldhagen's very unflattering assessment of them and 
reject the authoritarian model of the family.  
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 9:07 PM

J. Milano Patrick McEvoy­Halston I certainly acknowledge that 
sex plays a difference, but think we haven't payed enough attention
to what our early hardening practices do to boys. Boys I think are 
just raised a bit worse, looked at less (less mutual gazing than 
occurs between mothers and girls) ­­ even in many progressive 
families. I think they have attachment problems, and therefore 
their early propensity for war games ­­ where via bravado they test 
and disprove fears. 

Boys that go for trucks may just be interested in "shells," encased 
mechanical objects that hide one's vulnerable self from indifferent 
childrearing ­­ what's behind autism, which is ten times more 
frequent in boys. 

I'm sorry to have to refer to your friends in this response; but even 
progressives should use the fact that their boy determinedly goes 
for cars and trucks that there's more yet to do. "Biology" offers 
reprieve. 

An article for your consideration: 

http://www.psychohistory.com/originsofwar/02_whymalesaremore
violent.html
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 8:48 PM

RoloTomassi Patrick McEvoy­Halston Have you ever heard of 
young adults enjoying modern freedoms, but later renouncing it as 
Satan's culture and going hard­core conservative? Does this sound 
at all like extremists in every culture? The cause is early childhood 
punishment for self­indulgence; the cause is adopting the parent's 
point of view that any kind of self­respect, self­attendance, is 
horribly selfish and sinful. It's the only way they can feel loved 
rather than cast away, abandoned.

I'd rather hope this could be discussed rather than be overruled by 
blow horns blasting BULLSHIT. Especially since this regression 
can sometimes take hold of entire cultures, rather than just the 
worst raised. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 8:38 PM

J. Milano Up until the last decade I never met any guys who 
wanted to be a nurse and the female dominance obviously has 
something to do with being a nurturer.

Digressing, it's about choice and many women, for reasons that 
have nothing to do with men or misogyny, are interested in 
different things.

Well, what happened in the last decade, though? Better nurtured 
boys being more comfortable being nurturers, as well as preferring 
the Parisian sweater easily as much as the 80" tv? 

Boys have traditionally had more of a sink or swim upbringing 
than girls. Who knows their preferences when they're not as coldly 
abandoned, "toughened up"? Difference by sex will still exist, but 
it'll require a more refined eye to spot them: neither sex will prefer 
gadgets, autism boxes, which buffer them from the rest of the 
human race.  
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 3:33 PM

Lorin K Why grant that the impulse is real? Human beings that ate 
mostly vegetables would of been able to make short work of 
"nature" eons ago. The cruel force was simply early childrearing ­­ 
children got extended care, the care they needed, not because they 
were loved but because they usefully attended the mother, 
stimulated her, relieved her depression. They were still killed and 
abandoned in mass though. The earliest parents were infanticidal. 

So spirituality probably owed to people with no private selves 
filling up the world with predatory spirit creatures, to somehow 
help handle trauma by fiddling with it on the "outside."
We began with witches, ghosts, and demons, and as we evolved, 
got "healthier" forms of spirituality. But thank god a lot of us are 
finally out. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 3:14 PM

JustSlider BARBRA STRIDENT For many persons, religion is 
the opposite of "egomania," but, instead, their faith teaches them 
that they are not the center of the Universe, but are subordinate to 
a higher power.   

The "higher power" is your parents ­­ the origins of all gods. That 
"you" still feel the need to subordinate yourself to clearly 
domineering parents, means you've to some extent sacrificed your 
own and internalized their point of view. They scared the piss out 
of you.

The result is that children who rebel against their parents' 
expectations and focus on their own needs, get understood as 
egomaniacs, as spoiled. The result is that when a society ends up 
growing, progressing, self­indulging too much, one feels 
compelled to put it to a stop and restage on the global stage early 
childhood traumas where some large group of "bad children" get 
the punishment they've long had coming. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 3:58 AM

alchemy­flying Are you talking about me, alchemy­flying? I'm not 
conservative. Only arguing that the most progressive people alive 
have blindspots, that their less progressive kin think nows the time 
they can take them down for. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher’s atheist values: Why 

progressives must defend enlightenment, critique religious 
extremism
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014 2:04 AM

Liberals are wrong about a lot of things. They still romanticize 
tribal cultures, who easily possess the worst childrearing in the 
world. Steven Pinker made the point that they kill far more per 
capita than any modern society does, to support his argument that 
there has been evolution over the millenniums. But otherwise was 
still hoping to keep intact, relativism. It is about as far as a 
puncture that could be made ­­ that tribal cultures war and kill far 
more than we do. But the truth is he should have gone further and 
shown that whole societies and cultures can be thoroughly sick. 
Not redeemed by art; nothing. And this applies to many that 
liberals have sought to protect against the regressive members in 
their society, regressives who are mostly characterized by their 
need to project unwanted aspects of themselves into some other 
people ­­ whether aptly suited, or not at all ­­ rather than any ability
to see things straight.

The liberals alive today are the most evolved that's ever been; but 
in some instances they cannot allow themselves to see things for 
what they are. Not everything they see and initially know can be 
integrated into permanent awareness. They're kind of like 
Leonardo DiCaprio's character in "Shutter Island," who could 
come admirably awake to some terrible truths, but couldn't stay 
there past an evening. So almost guaranteed you take them before 
an openly infanticidal tribal society, and even if they sensed that 
the children were being killed, not out of necessity, but because the
parents just didn't give a damn, they'd have to, they'd simply have 
to, decide it was an economic decision or some such ... of course 

they loved their kids!!!

Eventually, we'll get an even more evolved group of liberals. But 
for now, the people who are taking advantage of their 
blindsightedness, making them seem those who are oblivious to 
facts ­­ akin to those they revile, like evolution and global 
warming­deniers ­­  are simply interested in doing in their more 
progressive peers. They're going to begin an effort to make them 
seem laughable. And so those who really aren't interested in war, 
who want our society to continue its progressive march, won't 
interfere as they do the terribly unprogressive thing of making sure
our society stops its growth, to restage childhood traumas, where 
"bad boys and girls" get punished, sacrificed in mass, and "good" 
ones know they are righteous and loved.  
Permalink

Original Article: Hilarious “Funny or Die” video says 

what we’re all thinking about social media
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2014 5:58 PM

Are you sure it's not saying we're all thinking of suicide?
Permalink

Original Article: Jennifer Lawrence: Not the nude photo 

hero we deserve, but unfortunately the one we need
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014 11:52 PM

thespiritbo We saw a chance to take down the actress who hadn't 

shown us her boobs (Oscars 2012, I believe), and likely was 
prepared never to. You, Miss Laurence, are now no more special 
than the rest of them. We participated in something really 
disgusting. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Gone Girl” didn’t botch the “cool girl” 

speech — it clarified it
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014 11:22 PM

My own sense is that smart, literate people who could make it in 
(or are at least natural to) New York, remain aristocrats around the 
rest of the bumbling. The film shows us acres of morons, with 
perhaps the most key moment in the film Dunne's takedown of her 
supposed best friend as actually the loathsome local village idiot. 
Some have risen, like the detective, and the lawyer (though we 
noted his pleb­king choice of transport); but there's nothing like 
these two when they're forced to get their smart on. 

Dunne does it throughout; and Nick, though slow to wake ­­ like 
Henry IV, slumming along ­­ can when pressed intuit a way out of 
sticky situations that leaves everyone else in the dust. He even 
betrays his sister in the end ­­ and it seems apt: part of "me" is New
York, baby, and we don't long abide the dull and dumb. She was 
won over by his ability to act the person she wanted him to be; he, 
by her handling the detective who's been so present and 
empowered, as if she was actually the smallest of hometown fries. 
Permalink

Original Article: Jennifer Lawrence: Not the nude photo 

hero we deserve, but unfortunately the one we need
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014 10:37 PM

ferric7 Amphiox I honestly thought Tracy Clark­Flory wanted to 
see her taken down. She's personally ­­ by her own admission ­­ 
been disappointing and humiliating herself this year, and likely the 
cause of why she's doing that and why she participated in the 
humbling of someone else, are the same.
Permalink

Original Article: Jennifer Lawrence: Not the nude photo 

hero we deserve, but unfortunately the one we need
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014 9:43 PM

Alex C Men are not denied the ability to be repulsed when a 
woman's beautiful body is not being willingly offered. We know 
seeing the photos that someone meant to humble and humiliate her,
and a lot of guys aren't turned on by that. 

Those who chose to look at them weren't just curious. Under cover 
of the collective agreement that this is just what happens to 
someone who's being too haughty, they joined in a kind of gang 
bang. It felt to me like a sex crime. 
Published comments
Original Article: EXCLUSIVE: Bill Maher on Islam spat 

with Ben Affleck: “We’re liberals! We’re not crazy tea­
baggers”

MONDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2014 5:55 PM

MyRealName, sure! Patrick McEvoy­Halston Terrifying.
Permalink

Original Article: EXCLUSIVE: Bill Maher on Islam spat 

with Ben Affleck: “We’re liberals! We’re not crazy tea­
baggers”
MONDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2014 5:35 PM

@MyRealName, sure! I would hope perhaps we'd consider that 
being educated on the subject isn't necessarily so much the thing as
is one's state of mental health. If Affleck reads a desire for 
righteous war amongst some liberals, even as much as they say 
they don't want to kill muslims, I'm glad he doesn't abash himself 
and not speak up. 

What's frustrating for Affleck is that liberals have poorly placed 
themselves to be able to defuse the influence of Maher and Harris. 
It is very possible that good numbers of cultures out there that 
historically have been conservative but which have begun to 
rapidly modernize, evolve, will end up feeling guilty for all that's 
been trespassed and accrued and suddenly turn puritanical in 
mass ... what happened to Germany in the 30s. Become a warrior 
culture of "knights" who've renounced their spoiled ways, now 
ready to die for their beloved mutter land. 

But liberals have had no way of admitting this to themselves, for 
they've only associated it with the rightwing perspective. So they 

insist it's "only extremists" ... when they ought to know that whole 
societies can suddenly turn extreme, especially when some within 
(the more emotionally evolved; the less abused/better raised) have 
successfully been pushing reforms, social/economic/political 
advances. 

I think Maher and Harris are aware of other liberals' deliberate 
ignorance, and are glorying in the fact that there is now no 
prepared way to show that those who are actually factually more 
correct are still possessed of the more perverse mindset. Good 
portions of the world might suddenly turn very conservative ­­ it 
was the change we knew in the 1930s from the Jazz Age 1920s. 
And someone pointing out in the late 20s what could possible 
develop in Germany is not necessarily more to be saluted than the 
liberal who wasn't as concerned. 

What's key is that one truly wants peace and ongoing growth. And 
the liberal in the 20s might have been one of the exceptional who 
could be truly favoring this, while still able to point out evidence 
that makes another culture you're actually rooting for seem 
barbaric. But s/he'd probably be one of those hoping for the growth
to end by popularizing an opponent we'll all need to shed a sane 
culture for war trance, war preparedness. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ebola, the “heart of darkness” and the 

epidemic of fear

MONDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2014 2:57 PM

dkelly5352 Reparations and the loss of territory greatly affected 
the German psyche.

More about this German psyche … I think it takes a particularly 
nasty childhood, full of shaming and humiliation, to feel so shamed
by anything later on that'd you'd go down a course that have you 
want to kill millions of people and take pleasure in the 
hypermasculine possibility of world dominance. 

They were getting revenge for childhood humiliations, sexual 
abuse; the treaty was a just flashback. Everything in our 
childhoods gets played out in the external social sphere. 

Economic growth ­­ and accrued guilt ­­ leads to war. Major wars 
aren't fought during depressions, because the point of war ­­ mass 
sacrifice ­­ is being handled internally.  
Permalink

Original Article: Ebola, the “heart of darkness” and the 

epidemic of fear
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 4:36 PM

@Amity Maybe that's just too much work.

So we're not tribal animals, but we are lazy shits. 

Won't you come over to my side and say we're just traumatized 
children, ruled over by (the like of) parents who'll abandon us if we
choose just to fart away all the advantages they've so graciously 
and selflessly given us?
Permalink

Original Article: Ebola, the “heart of darkness” and the 

epidemic of fear
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 4:12 PM

Andrew, note, believes it's pretty usual to freak out about things 
that are not actually genuine threats, saying we're all at core still 
tribal people possessed of primal fears. I think historians might 
allow for this because if they stop insisting humankind as rational, 
it's only to suggest how fallen we are, how base we are ­­ they like 
thinking of human beings as intrinsically greedy and self­
interested, for example. Take that you presumptuous assholes, 
believing yourselves better!

My way is sort of akin to Andrew's, in suggesting that past terrors 
determine how we see our world, not "realities." But because it's 
not a safe zone of imagining some distant anthropological tribe 
really far removed from the scholar who casually (arrogantly? 
angrily? retaliatorily?) ascribes the rest of the human family as 
similar to them, but the dangerous one of imaging one's own self 
once again as we were when in absolute terror before our 

mommies and daddies as they abandoned or ferociously attacked 
us, it's off the table. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ebola, the “heart of darkness” and the 

epidemic of fear
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 3:27 PM

@Amity Germany in the 1920s was still Jazz Age, though, it 
encouraged all the artists and new thoughts the Nazis, that 
Germans in the 30s, wanted dead as soon as possible. The way of 
seeing the decade as simply crazily disrupting, rattling, perhaps 
shows how anyone from a family that crucified/brutally abandoned
their children when they did anything deemed spoiled or selfish, 
would experience any period of innovation ­­ where one 
artistic/social advance was followed so quickly by something 
unimagined before; by something even better. 

What the Nazis did was ensure people that psychic disintegration 
caused by unpermitted growth would be put to an end. I understand
that Nazism ebbed for a short while, but took off again in spades 
during the 30s economic recovery. The Nazis halted women's 
rights, halted social, political, sexual freedoms, and the nation felt 
relieved; the inner sense of disintegration stopped.

The question is, what was going through the average person's mind
when they feared "communism"? Could it not be that every outside
perpetrator by that point carried every aspect of their own punitive 

parents? That every child they killed in war, carried every aspect of
their own terribly guilty childhood selves? That Germany itself so 
saintly, because every bad parental aspect had been projected 
outside; and the Volk also so good, because it was composed of 
puritanical good boys and girls ready in mass to die for Her?
Permalink

Original Article: Ebola, the “heart of darkness” and the 

epidemic of fear
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 1:37 AM

Maybe I can be corrected otherwise, but I really doubt that 
Germans in the Weimar 1920s believed that they were surrounded 
by enemies about to attack; but by 1939 they certainly did. If we 
all possess the same evolutionary history, if we're all afraid of 
monsters, why does it seem to speak out so loud at certain times 
and so shallowly at others?

I'm one who thinks that who we are is most usefully explored not 
by DNA but by the specific nature of our childhoods, how well 
loved we were. If we grew up under parents who often terrorized 
us ­­ Tiger Moms; patriarchal fathers; fear of the lash or more of 
devourment ­­ then if we end up in a society which is actually very 
empowered, like we are now, and Germany certainly was in the 
30s, at no risk at all from neighbors, but still believes itself terribly 
vulnerable, then it's a sign we've regressed into our childhood 
mindsets, our childhood selves. It's a sign that we're engaging once
again with very real childhood "monsters" we had to engage with 
everyday as children. 

What precipitates this paranoid state is simply growth panic: 
peoples who've exceeded what they believed they were allowed in 
life, are guilty of hubris, feel like they're disintegrating ­­ and so by
the wayside goes their normal selves. You take note of this by 
watching media images, but the media doesn't precipitate it.  

We go to war for defense and re­enactment. The aspect of 
initiation is pleasing; empowering against a demonic force that is 
always out there circling. And the takedown ­­ so long as it means 
not just killing monsters but the sacrifice of children (our own 
guilty childhood selves, who're surely sinful; deserved their 
mistreatment) ­­ immensely satisfying. 
Permalink

Original Article: Bill Maher: Islam’s “the only religion 

that acts like the mafia, that will f**king kill you if you say 
the wrong thing”
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2014 2:44 PM

@5easypieces @bigrafx @joe jones I think Maher is arguing that 
liberals refuse to acknowledge how conservative almost all 
Muslims are. Liberals do this because they understand that this 
rarely turns out to be a discussion of fact ­­ as Maher and Harris 
insist it is  ­­ and just pretext to find a people of "dangerous 
people" to satisfy our need to annihilate without guilt. 

We develop the fantasy need first ­­ to find a dangerous, terrible 
other and war against it ­­ then we go about establishing how this 
is simply the truth of the world: some bad people need to be 
bombed, attacked first before they attack us. Affleck should have 
argued that Maher and Harris have an unconscious need for war 
right now, to annihilate a lot innocents, and have to wake up to this
fact. 

They would deny it, and point out more statistical fact. But Ben 
should have said he feels it in them ­­ you want war, guys. If the 
stats showed something different, they wouldn't be brought up or 
would have been ignored.  

Permalink

Original Article: Atheism’s shocking woman problem: 

What’s behind the misogyny of Richard Dawkins and Sam 
Harris?
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 4:41 PM

Lissie You're a fun writer. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism’s shocking woman problem: 

What’s behind the misogyny of Richard Dawkins and Sam 

Harris?
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 3:06 PM

@esstee @Patrick McEvoy­Halston I certainly qualified the 
emotional health bit. But, yes, he is amongst those people I see 
targeted where I'm not convinced people taking him down  ­­ citing
very valid stuff ­­ are in a camp I'd necessarily want to belong in 
either. 

It is perhaps for this reason I make sure to argue my own point of 
view that the source of the woman hate owes to mistreatment by 
one's mother ­­ raised out of an environment that provided 
insufficient love and respect for her ­­ because I'm testing to see if 
those taking down Dawkins are themselves open to explanations 
behind women­hate other than ones they're comfortable with. 

If they're furious, then I'm wondering if they're actually more 
comfortable with a foreclosed environment than Dawkins himself 
is, and just represent another avenue in our Depression society 
where inroads just can't be made. 
Permalink

Original Article: Atheism’s shocking woman problem: 

What’s behind the misogyny of Richard Dawkins and Sam 
Harris?
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 2:34 PM

Richard Dawkins convinces me that he got to atheism out of 
emotional health. I think his fantastically playful mind came out of 

the fact that he had parents, had a mother, who encouraged him to 
play ­­ who were permissive, out of love. I sometimes wonder if he
gets targeted so much at Salon because he doesn't seem to admit to 
any sins at all; whereas Salon would prefer we're we'd all self­lash 
at least a little bit. 

So mostly I would want to defend him. But I know that when he 
said he was groped by teachers as a child and that it didn't harm 
him a bit, he was certainly wrong about that. And I know that 
there's more behind his support for Hoff Summers than he realizes.
A lot of men were still raised by women who were insufficiently 
loved and respected in the society they were born in, and who 
therefore made use of their children to satisfy their own unmet 
needs. Dawkins obviously had a better­loved mother than many ­­ 
and therefore his lack of a psychological need for gods to defer and
admit sins to. But is obviously still one of those, and thus his being
pleased by the prospect of revenge. 

I suppose the other thing for me is that many of these last of the 
"great men" that are being heavily targeted by feminists, still seem 
to me to be more innovative than contemporaries ­­ I'm thinking 
Updike and Roth. For this I still like seeing them in the limelight, 
not because they're towering men amongst a swath of deferential 
women. Seeing people decide against reading him would be a bit 
like being witness to the 30s generation that let the appallingly­
full­of­himself Jazz Ager, F. Scott Fitzgerald, go out of print. 
Permalink

Original Article: Heinrich Himmler, family man: Why 

“The Decent One” is the most haunting documentary I’ve 
ever seen
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 10:21 AM

CyclingFool About cops/soldiers using deadly force to "protect" 
us: I think we may learn better about why we have soldiers when 
we consider that they act out sadism we feel, so we can be 
dispossessed of it, live ordinary lives (they can also represent 
sacrificed youth and youthful potential ­­ so also the reprieve of 
first born to angry "gods"). They're a corollary of our need for 
homeless people, who we make feel vulnerability we've known but
want the hell away from us. It's all very useful, but for still quite 
psychologically damaged people. Many of the better­loved left 
know nothing of this. It's not in them. And would on their own 
create a society spared all of it.

The reason we let predatory capitalists go on may not be so much 
their absolute necessity in the creation of useful products, but that 
we are still primitive enough, our period of sustained "sinful" 
growth has gone on long enough, that we can only tolerate useful 
creation when we make sure it's done nastily; where it'll mean a lot
of destruction as well.
Permalink

Original Article: Heinrich Himmler, family man: Why 

“The Decent One” is the most haunting documentary I’ve 
ever seen
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 4:05 AM

Frank Knarf Personally, I think he's right. He could even say that 
when we want our leaders to bomb the hell out of people or 
structure our economy so that it makes destitutes out of a lot 
people, our psychological mechanism is about the same (lots of 
children are killed, while we go about our daily business). I 
disagree when it then spreads to absolutely everyone. If you're 
thinking you have some sin in you, you may just be ready to join 
others in a "cleanse." 
Permalink

Original Article: Heinrich Himmler, family man: Why 

“The Decent One” is the most haunting documentary I’ve 
ever seen
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 1:40 AM

wardropper

the article points to the truth about the little bad things in us all 
and their potential, given the opportunity, to become very big bad 
things.

Or it substantiates a lie we're all pretty well prepared to accept. The
other way, that it isn't in all of us but only in those who were 
abused as children, and set up brain systems to protect the 
abandoning/abusive parent and demonize the "bad" child, requires 
us to explore our own childhoods in a way that sets off major 
alarms.  You just don't go there.  

Permalink

Original Article: Heinrich Himmler, family man: Why 

“The Decent One” is the most haunting documentary I’ve 
ever seen
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014 1:09 AM

The phenomenon is "switching," and it's "in" a lot of us, but not all
of us: depends on our childhoods; whether it was so bad we had to 
set up different brain systems we could switch into, so to fuse with 
our disassociated terrifying parent alters and victimize our Bad 
Selves (guilty simply for being vulnerable). Switching is what 
occurred in Milgram's experiments ­­ it involves cutting off the 
empathic mirror neurons in the right insula ­­ and not everyone 
switched. The better loved don't. 

So, many feel this need to switch into persecutory alters they've set
up in their brains; they restage early childhood traumas where 
they're "the parents" and those gassed are themselves as children; 
and then afterwards they're completely out: they can go home 
calmly for dinner with the family. 

What precipitates this switching? It's growth panic, guilt, but I 
won't quite get into that; but I will say that it occurs after people 
begin to coalesce into a group. That is, don't be on the look out for 
stigmatization so much as a sense of group identity, of nationalism,
building; when it coalesces, then we'll understand exactly who's to 
be designated as vermin. Victims aren't foolish to be caught out; it 
"flowers" out in a terrible hurry after fusion is complete. 

For a sense of German childrearing during the early 20th century, 
perhaps check this out: 

http://psychohistory.com/originsofwar/06_childhoodOrigins.html
Permalink

Original Article: America’s sex abuse surprise: Why our 

search for “monsters” is blinding us
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2014 2:25 PM

What was key about Paglia, why a lot of men were excited by what
she said, is that it would have felt a bit as if mommy had 
authorized the rapes ... spoiled, over­protected young college 
women, welcome to the wilderness. 

Older women, like Ginsberg and Paglia, are being experienced 
now as supreme authorities that cut through all the blather. They 
represent our own Terrifying Mothers, and we're both afraid of and
eager to fuse with them. 

What's actually frightening is the knowledge that we are monsters 
of our own making. That we raise boys to see sex as something 
that can be taken, should be taken. 

Again, this certainly doesn't help. But the real problem is that 
disparaged, unloved mothers end up more needing their children 
than loving them. This leads to incestuous use of their children, 
followed by abandonment. It's experiences of this sort of contact 
with one's mother that makes one want to make use of the guilt­
reducing excuses of an anti­woman culture to go about humiliating
(what rape is primarily about) women. 
Permalink

Original Article: Camille Paglia thinks rape is intrinsic to 

men’s nature — and a lot of men are like, “This is 
awesome!”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2014 4:52 PM

Graham Clark Yes, unloved mothers from societies that disrespect 
women, will end up looking to their children for love, and will 
abandon them when they no longer serve this need. This produces 
the kind of rage that could fuel something as awful as rape, which 
will seem very aberrant to us eventually, as will such things as 
war. 

And yes, anyone from a genuinely provisioning home will not 
murder or rape. They weren't sexually abused as children. 

I don't understand your last paragraph. What I meant is that 
children who were abused will end up blaming themselves for the 
abuse. They set up alters in their heads, in the right hemisphere ­­ 
the Terrifying Mother (or primary caregiver) alter ­­  that tells 

them they deserve humiliation and punishment through life. 

I made use of your comment mostly to expand on what I think, 
which is a bit rude, but your bent is to humiliate people who don't 
even want to be your opponents, so it's tough not to sort of pass 
you by.  
Permalink

Original Article: Camille Paglia thinks rape is intrinsic to 

men’s nature — and a lot of men are like, “This is 
awesome!”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2014 3:57 PM

@dkelly5352 @trainsam From Lloyd DeMause's "Emotional Life 
of Nations": 

Ever since Jeffrey Masson wrote his book The Assault on the 
Truth: Freud's Suppression of the Seduction Theory, there has been
a widespread misconception that Freud backed down from 
maintaining the reality of childhood sexual abuse. The truth is 
exactly the opposite. Freud continued all his life to state that sexual
abuse of children in his society was widespread, insisting in his 
final writings that "I cannot admit [that] I exaggerated the 
frequency [of] seduction," that "most analysts will have treated 
cases in which such [incestuous] events were real and could be 
unimpeachably established," that "actual seduction...is common 
enough," that "the sexual abuse of children is found with uncanny 
frequency among school teachers and child attendants," and that 

"phantasies of being seduced are of particular interest, because so 
often they are not phantasies but real memories." What he actually 
"backed down" from was his initial idea that hysteria could be 
caused by sexual abuse, since, he said, "sexual assaults on small 
children happen too often for them to have any aetiological 
importance..." That is, it was because children were so commonly 
sexually abused in his society that Freud thought that seduction 
could not be the cause of hysteria. Otherwise, nearly everyone 
would be a hysteric!
Permalink

Original Article: Camille Paglia thinks rape is intrinsic to 

men’s nature — and a lot of men are like, “This is 
awesome!”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2014 3:46 PM

@Benthead @AmusedAmused

every one else rapes because they've been immersed in stories, 
images and jokes about worthless women.

That doesn't help, but it's not sufficient. The boy would have to 
have underlying experiences of being dominated and humiliated. 
And not from spurning from an early grade­school crush, but as an 
infant being manipulated and used in such a terrible way that it 
results in such a hellbent desire to revenge. 

This is not to say that it isn't helpful to challenge regressive media 
images of women ­­ though what helps may not just be that the 
proper message is getting through, but that boys are simply getting 
attention from decent people. But real improvement comes with 
improvement in conditions before the child really comes in contact
with "media" ­­ within the mother­child dyad. 
Permalink

Original Article: Camille Paglia thinks rape is intrinsic to 

men’s nature — and a lot of men are like, “This is 
awesome!”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2014 3:27 PM

SpudSpudly Biology works both ways and rape is not always 
about violence or control.  It can be about sexual desire.

Rape is about control and humiliation. Boys who were dominated 
and used incestuously by their mothers are the ones who'll attempt 
payback against other women. The only way this might be deemed 
biological is that the first homo sapiens were much like primates 
and were god­awful (mostly abandoning, infanticidal ­­ as were the
ancient Greeks, btw) parents. But really, anyone who belongs to 
those generational chains whose childrearing has improved from 
generation to generation, as mother finds way to provide a bit more
love to her children, and so on, will not rape. 

The idea of women craving rape, actual physical assault, should be
explored in the context of what happens to women who as girls felt

that they were "bad" and deserved sexual assaults they had 
suffered. If they were assaulted as children and the perpetrators 
were those the child needed to be kept protective, part of their 
brains will be installed with the perpetrator's point of view, and 
will glory when the "uppity girl" gets taken down a notch again. 
It's an example of the terrible results of child abuse, only.  
Permalink

Original Article: Camille Paglia thinks rape is intrinsic to 

men’s nature — and a lot of men are like, “This is 
awesome!”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2014 1:43 AM

 But here we have a piece where a woman is actually saying that 
men are intrinsically violent and that can never ever change, and 
it’s being heralded as a very serious idea about gender and sexual 
violence.

For some men this might feel flattering. The immediate reaction a 
woman should have towards a man, ergo, is to be wary. Anyone 
who grew up under a dominating mother, anyone who knew a lot 
of humiliating shrinking before her, would find this appealing, a 
great buff. 

If she'd of said that since all boys end up servicing the unmet 
(love) needs of their mothers, men are perpetually afraid of her 
dominion and rape other women foremost to gain some kind of 
illusory domination over her, she'd of been less well received I'm 

sure.
Permalink

Original Article: Camille Paglia thinks rape is intrinsic to 

men’s nature — and a lot of men are like, “This is 
awesome!”
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2014 1:31 AM

Benthead SpudSpudly No society will ever achieve a zero 
frequency rate for rape.

Why? Rape isn't inherent in men. It's not a desire to have sex but to
humiliate. Children who are warmly raised by their parents will 
have no inclination to rape at all, and we can get there, eventually.
Permalink

Original Article: “He didn’t care if he destroyed himself 

as long as he hurt you”: The sad, disturbing case of Ed 
Champion
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2014 9:56 PM

 Like many Internet habitués

Lines like this have me sometimes wondering if perhaps you 
shouldn't climb totally over to NYRB, or some such. "Amity," 
"Susan Sunflower," "Beans and Greens," "Aunt Messy," are all 

habitués. And if they were ever to meet you would you really want 
them to see in your face that you still thought them lesser sorts of 
people for not doing the proper not­ever, or only­to­correct­a­
research­mistake, commenting on articles?

Somewhere out there I'm sensing intelligent people reading an 
article and dying to interact and respond, but deciding against it to 
keep their sense of themselves intact ... for the pleasure of not 
being one of them. Sense of self maintained, but democratic 
discussion loses some. 

Salon, start doing more of what you used to do, and get excited 
about some of the conversations that ensue on your website. Don't 
use them to make yourselves feel superior, please ­­ everyday a 
comment adventure, indeed. 
Published comments
Original Article: 6 terrifying reasons why it’s time to stop 

eating meat
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2014 5:06 PM

BeansAndGreens Do you manage to do this low fat? I don't crave 
meat at all, but if you go China Diet / Ornish / Knives and Forks, 
it's not just mostly vegetables but very low fat (little to no oil ­­ 
even olive ­­ for example). I manage it (the low fat part, that is ) 
because I like being in company with all these evolved folks; 
because it means it's impossible to gain weight; and because I 
sadly still partake of Puritan superiority. 

Wouldn't it be a fascinating challenge if going off meat ­­ for 
humane reasons; because you care ­­ meant denying yourself the 
most healthy form of food: that is, if the paleo people were right? 
They're not at all, of course, but boy did we did we dodge a bullet 
there!
Permalink

Original Article: 6 terrifying reasons why it’s time to stop 

eating meat
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2014 3:05 PM

@Elle Cloud Most women aren't willing to make them, because 
their diet tastes better than plant­based. It's totally understandable 
and sane. 

I'm low fat and plant­based myself, btw, and as much as I enjoy 
knowing I have superior willpower to everyone else on the planet, 
and that I could easily best a 21 year old on a health exam (and not 
just the obese ones!), as well as steal all their dates away with my 
verve and natural good looks, every time I watch an old episode of 
Julie Child adding five pounds of butter I can't help but wondering 
if maybe she was just spared my sickly puritanism. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Atlantic is wrong about aging: Why 

our anti­elderly bias needs to change
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2014 7:19 PM

5easypieces I think so. Whether it's just austerity or the combined 
austerity + war punch of the 30s and 40s, we're living in one of 
those self­sacrificial periods which buys enormous allowance 
afterwards. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Atlantic is wrong about aging: Why 

our anti­elderly bias needs to change
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2014 4:38 PM

@Patricia Schwarz You probably should have written: My 
husband is 72 and more physically fit than the average 20 year old 
right now. Thanks obesity epidemic!!! May you be joined by ebola
spread amongst the young, for how more would this make us glow 
in comparison! 
Permalink

Original Article: The Atlantic is wrong about aging: Why 

our anti­elderly bias needs to change
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2014 4:30 PM

canarymein Patrick McEvoy­Halston The question would be 
whether those going ISIS are more healthy than their own 
grandparents were. They may well be. They probably belong to 
those family chains that really don't grow much across the 
centuries, and when one does ­­ they eventually shuck it all and go 
uber­conservative to feel less abandoned by disapproving elders. 
Whole countries do this, which is why countries that are new to 
wealth and industrialization, eventually throw it all away in war. 

The question is, are the grandchildren of emotionally advanced 
people like Justice Ginsberg healthier people than they are? My 
guess is that they are, surely. 

Are they more worth experiencing? That's tough, because I'm a big
fan of Roth and Updike and think people should still go there first 
before reading the millenials'. Let me say that I'm quite sure that 
millenials will have children who write works more worth our time
than those who got to produce works in that great period of 
allowance that follows periods of huge human sacrifice like 
WW2. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Atlantic is wrong about aging: Why 

our anti­elderly bias needs to change
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2014 4:01 PM

canarymein Patrick McEvoy­Halston You're someone who thinks 
everything anti­senior is biased. 

This is how humans evolve: we get some families that get unglued 
from simply re­inflicting childhood harms they suffered upon their 
own children. Instead, they see their child ... and manage a bit 
better. These children end up doing better by their children, and so 
on. The result is glorious human evolution towards the less trauma­
scarred and more beneficent, but also grandparents who are in 

emotional health, dinosaurs compared to their grandchildren. 
Permalink

Original Article: The Atlantic is wrong about aging: Why 

our anti­elderly bias needs to change
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2014 2:35 PM

 He will become wiser as he grows older. And we need that kind of
wisdom, as Cicero once noted, to counter some of the hot­blooded 
decisions of the young.

I think it was the hot­blooded decision of youth to vote for Obama 
rather than the Republican troglodyte. If one's grandchild was 
raised with a considerable amount more love than you were ­­ 
spanking by this time was fully out; both parents were actively 
involved; enormous amount of time put in ­­ it's probably a fact 
that all their decisions which look simply hot­blooded to you are 
probably just wisdom you can't see. If you're own childrearing was
poor enough, you might mistake every advance for spiteful 
indulgence. Basically, you'd still want them back in deference to, 
in constant attendance to, you. 

What you may most have to offer them is just evidence that 
humanity evolves, that they belong to a  chain of generations that 
can recognize that youth are better, and feeling grateful that this is 
so. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rape, domestic violence and football: 

The last battle for American masculinity
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2014 2:24 AM

And oh, last comment: if I read him right, Andrew believes leftists 
who think we can get along without a revolution are extremely 
childish. I must say that however much I believe revolutions can be
made a thing of the past ­­ like small pox, and child sacrifice ­­ 
they're with us for awhile yet. 

What revolutions do, is produce a lot of death, a lot of sacrificed 
lives. When the total becomes high enough, body after vital young 
body, full of possibility, we feel a giant demanding maw is 
satisfied that all the independence in the world has been garnered 
together and brought forth to be devoured, out of awareness of its 
contemptible presumption. Afterwards, golden years ­­ successful 
complete reorganization of our culture. 

Childrearing has been so bad for so long, our sense of our intrinsic 
spoiled sinfulness so strong for so long, we think it's an 
inevitability ... but we're in the process of evolving on out. We'll 
get to a point where advances in childrearing mean societal 
advance and reorganization (shucking the old) without anyone 
getting too stymied by it. 

Some might point to the sky, fearing the loss of "God's" approval, 
but by that point s/he'll be an atheist, and prepared to recognize 
that part of themselves is under influence of an older voice; that 
being at the back­end of society, while regrettable, also no true 

source of shame. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rape, domestic violence and football: 

The last battle for American masculinity
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2014 10:46 PM

Also a bit worrying is Brittney Cooper's recent article on 
childrearing, where she positioned what is in truth the most loving,
the most progressive way of raising children as as about as bad in 
its indulgence as physical abuse (spanking) ­­ the 100­year­
old"style." She certainly isn't FOX, but battling to become the 
"progressive" mainstream. 
Permalink

Original Article: Rape, domestic violence and football: 

The last battle for American masculinity
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2014 10:32 PM

Those who try to preserve its last self­parodying scraps and 
vestiges by rescuing the NFL from feminism and political 
correctness, or by blaming rape and spousal abuse on women’s 
autonomy — after all, if women left the driving to their fathers and
husbands, they wouldn’t be at risk from pervert cops! — are 
fighting a contemporary version of Pickett’s Charge. It’s a 
misguided and self­destructive crusade on behalf of something that
can’t be attained and wouldn’t be worth fighting for if it could.

The challenge is to see if we can think of historical periods where 
so many men feel like they've lost their masculinity, where the 
follow­up isn't just their disappearance into irrelevance. The early 
1900s was apparently one. The "New Women" were believed to be
challenging male supremacy ­­ all those monstrous women on 
bikes! ­­ but the Great War made men feel masculine again. 
Another would be the 1930s, where all of the Western world went 
the German way ­­ that is, from liberal growth to puritanism.  

My guess is that a lot of men wouldn't mind being deemed on a 
Pickett's charge. Whatever else was said about them, they'd be won
over just by the comparison. The image that comes to mind is of 
worn men who've accumulated a lot of wounds, prepared to 
sacrifice themselves over something vital to themselves but 
incomprehensible to everyone else ­­ Why are you doing this? You 
have nothing to gain from it!  You're just being used! The person 
saying this has already positioned themselves as the feminine, and 
so in their "incomprehension," lend strength. They charge, because
they are men. 

If we want to dissway, we should probably avoid such an image. 
How about instead they're just distraught children, which is what 
they are. 

About the future ... The thing that ends up putting a halt to 
progressive times is growth panic: collectively, people begin to 
feel they've outgrown what has been allowed, and end up feeling 
horribly abandoned. Terribly alone, they cut their growth short and

align with their parents' culture ­­ with regressives ­­ so to regain 
approval and feel like good boys and girls again. We should look 
to see what's happening in our attitudes towards children. If it's all 
"Go the f*ck to sleep," a powerful need to shorn our increasing 
need to be sadistic towards our children of guilt, we may be seeing 
a turn already away from liberal permissiveness. Those men 
currently bathing in being on a hopeless military charge, may end 
up retooling upwards. 

Permalink

Original Article: “The Equalizer”: Denzel Washington 

redeems American manhood
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2014 3:07 PM

 But that’s where the moral and psychological truth of “The 
Equalizer” lies: not in the infantile fantasy payback that will 
restore America’s global dominance and reassert the imaginary 
urban order of 40 or 50 or 60 years ago, but in a man sitting alone
with an old book, as a haunting old song plays from somewhere 
and the world around him fades into night, into nothing.

That's presuming we don't get more than just Cold War redux. 

Original Article: Feminism’s ugly internal clash: Why its 

future is not up to white women
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2014 11:45 PM

Oliva Does It danaseilhan

I don't know of a single feminist group or site that doesn't seek to 
be inclusive. 
I agree, but that doesn't mean that they aren't. My guess is that it 
owes to part of their psyches not being able to shut out the fact that
women of colour tend to be more conservative than they are ­­ 
Brittney Cooper's discussion of childrearing "styles" brought this 
out in full bloom last week. 
Their conscious selves may be blithely insisting that they are no 
more progressive than other "sisters," but their unconscious 
awareness of it as fact is why there is fight to institutionalize their 
own voice and ultimately arbitrate what feminism is to be about ­­ 
i.e. whitesplain. 
Permalink

Original Article: Feminism’s ugly internal clash: Why its 

future is not up to white women
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2014 6:25 PM

Is it between different viewpoints, or between those who've 
benefited from more helping, less punitive upbringings and those 
who haven't? Different psychoclasses, that is. 
Brittney is coming to see spanking as perhaps not the best way to 
raise a child, but still can't see parents who've long ago realized 
this as not guilty of likely "spoiling" their children (presumably 
she'd have all of them attend her lectures as well). She's probably 

somewhere just above the American median. 
Progressivism is about the most emotionally evolved taking the 
lead in a society. These are always those who as kids never 
understood themselves as "bad" but as full of promise. They don't 
need to be "disciplined,""socialized," in order to be good, just 
given unconditional love. 
The ones a step or more below will tend to want to take control of 
progressive moments to staunch growth as much as encourage it. 
To them, too much societal advancement comes to seem indulgent,
people taking good ideas always "too far," requiring the more 
sober to take over. 
A lot of those feminists taking flight from the internet sense this, 
and are hoping their new exclusive abodes can manage to direct 
progressivism. On the net, they're swarmed, and can't operate.
Permalink

Original Article: Obama, the slide back to Iraq and the 

power of the “Deep State”
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014 9:21 PM

al loomis Patrick McEvoy­Halston I think we mostly project 
charisma onto leaders, so I'm not "great man." Usually we put in 
people who don't so much lead but execute our own (often sordid) 
wishes. Puppets of the people, not the system ­­ which too is in fact
an artifact of our collective need, as hard as that is to believe. 

This said, if we see the presidency as an avenue to put forth a 

personality we all have abundant contact with, it'd be great if it was
someone like Nader. Kind of like as if someone had set up a shop 
on your block that resonated of human decency and kindness. Even
if you didn't shop there, it being near, something you pass by all 
the time, would encourage and buoy you. 
Permalink

Original Article: Obama, the slide back to Iraq and the 

power of the “Deep State”
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014 9:13 PM

YankeeProwler However, the interesting epilogue to the Obama 
presidency is that it is winding down in a time when America is 
once again becoming needed. In Poland and the Baltic states, 
jittery leaders are once again calling for American assistance as 
they face a threat from the east. In the Middle East, leaders from 
Tehran to Riyadh are urging America to fight a scourge that 
threatens to engulf them all. In West Africa, leaders are calling for
American assistance to help contain a different type of virus.

This has pretty powerful narrative appeal (genuinely, thanks for it) 
­­ a bit Tennyson. I wonder if the rest of the world finds the idea of
the old, gruff, long passed­over "gunfighter," possessed anew with 
relevancy, as appealing as we (sorry, but unfortunately) do. 

I hope they realize that that scourge about to engulf them all, is 
mostly just projected "fantasy" ... it satisfies our fantasy (our 
psychological) needs of the moment, and we have to be aware of 

this, and resist it. 
Permalink

Original Article: Obama, the slide back to Iraq and the 

power of the “Deep State”
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014 7:35 PM

Just a note, however much I wish Obama and his family well, 
Nader was always a vastly better man ­­ had been better loved; is 
more good.

It would be lovely if this time around we hear from an even larger 
continent insisting on putting one of our truly best as a figurehead 
for who we are as a people. I'd love to be truly inspired, rather than
trying to take pleasure in the felt hope and realized expectations of 
a nation. 
Permalink

Original Article: Obama, the slide back to Iraq and the 

power of the “Deep State”
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014 7:24 PM

 He began the process of moving the country away from our 
profoundly unfair and overpriced catch­as­catch­can private 
health insurance system toward some kind of socialized medicine. 
(Yeah, I said it.)

You're right; this was no small thing. We as a populace staked 
something down here that we're not going to fall back from, or, 
that is, that we'll never quite ever be able to delete as a marker of 
where we'd come and where we'll return to. It felt a little bit like 
that tremor we experienced this year when we collectively realized 
that America was not going to be stuck with football as something 
we're all expected to pledge allegiance to ­­ something else, soccer 
(Europeanism), informed apathy/disgust, got elevated a bit. This 
happened too with drugs and marriage. 
It's a big deal when some external "sites" that serve to keep 
primitive psyches stable, and thus are kept for the longest time 
sacred, can be felt to no longer satisfy an evolving populace ­­ the 
median. Obama was the guy we wanted kept around to "govern" 
this. Agreeable, reassuring company, like Steve Jobs.

Permalink

Original Article: There’s no rationalization for corporal 

punishment: Why Adrian Peterson’s apologists are wrong
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2014 3:22 PM

BrahBrah Kronosaurus Sweden made spanking illegal in 1979. We
could explore how they dealt with people who thought it just a 
parenting "style." 

http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/09/world/sweden­punishment­ban/

Permalink

Original Article: The racial parenting divide: What Adrian

Peterson reveals about black vs. white child­rearing
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2014 2:16 AM

susan sunflower If only we could get completely out of our heads 
that our mothers were right. 
Permalink

Original Article: The racial parenting divide: What Adrian

Peterson reveals about black vs. white child­rearing
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2014 2:09 AM

marymargaret1

Why is it ok to hit a child when doing the same to an adult will 
land you in jail?
Because too many of us unconsciously think especially vulnerable 
people deserve punishment, simply for being vulnerable ­­ they're 
actually guilty of something. This comes from how our brains react
to sadistic treatment from our parents as children. We need 
foremost to make our parents right for inflicting the abuse, so to 
keep them as we have to have them ­­ loving and supportive. And 
so we make whatever it was we did to warrant the abuse 
contestable, bad, evil. Since the foremost thing that comes to our 
mind is just our sheer vulnerability ­­ because that's how we mostly
felt ­­ our brains decide this is a crime. 

When we hear of children being hit, we remember our own former 
"guilty" selves, and agree (with our internalized parental alters, 
whom we are temporarily wholly fused with) that they are being 
unconscionably bad. 
At the societal level, the reason you can see in some parts so much 
hate for society's desperate, now calling for the like of sterilization,
owes entirely to this as well. 
Permalink

Original Article: The racial parenting divide: What Adrian

Peterson reveals about black vs. white child­rearing
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2014 9:44 PM

@Arminta Ross Black parents forcing their children to 
"demonstrate" in public that they are "good, well behaved, 
mannered." The goal was to prove to onlookers, specifically whites
that they were not harmful.

What is kept alive here is the idea that our mommies and daddies 
abused us ... because they had to! It was for our own good! ­­ 
historical circumstances necessitated it, unfortunately. 
What isn't being considered is that what we're dealing with here 
aren't loving parents miraculously capable of doing awful things to
their children when necessary, but abused parents casually visiting 
the same harms inflicted on themselves (by their parents) upon 
their own children. 
And doing so, because they were never given enough love not to 

mostly need their children to provide the love they never received, 
rather than love them, nor not to be furious at them when they 
focused on themselves (i.e., were "selfish," or "bad"). 
My parents are German and Irish. The collective lack of love of 
Germans meant that during the 30s and 40s they were going to 
need some group to project all of their own "badness" onto (as it 
turns out, those who had the best childrearing  ­­ the "spoiled" 
Jews), so they could finally feel worthy of love by their punitive 
parental alters (their parents' voice in their heads). 
The poorly loved (American) South needed to find some group ­­ 
i.e. slaves ­­ for the same psychological purpose. The Northerns 
were products of more loving childhoods, so not only no slavery 
but they got rid of it elsewhere. 
We're divided not mostly by race but by the emotional health of 
our parents, of the nature of the quality of the mother/daughter 
dyad across centuries. There are no guilty parties and we're all 
working to end this thing. 
Permalink

Original Article: The racial parenting divide: What Adrian

Peterson reveals about black vs. white child­rearing
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2014 7:32 PM

No parent lovingly spanks their child. They're always fused with 
internal persecutors in their own minds that see the child as bad 
regardless of what the child was doing. 
In fact, since many parents are so insufficiently loved they often 
need their children more than they love them, the "bad" thing they 

most often end up getting beaten/abandoned for is simply focusing 
on themselves, some kind of growth, being happy. The parent 
recognizes the child's desire to attend to his/her own needs rather 
than the parents ­­ it is their own ­­ and becomes in an instant their
own parents, fuses with them, and attacks the child without guilt.
When children are abused by parents/caretakers, survival depends 
on understanding themselves as to blame. They decide they 
deserved it; they must have been bad; and thereby keep the parent 
as the kind of person they need for them to be: a loving protector. 
So powerful is this lesson learned ­­ that growth and "selfish" self­
attendance is a bad thing, and, as well, weakness, neediness and 
vulnerability ­­ they install their parent's "voice" into their own 
heads (right hemisphere), and switch into it when they recognize 
people "guilty" for behaving as they did as a child.

You get into this enough, the repercussions of insufficiently loved 
parents and their children, of collective fusing with the 
perpetrator's voice and projecting one's "bad" self onto others, and 
you start finally get at the source of why war, of why Depressions 
(mass elimination of wealth means less spoiling, less badness, less 
likelihood of worse punishment). 
Maybe check it out at psychohistory.com. 
Permalink

Original Article: The racial parenting divide: What Adrian

Peterson reveals about black vs. white child­rearing
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2014 7:06 PM

ramparts The other part of being beaten daily is that the child 
intuits that the parent is right and that needy children are bad. 
Germans in the 30s and 40s fused with their internal persecutors ­­ 
their parents' point of view, the terrifying stern looks Cooper talks 
about, you could say ­­ and saw Jews as spoiled children that 
needed punishment. The punishment inflicted upon them in the 
camps were the same ones they themselves suffered as children. 

http://www.psychohistory.com/originsofwar/06_childhoodOrigins.
html
Permalink

Original Article: How I switched sides in the technology 

wars
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2014 2:56 AM

 You don’t always agree with me, and some of you have on 
occasion said mean things to me.

You remember the mean things, but not a word about the 
provocative. Did the website fail as a salon, or is this just your 
predilection, to sit there counting your friends and soothing your 
wounds?
Original Article: Football, violence and America’s cultural

divide
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2014 3:44 AM

sharksbreath Sports isn't for everybody and I'm sure you learned 
that real early in gym class. 

Yes, it's for those who need defensive testing and disproof of fears, 
which temporarily wards of feelings of insecurity and helplessness. 
Permalink

Original Article: Football, violence and America’s cultural

divide
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2014 2:53 AM

sortiz1965 O'hehir talked of those enlightened, nuanced, intelligent
progressives this way: and it really doesn’t help matters for 
horrified liberals to deliver sanctimonious lectures about how 
dreadful it is. NFL fans, on the other hand, are described (I think) 
humorously, in a way they'd laugh at too: Doritos and terrible 
fashion choices. Plus, pretty strong effort to show football players 
as about the American average.

Are you absolutely sure about where the derision is targeted, those 
turning their noses, or those suffering (enduring?) brain damage or 
just being what society has distilled/produced?
Permalink

Original Article: The “death of adulthood” is really just 

capitalism at work
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2014 2:50 AM

The current economy is not just about people staring at a screen 
but people interacting ­­ what waiters, baristas, sales associates do.
It's less male­autistic (man make automobile), which when we 
value the potential of what goes on in these interactions and value 
them accordingly with high wage and public esteem, will show 
progress over the last 40 years rather than just humiliating 
leftovers. A nation committed to (conversational) therapy, to 
registering and seeing people, adding a little bit more self­esteem 
to the average person so that they repeat less upon their children 
the damage inflicted upon them. Some stranger did do a little bit to
make your day, got your smile, and, in aggregate, made an impact. 

It's not just a pipe dream; it's happening now through all the 
obvious overt corporate policies of manipulation ("welcome to ­­, 
how may I help you?"); and we have to allow ourselves to see and 
value it.  
Permalink

Original Article: The “death of adulthood” is really just 

capitalism at work
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2014 2:22 AM

 Indeed, an individual citizen’s most important economic role, in 
the post­industrial West, is that of a consumer, inhaling goods, 
products, services and entertainment, as much of that as possible 
delivered electronically or shipped to your door.

I think their most important role is to make good play with the 
creative product. I think how it helps economically is that they 
haven't switched into a mindset that has them thinking of sparse 
goods and smaller selves with "God" now looking at them more 
fondly. 

They're keeping up, which is good, because this not only means the
latest Apple but taking on institutions like football and protected 
nerd­turf stuff like sexist video games, where a great gab of 
Americans are seeing things previously mostly off­the­table 
being re­thought as much as marriage and drug use have been. 
With the latest intrusions on football and (especially) video 
games/nerd culture, though, you could feel some former Obama 
supporters wonder if their favourite resting spots are now due to be
as destabilized as Tea Partiers found all of theirs. 

Roth (and Updike) is to be preferred over Rowling, because the 
emotionally more healthy subsequent generations haven't yet been 
allowed their post­war, post great­sacrifice, heyday (i.e., Roth and 
Updike are the best; and we should go back there for 
the exhilarating thrill of people braced against any challenge) . 
After we weather through a period of old left, of Depression, of 
sanctified self­sacrifical selves, of war, those who remain intact 
will take their inherently more egalitarian selves and produce even 
greater things ­­ 20 years on, maybe?

After great, hugely wasteful sacrifices, of innocent people being 
decimated and learning to make due with what they have (great fun

with old shoestrings, people!), people know allowance is throned, 
that societal regressives are backed off (rather than enfranchised), 
and always take advantage of it.  Rowling will pass, but those who 
love her will end up doing much better things than what they're 
limited to right now. Even if this just means having children, who 
write, and diss, and indulge. 
Permalink

Original Article: Calm down, America: We’re as safe as 

we were a year ago
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 2:39 AM

Take Arms Why is the only possible answer that America is being 
lead into war? Why can't it be that America as a whole has become
paranoid, and that our explorations should explore the sorts of 
things involved when individuals become paranoid they're about to
be attacked, in their private issues, those completely outside media 
interest? 

When individuals become paranoid they're being stalked, we don't 
immediately think the only possible reason is that the media must 
have been full of talk of predators. We might consider their 
families lives, concerns from their pasts, haunts they've never quite
been able to let go. Isn't this possible too with people in aggregate, 
in nations? 
Permalink

Original Article: Civility is for suckers: Campus hypocrisy

and the “polite behavior” lie
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 12:13 AM

Please try and show some civility in the comment sections, people.
Squash your inner troll and show some signs you might eventually 
count as part of polite society. 
Permalink

Original Article: Calm down, America: We’re as safe as 

we were a year ago
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 7:45 PM

I don't think they would seem so much of a threat unless we've 
projected our own childhood terrors onto them. This would mean 
we're for some reason being recalled to childhood feelings of 
exposure and vulnerability right now. 

If so, this would mean seeing ourselves stand up to these 
perpetrators would amount to about what it would amount to a 
previously bullied child finally doing it to his tormenters: 
absolutely everything.  
Permalink

Original Article: “I want a straight white male gaming 

convention”: Inside the culture war raging in the video 
gaming world
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2014 2:07 PM

 witness how Ubisoft gave an entire audience of journalists free 
tablets as they prepared to review its (in my opinion) fairly 
average game “Watch Dogs.”

Why the parenthesized "in my opinion"? It's obvious it's your 
opinion. God surely didn't toy with it and declare it barely worth 
his time. 
Permalink

Original Article: From 9/11 to the ISIS videos: The 

darkness we conjured up
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2014 4:21 PM

susan sunflower I don't think it's myth, or passed on cultural 
traditions, that does it; more inadequate childrearing. Children 
who've learned that, when they desist in their own interests and 
commit to those of their caretaker's, they finally get approval and 
love otherwise denied, will be prone to volunteer to sacrifice 
themselves ­­ their selfish, individuated adult lives ­­ in war. 

In death, so selfless, and ­­ as infantry ­­ so infantile, they feel 
they'll be forever appreciated and loved, wrapped forever in their 
mother's love. 

Many of those boys who refused to answer their nation's call 
would have done the rejecting themselves. That is, we internalize 
our parent's disapproving, angry voice, and when we're raging 

against other's sins, we're fused completely to it. Which is why we 
call those we're fighting and killing names we were ourselves 
called in our own childhoods. 
Permalink

Original Article: From 9/11 to the ISIS videos: The 

darkness we conjured up
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2014 2:42 PM

Trust Here's a view of why terrorism, based not on EVIL but on 
horrifying, love­starved childhoods: 

http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/eln03_terrorism.html. 
Permalink

Original Article: From 9/11 to the ISIS videos: The 

darkness we conjured up
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2014 2:32 PM

susan sunflower

His motivation wasn’t a matter of “Muslim rage” or “hatred for 
the West.” He felt himself to be moved by “compassion.” Like 
many Americans whose feelings of patriotism compel them to join 
the military, Knight yearned to “fight oppression and protect the 
safety and dignity of others.”

This could just be a yearning to stand as a knight protecting a 
culture. It's a way to be a "good boy," a mother country's favourite,
rather than someone who as a 17 year old is on the verge of 
abandoning his childhood origins, abandoning his mother, for full 
individuation into adulthood. Regressive fusion with a maternal 
entity as the first step, that is. Later the rage against a West 
imagined as sinful and spoiled, as polluted and "bad" ­­ his own 
former self. 

He didn't do this. But he still became traditional, humbling himself 
into a life of Islamic studies, clearly in his view seen as at­root 
pure (steadying elders, Muhammad's wise words), and vomited all 
over repugnant American values as well as his former corrupt self.
Permalink

Original Article: From 9/11 to the ISIS videos: The 

darkness we conjured up
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2014 12:11 AM

Of all things, “Last Days in Vietnam” is a tale of heroism, 
courage and selflessness; a tale about how many American 
servicemen, intelligence officers and diplomats risked their 
careers and in some cases their lives to rescue as many 
Vietnamese civilians as possible.

So war is (an avenue for) heroism, courage and selflessness. 

The weak spot where the ISIS videos worm their way in is not 
some deep­seated, grandiose desire to see our civilization 
destroyed, since we don’t really need to wish for that one 
anymore. It’s our persistent boredom, our permanent consumer 
narcosis, our yearning to be entertained at any cost by cute things 
and funny things and horrifying things that may or may not be 
real. 

So everyday is boredom, permanent consumer narcosis, and 
ridiculousness. 

How sure are you that someone reading these two articles of yours 
wouldn't be a bit more persuaded to begin a major conflict than 
remain part of the status quo? Maybe war has to remain an easy 
way to make yourself feel pure ­­ something where selfishness 
mostly abounds. And people keeping themselves enjoyably 
occupied while no major wars are being fought, kept a bit more 
virtuous. 

War is about killing people who contain parts of ourselves we seek
to disown ­­ our own "badness" ­­ so the fact that they seem so 
"us" may be a plus for our fantasy needs.
Permalink

Original Article: “Last Days in Vietnam”: Is the 

humiliation of 1975 about to be repeated?
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2014 1:32 AM

The war got rid of a lot of American wealth, which if we'd of kept 
would've made us feel extremely guilty. We waste so much wealth 
with the military because we're a nation that feels worthy of 
punishment when we accrue good things. The explanation for 
every nation in the world now going austerity, which kills wealth 
production, lies in this ill­reason as well. We still our growth, and 
demons won't devour us. 
Permalink

Original Article: It’s time to destroy the trolls: Orange­

fanged morons are choking the Internet
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2014 12:44 AM

CarolCrown Salon used to advertise its comment section by telling 
people to take chances, to not hold back!, rather than to remember 
to play nice. It wanted something with real life ­­ jazz, chaos, 
brilliance ­­ and it got it. That's the community I want back.
Permalink

Original Article: It’s time to destroy the trolls: Orange­

fanged morons are choking the Internet
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 4:53 PM

CarolCrown I don't trust that those calling for civility and decency 
are really thinking of the brilliant conversations we could be 
having; I think they've become those who hate comment sections 

because they're an avenue where nobodies might make a 
difference: full of people (like their once selves) of guilty 
pretension. 

If they can get everyone to look at comments as censors rather than
as learners, you've got them aping perturbed adults rather than 
open children. It's in favour of a conservative culture; one that 
would rather have people dressing primly than the monstrosity of 
letting it all hang out. 
Permalink

Original Article: It’s time to destroy the trolls: Orange­

fanged morons are choking the Internet
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014 11:38 PM

Pamela Troy Patrick McEvoy­Halston Sorry, it takes too much out 
of me. I was trying to be clear. 
Permalink

Original Article: It’s time to destroy the trolls: Orange­

fanged morons are choking the Internet
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014 11:32 PM

Pamela Troy I increasingly suspect that the liberal intellectual class
is feeling prone in their regression to make swaths of the country 
obviously worth a pass­by. As possessed only of virtue when 
maybe joining together to fight a corporation, or maybe just in 
their plain largely­unrecognized suffering, but not where 

something intellectual and smart could arise in plenty. 

The history of the net proved there are obvious major centers, but 
that genius really is everywhere. The hippies were right: write your
blog; we're listening and really considering that you might be one. 
To hold onto this truth, means believing, really believing, in 
growth, which just feels too sinful and against the current right 
now, so we/they collude in isolating only certain controlled spots 
as worth attending to. Ivy Leagues, writers proper. 

When people are being communicated to that they don't want to be
heard from but seen as playing a role, we may still hear plenty 
from the damaged, but less and less from the savvy intelligent.  
Permalink

Original Article: It’s time to destroy the trolls: Orange­

fanged morons are choking the Internet
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014 11:04 PM

People used to see criminals simply as bad, just as they could see 
other races the same way. They needed categories of people they 
could split unwanted aspects of themselves into ­­ their felt 
intrinsic badness ­­ which they could now subject to name­calling 
and abuse, out of their own childhoods. Better raised/more loved 
people, with much less of a need to inject parts of themselves into 
others, began to see criminals for who they actually are, as just 
very abused people: the last people, in fact, to deserve further 
incarceration and torture. They saw constituents of other races 

simply as individuals, with no way of assuming anything about 
them until one became familiar with them. 

So perhaps liberals will take care that when they're insisting on 
killing "trolls," participating in changing our paradigms so we no 
longer so much see democratic comment sections but wretched 
abodes to stay clear of, that they're not regressing and creating 
poison containers again. Done completely without guilt, because 
there are of course a lot of very disturbed people on the net. 

What they might do is, yes, actively help stop people from being 
threatened and hurt; ban perpetrators; but also maintain a 
celebration for individuals who in comment sections say such 
interesting things. Not the faux celebration stuff, where administers
single out comments which suggest their ideal is someone of 
middling intelligence but who might still be capable of learning 
something. But rather the stuff Salon has seen a lot of in its history:
the remarkable.
Permalink

Original Article: It’s time to destroy the trolls: Orange­

fanged morons are choking the Internet
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014 10:31 PM

Crotus Haereticus Are we really content for magazines to maintain 
comment sections they really could give a piss about? "Comment 
if you must, but be concise and limit it to one." Back to Victorian, 
from more modern assessments of the one's relationship to the 

parent.  
Permalink

Original Article: “Jennifer Lawrence’s body became the 

body of all women”: How I felt when I looked at those 
hacked celebrity nudes
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014 6:53 PM

I'm suggesting this because we now know that when people 
administered repeated shocks in the Milgrim experiments they 
weren't obeying authority but rather taking advantage of an 
authoritative situation ­­ the power of the university ­­ to switch 
into perpetrator alters that saw vulnerable people as deserving 
punishment. (Here, the authoritative situation which absolves us 
mostly of guilt is that this has become the phenomena we're all 
expected in some way to have engaged with ­­ tackling the 
internet, nudity, and privacy ­­ to show we're keeping up and 
actually give a damn about our world. To have looked means not 
only not being ignorant but being capable of a more engagement­
worthy, bravely self­incriminating and hard­won opinion, as TCF 
hopes I think to have demonstrated.)

When children are abused they don't blame the perpetrators but 
rather themselves ­­ it's a life­saving tendency, because they need 
to see caretakers as provisioning and good. This means that even 
children who've been raped will start talking in voices that show 
they believe they deserved it. They'll take dolls, which clearly they 
see as representing themselves, and start stabbing at them and 
shouting them, calling them dirty and bad. And by no means do 
they inevitably grow out of it ­­ in fact, those alters are probably 

set up for life. 

We're dumping ice buckets on our heads, probably staging our 
once being left out in the cold (we get the thrill, in restaging 
previous terrors, of knowing some control). Our childhood traumas
are popping back into our awareness, and personally I think most 
of us have set up these self­protective perpetrator alters and are 
finding ourselves prone to fuse with them.  
Permalink

Original Article: “Jennifer Lawrence’s body became the 

body of all women”: How I felt when I looked at those 
hacked celebrity nudes
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014 6:11 PM

It is nice to know you could look at the pictures, recognize your 
younger self in them, and feel concern. 

A lot of people might be drawn to look at these photos, however, 
because the voice speaking predominately in their heads is that of a
perpetrator, the one which tells us we are bad, that we deserve to 
suffer, rather than one which ostensibly lead you that speaks 
curiosity. They'd not so much recognize their younger selves in the
proud bodies, now exposed, but project onto them, actually 
enjoying partaking in the humiliation of their proud, 
hopeful, perennially vulnerable younger selves. 
Permalink

Original Article: “They are intellectually underpowered 

and full of themselves, because they’ve been told their 
whole life how wonderful they are”
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2014 10:29 PM

In his book, Deresiewicz said we as parents are intimidating our 
children from individuating (from us) too much. He talked 
psychoanalysis, "You­shall­not­be ­aware!" Alice Miller, and 
Tiger Moms. And the result is a society where we've agreed not to 
(emotionally) abandon our kids, and where they've been terrified 
out of ever growing up. 
How did we as parents become so awful? The explanation comes 
from the fact that we mostly individuated from our parents; we 
grew up in eras that had such allowance (all that delayed 
infanticide during the Depression and World War 2 bought 
decades of subsequent trespasses); but, like the 1920s crowds, we 
knew there eventually was going to be a price paid ... and are 
visiting the price on our own kids, while we fuse with the 
regressive voice. 

At some level we feel good that we've created a society where if 
you're a brilliant middle classer who doesn't get into the ivy 
leagues, everything you might do will be faded out of vision 
because your role is simply to count as one of the lost (that's where
you'll get your approval), and we'll insist on it in our attentions at 
least. And if you get into the ivy leagues, there's got to be a limit to
how much new you'll produce, simply because you'd of had to 
have been the kind of person who obliges a whole lot. Counter 
measures (against kindled mass individuation and growth), 

everywhere.  
Deresiewicz might get some to drip down a tier, but that'll just 
mean dropping them amongst others who actually take satisfaction 
from dramatizing themselves as thwarted ­­ because that is the role
we want them to play: warm approval given ­­ which would be 
hell. It'll mean being amongst those content to ape their "betters," 
who'll implicitly recognize/affirm their superiority, because this 
too suggests those who've capitulated to smaller dreams than the 
"spoiled" middle class post­war Americans did. 
And if they figure out the cure for cancer, annoy us by being the 
ones to do so, something about who they are will have to be 
attenuated so we can, quick as spit, go back to staring at the ivy 
leaguers, who glow as if imbibed with what we'd previously 
displaced everywhere. 
Permalink

Original Article: Furious trolls are everywhere: Even 

Internet moms are angry — and they hate you
MONDAY, AUGUST 25, 2014 1:54 AM

nerdnam Constantly calling comment sections abodes for trolls is a
way for those who are thriving to begin to not even be able to see 
talent outside their friend groups. The category, the increasingly 
fetid category, would begin to colour all contents, and it becomes a
place where the human voice can no longer intrude on ritual need. 
Permalink

Original Article: Why can’t the media talk about the Ivy 

League without freaking out?
SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 2014 4:36 PM

Looking above, I guess that should be "Ivy's," not "Ivies." Oh well,
live and learn. 

My response was psychoanalytic, but still apropos ­­ the book does
go there. He talks not just Alice Miller but a good stretch of "Tiger 
Moms" ... of parents who terrify their children into quiescence, 
who cannot possibly be disobeyed by the child. 

I'm suggesting that we as a society keep these moms in our heads, 
and realize that there is nothing that draws their ire more than we 
assume to individuate from their expectations and needs. When 
we've done so anyway, seeing ourselves in the upcoming 
generation of youth, we fuse with our angry maternal alters and 
make sure their aspiring selves pay. 

It's the only way we can demonstrate fealty, and allow ourselves to
get off. 
Permalink

Original Article: Why can’t the media talk about the Ivy 

League without freaking out?
SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 2014 3:57 PM

You didn't do Ivy, but the question is, if you were born a 

generation later, would you have? My guess is that you would, and
we've a much more streamed, eager­to­please Laura Miller to find 
there, but still Laura Miller. 
It may be that while those who get into the Ivyies are being told to 
be exultant ­­ or else ­­ that those who get into the "State" ones are 
being "told" they're dumb, unexceptional, second class. The 
primary purpose of our age may be to still the capacity of our 
youth to individuate ­­ a purpose, built out of an unconscious need 
to sacrifice youthful potential in order to placate abandoned 
parents in our heads ("alters"), who are furious at all the growth we
assumed for ourselves. 
Deresiewicz may be participating in this by doing all he can to 
shepherd talented youth into abodes where it's going to be tough to
shake off the feeling they've got no special shine, really. That 
nobody's attending to what they do, and that nobody ought to be 
attending.
He, after all, talks in his book about the terrifying power, the 
terror of, parents, and admits it’s been tough for him to get past 
himself. He assumes he's doing so by calling for youth to start 
distancing themselves from their parents by risking becoming truly
disagreeable to them, and leading society into directions that are 
novel but which we all may not be comfortable with. But he could 
be abating their fury by shoveling that many more into places 
that'll occlude any societal feedback that what they are doing might
really be worth something. 
Maybe ten years from now, when this call, this need, for a lost 
generation has ended, the Laura Millers will once again be going 
back to "publics" ... but mind you, the Ivyies will by then have 
changed their ways as well. The time for the middle class nobody 
to not be allowed ­­ because this would demonstrate our world as 

one of genuine potential ­­ to be seen as having achieved anything 
notable, will have ended, and we'll be for merit and promise again.
Published comments
Original Article: I asked my husband to take away my 

credit card
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 12:33 AM

You're getting everything you want out of life ... and so regress to 
the teenager who hasn't learned to control her finances ­­ and who 
is a dwarf to her almighty mother, out of fear of the sense of 
abandonment that full individuation often brings. 

Giving your husband your credit card would correct an image of 
him which is no longer serviceable ... that of him as someone who 
"transcends any traditional notions of marital division of labor." 
Giving him the credit card would make him 50's mold; make him a
degradation of what you've accomplished. Sacrificing that, you're 
the good girl who never grew beyond her mother; and you feel 
taken care of again.  

Permalink

Original Article: Is Hillary Clinton the true heir of Ronald 

Reagan?
SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 2014 3:09 AM

If Reagan and his backers had made a bazillion dollars but their 
policies, inexplicably, ended up buoying up everybody else ... 
made everyone rich, they'd of been depressed as hell. It's not just 
greed, but that they know they're participating in shovelling people
into the maw. 

The number of Americans who like what he did ... is correspondent
with how many of them can't see any societal growth without 
feeling deeply anxious. (To them) People need to be 
created/refashioned to feel all the pain and vulnerability, even if it 
ends up being them. 

What's Hillary, this unstoppable force, this Godzilla, going to be 
like? I don't know; but I suspect a lot of us are going to be glad to 
be counting ourselves within her skirts, as She stomps across the 
rest of the globe, attacking "them," before they have a chance to 
attack us. 
Permalink

Original Article: The American Century is over: How our 

country went down in a blaze of shame
SUNDAY, JULY 13, 2014 12:44 AM

KPinPT hquain

Or are we just fooled by this? A lot of those same people enjoying 
themselves casually at the park or at the market vote in people who through 
war or economics literally kill the weak. 
Maybe through "society" we've just created a great homeostasis mechanism, 
that hides our craziness away from us in the everyday. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”: Can 

the ape­pocalypse save Hollywood’s dreadful summer?
SATURDAY, JULY 12, 2014 3:27 AM

BeansAndGreens Yes, the rock giants were better than people 
made them out to be. 
Permalink

Original Article: Why Lana Del Ray is the perfect artist 

for an America in decline
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014 4:35 PM

susan sunflower The author wrote an essay about the total death of 
life­affirming instincts, of Eves of the Apocalypse signalling that 
our death instinct is currently very strong ­­ that the end really 
might be near! ­­ while you still see safe­enough, apparent ennui 
(yawn) … not even up to goth.  

It was a "good essay," then, but still absurd? ­­ everyone's really 
just looking for brands/styles to emulate or avoid ­­ the next 
Kardashian, Bieber, Taylor Swift? The same ol same ol. 

Are you sure? 
Published comments
Original Article: Why Lana Del Rey is the perfect artist 

for an America in decline
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014 3:17 PM

So Lana Del Rey, "Maleficent," Kendall Jones … deities of 
sacrifice, warfare and destruction, calling out to be fed the blood of
innocents ­­ like the disassociated vision of three devil­women in 
Lars Von Trier's "Nymphomaniac." 

We're being visited. 
Permalink

Original Article: Why Lana Del Rey is the perfect artist 

for an America in decline
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014 2:50 PM

To compare this with the article, for DeMause it wouldn't be "the 
fearsome global dislocations … that are killing our life­affirming 
instincts" which is the problem, but that we're turning off our 
ability to enjoy "late capitalism" because we sense disapproving 
parental voices telling us we shouldn't be having fun, individuating
­­ "actively meet[ing] the future," as you say it. 

And for him this death instinct would be a desire for a purge, a 
sacrifice of everything in us which is "bad," which would make us 
feel pure again. 

And this regressive return to "amniotic fluid," the womb, the 
"primal source," is what we do when we're fleeing a sense of being
abandoned owing to society's ongoing "guilty" (parent­neglecting) 
growth ­­ we begin to fuse back to Mother, be part of the maternal 
body. 

About this ­­ The death drive is perennial, but when a society 
seems to hover on the even of destruction, these Eves of the 
Apocalypse … emerge to speak our well­founded anxieties ­­ I'm 
not sure, but this bit by DeMause sure looks worth taking a look at 
as well: 

In the course of researching my book The Emotional Life of 
Nations, I discovered that just before and during wars the nation 
was regularly depicted as a Dangerous Woman. I collected 
thousands of magazine covers and political cartoons before wars to
see if there were any visual patterns that could predict the moods 
that led to war, and routinely found images of dangerous, 
bloodthirsty women. Even the most popular movies before wars 
featured dangerous women, from The Wizard of Oz with its killing 
witches before WWII to All About Eve before the Korean 
War, Cleopatra before Vietnam, Fatal Attraction and Thelma and 
Louise before the Persian Gulf War and Laura Croft and Kill 
Bill at the start of the Iraqi War. War itself when personified was 
always shown as a Killer Woman, tempting young men with her 
attractiveness. (Lloyd DeMause, "The Killer Motherland")
Permalink

Original Article: Why Lana Del Rey is the perfect artist 

for an America in decline
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014 2:11 PM

As early as the Freedom Phase, people began voicing their feeling 
that “materialism” (economic progress) should be opposed. A. J. P.
Taylor notes “years before the war…men’s minds had become 
unconsciously weary of peace and security…they welcomed war 
as a relief from materialism.” Before WWI, “there was a feeling of 
approaching apocalypse…The world as it is now wants to die, 
wants to perish, and it will.” Only a sacrificial slaughter could cure
Europe of the freedoms offered by cities: “infinite opportunities, 
but also rootlessness and loss of social ties…factory man is 
neurasthenic, bored, unable to endow any experience with value.”

Being “bored” by change and challenges meant having your real­
self feelings cut off by your dissociated punitive parent alter, 
whose authoritarian “culture” was opposed to innovation: “City 
life and Gesellschaft doom the common people to decay and 
death…the doom of culture itself,” i.e., individualism spells the 
doom of your parents’ authoritarian culture. 

Lloyd DeMause, "War as Righteous Rape and Purification"
Permalink

Original Article: Liberty, equality and Lincoln’s legacy: Is

America doomed?
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 7:04 PM

stevieboy  Let the red states go in peace.  Let them create their 
theocracy, let them exclude immigrants, let them reinstate Jim 
Crow laws if they like, let them make being gay a crime, let them 
do whatever they want but, above all, let them go.

We become here pure while the other side contains all the 
contaminates and sin … this is actually what happens just before a 
fight. We don't just let the other side become all bad (i.e. let them 
go), but war against them to eliminate badness from the world. The
Confederate States are vastly less evolved, but "the Northern" 
aren't themselves quite spared of projection and being requited of 
sin. 

Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 6:46 PM

@tasherbean Historians have insisted this is true about Hitler, that 
charismatic He charmed a nation into some place abominably evil. 
But History at least has had its Goldhagen, who insists Hitler just 
bubbled up out of what most Germans wanted to do, and though 
there's been backsliding, the discipline hasn't quite managed to spit
him out yet. 

And then there's us … still insisting the public couldn't possibly 
have wanted what it got ­­ that it harboured something within that 
was quite awful ­­ without anyone saying baloney . If any of us can
accept the possibility that Germans in mass could want to eliminate
a whole race, we should be up to imagining that post­1980 
America was what a lot of people unconsciously wanted. The pain,
the hopelessness, the insecurity … the awful all of it, preferable to 
more post­war years of endless promise, the sense of abandonment
arisen from that.  
Permalink

Original Article: Liberty, equality and Lincoln’s legacy: Is

America doomed?
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 6:28 PM

nywriter maritimus49 rd they whine like little babies and start 
secession movements

Just a note that this was how the British (and Benedict Arnold) 
viewed Americans in 1776/1781. The colonialists saw themselves 
as abused children who were no longer going to swallow the pap! 
­­ spitting up the noxious brew into the harbour ­­ while the Brits 
saw themselves as stern but fair parents who'd tolerated enough out
of these ungrateful, spoiled brats! 

The Right's composed of poorly parented, less loved children, 
who've evolved into a psychological mold that can tolerate little 
"sinful" societal growth. The Left by those who've known more 

love, and who can manage a lot. They can both however regress to 
birth trauma and war, as was what laid behind the war of 
independence. 
Permalink

Original Article: Liberty, equality and Lincoln’s legacy: Is

America doomed?
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 5:46 PM

@nywriter @Amity To be a commenter these days is not 
contributing to a conversation but being a likely troll. I think you 
could be fined for pretending this word didn't leach out from a sink
of sin.
Permalink

Original Article: Liberty, equality and Lincoln’s legacy: Is

America doomed?
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 5:25 PM

their, not they're. It happens. 
Permalink

Original Article: Liberty, equality and Lincoln’s legacy: Is

America doomed?
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 5:18 PM

I am saying that the public is getting sick of the anti­democratic 
game of Freeze Tag in Washington, in which Republicans and 

Democrats take turns being “in charge” and doing nothing, and 
that it isn’t sustainable into the indefinite future.

I think the best (the most emotionally healthy) of democrats would 
be delighted if this "freeze­tag" ended, but many of the rest would 
be secretly horrified. For them, our republic lurches on … and this 
is growth­stifled enough for them to feel comfortable putting a 
perch on it. If it leached democratic fulfillment, as if someone like 
Katrina vanden Heuvel were getting their way on every point and 
the republic was assembling into something remarkable and 
awesome faster than a Michael Bay' transformer, they'd feel 
shutdown by all the rapid societal change, and find themselves ­­ to
their horror ­­ taking swipes at what they know they should only be
rejoicing. 

If this latter group agrees that that the freeze has to end, it'll 
probably be sign than they can no longer handle just their enjoying 
their perch and are wishing for a societal cleansing through war ­­ 
a chance to be pure, golden warriors to a cause! A period of 
horrible compromises … is a period of people holding on before 
they're psyches compel them into war. One should still find some 
enjoyment in it, and hope it carries on whilst an accumulating 
number on the side see only something "post" and fetid that surely 
must die. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells

SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 4:37 PM

CarolCrown Patrick McEvoy­Halston Both parties, indeed all of 
our gov't, are killing the dreams of our children. The oligarchy are
making sure of that.

I just don't think we get at the root of the problem if however much
we agree that "we" elected in Reagan, that "we" knew/sensed what 
he'd be up and still wanted him in, we still tend to gravitate (away 
from us) towards some "other" as the focus of the problem … be it 
Reagan himself, or "oligarchy." 

If a lot of us (unconsciously) want a generation to suffer, to 
sacrifice itself, Reagan's a tool … but so too is an oligarchic 
societal structure, that keeps the bulk of the populace denied 
resources and suppressed in fear (try, society, to grow, with this 
weight on your tail.). People can be that perverse, actually want to 
wipe out prosperity? I think our military is obvious example of 
that, myself. So is history ­­ where once, we all remember, child 
sacrifice was the norm ­­ and to please the parental gods ­­ and it 
all just seems to have slowly amended from that rather than starkly
disappeared. 

I think I'm making an important point ­­ something the left needs 
to wrestle with to be most effective in the future. So I press. But 
absolutely, you're clearly a very good person, and I'm selfishly 
very glad you had children and grandchildren because they're part 
of the sanity (and sunshine) we deserve and need. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 4:04 PM

edwinhall For anyone paying attention, it was clear what would 
happen under Reagan. But most people don't pay attention.

What was it that made you so sure the problem was that they just 
weren't paying attention? Perhaps they saw that Reagan would kill 
so much prosperity, and were relieved by it. The problems so many
are afflicted with today, are perhaps to some ­­ perhaps to many ­­ 
a sign that were not living in a spoiled age … a good thing, that is; 
an accomplishment. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 3:50 PM

CarolCrown Patrick McEvoy­Halston You did … but then 
afterwards it was all Reagan. If you really thought the problem was
with us, then Reagan's senility is irrelevant compared to what was 
mentally averse in us. As is, it felt like a familiar sidestep … 
drawing us all to think more of Reagan than what is 
psychologically difficult to accept about the bulk of us. What we're
all comfortable with. 

Not you? Good to hear. But all the democrats who were okay with 
youth dream­killing austerity economics? … yes. Still good 
people, but still mentally afflicted enough to feel the thrill. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 3:43 PM

Paul Grajnert They're seen as great for putting aside the individual 
and focusing on the collective … but not as the 1960s were doing 
the same thing. 

They were inspired out of poverty, not societal affluence, and we 
hardly imagine them having any fun other than dancing to keep the
darkness away … which is something a conservative likes to hear. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 3:38 PM

KPinPT Patrick McEvoy­Halston Paul Grajnert KP, you got that I 
was articulating why we see a cruelly stifled generation ­­ the 
Great Gen ­­ as a great one? It's a symptom of something terrible in
us. Like we should all just forbear. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 3:30 PM

Paul Grajnert The Great Generation were "great" because they 
made do in incredibly difficult times … maybe too in their being 
the opposite of "spoiled," i.e., their being stunted … Actually, 
that's probably the bulk of it. 

The fact that we imagine them great, that is, may have a lot to do 
with why we're ensuring this next generation will have a chance to 
become "great" ­­ tasked youth; maybe even afterwards being 
lobbed into a world war ­­ in the same way as well.

Maybe we'll quickly evolve and gauge them simply as 
shortchanged, and do what we can to recover our current youngest 
generation, not only so they don't suffer but so that they don't 
equate suffering/self­denial/self­sacrifice with virtue. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 3:14 PM

Ehmbe Patrick McEvoy­Halston The article is about the damage 
done to youth, not to minorities. However racist they also were, the
American people were child­hating enough to elect him in. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 3:10 PM

CarolCrown If "we" showed those "spoiled" kids, is our own guilt 
for doing this the reason for your skipping immediately to talking 
about Reagan's senility and the damage the old coot caused? That 
is, why not that "we" were, not senile but sadistic, in electing him? 
Why not, the damage "we" caused is enormous?

If we actually wanted a generation to be sacrificed, the problem 
with articles like this one is it's just confirmation it worked. If we 
work at why a generation would want to do this ­­ the psychology 
of it ­­ then maybe we'll get somewhere. 

My belief is that most of us are still made extremely uneasy by 
societal growth and happiness. If a post­war generation is allowed 
to live it, to innovate way beyond what predecessors managed, 
they'll sacrifice the next one so that long­denied parental "gods" 
(denied, because we were obviously busy attending to ourselves) 
are finally given something to snack on. 

We're eliminating youthful promise out of the world, and it makes 
us feel less punishment­worthy, less worthy of being abandoned. 
The fact that youth today cling to familiarity and are scared to take 
risks, that they've been burdened with this … unconsciously gives 

us a thrill. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ronald Reagan stuck it to millennials: A 

college debt history lesson no one tells
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014 2:44 PM

marc22309 Given the article ­­ child­hating enough?
Permalink

Original Article: GOP’s culture war disaster: How this 

week highlighted a massive blind spot
THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 5:25 PM

Candace Mann But what does it mean for it to really be about 
religion … what is religion fundamentally to them, but subjugating
Terrifying Women, rewarding the masochistic, and punishing 
(what they see as) human sin ­­ autonomy, growth and pleasure? 
Permalink

Original Article: GOP’s culture war disaster: How this 

week highlighted a massive blind spot
THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 4:16 PM

1. Innovative Phase:

A new psychoclass comes of age after the previous war, a minority
of the cohort born two to three decades earlier and raised with 
more evolved childrearing modes. This new psychoclass 
introduces new inventions, new social and economic arrangements 
and new freedoms for women and minorities, producing an "Era of
Good Feelings," a "Gilded Age" that for a few years is tolerated 
even by the earlier psychoclasses. 

By the end of the Innovative Phase, however, the challenges 
produced by progress and individuation begin to make everything 
seem to be "getting out of control" as wishes surface into 
consciousness that threaten to revive early maternal rejection and 
punishment. In addition, as women, children and minorities get 
new freedoms, older psychoclasses find they cannot be used as 
much as they previously had been as poison containers who can be 
punished for one's sins. Purity Crusades begin, anti­modernity 
movements demanding that new sexual and other freedoms be 
ended to reduce the anxieties of the nation's growth panic and "turn
back the clock" to more controlled times and social arrangements. 

(Lloyd DeMause, "Emotional Life of Nations")
Permalink

Original Article: “Feminism is a sexual strategy”: Inside 

the angry online men’s rights group “Red Pill”
WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 9:13 PM

BeansAndGreens Guys who are made uneasy by constant change 

and growth are of a certain set … this psychological disposition 
comes from equating societal growth with (deserved) 
abandonment, which is how in their families their own 
individuation was greeted by their immature caregivers. Since in 
most families the mother is still most prominent, empowered, 
spurning women become the problem ­­ for them, the obvious 
target.

The "solution" usually ends up being war. Before WW1 men were 
concerned that new freedoms had made for bullying women (the 
New Woman) and effeminate men. Insatiable women, women as 
vampires … and they collectively agreed that war would make 
them all men again. 

If we don't go that route, we'll have to understand that just the 
sheer fact of furthering progressive growth, will drive loads of us 
crazy. The only "solution" is through means of war and/or 
depression, which completely kills the growth.  

So we have to hope that most of us were well enough loved by our 
caregivers that furthering rights for all is something we think 
makes us better rather than spoiled. Otherwise we know what to 
expect with every social advance we make … the time when we all
thought we deserved "a better road" lasted a good 30 years post­
war, but ended 1980. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Feminism is a sexual strategy”: Inside 

the angry online men’s rights group “Red Pill”
WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 7:59 PM

kellygreen ...and part of that difficulty stems from an unwillingness
of affluent women to share the power they've gained with women 
of lower social classes.

This is how even certain members of the left are presenting 
feminism right now … and in doing so they've pretty much joined 
the antifeminists because feminists are essentially being called 
Marie Antoinettes. 

We had a split sometime around 1980 where certain members of 
the population (the more evolved psychoclass … the better loved) 
were comfortable accruing more and more prosperity, more 
growth, and others felt spoiled and "bad" for everything they'd 
enjoyed up to them and needed for their own to be stifled. The 
working classes voted for Reagan and austerity 
economics ... knowing what they were going to get. 

Progressives may, in their emotional need to imagine people as 
intrinsically good but just mislead, not accept my argument, but 
these attacks on them (on feminists in particular) as spoiled white 
people who justify their privilege by making sure some from other 
cultures are included ­­ i.e. brown presidents ­­ are mounting, and 
they'll need some kind of counter. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Feminism is a sexual strategy”: Inside 

the angry online men’s rights group “Red Pill”
WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 2:39 AM

SilentBlogger7 Given that human nature is a constant

Why should we "give" you that? How about those who are able to 
keep up with the social advances a society is making are 
superior (more loved) human beings to those regressives who 
believe all this selfish growth has abandoned them "God's" (i.e. 
their immature parents') love, which can only be reclaimed by 
launching purity crusades to stifle the growth and (eventually) by 
sending the masses of effeminate men into wars? 

Periods where feminism is encouraged are always periods where a 
society is still being lead by its more progressive elements ­­ pre­
WW1 and the 1920s, for instance. They're not periods, that is, 
where one power has simply supplanted another. 

If feminism can seem hampered today, as having lost some of its 
strengths from the 60s and 70s, it's because there isn't any group 
out there today, any still exceptional "ism," that hasn't cut back in 
its license, so distanced we all are from a time where we really 
believed we could have and deserved everything. 
Permalink

Original Article: My soccer racism nightmare: How to 

keep the beauty in the beautiful game
TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 7:14 PM

pomata24 portlandliberal No, portlandliberal is right. 
Permalink

Original Article: In praise of the “beta male”
TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 6:51 PM

Paul the Apostate Well, it was a post­world war culture, which 
does amazing stuff because ­­ owing to previous huge sacrifice ­­ it
unconsciously feels it's totally allowed it now; just try and staunch 
it, regressive societal puritan!  

This took us to 1980, where collectively we no longer believed we 
unilaterally deserved it good. Progress would still be permitted, but
no longer without costs … thus our current cultural climate has 
actually been ­­ as most of us realize ­­ substantially evolving, but 
there are legitimate reasons to look back to 1950/60/70 and say 
to/ask ourselves, this isn't as good … what the hell went wrong?
Published comments
Original Article: In praise of the “beta male”
TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 6:27 PM

kellygreen Being "not woman" isn't some place boys get to by 
modelling, but by spitting out being used as love­replacements for 
absent husbands (John Updike's contention) … it just comes 
naturally. 

The same men who define themselves by being "not woman," 
however, will in a sense end up eagerly conjoining themselves to 
them. The most hyper­masculine of cultures are also the most rabid
in mother­defense … this is just as much a means of being the 
deferent boy by Her loyal side as cooking the latest NYT recipe for
your alpha­status "wife." 
Permalink

Original Article: In praise of the “beta male”
TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 3:29 PM

@MysteryPrincess @Patrick McEvoy­Halston For Chris Hedges 
it's the liberal class, for Thomas Frank it's the professional, for 
Noam Chomsky it's all those liberals who (he sees as) intentionally
set up the working class to seem prejudiced and therefore 
ignorable, but to a number of prominent members of the left what 
we've seen in this country over the last fortyish years is the rise of 
an affluent, empowered class, which has made cultural issues their 
own make­up glow while they more or less let corporations and 
austerity economics drive the rest of the country to rot. Who needs 
to listen to Kansas anymore?

And in this context, the more you look like someone an out­of­
work, quickly­going­crazy Fox Newser would ID as a loser, as 
surely wearing the panties … the more you're own victorious class 
will recognize you as something of an exemplary. One they might 
deign to know only so as to not interfere with their clear role as a 
perfect sentinel against the mad sexist mobs of America.  

We often joke, but are actually quite serious, that he would make a
much better housewife than me. I love him for these things. Not 
because it is “alpha” or “beta,” but because it transcends any 
traditional notions of marital division of labor.

This folks, is basking in (and being buoyed by?) one's (turnabout) 
evolutionary successfulness/exemplariness … Tracy could at least 
have recognized that what was amusing about the comments on 
evolutionary psychology was that it were members of the past­over
classes ­­ those who guessed wrong and are leaching into desperate
madness ­­ who were insisting on knowing a winner from a loser.  

I hope she and her husband have got something good that can last 
even when they're not the thing. If not, may they each still find 
tremendous happiness. 
Permalink

Original Article: In praise of the “beta male”
TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 4:56 AM

In our age, a lot of guys are participating in a sense of Alphaness in
being such a perfect Beta mate. They imagine themselves as 
actually above criticism, as actually sometimes being in the 
unheard of position of being able to (gently) chastise female 
feminists ­­ "you haven't read all of bell hooks! OMG!" ­­ while 
the rest of their sex is forbearing the suspicion of patriarchy. That 
they found such a niche, must mean they're a class above … that in

a competitive biological sense, they're Alpha compared to their 
caught­out "peers", who only look good to Fox News. 

If the left changes so that being the perfect feminist isn't as 
important as being most true to the working class, if knowing all of
bell hooks isn't as important as your ability to sit by an average 
working­classer and not wretch at their prejudices and preferences,
then, once their societal privilege is lost, we'll see if these 
ostensibly Beta males are as intrinsically comfortable in their roles 
as they know themselves to be right now.
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 2:22 PM

porsadgai Patrick McEvoy­Halston tasherbean I think we're hoping
that vanden Heuvel made him look down at his aged shrivelled 
pee­pee, and weep. 

It's implicit in our wanting him to see himself as "armchair" … 
though we know that he'd be doing more for his particular causes 
by propagandizing in his comfortable hoist in Washington, we not 
only suspect that the macho concept of not having the cojones to 
go over could work to publicly shame him, but we too still accept 
its validity. 

Not just right­wingers but left­wingers too have been chided for 
their comfortable living recently­­ see Thomas Frank's attack at 
this site on Paul Krugman. Preferring the soft and comfortable over
hanging out in the dregs ... is at least a start. 
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 4:52 AM

tasherbean Patrick McEvoy­Halston I agree, though I wish more 
progressives understood the battlefield as really not so much where
you test your mettle, or prove your courage/stuff, but as a place 
where you enthusiastically sacrifice yourself ­­ a place you're 
actually chasing down, as you would the hot new theatre release, 
or sundae shop in summer. 

Thanks to movies we have some sense of this before WW1 … so 
to show just how awful the after and during was. But it may be the 
norm ­­ not pissing in pants or stilling fears, but out on the plains 
and requited to your mother country's love, forevermore.  
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 4:21 AM

Anony2 Patrick McEvoy­Halston jrtguy That's all very macho, 

though … and we're cheering it on. 
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 4:13 AM

tasherbean Patrick McEvoy­Halston That's not what I said/meant. 
It's absurd/cruel to ask someone to go to war ("useless war" ­­ 
tautology?), but if "you" ­­ the asker ­­ doesn't go … at least some 
part of you is saneish. You recognize that there's no friggin' way 
you're going to let yourself die on some battlefield, rather than 
being under the delusion that the battlefield is a place to long for 
for promising valour and salvation … a nation's forever gratitude 
and a thousand honey virgins in the afterlife, and the like. 

You know, the way of perceiving of the battlefield that held during
the world wars, where everyone signed up … the powerful and 
elite as eagerly as everyone else.

If we're taunting for not being a man … we're supporting the 
battlefield as our collective answer. Progressives have done little to
present it as not actually where mettle is really most tested, don't 
you think? 
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 2:41 AM

@Techman @Patrick McEvoy­Halston We see it differently. The 
advocate for war who isn't willing to put their ass on the line, who 
to you is not a real man, is to me someone who is still seeing some 
things straight. The battlefield as some place you should avoid, 
rather than the battlefield as the easy way to show your purity and 
virtue ­­ maybe especially if you die there for your mother country.
The next lot of Republican leaders might be eager to do that … and
then what do we say? Well, you did walk the talk? 

Let's not dispel the still­sanish ones for the absolutely insane. 
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 2:14 AM

sigtunafish Patrick McEvoy­Halston jrtguy Yes, he'd be walking 
the talk ­­ being a real man. 
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 2:03 AM

jrtguy Patrick McEvoy­Halston If Kristol had surprised her and 
said ­­ okay! ­­ and went on over, he'd of proved, what? His 
manning up, n'est pas? 

We might be used to powerful people advocating for wars they and
their children will not be enlisting in, but this needn't be the way it 
could be in our near future … how many of them went over in 
world war one and two? And how many encouraged that their 
manhood was thereby proven, their loss of limb or life a great boon
to their countries, by posters featuring women impressed by their 
courage?

It's not good news for a prominent progressive woman to be caught
chastising a man's wimpyness for not heading on over. Anyone 
who stays away from battle has some sanity to them, even those 
who'd favour that you and I go.  
Permalink

Original Article: Nation editor destroys Bill Kristol: “You 

should enlist in the Iraqi army”
MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2014 1:36 AM

I don't think it helps for her to imply that manhood comes from 
putting yourself onto the battlefield … which is sort of what she 
does here. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Transformers”: Robot warriors of the 

Tea Party attack
SUNDAY, JUNE 29, 2014 3:22 AM

Being loyal to this movie may not so much be being loyal to those 
past­over for their regressiveness, but for their fidelity to the 
human … should have read, its fidelity, not their. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Transformers”: Robot warriors of the 

Tea Party attack
SUNDAY, JUNE 29, 2014 3:13 AM

I'm sure we all took Andrew's advice and saw the last Transformer 
movie, and this is just where  Michael Bay was inevitably going to 
be today … which is still worth watching (it personally took me 
two takes, not for overload but because ­­ I admit ­­ of being 
depressed). If the more persuasive movie is "Godzilla," it's because
Bay's still about the individual hubristically mastering the beast (a 
tyrannosaur, of course) rather than giving Great It full reign … and
this is just out of step with what adds "current" today. 

Being loyal to this movie may not so much be being loyal to those 
past­over for their regressiveness, but for their fidelity to the 
human ­­ to true humanism, that is … a strange ­­ perhaps­to­you­
impossible ­­ point made better, perhaps, when you consider that 
Bay still features charismatic actors you really enjoy spending time
with, while other action films enthuse with those we know 
compete timorously for every role; guaranteed nothing for being so
shallowly possessed of anything that'd add anything special to a 

role. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Begin Again”: A corny attempt to 

recapture the magic of “Once”
SUNDAY, JUNE 29, 2014 1:20 AM

GordonsGirl Patrick McEvoy­Halston Thanks!
Permalink

Original Article: “Begin Again”: A corny attempt to 

recapture the magic of “Once”
THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 2014 3:39 AM

onemilarepa Yeah, entrancing writing. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Begin Again”: A corny attempt to 

recapture the magic of “Once”
THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 2014 1:22 AM

 There may be no one on the 21st­century American screen with 
Ruffalo’s ability to invest careworn, burned­out characters with 
soulfulness, and he’s so interesting in every shot of “Begin Again”
it almost doesn’t matter that the character of Dan is pretty much a 
cliché.

His tweeter feed is mostly about avant­garde social causes, and can
actually be inspiring … maybe we also like him because we sense 
his butterfly. 
Published comments
Original Article: “It’s a disgrace”: Inside American 

schools’ horrific “scream rooms”
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 3:11 PM

@willie99 Yes, let's make their jobs harder by taking away their 
ability to restrain children when they get out of control.

There are a lot of us who can't help but think that all childen are 
out of control and need punishment and restraint. We're our 
societies' projectors (our own inner demons into them), 
its regressives … and be sure, we're the ones you've got to keep 
your eye on. 

That small room you're talking about probably existed at the same 
time as when spanking was sometimes okay for the principal or 
teacher to do (maybe also their fondling of kids'  privates … 
something Richard Dawkins admitted was common practice in the 
boarding schools he attended, and not especially frowned on, 
because people still insisted that it was no big deal, couldn't 
possibly harm) … hopefully if we stepped back into those schools 
it'd be like having wandered into some place we saw now as 
clearing possessing vestiges of the medieval. 
Permalink

Original Article: “The Internet’s Own Boy”: How the 

government destroyed Aaron Swartz
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 2:34 PM

David P. Graf If I'm not going to Harvard, how exactly do I get 
access to JSTOR … that repository of everything all our best 
minds are assembling out of their academic experience? If it's not 
accessible, if I can't read any of it ­­ that's quite the wall, don't you 
think? 

Do we really want to communicate that universities own 
knowledge? That we haven't evolved beyond thinking walled 
guilds are necessary for our collective psychology equilibrium?
Permalink

Original Article: “The Internet’s Own Boy”: How the 

government destroyed Aaron Swartz
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 12:26 AM

Young computer geniuses who embrace the logic of private 
property and corporate power, who launch start­ups and seek to 
join the 1 percent before they’re 25, are the heroes of our culture. 
Those who use technology to empower the public 
commons … however, are the enemies of progress and must be 
crushed.

We can only go so long where we believe we deserve to have it 
good … be treated as we should. The fact that good people like this
one went down spared us having to justify to ourselves why they, 

not those fortifying a deflating culture, can so vex us with their 
hubris. (The ones embracing private property and corporate power 
have shorn themselves of humanity, an open future, by becoming 
agents … and we at some level recognize their defeat.)

People can take pleasure when they see something they know is 
good go down and know they did nothing, or would have done 
nothing, to stop it from happening. Erratic, uncountenanable 
parental gods … would notice their loyalty, their showing that until
the gods changed course and favoured permission they were 
owned by their whim ­­ and would at the very least count them 
amongst those already absorbed.  

There's not even guilt involved, inner lament at cowardice. 
Someone was trying to show that we deserve something better than
we've got, and we know we're a wicked, spoiled lot that at the very
least needs a long stay in an unfair, precarious world before ever 
being allowed once again to be lead by transgressive youth.
Permalink

Original Article: Belle Knox: “I’m a sexual person and 

that’s that”
TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 2014 1:08 AM

@shaunnarine When you want to be tethered to keeping 
progressive aims "armed" right now, you have to some extent 
disassociate yourself from the reality ­­ actual reality, that is. 

By which I mean, of course we know (though this needn't be the 
case) everyone in porn is the victim of child­abuse, but we have to 
realize that the strongest current now is to waylay people taking 
pleasure in, exploring themselves through, sex ­­ actually in 
everything, really. Become grandmas about it, as we're becoming 
towards diet (hear anyone say anything positive ­­ ala Julia Child 
­­ about the importance of garnering life­pleasure from butter and 
real sugar, lately?), ambition (hear anyone ­­ other than those 
we're keeping as assholes for fantasy reasons ­­ shut down their 
being called "spoiled" by saying they deserved every friggin' lick 
of it?), and the deserved lot of the average Joe (hear even the 
radical progressive say more than we deserve a living wage, that 
we deserve ­­ enough to insinuate in ourselves the inner richness 
from which any damn one of us might beget revolutionary artistic 
genius ­­ a luxuriant wage?). 

It's a weird thing to actually encourage people to abstract out from 
experience so to get closer to the pulse ­­ but so it is. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hillary Clinton forgets the ’90s: Our 

latest gilded age and our latest phony populists
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 7:42 PM

Artemis Rose I wouldn't rely on her being resolutely pro­gay 
rights, either ­­ Terry Gross was right to press her on it. Something 
about that last interview she had where, concerning gay marriage, 
she said she was where the majority was until lead into another, 

more evolved, position, seemed to me to allow room later for her 
saying in this instance she was mis­lead … the leaders becoming 
those not being so much ahead of the curve as adept at 
manipulating naivety (Hillary is positioning herself as the 
everyman here) and goodwill for self­serving causes.  

"Evolving" is a trepidatious term right now; not clean­cut. It can 
bear the prejudice of having narcissistically/arrogantly asked 
people to make more administrations to themselves at a time when 
their lives are already tasking them to the extreme … all for the 
reward of staying relevant, able to join our collective Pharrell 
Williams' "Happy" dance. 

If it becomes "adults" finally stretched thin by self­bemused 
"children," if we decide true virtue actually comes to lie in those 
habitually unpresuming average Americans who needed to become
"evolved," in a populist form she might end up spanking back at all
the adjustments she was expected to make, and be cheered for it.  
Permalink

Original Article: Hillary Clinton forgets the ’90s: Our 

latest gilded age and our latest phony populists
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 5:47 PM

Jane Cullen After a world war and a Depression, everyone feel's 
like they're now owed a lot ­­ no God would demand further 
suffering, and instead would surely wage war against those who'd 
stifle His/Her finally allowing people a little; maybe a lot more 

than a little. So we got the 50s, where all the things only the rich 
enjoyed in the 30s and 40s were available for everyone. So we got 
a society where the most evolved were soon going to get to lead 
the less evolved forward; the tide was with them, even if this was 
hardly still facile. 

Then this became too much for the working class ­­ those of less 
nurturing families ­­ and they brought Reagan in knowing he was 
going to put a stop to the growth, make life harder, and more 
soothing to those who couldn't psychically handle it if the easy 
prosperity and true Utopian visions kept expanding and being 
realized. The liberals split off from their neighbours, collected 
around each­other and became a professional class, not out of 
arrogance but because unlike their former neighbours they still 
were okay with more growth ­­ however much it still helped them, 
eased their disease, that growth now was "complicated" …. only 
certain people were going to enjoy, and the rest would do worse 
than baseline. 

And it's becoming too much now for many liberals, who just aren't 
the same people they were before. They got excited when we 
bashed into Iraq the first time around, and felt relieved when Iraq 
was starved of five hundred thousand children's lives through 
sanctions, and they'd be uncomfortable now if not just Seattle but 
everyone was granted a living wage … unless it involved a kind of 
masochism where thereby everyone's also sublimating their own 
distinct personality to becoming instead part of a nation's fibre ­­ 
1930s kind of stuff, where people became a wall mural.

And here in this comment section we're seeing that some liberals, 
some progressives, haven't changed at all … except perhaps 
genuinely realizing more out of life and becoming even better, 
more loving, people. But they might be finery that in this period, 
doesn't matter. If we get Communism, sadly it won't involve you. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hillary Clinton forgets the ’90s: Our 

latest gilded age and our latest phony populists
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 4:42 PM

genetic.liberal TimN sir_ken_g Good link to the Richardson video.
It helps us understand that war is not just a place where we stage 
war against childhood perpetrators ­­ our parents ­­ but where we 
sacrifice "guilty" children, full of our "guilty" neediness and 
vulnerability. 

At the core, we felt we deserved our parental abuse and neglect (it 
keeps our parents holy; right to have been so angry at/neglectful of 
us), so they've got to go too ­­ hundreds of thousands of them, 
even. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hillary Clinton forgets the ’90s: Our 

latest gilded age and our latest phony populists
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 3:57 PM

All Americans want peace, a good job and a decent life, a worry­

free, enjoyable retirement?

The only way Americans seem to feel at peace is when they break 
up uninterrupted peaceful periods with war and discord. 

They only feel decent when they've projected all their indecency 
onto an other, and made life difficult for them. 

The only way they're Worry­Free (that is, that God's not going to 
come down and stomp on their ass) is when they feel guiltless … 
which involves doing things like ensuring they and their kids live 
in a highly uncertain and even bleak future only absolved by 
miraculous efforts of luck and pluck, however much it impinges on
them substantial actually smaller worries. 

I wonder if you're only thinking of Americans when they've got 
their street faces on? Or if ­­ past being able to will yourself to 
believe they're actually as good­hearted and intrinsically 
understandable as you in your true goodness had earnestly wanted 
them to be ­­ you're now  aggressing onto them a sort of blandness 
you'll hope they'll masochistically accept to alleviate you of further
percolations/proof of their terrifying two­faced menace? 

It is okay for the left to find distasteful those they're trying to help. 
They're allowed to know themselves as more progressive, better. 

It's just honest. Most the rest of us are coming apart, insane. 
Permalink

Original Article: Dick Cheney, Iraq and the ghosts of 

Vietnam
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 3:33 PM

What all those people shared, I believe, was the conscious or 
unconscious belief that a foreign war with a plausible­sounding 
excuse, and one that ended with a clean victory, would be good for
America and might restore the sense of national unity and purpose
we putatively lost in the ’60s. If it sounds insane to contemplate 
ordering the deaths of thousands of people as a form of national 
therapy,

The latter part ­­ if it sounds insane to contemplate ordering the 
deaths of thousands of people as a form of therapy ­­ is harder to 
understand than the  idea that laying waste to an opponent is a 
great cure for feeling humiliated … how many of us would cheer 
our sports' team that much louder if "next time round" we not only 
beat them but humiliated them ten­zero? About that, though, the 
origins lie in humiliations we suffered in our own childhoods not 
in history ­­ peoples making up for humiliations suffered two 
decades or ten centuries ago are really just making up for 
humiliations they repeatedly experienced as children. History is 
just a landscape where we fight out our childhood traumas … such 
should be common sense. 

Wars offer a chance to humiliate an opponent we've projected our 
own childhood perpetrators into, but it also a means of relief. 
Those young soldiers ­­ those kids ­­ we're sending off to die, 
represent our own youth and promise. By giving them up for 
sacrifice, we're admitting to our intrinsic sinfulness, and feel we'll 
then get to keep our second and third. Afghanistan now is pretty 
much imagined just as a maw sucking down our troops, just as the 
world economy is as some abandoning"place" that is sucking down
our kids' hopes and dreams: so strong is our need now just to 
absolve ourselves of sin, grandiosity from humiliating an opponent
is hardly on the scene. Maybe its due now for a reemergence. 
Permalink

Original Article: Dick Cheney, Iraq and the ghosts of 

Vietnam
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 3:13 PM

Bill Murphy NYC Patrick McEvoy­Halston If we never had the 
Iraq war, and the economic meltdown was avoided, and we never 
found ourselves under rule of austerity economics, and we didn't 
now have legions of kids with guaranteed stunted futures, and the 
humanities wasn't being emasculated by managerial rule, and 
people were actually open to new voices rather than scared by 
accents outside their class, many liberals' heads would have 
exploded out of excess guilt. They'd be as errant and unglued as 
many of the right are. Too much pleasure, too much sin … for all 
but the most emotionally evolved on the left. 

Fortunately for them, they can now feel calm and undaunted in 
their progressive estimations of themselves, because we've fixed 

things so that the best we could do now are things which help 
alleviate a depression we're all still going to have to weather for a 
good while, not actually take us into some place deeper into the 
wonderful. 

We'll have people like Thomas Frank leading us into becoming a 
folk, a "place" where none of us have any distinct personalities, 
just doing what we can ­­ all humble like ­­ to help our fellow 
brother and sisters weather a tough time. Brother can you spare a 
dime? … still a cowering, tenement age, to be shucked off once 
humanity has decided we'd all suffered enough.
Permalink

Original Article: Dick Cheney, Iraq and the ghosts of 

Vietnam
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 5:46 AM

As I see it, they too were infected with the same strain of PVSD, 
and embraced the Iraq war as a chance to repent for their un­
American attitudes of yesteryear.

They've repented admirably as well through the creation of an 
economy which is killing the ability of youth to replicate any kind 
of great 60s culture. At some level they know they've created a 
world where the young will only advance so far as they've been 
heeded. Thirty year olds living with their parents, indeed. 

For them, these liberals you're talking about, Iraq was a great 
success: massive amounts of money that might have been put to 
letting us all enjoy life a bit more ­­ i.e., guilty spoiling ­­ was 
gotten rid of. So much loss … enabled them to guiltlessly 
subsequently pursue all their feel­good social causes. Without it, 
with pervasive prosperity and much less of a class split to talk 
about, it would have felt like they were all just enjoying 
themselves too much … a youth­lead 1960s/70s, without having 
been "earned" by massively sacrificial depression and war. 
Permalink

Original Article: Dick Cheney, Iraq and the ghosts of 

Vietnam
SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2014 4:56 AM

Amity Nations go to war when both sides think they can win.

Germany and Japan waged war against the rest of the world … I 
know they were grandiose at first, but unconsciously perhaps they 
already anticipated a great collective sacrifice rather than total 
victory. Their victory, was that they chose to die; it was under their
control. 
Permalink

Original Article: Fox News’ “destructive” ignorance: 

Network gets schooled by male rape survivor
FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014 2:35 AM

mahabarbara Patrick McEvoy­Halston p47nandmosquito Forced 
beast­feeding, forced breast­stimulation, is … mind you, 
admittedly I was mostly thinking infanticidal New Guinea tribes 
with this one.

P47 argues that we need to understand that rape of men by women 
is as frequent and devastating as rape of women by men. If we look
to the young adult male who is beset upon by an older woman, but 
other than young, naive and impressionable, imagine him a blank 
slate ­­ not someone already ingratiated to abuse ­­ we leave plenty
of room for people to argue that we're arguing as rape what could 
well have been just a fantastic teenage conquest. Maybe a bit too 
much; a gulp of the adult swallowed down too quick. But maybe 
also with later self­esteem benefits ­­ the stud!  If he was 
psychologically manipulated, he wasn't physically held down and 
molested … the guy's got muscle­power over her, ninety­nine 
times out of a hundred, easy. 

If, however, you factor in that the young adult male targeted was 
already used incestuously as an infant and young boy by his 
mother, had his body manipulated in ways that fit her needs rather 
than his own, and who came to think that pleasing her in this way 
was the only way to gain her approval, then the young man's 
proclivity to please is being used by the older woman and it draws 
him back to what we would all easily agree is a very humiliating ­­ 
poisoning ­­ situation. It would ruin you, like we all understand 
male­on­female rape as potentially doing. 
Permalink

Original Article: Fox News’ “destructive” ignorance: 

Network gets schooled by male rape survivor
THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 5:17 PM

p47nandmosquito Incest is what is near universal. Any culture 
which routinely brutalizes its women will produce women who use
motherhood ­­ i.e., their children ­­ to stimulate themselves, get 
some of the pleasure and love they otherwise received so 
shallowly. Attention is given ­­ breast­feeding, coddling ­­ 
irresponsive to the child's cues.  And then abandonment. 

The "incest taboo" … is really that no one's allowed to broach 
talking about it. In our minds, it puts us beyond rapprochement 
with our mothers. 
Permalink

Original Article: Fox News’ “destructive” ignorance: 

Network gets schooled by male rape survivor
THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 3:22 PM

If you were a sop for your mother's depression as a boy (followed 
by abandonment), two things are certain: one, you'll cling to 
organizations that are patriarchal; and two, any time you're recalled
to feeling helpless and used you'll defend against it, by pretending 
it was in fact your conquest, and the like. 
Permalink

Original Article: A fissure in the dam of political reality: 

How Eric Cantor’s defeat foreshadows the coming 
apocalypse
MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 4:03 PM

Salon has an article up where Krugman explains that, even though 
the consensus is opposite, Obama has actually had a very 
productive year … done some saving the world stuff. If what 
defines a portion of America right now is a desire to stop growth, 
master it by limiting it to what is imaginable within a feudal or 
tribal society, that so few know about it is probably a good thing. 

May the complex, uncertain and novel find some way to continue 
on. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ugly, paranoid, divisive politics: The 

GOP are all Know­Nothings now
MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 1:17 AM

rphillips111 Patrick McEvoy­Halston To some people, long 
uninterrupted periods of goodness/happiness becomes 
excruciating, if not a tyranny. They rejoice when war occurs, 
because it means the sacrifices are going to pile up, and the 
previous gains, long forgotten. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ugly, paranoid, divisive politics: The 

GOP are all Know­Nothings now

SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 2014 2:17 AM

 Bluntly put, progressives think people need fixing in order to be 
decent citizens.

Progressives promise a better world. The fixing people need to 
match them is to believe that this is something that they actually 
deserve, that it wouldn't make them spoiled rotten. To get this fix 
you've got to put money into people's childhoods; you've somehow
got to get them to be better loved, less feeling like self­attendence 
is somehow … disparaging. Not much chance of this right now. 

So progressives usually do their best work when the populace 
hasn't so much evolved as become satiated … after long periods of 
sacrifice/wars, they aren't all that much fretting human sin and are 
quite willing to let the more progressive amongst them take the 
societal lead. They do their worst work when countries around the 
globe are beginning to see their nations as great "mother countries"
that are committing them to very little compassion for those 
"guilty" of neglect, self­promotion and gluttony. Russia vis­a­vis 
Ukraine. France. 
Published comments
Original Article: Slenderman: Nightmarish info­demon or 

misunderstood cultural icon?
TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 2014 4:03 PM

J. Nathan yeah, that's right ­­ alter. My brain likes the double "a"s 
for the twinning and the lack of drop. 

I think those with more abusive parents are doing something 
different than those with more loving. The former are more 
embedding their parents to keep themselves in line, have multiple 
personalities. The latter are more their own selves all the time; they
don't switch into somebody else. 
Permalink

Original Article:  Men  can
    be feminists but it’s actually 

really hard work
TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 2014 3:28 PM

designated, not "designed". 
Permalink

Original Article:  Men  can
    be feminists but it’s actually 

really hard work
TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 2014 7:07 AM

Berlatsky's bit as a loud feminist is working wonders for him. 
Smart women like McDonough are in mood to pet him, and he's 
got all these bound legions of men out there that he can with 
approval act as arrogantly as he wishes. 

But the idea that this is hard work is garbage. For people like him 
being a feminist was automatic as soon as he realized it as a 
furious angry woman he could cast himself in sympathy with, be 
on the same side with. 

But anyone's who's paying attention can already feel that anything 
PC is on the way to be designed as arrogant, elitist folly as 
nationalism and working class populism gain ascent amongst the 
Left. And when this happens, when McDonough is left … near 
alone, the Berlatskys out there are more going to be seeing her 
efforts as suspiciously selfish, a way to parade herself over peoples
whose concerns had been ignored way more than entitled 
professional women's have been. 

Watch out, Katie. His feminism is built out of humiliating 
cowering, and it'll end with his revenge. I'm sorry you can't already
feel this. 
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014 9:02 PM

Jackson1968 Patrick McEvoy­Halston Jackson1968Patrick 
McEvoy­HalstonI think it's more that America got bought off by 
cheap retail goods and gadgets, and does not care about bloat or 
corruption until it affects them as individuals. 

I understand. But please note that this too is part of how the Left 
has come to understand "the people" ­­ that is, as not just "the 

genial but sometimes too trustworthy" that I put up, but also as 
"the sometimes lazy and self­centered" that you just did.

This all is akin to how 18th­century gentleman estimated 
townsmen when the townsmen accepted them as betters ­­ it 
usually involves cementing them nonetheless as basically 
goodhearted and decent people ­­ and very distant from the fervent 
anti­intellectuals you inferred them as earlier. These people weren't
just lead on and managed but had hate brimming out of their 
bones. 
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014 8:43 PM

Jackson1968 Patrick McEvoy­Halston Without the military, they'd 
have to own their hatred … which would make everyday life 
impossible. So the institution is invented, and slaughters; and while
we at some level take note it's still disowned while we just go on 
about our everyday. 

No one can be seen as consenting to or desiring bloat … unless 
they can be entertained as something other than rational. The Left 
didn't always protect the motivations of "the people," showcase 
them as genial if sometimes too trustworthy, but that's all we get 
now. 

Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014 8:25 PM

@Jackson1968 @Patrick McEvoy­Halston

This is a viciously anti­intellectual country, and many academics 
internalize the sense of worthlessness thrown at them.

I particularly liked this part of your response, Jackson1968. If they 
felt they were unduly privileged, enduring this massive invasion 
and perpetual obstacle / nuisance may have helped them feel like 
they've absolved themselves of something worse. 

WE as an aggregate are served by some very weird things … as I 
suggested in our preference for a huge military that crushes the 
small. If you feel this doesn't include you, that you're one of those 
to which terms like masochist doesn't at all apply, you're probably 
right ­­ America still has a lot of emotionally evolved people 
amongst its left. 

But together we're a patient that should be on the couch. 

Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014 8:05 PM

If the problem is administrative bloat, we should ask exactly what 
psychological function this bloat addresses / absolves. We have a 
gigantic military … because the aggregate of us still possess an 
absolute need to terrorize small countries (the small and 
vulnerable) around the world. We have austerity economics, 
because the bulk of us feel less spoiled and punishment­worthy if 
avenues for growth in our culture are stifled or cut off. 

So this bloat, is about what? So we think of universities more like 
protective playpens … professors and students surrounded by a 
thick layer of fat which cushions but also infantilizes?  Or is it to 
communicate that distinction is useless because there are too many 
layers between you and the outside world, so it's best just to take 
pride in the university? 

Or do we just have some need for universities to feel huge, a 
massively multi­celled organism, that embeds the same thrill we 
got when we learned that wee humans were actually sorta on the 
same side as Godzilla this time around? We're part of some kind of
giant body that matters!

If it's plain they're just a cancer, then we should ask what 
conciliation we all gain when we feel we loaded up our institutions
with massively replicating dead weight. What solace do we gain 
from the brain­dead and bland?
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 6:17 PM

Signe_S Patrick McEvoy­Halston If "consuming" means 
experimenting with new products, dropping affiliations that were 
appropriate to your past self but not to the one you've evolved or 
are evolving into, then it's to be praised. If it means just a constant 
flight from your inner problems, then it does deserve 
condemnation. 
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 6:11 PM

walkingmountain Might this new generation be more meek and 
compliant and serve the interests of our plutocracy just to survive?

The debt has to go, but if they weren't saddled with it I'm not sure 

how much more radical they'd be. Something about the larger 
societal mood they've long been swimming in suggests to me they 
were going to toe the line, be minimally noticeable, even if before 
them someone dropped the Happy Valley. I think they'd see the 
ample garnishes this avenue would avail them with, and fret 
drowning in all the spoiling. 
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 5:37 PM

Lelaina We may decide that any job that involves constant contact 
with the public … is about exactly where we should place our most
evolved people ­­ at least for a portion of their weekly schedule. 
Waiters, baristas and sales associates could be reconsidered as 
people who give us the ostensibly innocuous "tending" ­­ 
conversational interactions ­­ that help soothe, nurture and civilize 
a populace. The movie "Grand Budapest Hotel" carried something 
of this idea. So does the concept of the Parisian flaneur ­­ where 
you add something very important to a culture simply by being 
discriminate, by dressing smartly and in evident view. 

This would make all of America a "Portlandia," and this would be 
preferable to simply using the number of university graduates 
employed in occupations like this as a sign of simple waste. 
Getting our more emotionally involved young people in constant 
contact with the public, may be counted as something of a win. As 
will, of course, giving them a living wage ­­ primarily because 

they're doing something other than a waste of their time. They're 
not low but high ­­ already on par with our doctors and lawyers ­­ 
and so given appropriately a co­equal wage.

Like "Portlandia," of course, that's not all they do ­­ the rest of 
their life involves more self­tending, and begetting artistic 
surprises we'll also end up benefiting from.
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 4:48 PM

 Maybe college shouldn’t be about individuals getting rich. Maybe
there is another purpose.

Yes, perhaps the purpose is about keeping alive the idea that the 
point of life is to develop a deeply rich soul/personality. You keep 
alive the idea that some institution needs to be esteemed 
sufficiently so that it offers protection for students to entertain 
therein practices and ideas that might be repugnant to those of a 
more prosaic nature who might want to peep in. From them our 
world gets challenged, changed, not just having already existing 
requirements better met. 

What a miracle it is that this country for awhile accepted ­­ or, 

rather, wasn't just hostile and angry ­­  that they were sending their 
kids into institutions that would not just augment their social class 
­­ reflect a pleasing glow back on them ­­ but return them kids 
who'd thumb their noses at them. We to some extent accepted that 
our kids were bound to come back to us … radical. 
Permalink

Original Article: Colleges are full of it: Behind the three­

decade scheme to raise tuition, bankrupt generations, and 
hypnotize the media
SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 4:07 PM

Yes, the liberal arts does well when we're lead by people with 
more evolved conceptions of children, and poorly when we're all in
mind dominate their very bad, narcissistic selves.

If liberal arts stays for the rich but gets shortened up everywhere 
else, this would be our further regression to a late 18th century 
social structure. You'd know the aristocracy for their manners and 
polite vision, and the well­intentioned but ignorant for their 
limiting obsession with mechanical things. 

If the idea that everyone should "go to college" (i.e. become more 
liberally informed and inspired) is lost, it wouldn't' be recuperated 
if we all become better paid and better employed. Some distant 
figure collecting up how far we're advancing as a species, would 
count this as our re­possessing our labourer ancestors' diminished 
estimate of themselves, and sigh. 

Permalink

Original Article: Slenderman: Nightmarish info­demon or 

misunderstood cultural icon?
SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 3:00 PM

@ismene @Patrick McEvoy­Halston Wasn't familiar with Bloody 
Mary. This is what I got out of wiki: The lore surrounding the 
ritual (if she is summoned properly) states that participants may 
endure the apparition screaming at them, cursing them, strangling
them, stealing their soul, drinking their blood, or scratching their 
eyes out

So very much yes ­­ that's the kind of apparition in your mind that 
would tell you that unless you kill your kids they'll turn into satan.
 You don't just sit there taking in the harangue, but become for 
awhile the Bloody Mary yourself, and see your victims as very 
much deserving being screamed at, strangled, and having their 
eyes scratched out. 

After it's done, you switch back to normal, and will be tried and 
convicted in a brain state that is completely disconnected from the 
one ­­ the furious parental altar ­­ you were forced into being for 
awhile.
Permalink

Original Article: Slenderman: Nightmarish info­demon or 

misunderstood cultural icon?
SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 2014 11:53 PM

 something must be profoundly wrong in the home lives and/or 
psychic worlds of two children who would try to kill a schoolmate 
for no discernible reason, and that scary stories on the Internet 
probably didn’t have much to do with it.

Anyone who's been attacked, severely hated upon by their parents, 
has to do something miraculous to keep their sense of their parents 
as they still need them to be: completely right and ultimately 
willing to love and support. This miracle is called the formation of 
the superego. 

What the superego is is an altar of your parents taken into your 
own head, and it polices over everything you do so that you never 
do what you had to have done to have been subject to such hate 
and rejection. What this something must have been, the young 
brain can only conclude, is just the sheer fact of your being 
vulnerable and needy. This is why vulnerable people ­­ children, 
students ­­ are targeted so often, bullied. We popularize the 
understanding of this enough, and the reason no longer becomes 
indiscernible/unfathomable. 

Abused kids switch into their parental altars especially when 
they're themselves "guilty" of unallowed growth ­­ that is, focus on
oneself and one's own life adventures rather than on the unmet 
needs of one's severely love­deprived parents. Budding 
teenagehood, more than fills this bill. Since such growth means 

feeling vulnerable to being lost to love once more, the child makes 
the switch, into a different neural structure in their brain, and 
attacks the guilty innocent ... representatives of their own guilty 
selves. They become their parents, the goblin Slendermans … 
adults with blank stares, in suits and ties. Or like Norman Bates, in 
dress. 

And then they resent to just being children again. The idea of 
punishing them, is absurd. 

About the internet phenomenon … it could amount to inventive 
obsession and fiddling. I'd praise the creativity but not conclude 
that every age has its demons; they can be made to go away. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ross Douthat’s polite misogyny: What 

the NYT columnist gets wrong about Elliot Rodger
THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 4:37 PM

disigny Anyone who wants to do something real about all this 
should be concentrating on how we might reduce the Stresses, and 
stop obsessing about guns.  Guns do not produce stress just by 
being there.

The problem is that a society that cannot be cowed from 
progressing, is an ongoing source of stress for many people. For 
them, reducing the stress must involve going back as much as 

possible to "father knows best," a society beholden to limitations. 

When a society tilts social structures away from what helped meet 
psychic requirements of the less emotionally evolved, the 
conservatives, this leaves them with nothing on hand to dump 
otherwise disabling aspects of their own psyche into. Further they 
feel associated and therefore guilty, further away from what their 
own parents would have approved/allowed for them, and out of 
feeling totally alone and rejected, they panic. 

What they do is try to forge what is currently happening in Russia 
and apparently around the world. A more nationalistic culture 
evolves ­­ fusion occurs ­­ that after bonding to the mother nation 
finds some official outgroup of the guilty presumptuous (full of 
their own self­projections) to stage revenge on. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ross Douthat’s polite misogyny: What 

the NYT columnist gets wrong about Elliot Rodger
THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 4:15 PM

iamnotyou mahabarbara Ehmbe Is your attitude mostly owing just 
to people brazenly not living life in conservative strictures? I ask 
because people with your attitude toward female dress have 
traditionally preferred men not keep their hair too long and the like
as well. 

Going braless is just another way of saying we're here to live freely
and won't be disallowed that. It is this that drives conservatives 
crazy ­­ the presumption, the ostensible arrogance, not the 
triggering of sex drives to which men can supposedly be mostly 
helpless. To some men they neuter far more than they sexually 
excite. 

You conjured "a boss" to look at the young woman in order I think 
to counter the implicit authority of an uncowed woman ­­ it 
registered; they do intimidate. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ross Douthat’s polite misogyny: What 

the NYT columnist gets wrong about Elliot Rodger
THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 3:37 PM

@Connie Boyd  My impression is that he doesn't like women and 
is disgusted by female sexuality. He has issues he hasn't dealt with.
I'm being tactful.

Maternal incest would produce this. His fear/hatred of progress, by
as a young boy being abandoned or punished when not attending to
his immature parents' needs and pursing his own. His clinging to 
conservative structures, by needing  social institutions as shared 
ways of dealing with emotional problems caused by deep personal 
anxieties surrounding growth and individuation.
Permalink

Original Article: Ross Douthat’s polite misogyny: What 

the NYT columnist gets wrong about Elliot Rodger
THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 3:17 PM

RobertSF Conservatives are those who become insane when 
society moves faster than they can psychically tolerate. 
Progressives are those who don't so much need our current societal
structure for exoskeletal propping up, and so just go about forging 
a society that matches their own more emotionally evolved natures.
The future always is better if it isn't taken over by a more 
regressive spirit. 
Permalink

Original Article: Ross Douthat’s polite misogyny: What 

the NYT columnist gets wrong about Elliot Rodger
THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 3:02 PM

Tristero1 MarkJD  The work of a deeply closeted and fearful 
homosexual … Mr. Douthat is horrified and disgusted by females 
and their anatomy.

Homosexuals are those horrified and disgusted by females and 
their anatomy? 
Permalink

Original Article: The day I left my son in the car
THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 5:26 AM

diacri The picture is of a parent ostensibly abandoning his child to 

a dingo … the real issue is how leaving our children to the dogs is 
so on our minds it's popping up everywhere?
Permalink

Original Article: Men’s rights group raises $25,000 to 

protect them from feminists
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 2014 8:21 PM

I think more eye­on­the­ball for Salon would be to be focussing on 
those eschewing "politically correct fantasia[s]" (Thomas Frank) 
for increased class consciousness. A lot of liberals targeting 
working class plight seem concerned to slip in their hatred of an 
over­concern by their peers with "boutique issues" (Chris Hedges)
 ­­ things like affirmative action and women's rights. 

And they're having some success shaping things like feminism as 
something entitled ivy leaguers pursue to no end while enjoying 
life as members of an increasingly entrenched oligarchy. They're 
having success shaping the kind of working class men who might 
cheer on MRAs as just those now mislead after having been 
egregiously betrayed by society ­­ as actually fundamentally the 
best people around, for being so modest and humble ­­ for 
suffering. 

A number of them seem to be eschewing a professional for a 
working class identity themselves; and when I hear them I can't 
help but think that if in the future they visited a family prospering 
in a more worker­friendly environment they helped procure, but 

with the man visibly more the patriarch, and the wife more visibly 
in the supporter role, I don't know how alarmed they'd really be 
with this … isn't the important thing that they're prospering? is 
what they might think.

I find in their work, their voice, a nostalgia for binding men and 
women into our heritage. A pre­60s cage. And all the while they'll 
have little nice to say about MRAs. 
Permalink

Original Article: The day I left my son in the car
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 2014 7:08 PM

When I was little, I believed there was a wolf that lived in my 
closet, up near the black plastic bags of old clothes. The wolf 
spoke perfect English and told me that if I didn’t count to 20 
before I fell asleep he would come out of the closet and eat my 
feet. I used to lie in bed, tight beneath the covers, and count. I 
knew that if I counted, I’d be safe. It made sense. One, two, three, 
four. I counted every night. I never doubted.

About this wolf … are you sure this wasn't a manifestation of the 
sadistic, possessed state your own parents directed onto you 
(themselves temporarily under possession of altars of their own 
parents ­­ i.e., "old clothes"), displaced onto a wolf in your 
nightmares? None of us are about to recognize that our parents 
actually get into possessed states like this, where they really are 
considering hurting us or abandoning us, but isn't this most likely 

the source of those wolves and under­the­bed monsters we so fear 
might devour us, as well as all the institutions that historically have
made childhood such a precarious thing? What could possibly 
terrify us more?

Anyway, I hope this longish piece isn't built on laying down one 
further crushing wall on how you might occasionally have found 
yourself possessed of attitudes towards your children your 
conscious mind cannot accept, even if not at all occurring here. 
That is, because it can't quite be disowned, percolates too close to 
truth, it has to be repeatedly drawn out but intimidated into more 
acceptable shape. Abandonment becomes just you slipping into 
more lassitude­accepting times. The crime, society's. 
Permalink

Original Article: Jonah Hill shows how to say you’re sorry
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 2014 5:21 PM

How exactly does someone use the word "faggot" in a non­
homophobic way?  How exactly did the word become the most 
hateful word he could imagine using? What does it mean for it to 
still be so ingrained?

I think many of us are a little worried that some of these actors 
who are ostensibly best friends with the gay community but who 
are yet undeterred to make this word their automatic go­to when 
they want to eviscerate someone, may possess two states of mind 
regarding homosexuality. 

If certain cues of a situation are triggered, then their approach is 
genuinely respectful and civil. But if others, then they're looking 
down on something degraded. Two different, still­existing, routes 
in the brain, that lead to two different imaginings of human beings;
not just terminology learned when you're young surfacing when 
excited or exposed. 

There's sort of this cocoon progressives are living in where we're 
all pro­gay; we can't be caught out as homophobes because we 
know its not true. It's one of the markers that we're not one of the 
neanderthals, like loving Obama and knowledge of global 
warming, and it's part of how we mentally dress ourselves every 
day ­­ as self­constituting as our morning and bedtime routines. 

We take it all as part of a package, and remain unaware of how 
much some of it may be about making us feel contemporary. That 
is, if this current urban liberalism slips away with the next 
incarnation of democrat and other things become more socially 
responsible than being pro gay marriage, like for instance, being a 
patriot (nationalism's currently on the rise across the globe), how 
much will the support of homosexuality go down as liberalism 
becomes an elite shibboleth that took attention away from and 
betrayed the rest of working class America, a villain? 

Might an actor call someone a faggot and be allowed to let it linger
as something that maybe counted against the body health of the 
nation? 

Permalink

Original Article: Goodbye, Patton Oswalt: An Internet 

troll vanishes, still wanting it both ways
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 2014 1:04 AM

WordKing They have hired Thomas Frank, though, who recently ­­
here ­­ said this: It’s a never­ending saga of privilege run amok, 
which of course allows our op­ed moralists to completely overlook
the real scandal on campus—the corporatization of the university, 
a development that has plunged an entire generation into 
inescapable debt but that is somehow less visible to the columnist 
than the latest political­correctness fantasia.

In the last year they also posted an article by Chomsky where he 
said something along the same lines of Frank, and an interview 
with Richard Rodriguez, where he blasted affirmative action and 
the liberal concern to make brown presidents, over the travails of 
the working class. 

To me it isn't clear exactly where Salon.com is headed. We might 
indeed start hearing more of this point of view, with those you're 
lambasting becoming worried just how much their own site has 
their back.  
Permalink

Original Article: She­Hulk is not a “giant green porn star”:

How female superheroes become a male power fantasy
TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2014 8:26 PM

Noah Berlatsky It's possibly the photo as well, but the whole sense 
I got form this article was of cowering and self­rejection 
("superheroes until you superpuke" … from someone who's read 
comics for 30 years?) … like Godzilla's overhead, and we probably
ought to oblige ourselves to it. Maybe for you not austerity 
economics, but I wanted to suggest that there is a way to align 
oneself irrefutably to women ­­ where you feel completely focused 
on not being a woman­hater ­­ where an unconscious need for 
revenge is nevertheless effected. 

The writer of that article I linked to was suggesting that our current
mood for older awesome women warriors, to associate with "her," 
is driving attention away ­­ is abandoning ­­ the girl. This would 
be a fair summary of "Brave" and "Malificent" ­­ where the whole 
fate of the girl we unquestionably allow to the monster ­­ and this 
is one way it can be done. 

Downing the rich can also be antifeminist, if it means binding men 
to working class' travails and foibles ­­ if it means going anti­
bourgeois. We'll put women into total power, but excuse our 
errancy by binding ourselves more and more with men who 
worked hard but didn't get it so good, across the ages. Revenge 
comes from becoming lost to them, just us and our fathers. 

Sorry if this still seems all disconnected. It came naturally from 
what I read and experienced. 

Published comments
Original Article: She­Hulk is not a “giant green porn star”:

How female superheroes become a male power fantasy
TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 2014 7:36 PM

"Goyer isn’t wrong exactly; most estimates of superhero comics 
readership I’ve seen puts the audience at around 90 percent male, 
and She­Hulk herself was certainly created by men (Stan Lee and 
John Buscema.)"

Interesting that this writer invested so much time in this all­male 
sanctuary. I guess he still saw the potential of it, so willingly 
weathered the blatant sexism for some of what X­Men would 
eventually offer. Bravo to take wounds like that, in support of a 
worthy genre! (Though if X­Men Byrne was so good, why the 
photo­attack on him here?) Others would have just split off 
immediately and concentrated on literature, where the crowds at 
least were more likely to be genuinely grown up. I hope the 
exposure hasn't coarsened what would surely have been otherwise 
a naturally ardent supporter of women rights. 

You wouldn't actually be someone who is only "borrowing the 
power" right now, and whom later we'll find championing causes 
that cause more mass scale damage to vulnerable women than 
anything else, like being a social rights activist but with approval 
for austerity economics ­­ like Obama has mostly been? At a deep 
level the mind knows, that if for instance you're drawing people 
into comics which effectively is a geek­ridden, anti­women genre, 
it legitimates as authority­bearers the sort that could in an instant 

suddenly go overtly anti­female, if it could be done innocuously; 
covered by something awesome, like nationalism. 

Like, for instance, those who'd stage wars against sexist countries, 
which'll have the effect mostly of throwing endless 
women/mothers into misery. Or like, for instance, those who'd 
endorse concepts like "honour" or "duty" or 
"responsibility/bucking up," when they're used by liberals prone 
now in chastened times to use the same terms, with their known 
allegiance to everything that isn't flower­power or of a feminine 
sensibility. 

P.S. If you're wanting this ­­ "then there should be women up there 
in spandex performing superfeats along with the guys" ­­ re­
reading current Salon headlines should show you we're getting this
in spades, and about to get lots more. I wonder what you'd make of
those saying that maybe more feminist, less suspiciously making 
feminism something we oblige ourselves and cower to like little 
boys and girls to our awoken pissed­off mothers, would be more 
giving headlines to the girly sleeping beauty. Who'd be overtly 
pleased as shit if some brave knight slayed the great titan women 
hogging attention away from her own youth, optimism, and simple 
desire to tease, please and play. 

Permalink

Original Article: David Graeber: “Spotlight on the 

financial sector did make apparent just how bizarrely 
skewed our economy is in terms of who gets rewarded”
MONDAY, JUNE 2, 2014 6:23 AM

@maria4616 Thanks a lot for this, maria. Much appreciated. 
Permalink

Original Article: David Graeber: “Spotlight on the 

financial sector did make apparent just how bizarrely 
skewed our economy is in terms of who gets rewarded”
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 6:23 PM

Anyone out there have parents who readily treated themselves to 
things they disallowed to their children? Anyone out there have 
parents who were so self­absorbed they often were barely aware of
the distress their own children were suffering ­­ their being hungry,
thirsty?; their feeling all alone? 

Here's my speculation. I'm guessing that most of us still had 
parents like this. And the question is, then, when society replicates 
our situation as children, putting the majority of us in the position 
of neglect and pigeon­holing a select number as the obnoxiously 
self­absorbed, what pleasure are we getting from it? 

Could it be the same pleasure we had as children when, as a result 
of turning away from protesting our parents' hypocrisy toward 
blaming our own selfish expectations ­­ even our own 

"blameworthy" vulnerability, which "surely" prompted the neglect 
­­ our parents noticed we chose not to reflect badly upon them and 
finally smiled some love towards us as a result?

It strikes me that main point of the next ten years or so is to in 
every way communicate that none of us really lived especially 
well, that growth, "selfish" personal development ­­ all avenues for
it ­­ was/were stifled. I think this even applies to many liberals of 
affluent parents, who we all assume are to be defined by their 
being distanced from real problems but I actually see mostly as 
being cruelly confined to a kind of class think ­­ only able to derive
pleasures from people pretty much exactly like themselves, from 
stasis percolating up only what is not disagreeably new and so 
what probably isn't really new at all. Which is a horrible 
development for people who fifty years ago ­­ during the 60s ­­ 
would have been those who felt delight rather than dis­ease when 
categories and confines that kept people away from one another, 
and which locked away discovery, started really falling off.

If becoming an aggregate of helping classers, a folk, a Volk, we 
sunder ourselves of the bourgeois claim to individuality ­­ that 
armour against personality dissolution, peasantry ­­ which too 
would show our time's resolution against giving individual 
development the limelight. We'd do better to think of ourselves as 
professionals ­­ the high ­­ and call each one of us Doctor, Sir, or 
Madame. And not as fools would do, but as those who's self­
respect engenders a fierce claim to individuality. 
Permalink

Original Article: David Graeber: “Spotlight on the 

financial sector did make apparent just how bizarrely 
skewed our economy is in terms of who gets rewarded”
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 5:20 PM

lwaxanatroi Why is there such a deep human need to feel guilty if 
you didn't suffer some before getting benefits? My guess is that the
state couldn't have just sent checks directly to the recipients 
because the recipients would have understand it as "rewarding non­
work," as spoiling. And so all the administrations are made to keep
in place, by the people at the bottom, so people feel they at least 
worked and suffered and degraded themselves some, to earn their 
benefits. 

For people raised to believe suffering is a virtue and that ample 
provisions and care is spoiling, people who know and show how 
none of this suffering is actually necessary, are the villains. They'll 
be shut out. Because psychologically, it still is. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 4:48 PM

Aunt Messy Patrick McEvoy­Halston Amity Morisy Okay. I'm a 
poet who won't let good meaning in sounds be bullied into silence 
by proper english. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 4:30 PM

Aunt Messy Patrick McEvoy­Halston Amity Morisy Would you 
agree this sounds a bit suspiciously prim for an "Aunt Messy"? In 
any case, my brain clearly decided to live a little. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 3:51 PM

Morisy Patrick McEvoy­Halston Thanks Morisy. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 6:06 AM

@Morisy Personally I think circumcision is always harmful; there 
is no context that molds it into love. Let's be rid of it. The tone part
is an interesting challenge ­­ your bringing up how women have 
historically been silenced owing to anger, emotion. For me, this is 
a factor though. We're reading if we're dealing with people who 
can be assuaged. Or if they'd be displeased if somehow discourse 
lead away from culminated righteous revenge. We're reading if 
they're the angry progressive who's pressing for social 
improvement for all people, or the angry "Tea Partier" we can't be 
sure wouldn't be most happy if just he and his buds safely aloof 
above armageddon … they're both angry; but only from one does 
one also sense a large body of self­esteem and love. 

My concern about MRAs is not just that what is actually wanted is 
revenge but that I don't trust that they won't actually perpetuate the
further neglect and abuse of boys. Since I think the main abuse 
was at the hands of parents, the neglected mother, it's very hard for
those abused to rid themselves of the conviction that they actually 
deserved it. For such stigmatization, such betrayal, it would put 
them beyond ever imagining themselves finally deemed worthy of 
their mother's love, which they don't have the ego to sustain. 

Rather, I think they might perpetuate a society which denies 
parents, mothers, the resources to properly take of their children, to
show that they believed the vulnerable child deserved the pain and 
to absolve their own mothers of all blame. This of course is also 
indirect revenge, but the show, the overt sort of revenge, is re­
directed at other women in society, whilst they proclaim 
themselves the most staunch of mammas' boys.  
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 4:16 AM

Amity Morisy Patrick McEvoy­Halston "Begat" sounds too much 
like one's squatted and taken a loud shit; that's probably why my 
mind averred around it. 

Allow your snob to be open to the poet. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 3:54 AM

@Morisy @Patrick McEvoy­Halston I'm mostly ... it would be a 
help if, unified, a cultural sphere was encouraged where hate was 
never okay. Kate McDonough does good things ­­ but because 
behind the message is no doubt fundamentally love, something I 
can't say about when, say, Noah Berlatsky posts. When I heard 
Sweden two decades ago made spanking a criminal crime, I 
applauded … a (evidently fairly evolved) society was 
communicating abuse was not okay, and I knew this would help 
reign in, deter, provide feedback that would stop. (Sweden's 
regressing, by the way … a growing number are seeing kids as 
being spoiled.)

But yes, the real gains I feel come out of the sheer fact that people 
who tend to hate inequality and discrimination will push for a 
liberal social system that lends more support for parents, and who 
are themselves guaranteed to be raising kids who'll be mostly 
immune to this nonsense, regardless of social sphere. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 2:52 AM

@Morisy @Patrick McEvoy­Halston

Re: For every abusive mother, there's an abusive father.

If this is what you really think, this would make you a radical in 
today's culture. Anyway, I agree … except no one plays more 
important a role in your development than your mother ­­ for sure 
in emotionally unevolved families, and maybe even with the NY 
liberal types, where fathers and mothers are more likely to split 
time. 

Re: Nor do men get any more of a pass for bad behavior in 
adulthood.

We see human will and choice a bit differently. I'm a determinist; 
who you later become is almost entirely begetted by the nature of 
your childhood origins. If you feel you've got a choice, that you 
could resist ­­ you've had better than a good number. 

Re: "mommy issues." 

This is a slur. Forgiveness is great if you can get to it ­­ if you're 
using your children it's because you're from a lineage that never 
evolved beyond this. There really is no one to blame because it 
was determined; outside of choice. 
Permalink

Original Article: Hey, guys: Elliot Rodger is our problem
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2014 2:19 AM

One of the reasons I was prone to deflect was that I realize that 
what is, in my judgment, most underlying of female­hate, is 
completely off the table, not to be discussed. Hatred of women is 
inspired by actual experiences of abuse. Sustained, and when 
you're most impressionable and vulnerable. Not by an enemy but 
by all those insufficiently loved/respected mothers out there ­­ the 
legions of them ­­ that can't help but expect their children to 
provision them with the nurturing they themselves didn't receive. 
This means children get used, early, when they needed exactly the 
opposite; and being used here produces the rage. 

The later environment(s) of female­hate is hardly a help. It 
encourages and legitimates revenge, when it could have nurtured 
understanding and respect ­­ especially if boys' own neglect was 
recognized and respected. But, say, those New York liberal parents
out there wouldn't have problems with their own boys hating 
women even if their entire cultural milieu was somehow owned by 
Rush Limbaugh. They'd of had more loved mothers who did 
nothing to them that would engender that level of true hate, and so 
are guaranteed the kinds of guys out there who see hatred of 
women as absurd ­­ feel it in their bones, beyond thought. If 
resistance to Rush was previously nowhere, these boys would from
produce it … apparently out of nowhere. They'd of had the right 
mothers even if denied for two decades, the right "books." 

Also, there are some guys out there who are feminists a bit too 
easily, as if they've readily crumbled to a great power they can 

borrow. If they're that because at some level they're pleasing their 
own punitive inner maternal altars, their superegos, you have to 
watch out because they'll surely find some way to find revenge for 
still­life­path­determining previous neglect and abuse. This 
happens in wars, for instance, where men pledge absolute fealty to 
their motherlands, become Her knights, then persistently rape 
abroad ­­ war's greatest prize. 

I realize no one wants to talk about any of this right now but it 
does take us back to about the age­levels and "party members" 
Freud thought we should mostly focus on to understand our larger 
society. Not movies but incest. Not loving but wanting to combat 
and kill our parents, even if displaced and deferred.  
Permalink

Original Article: How Seth Rogen proved Ann 

Hornaday’s point about Elliot Rodger
THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 12:02 AM

What Eliott Rodger did was make life seem that much more scary 
and random for young people. Joan Walsh wrote an article awhile 
ago where she looked at the world we've created for kids, and 
judged seriously that we must hate them. I believe somewhere in 
the same article she speculated that it might be still our Calvinist 
heritage, our inherent belief that human 
beings/pleasure/youthfulness are sinful, that unconsciously 
motivates us to throw one generation under the bus after a few 
previous had known optimistic, prosperous times. 

If behind the policies that are freezing the potential of youth to feel
secure in this world, is any hint that this is what the adult 
population actually wants for its children right now, vulnerable 
youth might pick up on it and seek to please us by helping 
communicate there'll not soon be any relapse to the tension.

We know nations can turn sadistic; we know they can wholesale 
sacrifice their kids. As I said, I think overall Apatow and Rogen 
are actually amongst those who are going to be partaking less in 
whatever mental illness is collectively driving us to forge a world 
to give our children nightmares. We should have their back.  
Permalink

Original Article: How Seth Rogen proved Ann 

Hornaday’s point about Elliot Rodger
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 7:46 PM

Rogen, Apatow and Favreau strike me as reasonably emotionally 
healthy people, and it's overall a good thing people of either sex 
are exposed to them. Tinkering with the overt message their films 
send may not matter so much as if they themselves are regressing 
or evolving … what we took at a felt level from "being in their 
company." 

It is possible that society is cueing vulnerable people to go on these
slaughters of the innocent. We may have long ago passed that point
where human progress felt permitted. And despite punishing 
austerity measures, splitting populations into a narrow sliver whose

role is arrogant opulence and a broad spectrum whose role is to 
will down their knowledge that a pre­revolutionary France societal 
structure should feel regressive, it's not clear that we're just stuck, a
lost generation / decade. It can't be hid; there's still percolations of 
the new. 

So we send out signals that periodic mass sacrifices of the innocent
will make us feel momentarily absolved of a larger response to our 
collective ongoing sin. 
Permalink

Original Article: How Seth Rogen proved Ann 

Hornaday’s point about Elliot Rodger
WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 7:04 PM

nimitta Concerning Apatow, you sound a bit like a lawyer making 
a plea tailored to fit jury prejudices … what HAD to be said to get 
their client off. 

That is, if I re­watch his movies and all he comes across is that ­­ 
where plights are only satisfying to the extent that these 
menchildren grow up; where "maturation" gets stunted but isn't to 
be questioned ­­ I'll probably lose my consideration of him as a 
genuine artist. 
Permalink

Original Article: “Godzilla” is the best action movie since 

“Jaws”
SATURDAY, MAY 17, 2014 2:56 AM

Our mommies were once way bigger than us, as well as sometimes
absolutely terrifying, and boy was it exciting when She opened a 
can of whoop­ass on others presuming to possess Her power! 
Permalink

Original Article: To circumcise or not to circumcise?
FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 3:43 AM

Leslie eshu21 Circumcision does ready men for war. If your 
mother is so demon­haunted by her own mother, who hates her for 
daring to individuate and turn her attention away from her and all 
her still­unaddressed needs onto herself and her own child (who 
will focus solely on her during its first few years of life), that she 
in possession is the first to introduce you to the Devil, then later in 
life to show you think, as well, that innocents DESERVE being 
killed and crippled­­and thereby gain her approval, and finally her 
love­­you go to war and kick the shit out of populations of people. 
You don't fail, of course, to obliterate a substitute for your mother, 
who you still unconsciously want to rape and kill for what she did 
to you. This is why wars target innocent kids and women­­it's all 
about obliging yourself so you show you deserve love, and 
obliterating the bitch who could make you so twisted so to see any 
kind of logic in this. 
Permalink

Original Article: To circumcise or not to circumcise?
FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 3:22 AM

kchoze Would you be okay with a woman "choosing" to mutilate 
her clitoris? I doubt it. You ground someone into how deserving of
hate they are so early in life, even as an adult they'll reflect in their 
disregard of themselves how right "you" the parent were to hate 
them, to let them, to WILL them, to be mutilated. And so, they still
hope, with their on their own mutilating themselves further, maybe
have a chance at the love "you" inexplicably denied them. 
"You" wanted them to be a pin­cushion, so they made themselves 
that. Now "YOU'VE" GOT to be more in the mood to drop the 
knife and offer instead the hug. 
Permalink

Original Article: To circumcise or not to circumcise?
FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013 3:11 AM

MEW is an idiot. Male circumcision is exactly the same as hacking
at young girls' genitals. The only thing you do is stop it. A lot of 
Americans had it done to their children, because a lot of Americans
are so demon­afflicted, so unevolved, that they see a lovely new 
birthed soul, and instantly feel compelled to teach it a lesson.  
Permalink

Original Article: Supreme Court strikes down DOMA
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 2:48 PM

gkrevvv Interesting take on marriage. Certainly useful to reflect 
on. 

Permalink

Original Article: How to get chicks without being a jerk
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 5:20 AM

My guess is that a lot of guys who are great listeners HAD to adopt
that role with their mothers. They learned they had to closely 
attend to them, and when they did so they received affirmation and
love. Their fate is to become friend­zoned, as I'm hearing people 
here call it, because their tendency is to default to the needs of a 
woman rather than forge their own way in the world. You can't 
love, truly admire, someone like that. 
(Hey Salon, I'm stil listed as only having posted one comment. Is 
anyone else having the same problem?)

Permalink

Original Article: The ugly SCOTUS voting rights flim­

flam
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 2:13 AM

test post
Permalink

Original Article: Is the “fat acceptance” movement losing?
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 1:14 AM

@Kamil Moscatopolitano Good luck with things, Kamil. 
Permalink

Original Article: Is the South more racist than the North?
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 10:04 PM

@Jeremy McKenna. I'm trying to recover too. Maybe when I'm 
back to norm I'll wonder why Salon seems like it has just stirred 
into the kind of crazy state one wanders into just before deciding 
on a war ­­ maybe such and such a people ARE evil ­­ rather than 
its more conscious other self that knows this fact well enough 
already, and has been long­slog working to help bulk up the 
deficient side. 
Permalink

Original Article: Is the “fat acceptance” movement losing?
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 9:54 PM

Patricia Schwarz toast2042 Re: The brain has ways of making the 
organism eat ... I'll eat whatever is around
Personally, I'd call that more unmet oral needs. The curse of our 
brains, our DNA, of something independent of our control, is that 
fatty foods are WAY better tasting than low­fat foods are. That is, 
every human being is presented with a challenge: eat what you 
should eat to enjoy the eating experience as much as possible, and 
it may be unlikely you won't gain some weight; or, deny yourself, 
live everyday a bit worse as far as pleasure from diet is concerned, 
and stick to a good chunk of low­fat options (no oils on your 
salads, for example), and live without any excess weight. 

Right now, I'm living on a strict diet of no comment history I can 
actually access owing to flaws in this insufficiently tested new 
comment system, and am feeling very denied. Sigh. (unhappy face)
Published comments
Original Article: Is the “fat acceptance” movement losing?
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 7:52 PM

metropolitannyc Emotionally healthy people aren't going to be 
obese. But if we start telling people who eat food to compensate 
for the like of not having received enough attention in their youth, 
that what they are is not okay, I don't think when they switch to 
becoming gym­rats we've really gotten them anywhere. 
They'll be fit as a fiddle; of great physique to scold other people 
and immune now, mostly, to themselves being further scolded; but 
really just as denied. 
Permalink

Original Article: Is the “fat acceptance” movement losing?
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 7:13 PM

CyclingFool Re: We don't laugh at smokers and we don't blame 
people who are dying of lung cancer because they couldn't quit 
smoking. We understand the addictive power of tobacco and blame
the tobacco companies for poisoning people for profit.
This shouldn't be the only progressive response, however ­­ 
smoking owes to childhood conditions; and not nice ones. 
Unfortunately we skip away and pretend all human beings are a 
kind of type ­­ all good­hearted natural proletariats, or something, 

without the resources to take on giant companies and all their 
machinations. Looking away from truth is immature, and humanly 
neglectful. They shouldn't be blamed; not at all. But while we war 
against those who'd prey on them, we should still remember they're
in need of other kinds of help as well. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Hayes: Bring on the upper­middle­

class revolution!
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 7:04 PM

@SansArc Re: The middle class has never risen up against the 
elites.
Actually, I'm pretty sure they're the ones who do it. This quote 
comes to mind: 
The middle classes­­"hardly touched by the depression" ­­and the 
wealthy­­"the richer the precinct the higher the Nazi vote" ­­were 
the main sources of the over two­thirds of all delegates who voted 
Hitler dictator. http://www.psychohistory.com/htm/eln06_war.html
Permalink

Original Article: Announcing Salon’s new comments 

system: It rules
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 6:43 PM

Leslie Hey Leslie, like Brad Benson here, I want a site that makes 
it possible to hear opinions we may at first find offensive, but 
perhaps later come to understand and like. I want to hear from true 

PROGRESSIVES, that is, who always say things societally 
untoward at first, before it kicks in as okay ­­ "Shit, I didn't know 
you were allowed to say that!; I never was." Think of when the 
new left emerged, and what was said of their ostensibly rude, self­
centered mannerisms by the old left. Shit, these "civilized" folk 
were practically with the Kent State shooters. 
Anyway, I for one most certainly don't want to see BBC 
moderation define what some swing young Americans might offer 
the world. 
Permalink

Original Article: Is the “fat acceptance” movement losing?
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 6:32 PM

It is scary when the world is suddenly ready to crash down on 
certain people, and Daniel is right that it does seem to be crashing 
down on obese people. Somewhere out there there are people who 
would like to be in a climate where it can just be admitted that 
being fat means you're compensating for not receiving sufficient 
attention and love, but it seems we most hear from who'd gird 
these people from any self­reflection, and those ready to hawk 
down and rip them apart. 
Being fat does tell you something about someone; it is a sure tell. 
So is nail­biting, something I've regressed to lately, and am glad I 
know isn't simply some DNA­determined condition or something. 
Permalink

Original Article: Chris Hayes: Bring on the upper­middle­

class revolution!
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 6:12 PM

fishboo If this wasn't where you were at, and academia gave you 
an immediately rewarding, even posh life, are you sure you 
wouldn't feel even more precarious? How would it be to post in a 
comment section that you've found a job that has delivered on all 
fronts, and excuse yourself from jealousy or class resentment by 
something along the lines of, "well, me being happy makes it 
easier for me to offer more to my students"?
This would be the truth, of course, but how many of us in positions
that might be ascribed as elite would feel comfortable if we didn't 
have some serious wounds to show, if we were suddenly 
surrounded by a crowd in Guy Fawkes masks? It could happen; I 
think we all feel, that it could happen. 
Permalink

Original Article: Announcing Salon’s new comments 

system: It rules
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2013 4:18 PM

Re:  Salon was one of the first sites to allow readers to comment 
on stories
Personally, I wouldn't have written it this way. Given today's 
stigmatization of commenters as potential trolls, "allowed" still 
communicates that readers are kids seeking bonbons, that the more
generous and obliging are still willing to hand out. In this climate 
what needed to be said was something more like this: Salon was 
one of the first sites to recognize that it's overall content was 
strongly enhanced if it enabled readers to comment. 

Re: Happy commenting — and remember to play nice!
Okay. But once upon a time this site encouraged people to NOT 
hold back (the exact words were, I think, "don't hold back!"), to 
not be timid or too self­censoring, I kid you not! The emphasis was
to ensure that people didn't hold back from trying things that would
keep people wanting to come back to the salon. Agreeing that if 
you don't watch your step, you might inadvertently become one of 
those tempest­full trolls infesting the web, might just mean starting
up this new go­around already in braces. 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful