CONSERVATION ASSESSMENT

Center Church Crypt, New Haven, Connecticut










January 14, 2010





New England Cemetery Services
Jonathan Appell, principal
Nick Pedemonti
Edward G. FitzGerald

New England Cemetery Services
West Hartford, CT 06107
27 Miles Standish Drive
Phone: (860) 558-2785
Fax: (860) 232-6656
E-mail: info@GravestoneConservation.com
Index New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt

1 Introduction ...................................................................................... 2
2 Past Conservation Efforts .................................................................. 2
3 Condition Survey ............................................................................... 4
3.1 SITE ......................................................................................................... 5
3.2 GENERAL PROBLEMS ................................................................................... 5
3.3 PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH SPECIFIC STONE TYPES ................................... 6
4 Applied Preventive and Remedial Measures ..................................... 8
4.1 CLEANING ................................................................................................. 8
4.2 TISSUE REMOVAL ....................................................................................... 8
4.3 RESETTING ................................................................................................ 8
5 Recommended Treatment Program .................................................. 9
5.1 PREVENTIVE MEASURES .............................................................................. 9
5.1.1 Humidity Control ........................................................................................ 9
5.1.2 Visitor Use Guidelines .................................................................................. 9
5.2 ACTIVE CONSERVATION MEASURES .............................................................. 9
5.2.1 Cleaning .................................................................................................. 10
5.2.2 Desalination ............................................................................................. 11
5.2.3 Consolidation ........................................................................................... 12
5.2.4 Monitor Lead Encasements ......................................................................... 13
5.2.5 Remove Lead Encasements/Reset Markers ................................................... 14
5.2.6 Repair Patching ........................................................................................ 14
6 Estimate of Costs ............................................................................ 16
Appendix A: Glossary
Appendix B: Individual Marker Assessments
Appendix C: Structural Engineer’s Report
Appendix D: Products and Manufacturers
















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1 INTRODUCTION
In June 2007, Jonathan Appell, principal conservator at New England Cemetery
Services (NECS), was contacted by James W. Campbell of Center Church in New
Haven, Connecticut, to conduct a condition assessment of the grave markers located
in the basement Crypt of the Church’s facility at 311 Temple Street. Caretakers of
the Crypt had noted accelerated deterioration of the grave markers despite past
conservation and stabilization efforts. The services of NECS were secured to conduct
an assessment of the markers exhibiting the highest degree of damage and
deterioration, to carry out initial conservation and stabilization treatment of those
markers, and to produce a report documenting the applied treatments and
recommend a program to prevent further deterioration of the markers.

The Center Church Crypt has a unique history. The Church congregation first erected
a building on the site located at 311 Temple Street, adjacent to the New Have Green,
in 1639. This early frame structure was replaced by a larger facility in 1670, then by
a brick structure in 1770 and finally, by the current facility in 1815. Throughout this
period, the Church property also served as a central burying ground for New Haven.
However in 1814, when construction of the present Church facility began, the burial
ground was no longer in use. Due to spatial limitations of the Church property,
bounded by Temple Street to the West and the inactive burial ground to the East,
the architect of the 1815 Church facility devised a solution to expand the footprint of
the Church to meet the growth of its congregation by erecting the new facility over a
portion of the old burial ground. The graves located within the expanded footprint
were left undisturbed and incorporated as a crypt beneath the new facility. Thus, the
stone grave markers located within the Crypt have been spared many of the effects
of weathering which have damaged other markers of a similar vintage located in
unsheltered environments. The Crypt presently supports regular public visitation and
serves an important historical function as a uniquely preserved record of early
American funerary practices.

2 PAST CONSERVATION EFFORTS
Prior to executing assessment and treatment of the Crypt markers, NECS conducted
a survey of past conservation work done at the site. In 1985, the Center for
Preservation Research (CPR) at Columbia University, New York was contracted by
the Church to conduct a survey of 152 “table” tombs and grave markers and 44
marker fragments located within the Crypt and to prepare a treatment program for
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their conservation.
1
Each of the markers was documented
2
and given a “priority”
ranking for conservation treatment.

CPR’s assessment established that many of the markers suffer from stone decay
induced by the movement and evaporation of soluble salts carried by ground water
that wicked up through the stones from the soil in which they are seated. The
assessment further determined that the damaging effects of salt movement through
the stones had been exacerbated by the presence of an impermeable asphalitic and
concrete floor which had been laid around the stones circa 1879 and the installation
of a central heating system circa 1965 which promoted the evaporation of aqueous
salt solutions and deposition and crystallization of salts on the stones’ surfaces.

CPR’s assessment recommended the removal of the impermeable flooring material
and excavation of several inches of soil beneath it. After archaeological testing by
Overhead Construction, Inc. and further review by Joseph Simeone Architects, this
recommendation was carried out. In the summer of 1990, the impermeable flooring
was replaced by brick pavers and care was taken to leave an area of soil around the
markers exposed to permit evaporation. CPR also proposed and tested a number of
stone conservation treatments, however these were not carried out (the scope of
their contract did not include the execution of treatments).

In December of 1990, the Architectural Conservation Laboratory (ACL) at the
University of Pennsylvania was contracted to continue work started by CPR by
developing and executing a program of stone conservation treatments to repair and
stabilize the condition of markers in the Crypt.
3
Their work included testing of
treatment products and methodology, initiation of treatment (primarily initial
cleaning, removal of residue left by composite floor, and desalination) of 50 markers
determined stabile enough to undergo treatment (Priority 1, 2, and 3 markers as
determined by CPR), repair and resetting of markers and marker fragments that had
either been covered by or incased in the (now removed) composite floor, and
monitoring of applied treatments and Crypt environmental conditions.

ACL environmental monitoring established that moisture levels are high within the
Crypt due to high soil moisture content (up to 7.62%), water entering (due to lack of
proper drainage) through perimeter walls, high relative humidity (80% ±5%,

1
Center for Preservation Research, “Center Church-on-the-Green: Condition Survey and Conservation
Program for Monuments in the Crypt,” Center for Preservation Research, Columbia University, New York
(1985).
2
Though the report produced by the Columbia Center and subsequent researchers indicates that survey
documentation of all markers was prepared, this record could not be located within the Church archives.
3
F.G. Matero, et al., “Center Church Crypt, Conservation Program: Phase II,” Architectural Conservation
Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (1991).
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primarily due to evaporation of ground water through permeable brick flooring and
foundation walls and capillary rise of water through marker stones), and
condensation resulting from the temperature gradient between warm air and cold
stone surfaces. Markers located near perimeter walls were found to be most affected
by moisture issues. Based on these findings, ACL recommended improvements to
Crypt ventilation and introduction of a dehumidification system as well as a
comprehensive repair and maintenance program to address problems with the
building envelope. During ACL’s tenure, action was taken to stabilize and seal Crypt
perimeter walls resulting in notable remediation of moisture problems affecting
markers in close proximity to these walls.

ACL’s activities also included temporary stabilization by means of pre-consolidation
(ethyl-methacrylate copolymer resin solution, applied to marble Marker No. 145H
only) and application of Japanese tissue facings (adhered with acrylic resin
emulsified in an ethyl acetate solution, i.e. Acryloid B72) on 21 Priority 1 sandstone
makers exhibiting active deterioration in the form of flaking, scaling, or exfoliating
surfaces. ACL’s report indicates that these measures were intended to act only as
temporary stabilization and that facings should be removed and replaced after one
year, however, no further action was taken and tissue facings were left in place.
4

ACL recommended continued site monitoring, more through documentation of
markers, the introduction of a permanent marker numbering system, improvements
to interpretation and presentation of markers, and a program of conservation
treatments.

Sometime following ACL’s work in the Crypt, an unknown party was contracted to
continue conservation of the stone markers. While no documentation of the work
completed by this contractor is available, evidence suggests that their work included
the excavation and application of lead flashing encasements to the below-grade
portion of 11 separate markers.
3 CONDITION SURVEY
NECS began work at the site by undertaking an initial survey of Crypt contents and
the building envelope to assess forms of deterioration affecting markers and
determine their possible causes. Twenty-two markers showing clear evidence of past
treatment or immediate deterioration were located for treatment (only twenty of
these were treated by NECS due to budgetary/time constraints). NECS determined
that much of the visible deteriorate of markers can be attributed to site and building
related factors. Services of a structural engineering firm, Structures North
Consulting Engineers, Inc., were retained to provide an expert assessment of

4
Ibid., Sect. 5.3.2, p. 136.
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contributory factors of stone deterioration in the Crypt. Their report and
recommendations are contained in Appendix C.

3.1 SITE
Each of the above mentioned studies and conservation treatment programs
conducted by predecessors has observed or attempted to mitigate the damaging
effects of water infiltration in the Crypt.
Water infiltration remains the single
greatest site-related factor contributing to
the deterioration of markers. The
effectiveness of any conservation treatment
program addressing the condition of the
Crypt contents is wholly dependent upon
successful mitigation of water infiltration
through the building envelope.

Improper drainage and surface run-off are the root source of water infiltration to the
Crypt. When charged with water from a rain event, the soils adjacent to and beneath
the Crypt walls become fully saturated or “water-logged”. Present site conditions do
not promote proper shedding of surface and ground water away from foundation
walls. Ground water is then wicked up through the makers from the soil in which
they are set. Additional moisture contributing to damp Crypt conditions enters
through failing foundation walls. Condensation of moisture occurs because of
temperature variants between warmer Crypt air and colder foundation walls.

Damp conditions were duly noted by the ACL report which included
recommendations for repairs and treatments to decrease Crypt moisture levels.
Recent remediatory efforts to correct structural drainage issues are apparent (e.g.
new plastic PVC piping visible) in interior drainage systems visible in attic where the
roof line meets the exterior walls. However, on repeated visits to site during rain
events, this system has been observed to be partially ineffective. Inadequate
capacity, faulty construction, or some blockage in the drainage system appears to be
preventing collected water from discharging through the leaders in sufficiently high
volume. This system requires further inspection and possible repair by a qualified
drainage professional.
3.2 GENERAL PROBLEMS
Evidence of alteration, damage, degradation observed in many makers can be
attributed to the following factors:

Soluble Salts:
Water infiltration remains
the single greatest site-
related factor contributing to
the deterioration of markers.
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Efflorescence and subflorescence resulting from the evaporation of saline water
present in the porous structure of stone is a primary agent of decay affecting stones
in the Crypt. Damage resulting from the presence of salts is manifest in the form of
scaling, spalling, delamination and general loss of stone surface material.

Lead Casings:
Lead flashing (comprised of lead or lead-coated copper) encasing sub-grade stone
surfaces, applied to shield markers from ground water infiltration, were visible above
grade level on some stones. Portions of the lead encasements protruding above
grade (possibly to prevent water from entering through the top of and flowing down
behind the casements) have obscured decorative carvings and inscriptions present at
the bottom of treated markers. Lead completely encapsulates the bottom portions of
treated markers and may trap moisture against the surface of stones and prevent
proper breathability. Further, temperature variation between the Crypt air, markers,
lead encasements, and soil may promote formation of condensation between the
makers and lead encasements.

Markers Set Below Grade:
Some markers have either been re-set below grade level or have been partially
obscured due to grade level change (which likely occurred during the installation of
either the composite floor or later brick floor). Portions of decorative carvings and
inscriptions present at the bottom of some markers have been obscured below
grade. Obscured portions have become discolored by minerals present in ground
water.

Graffiti:
Some markers have been disfigured or discolored by crayons or pencils used to take
grave rubbings. In the most extreme cases, markers have been permanently gouged
or scratched from this activity.

3.3 PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH SPECIFIC STONE TYPES
Sandstone:
The majority of makers in the Crypt are carved from brown Triassic sandstone
(“brownstone”). Sandstones are generally more porous than other rocks, leaving
them particularly susceptible to absorption of decay-inducing solutions which may
result in surface loss. Surface loss in the form of disintegration, flaking, and scaling
presents the most serious and widespread threat to markers in the Crypt. Damage of
this nature is most likely due to absorption of ground water laden with natural salts
and other minerals which form crystals in the open pore structure of the stone. This
crystalline deposition is visible on the surface of most stones of this type in the form
of efflorescence, a white powdery substance. Surface loss due to mineral
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crystallization poses immediate danger to carvings and inscriptions on sandstone
markers.

Soluble salt crystallization was found to be exacerbated by previous conservation
treatments applied to many of the sandstone markers categorized as Priority 1 or 2
by the ACL study. Specifically, the Japanese
tissue facings meant to temporarily stabilize
the surface of these markers have become
saturated in the damp conditions of the
Crypt, holding mineral-laden water on the
treated surfaces. Many of the tissue facings
were applied to sensitive areas of the
markers, across inscriptions and carvings.
In some cases, damage caused by
prolonged exposure and retention of surface moisture resulting has left inscriptions
behind the tissue facings illegible. The acrylic adhesive used in the application of the
facings has also left a residue on the surface of treated makers.

Marble:
A number of markers are carved from white marble originating from quarries located
in Vermont. A few stones are known to have been imported from Italy. The marble
markers are generally in good condition and have not suffered damage resulting
from acidic deposition (i.e. “acid rain”) which commonly affects markers of this
lithology found in exposed outdoor settings. The most common problem affecting
these markers is discoloration. While some of the discoloration is due to naturally
occurring ferrous inclusions in the stone, anthropogenic factors—such as rubbings
taken by visitors—have left black particulate surface soiling. Soiling does not
constitute major cause for concern beyond
aesthetic considerations; however, excessive
soiling may encourage the retention of surface
moisture, adversely affecting the condition of
these stones. A few markers located near the
western perimeter wall are in extremely fragile
condition and suffer from granular
disintegration due to the breakdown of the
stones’ calcium carbonate binder.

Slate:
Markers carved from slate are in generally good condition. Because of its dense
physical composition, slate is significantly less susceptible to the moisture related
damage affecting other stone types in the Crypt. The most common problem
Soluble salt crystallization
was found to be exacerbated
by previous conservation
treatments applied to many
of the sandstone markers…
A few markers… suffer
from granular
disintegration due to the
breakdown of the stones’
calcium carbonate binder.
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affecting slate makers is surface loss due to delamination (or “slatey cleavage”).
Delamination may be induced by mechanical decay processes resulting from the
presence of efflorescences or oxidation of iron inclusions between laminae.

4 APPLIED PREVENTIVE AND REMEDIAL MEASURES
NECS identified 21 markers in need of immediate treatment. The following
treatments were applied to these markers. Prior to application of preventive or
remedial measures, each marker was documented: measurements were taken, pre-
treatment condition noted, and surfaces to be treated were photo documented.
Individual assessments of each marker treated by NECS are contained in Appendix
B.

4.1 CLEANING
Where surface soiling, residues, and surficial build-up of efflorescent salt were
apparent, marker surfaces were cleaned using D/2 Biological Cleaner. Salts and
other particulate matter were removed from stone surfaces with a soft brush.
Surfaces were then prayed with clean water and brushing was repeated to loosen
deposits. Cleaner was applied to affected surfaces with a low-pressure hand sprayer
and allowed to remain on surfaces for approximately one minute before being
thoroughly flushed with water. This method was not effective in all cases and, on
some markers, efflorescent salt or tissue residue remain. A more powerful (i.e.
caustic) cleaner and/or poulticing may be necessary for complete cleaning of these
surfaces.
4.2 TISSUE REMOVAL
On markers where Japanese tissue had been applied, removal of tissue was deemed
necessary to permit proper “breathability” of stone substrate and reduce the
occurrence of damage from soluble salts. Tissue was either partially or completely
removed (where possible) by wetting stone and tissue surfaces with water then, by
pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand and with the aid of a
small metal mason’s trowel. Where delaminated or detached portions of the stone’s
surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue, it was determined that
complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage so, it removal was left
incomplete in these fragile areas.
4.3 RESETTING
Where markers were found to be set so far below grade that portions of their
inscriptions or decorative carvings were obscured, excavation and resetting were
determined necessary. Markers were excavated by hand using shovels and garden
trowels and removed from excavation. Perimeter of excavations were lined with a
“breathable” landscaping fabric (or “geotextile”) to prevent soil and sand from
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migrating, and filling air space in gravel backfill. Bottom of excavations were
adjusted with fill to raise markers anywhere from 3 to 6 inches above previous
setting. Markers were then reset and excavations back-filled with a combination of
50% large “pond stone” gravel and 50% small “pea stone” gravel with no cinders or
crushed stone so as to permit breathability and allow moisture and other deleterious
solutions to escape through the ground. Care was taken at all times to protect
marker surfaces from damage.

5 RECOMMENDED TREATMENT PROGRAM
5.1 PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Preventive conservation is a process that seeks to prevent, reduce, or mitigate the
effect of factors contributing to the deterioration of objects. True preventive
conservation is a holistic approach involving the constant assessment and efficacious
management of all environmental variables including site conditions, visitor use, and
regular maintenance routines.
5.1.1 Humidity Control
The main purpose of relative humidity control is to prevent salt damage. The
humidity regime required to prevent damage in a stone that is contaminated with a
single salt is well established, but stone is more commonly contaminated with a
mixture of salts. In order mitigate damage caused by salts, Crypt perimeter walls
and building envelope must be properly sealed and building features (i.e. gutters and
downspouts) must be maintained to promote discharge of rain water away from site.
Necessary building repair and maintenance should be carried out by a qualified
contractor. Ineffectiveness of existing interior drainage system should be inspected
and addressed by a qualified drainage expert. (For further analysis of Crypt moisture
and site drainage issues, see Appendix C: Structural Engineer’s Report.)
5.1.2 Visitor Use Guidelines
Site visitors should be supervised and the size of groups of visitors limited to prevent
human damage to markers. The practice of taking rubbings of marker inscriptions
and other forms of visitor contact with the markers should be minimized or,
preferably, prohibited. Rubbings made with chalk, pencil, wax crayon, and other
implements can mark stone surfaces and can be difficult to remove. Rubbings may
also scratch some softer stones—this damage is irreversible.

5.2 ACTIVE CONSERVATION MEASURES
Center Church Crypt contains an historically significant and irreplaceable collection of
grave markers. Many of these markers are in critical condition. Their conservation
and protection require the careful attention of a qualified stone conservator. The
conservator should possess practical experience in the treatments outlined below and
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should conduct all work in accordance with the Code of Ethic and Standards of
Practice of the American Institute for the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
(AIC).

The following recommended treatment measures may be carried out over time as
funding permits. Due to the confined environment of the Crypt, hazardous products
should not be used without improvement to site ventilation (e.g. ventilation fans).
Manufacturer’s specifications for safe use of products must be strictly followed.
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the products specified below are contained in
Appendix C of this report.

5.2.1 Cleaning
Removing dirt and other foreign deposits (Japanese tissue remnants, particulate
soiling, staining, biological growth, etc.) from the surface of markers is necessary to
examine the condition of the underlying stone and, in turn, better judge what further
conservation may be necessary. Cleaning may also serve in some circumstances to
remove harmful materials from the surface. However, the primary reason for
cleaning is to improve the appearance of markers. A dirty marker does not look well
cared for and the dirt may obscure fine detail in the carvings and inscriptions.

For general purpose cleaning of non-calcitic stone (i.e. sandstones), a low-acid
masonry cleaner should be used. No acid-based or caustic products should be used
on calcitic stones (i.e. marble). For removal of biological growth, a non-toxic,
biodegradable, biological solution with a neutral pH should be used. Where Japanese
tissue is present, it may be necessary to employ a more aggressive cleaning agent.
For this purpose, pure acetone is recommended as a solvent for the Acyloid B72
reported used by ACL to bind tissue to stone surfaces. Additional cleaning of deep-
seated staining or heavily soiled stone surfaces may be attempted using non-toxic
poulticing (e.g. masonRE® Latex 20, Cathedral Stone Products, Inc.) where
necessary. Poulticing should not be used on poorly consolidated or friable stone
surfaces where material loss is likely to occur.

Note: experience suggests that removal of Japanese tissue from extremely fragile
stone surfaces (i.e. those exhibiting advanced granular disintegration or other
deterioration) is especially difficult and, in many cases, cannot be done without some
loss of surface material. Some additional experimentation with alternative methods
(other than those listed here) may be necessary. “Spot Cleaning” (i.e. cleaning only
affected areas) may be used.

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5.2.2 Desalination
Soluble salts are a major contributor to decay observed on markers in the Crypt.
While it is not possible to completely remove all salts present in stone materials,
salinity may be reduced by washing markers with clean water and the use of
Product
For Sandstone: Sure-Klean® Light Duty Restoration Cleaner® (ProSoCo, Inc.)
Use
Removal of soiling and residues, general cleaning.
Application
1. Working from bottom to top, pre-wet the surface with clean water.
2. Apply Restoration Cleaner using brush. Gently scrub surface.
3. Let dwell for 5 to 15 minutes. Gently scrub heavily soiled areas. Do not let product dry
on the surface. If drying occurs, lightly wet treated surfaces with fresh water. Reapply
cleaner while gentle scrubbing.
4. Rinse surface thoroughly with clean water.
5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 above if necessary.
Comply with manufacturer’s instructions for safe use.

Product
For Sandstone and Marble: D/2 Biological Solution® (Cathedral Stone Products, Inc.)
Use
General cleaning and removal of biological growth.
Application
1. Apply D/2 Biological Solution with a brush to a dry surface. Do not pre-wet surface.
2. After waiting 2-5 minutes, scrub surface with a non-metallic, short bristle scrub brush.
3. Allow undiluted D/2 to remain on the surface 5-10 minutes.
4. Apply additional D/2 to maintain a wet surface and continue scrubbing.
5. Rinse thoroughly with clean, low-pressure water (not more than 300 psi, 1-2 gpm).
Comply with manufacturer’s instructions for safe use.

Product
For Sandstone and Marble: Acetone
Use
Removal of Japanese tissue and Acryloid B72 residue.
Application
Apply acetone with brush or rag to saturate tissue or surface residue. Lightly scrape
saturated tissue from stone surface with small dental spatula. Gently scrub residue from
acetone-saturated surface with bristle brush. Reapply acetone to keep surface saturated
while working. Lightly pat surface with acetone-saturated rag to remove remaining
residue.
Acetone is toxic and highly flammable. Wear skin and eye protection, avoid inhalation, and
keep away from sources of ignition.
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poultices. Desalination through washing should be attempted before resorting to
poultice. Washing may be conducted by wetting stone surfaces with low volume
water sprays or misting devices. Stone is then allowed to so that salts are drawn to
the surface. Salts can be either flushed with water or removed from surface with use
of a damp sponge.


5.2.3 Consolidation
Where stone is severely weakened by decay, some form of consolidation may be
necessary to restore surface integrity. Stone consolidants work by penetrating
decayed surfaces to bind weaker material to stronger substrate. For non-calcitic
stones (i.e. sandstone) an ethyl silicate consolidation treatment that replaces natural
binding materials with silicone dioxide should be used. For calcitic stones (i.e.
marble) hydroxylated conversion treatment that consolidates carbonate mineral
grains should be used. Due to the enclosed (indoor) nature of the site and hazardous
potential of consolidants, no spray application of products should be used. Local
exhaust ventilation, particulate respirators, and skin and eye protection must be
employed in accordance with U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) regulations in order to control harmful chemical exposure and prevent the
accumulation of combustible vapors.

Product
For Sandstone and Marble: sepiolite or attapulgite clay of fine particle size (50mm)
Use
Removal of sub-surficial soluble salts by physical action.
Preparation
Mix clay powder with water to achieve pate-like consistency.
Application
1. Surface must be sound and swept clean of dust, salts, sand or loose fragments. Special
precautions are to be taken where the surface is delicate and/or easily detached.
2. Pre-wet surface with water spray. Saturation must be sufficient for water to reach and
mobilize salts below surface.
3. Apply clay mixture to stone surface in 0.5 inch thickness (or more depending on depth
of contamination) with trowel.
4. Allow poultice to dry for approximately two weeks.
5. Once dry, clay should be removed to expose substrate.
6. Surface should be checked for salt content and poultice or salt residue should be
removed by washing surface with clean water.
This procedure should be repeated until the salt levels are significantly reduced.
Experience suggest that 3 to 4 cycles may be necessary.
Dry clay powders are potentially hazardous substances and must be used with adequate
personal protection, mainly to prevent inhalation of the fine particles.
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5.2.4 Monitor Lead Encasements
While the application of lead encasements is theoretically sound (i.e. protects stone
from ground water, is completely reversible, etc.), its effects in situ may prove
Product
For Sandstone: Conservare OH100® (ProSoCo, Inc.)
Use
Consolidation of natural binding materials.
Application
1. Apply OH100 in repeated applications using brush to saturate surface referred to as
“cycles.” A cycle consists of three successive saturating applications at 5-15 minute
intervals. Typical treatments involve two or three cycles (6-9 separate applications).
2. Allow 20 to 60 minutes between cycles. Laboratory testing will determine the optimum
delay between applications and between cycles.
3. Apply OH100 until excess material remains visible on the surface for 60 minutes
following the last application.
4. Immediately flush excess surface materials using industrial grade MEK (methyl ethyl
ketone) or mineral spirits. If a second treatment is necessary, allow two to three weeks
curing time following first treatment.
Note: This product is combustible and harmful if ingested or inhaled. Fire protection,
adequate ventilation, and safe handling are required. Comply with manufacturer’s
instructions for safe use.

Product
For Marble: Conservare HCT® and HCT Finishing Rinse® (ProSoCo, Inc.)
Use
Consolidation of natural binding materials.
Application
Working from the bottom of the work area to the top, apply HCT in three successive
applications using brush to saturate surface. Treated surfaces must dry thoroughly
between each saturating application of HCT, and prior to application of Finishing Rinse.
HCT
1. Apply HCT to the point of rejection.
2. Allow the treatment to be absorbed for 30 minutes or until surface is visibly dry and
absorbent.
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 until three saturating applications have been completed. With
some stones (e.g. porous limestones), additional applications may be required.
4. Allow surfaces treated with HCT to dry for 30 minutes or until surface is visibly dry.
Finishing Rinse
1. Apply HCT Finishing Rinse to the point of rejection.
2. Allow treated surfaces to dry for 24 hours before applying additional conservation
treatments or surface repairs.
Note: A minimum of 30 minutes drying time is essential between applications. If
necessary, drying time may be extended overnight without adverse effects.
Comply with manufacturer’s instructions for safe use.
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adverse. Condensation may form between stone and lead surfaces where it cannot
escape via evaporation. Further monitoring of moisture levels of markers (especially
during cold months when the ground-Crypt temperature variant is at its greatest)
that have received this treatment is necessary to determine its true effect. Should
adverse conditions be observed, markers should be reset in gravel to permit
breathability and allow moisture and other deleterious solutions to escape through
the ground.
5.2.5 Remove Lead Encasements/Reset Markers
Some of the lead-encased markers show said encasement above grade level. Some
encasements cover portions of inscriptions or decorative carving on the lower
portions of markers. While not posing an immediate danger to the physical condition
of markers, visibility of the lead may be aesthetically obtrusive. Additionally, lead
encasements may prove to have an adverse effect on the physical condition of
markers. To mitigate adverse aesthetic and potentially physical effects on markers,
lead encasements should be removed and markers reset in gravel which will permit
breathability and allow moisture and other deleterious solutions to escape through
the ground.


5.2.6 Repair Patching
Damaged or missing elements and stones exhibiting severe delamination may be
repaired or treated by patching with a restoration grade mortar. Repair patching is
designed to prevent further delamination or surface loss and restore aesthetic
condition by reestablishing cohesion with separated surfaces or elements.
Elastomeric caulks or sealants should not be used for this purpose since there is
Product
Large “pond” and small “pea” stone gravel, landscaping fabric or “geotextile” (home
improvement stores)
Use
Resetting markers in permeable below-grade environment.
Application
1. Determine from measurements the correct height of marker and prepare area for
marker excavation by laying down tarp to collect excavated soil.
2. Excavate marker using garden trowel or small shovel, taking care not to damage stone
surfaces.
3. Remove stone from excavation and remove lead encasement with the use of snips,
saws and other hand tools as necessary, taking care not to damage stone surfaces.
4. Line perimeter of excavation with plastic garden mesh to prevent soil and sand from
migrating into back-fill. Fill bottom of excavation with “pond” and “pea” stone gravel to
adjust marker to appropriate height above grade (measurements should be taken to
ensure correct excavation depth before stone is reset). Ensure that mare is plum, level,
and in plane with adjacent markers.
5. Reset marker in excavation and back-fill with “pond” and “pea” stone gravel, taking care
to adjust marker position (using spirit level).
New England Cemetery Services

Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | 15
considerable risk of moisture entrapment. Stone surfaces may be consolidated prior
to treatment to ensure cohesion of mortar to sound material. All debris, particulate
matter, consolidant residue should be removed from surfaces prior to treatment.
Mortar should be mixed with mineral-based pigment to match color of adjacent stone
and minimize aesthetic impact.


Product
For Sandstone: Jahn® M70 Restoration Mortar (Cathedral Stone Products, Inc.)
Use
Repair and reattachment of non-calcitic stone.
Application
1. Dry or porous surfaces may be pre-wet to prevent the substrate from prematurely
drawing moisture out of mortar.
2. Mix mortar according to manufacturer’s specifications.
3. Apply mortar to stone surface with trowel, ensuring not to leave any voids. For repairs
thicker than 2 inches, apply mortar in layers, allowing the first layer to cure for a two to
four hours before applying the second layer. If applied in layers, scrape off any cement
skin that has formed and continue application. Dampen the surface and before applying
the next layer. Work mortar firmly into the surface of the stone.
4. Build up repair material so that it is slightly above the adjacent masonry surface. Allow
mortar 30 to 60 minutes to set slightly (wait time will vary with temperature and
humidity).
5. Scrape off excess material using a straight edge. Do not press down or “float” the
repair. Where repairs occur at profiled edges or corners, form mortar to
match the profile of the surrounding masonry. In all cases, finish and texture repair so that
it is as indistinguishable as possible from the adjacent masonry.
6. Allow patch to set (approximately 4-6 hours).
7. Clean any mortar residues from area surrounding the repair by sponging as many times
as necessary with clean water. This should be done before repair material sets.
8. After the repair has been cured and allowed to dry for at least one week, if the
appearance of a repair does not meet the specifications of the job, the surface color of the
repair may be enhanced by applying a vapor permeable, mineral based pigmented stain.
Comply with manufacturer’s instruction for safe use.

Product
For Marble: Jahn® M120 Restoration Mortar (Cathedral Stone Products, Inc.)
Use
Repair and reattachment of calcitic stone.
Application
Same as above.
New England Cemetery Services

Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | 16

6 ESTIMATE OF COSTS

Costs reflect recommended conservation (including estimated labor and materials listed) of
twenty-one (21) markers identified and assessed in this report only and do not include
recommended work by other specialty contractors.

Description
Cost per
Stone
Total
Cost
Cleaning, Sandstone Marker $75-450 $7975
Sure-Klean® Light Duty Restoration Cleaner®, Acetone
Cleaning, Marble Marker $75-450 $600
D/2 Biological Solution®, Acetone
Desalination $275-450 $4725
Sepiolite or Attapulgite Clay
Stone Consolidation, Sandstone Marker $350-575 $8750
Conservare OH100®, Portable Air Scrubber Rental
Stone Consolidation, Marble Marker $300-400 $950
Conservare HCT® and HCT Finishing Rinse®
Removal of Lead Encasements/Reset Marker $350-475 $3975
Gravel and Landscaping Fabric
Repair Patching $200-500 $3650
Jahn® M70 Restoration Mortar
Total $30,625











END








New England Cemetery Services

Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | 17

















GLOSSARY OF TERMS
APPENDIX A: Glossary of Terms New England Cemetery Services

Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | A-1

Definitions from, International Council on Monuments and Sites: International Scientific
Committee for Stone (ICOMOS-ISCS), “Illustrated Glossary on Stone Deterioration Patterns”
(Champigny-Marne, France: ICOMOS-ISCS, 2008).

Alteration: Modification of the material that does not necessary imply a worsening of its
characteristics from the point of view of conservation. For instance, a reversible
coating applied on a stone may be considered as an alteration.

Biological colonization: Colonization of the stone by plants and micro-organisms such as
bacteria, cyanobacteria, algae, fungi and lichen (symbioses of the latter three).
Biological colonization also includes influences by other organisms such as animals
nesting on and in stone.

Efflorescence: Generally whitish, powdery or whisker-like crystals on the surface.
Efflorescence is commonly the result of evaporation of saline water present in the
porous structure of the stone.

Crumbling: (Sub-type of disintegration.) Detachment of aggregates of grains from the
substrate. These aggregates are generally limited in size (less than 2 cm). This size
depends of the nature of the stone and its environment.

Damage: Human perception of the loss of value due to decay.

Decay: Any chemical or physical modification of the intrinsic stone properties leading to a loss
of value or to the impairment of use.

Degradation: Decline in condition, quality, or functional capacity.

Delamination: Detachment process affecting laminated stones (most of sedimentary rocks,
some metamorphic rocks...). It corresponds to a physical separation into one or
several layers following the stone laminae. The thickness and the shape of the layers
are variable. The layers may be oriented in any direction with regards to the stone
surface.

Deterioration: Process of making or becoming worse or lower in quality, value, character,
etc...; depreciation.

Discoloration: Change of the stone color in one to three of the color parameters: hue, value
and chroma. Discoloration is frequently produced by salts, by the corrosion of metals
(e.g. iron, lead, copper), by micro-organisms, or by exposure to fire.

Disintegration: Detachment of single grains or aggregates of grains.

Film: Thin covering or coating layer generally of organic nature, generally homogeneous,
follows the stone surface. A film may be opaque or translucent. Paint layers, certain
APPENDIX A: Glossary of Terms New England Cemetery Services

Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | A-2
categories of water repellents or protective agents (e.g. anti-graffiti), sealants, are
considered films.

Graffiti: Engraving, scratching, cutting or application of paint, ink or similar matter on the
stone surface.

Granular disintegration: (Sub-type of disintegration.) Occurs in granular sedimentary
(e.g. sandstone) and granular crystalline (e.g. granite) stones. Granular disintegration
produces debris referred to as a rock meal and can often be seen accumulating at the
foot of wall actively deteriorating. If the stone surface forms a cavity (coving), the
detached material may accumulate through gravity on the lower part of the cavity.
The grain size of the stone determines the size of the resulting detached material. The
following specific terms, all related to granular disintegration, refer either to the size,
or to the aspect of corresponding grains:
Powdering, Chalking: terms sometimes employed for describing granular
disintegration of finely grained stones.
Sugaring : employed mainly for white crystalline marble,
Sanding: used to describe granular disintegration of sandstones and granites.

Pitting: Point-like millimetric or submillimetric shallow cavities. The pits generally have a
cylindrical or conical shape and are not interconnected, although transitions patterns
to interconnected pits can also be observed. Pitting is due to partial or selective
deterioration. Pitting can be biologically or chemically induced, especially on carbonate
stones. Pitting may also result from a harsh or maladapted abrasive cleaning method.

Scaling: Detachment of stone as a scale or a stack of scales, not following any stone structure
and detaching like fish scales or parallel to the stone surface. The thickness of a scale
is generally of millimetric to centimetric scale, and is negligible compared to its surface
dimension.

Soiling: Deposit of a very thin layer of exogenous particles (e.g. soot) giving a dirty
appearance to the stone surface. With increasing adhesion and cohesion, soiling can
transform into a crust. Soiling may originate from atmospheric pollutants (industrial,
domestic or car exhaust products) or from particles transported by running water or
heating convection.

Spalling: (sub-type of scaling.) scaling in which the interface with the sound part of the
stone is parallel to the stone surface. In the case of curved surfaces, spalling may be
called contour scaling.

Subflorescence: Poorly adhesive soluble salts, commonly white, located under the stone
surface. Subflorescence is commonly the result of evaporation of saline water present
in the porous structure of the stone. As subflorescences develop inside the porous
structure, they often result in scaling of the surface.

APPENDIX A: Glossary of Terms New England Cemetery Services

Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | A-3
Encrustation: Compact, hard, mineral outer layer adhering to the stone. Surface morphology
and color are usually different from those of the stone. Encrustations on monuments
are frequently deposits of materials mobilized by water percolation and thus coming
from the building itself: Carbonates, sulfates, metallic oxides and silica are frequently
found.





























































MARKER ASSESSMENTS
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-1


ASSESSMENT FORM KEY

Marker No.: For sake of continuity, NECS adopted the numbering system employed in the
CPL and ACL studies. This system includes two sets of numbers, a Reference Number and
Inscription Number:
Reference Numbers (from 1 to 152) had previously been assigned to all markers
following distinct lines running approximately 30 degrees from the north-south axis.
Numbers appended by an “H” indicate the marker as a headstone, “F”, a foot stone
and “T”, a table tomb (e.g. 7H corresponds to Samuel Wales’ headstone and 10F is his
footstone). Fragments are prefixed by “FG” and numbered FG1 through FG44.
Inscription Numbers, where available, follow the Reference Number in parenthesis
and correspond to an earlier survey conducted by Del Townsend and Marguerite
Thomas.
Note: markers were labeled with this numbering system (possibly by ACL), however numerous
inconsistencies between labels and documentation were encountered (e.g. marker 150H (56),
headstone for Mary Noyes, is labeled as 151F (124) ). Erroneous marker labels are indicated
here by an asterisk (*) following the correct Marker Number (i.e. 150H (56)* for headstone of
Mary Noyes).
Name: the inscribed name on the marker (may no longer be visible, i.e. procured from
records)
Section No.: dividing the Crypt into four separate sections were adopted from the CPL and
ACL studies (see Section Map below).
Marker Type: the physical form of the marker as one of, head stone (HS), foot stone (FS).
Material: the primary stone from which the marker is carved.
Dimensions: length x width x height (given in inches).
Priority: the current priority for conservation treatment as one of:
1 Critical condition, active deterioration, requires immediate attention,
extensive treatment.
2 Serious condition, active deterioration, requires treatment as soon as
possible.
3 Stable condition, agent of deterioration present, requires moderate
treatment.

Existing Condition: the state in which the marker was found prior to any treatment.
Applied Treatments: description of the conservation treatment applied to the marker.
Post-treatment Condition: the state in which the marker was left following treatment.
Recommended Treatments: recommendations for further conservation treatment, as one or
more of: Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement, Remove Lead
Encasement, Resetting, Repair Patching. See report for details of treatment.







APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-2


Center Church Crypt Section Map



Modified from drawing by Joseph Simeone Architects, LLC.
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-3


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
149 (52)

Name:
Joseph Haynes Noyes
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
13 x 15.5 x 2.5 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present two inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue. Extensive efflorescence present below area covered by tissue.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue completely removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Much of the surface behind the tissue exhibits high levels of deterioration
with pitting apparent to a depth of approximately one quarter inch and
advanced scaling and granular disintegration widespread.

Recommended Treatments:
Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace Lead Encasement, possible
Repair Patching















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-4

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
149 (52)
Name:
Joseph Haynes Noyes



Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009






APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-5

Image Description:
Marker showing surface loss upon tissue removal.
Marker No.:
149 (52)
Name:
Joseph Haynes Noyes



Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-6


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
150H (56)*

Name:
Mary Noyes
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
16.5 x 32 x 4 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present three inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Much of the surface behind the tissue (where removed) showed highly
advanced efflorescence. Noticeable crystalline efflorescence buildup was
present within the inscription.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace
Lead Encasement, possible Repair Patching








APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-7

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
150H (56)*
Name:
Mary Noyes


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-8



Image Description:
Close-up of marker after removal of loose tissue.
Marker No.:
150H (56)*
Name:
Mary Noyes


Perspective:
Front, midsection
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-9


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
151F (124)*

Name:
John Noyes A.M.
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
FS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
14.5 x 25.5 x 3 in.



Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present 3.5 inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
The remaining tissue is spread from three to seventeen inches above grade;
from the top edge of the lead encasement and the inscribed name, “Noyes”.
Much of the surface behind the tissue (where removed) exhibited advanced
buildup of efflorescence. Efflorescence progressively more advanced toward
the bottom of the marker and the top of the lead encasing. High levels of
deterioration with pitting and granular disintegration were apparent at the
stone’s surface.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace
Lead Encasement, possible Repair Patching



APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-10

Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
151F (124)*
Name:
John Noyes A.M.


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-11


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
152H*

Name:
[illegible]
Deborah Jones?
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
18.5 x 18.5 x 3 in.


Existing Condition:
No lead or tissue present. Stone no longer holds any of its original surface
layer and has deteriorated beyond recognition (i.e. no visible trace of
inscription apparent) above grade. Deterioration is considerably less
pronounced below grade, however, it is difficult to determine how much of
the above-grade surface has been lost based on initial viewing. Surface of
stone exhibits a green, yellow, and brown chemical residue (unidentified).
Marker is in close proximity to an outer wall which has itself been
compromised by decay and delamination; this factor has likely contributed to
the marker’s deterioration.

Applied Treatments:
Due to the fragility of surface material, no initial treatment was applied for
fear of accelerating decay.

Post-Treatment Condition:
No initial treatment was applied; stone remains in highly deteriorated state.

Recommended Treatments:
Repair and stabilization of adjacent wall (immediate impact on this marker),
Consolidation, possible Repair Patching








APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-12


Image Description:
Marker before treatment showing advanced decay.
Marker No.:
152H
Name:
[illegible]


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-13


Priority:
2
Marker No.:
125 (15)

Name:
Ann Cooke
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
18 x 27 x 3.5 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present 1.5 inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue. Deterioration present in center of inscription, upper left corner on
front of marker, and upper right corner on back.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with water
then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand and
with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of the
stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Surface behind the tissue (where removed) exhibited minor granular
disintegration, pitting (pitting occurred in a linear formation), and advanced
efflorescence.

Recommended Treatments:
Desalination, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace Lead Encasement, possible
Repair Patching







APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-14

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
125 (15)
Name:
Ann Cooke


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-15

Image Description:
Marker before treatment, close-up of deterioration
Marker No.:
125 (15)
Name:
Ann Cooke


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/27/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-16

Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
125 (15)
Name:
Ann Cooke


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009









APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-17

Image Description:
Close-up of marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
125 (15)
Name:
Ann Cooke


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-18


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
112H (124)

Name:
John Noyes A.M.
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
27.5 x 52.5 x 4 in.


Existing Condition:
No lead visibly present. Stone partially wrapped with Japanese tissue.
Portions of the tissue had been previously removed either manually, by
gravity, or decay of the stone or the tissue itself. Spalling present on the
front and lower portion of the back of marker.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Further spalling and granular disintegration apparent in areas where tissue
was successfully removed. From the time of last complete record of marker’s
inscription, stone has apparently lost approximately 50% of its surface,
rendering the maker illegible in areas indicated by ellipses: “of whic... an
agreeable… and, in… he… of… resigned in death.” Minimal efflorescence
buildup on disintegrating areas and scaling debris.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation




APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-19

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
112H (124)
Name:
John Noyes A.M.


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-20

Image Description:
Close-up of marker showing efflorescence and rising damp.
Marker No.:
112H (124)
Name:
John Noyes A.M.


Perspective:
Front, lower left
Date Taken:
5/27/2009













APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-21

Image Description:
Close-up showing surface loss behind removed tissue.
Marker No.:
112H (124)
Name:
John Noyes A.M.


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-22


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
135H (90)

Name:
Rebeca Trowbridge
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
14.5 x 22 x 2.5 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present two inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue. Fine granular disintegration and advanced delamination present at
lower section of back side. Inscription partially illegible. Efflorescence visible
one to two inches above lead encasement.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue completely removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with small metal trowels.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Further delamination and granular disintegration apparent in areas where
tissue was removed.

Recommended Treatments:
Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace Lead
Encasement, Repair Patching












APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-23

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
135H (90)
Name:
Rebeca Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009



APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-24

Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue, showing severe scaling.
Marker No.:
135H (90)
Name:
Rebeca Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-25


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
118H (14)

Name:
Ann Collins
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
22 x 27.5 x 2.5 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present two inches above grade (covering bottom border
inscription). Stone wrapped with Japanese tissue. Granular disintegration in
crack-like fashion across middle of winged hourglass carving and through
inscription. Majority of inscription lost since previous assessment conducted
by University of Pennsylvania.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Surface behind the tissue (where removed) exhibited advanced granular
disintegration and surface loss. Advanced delamination present in bottom
right quarter of area covered by tissue. Deterioration (indicated by ellipses)
preventing legibility of inscription:
“Mrs ANN the … ife
Of Capt Ebe … r
Col… [disintegration]
who die… [delamination]”

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace
Lead Encasement, Repair Patching


APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-26
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
118H (14)
Name:
Ann Collins


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009



APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-27
Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
118H (14)
Name:
Ann Collins


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-28


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
143H (92)

Name:
Stephen Trowbridge
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
24.5 x 36 x 4-3 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present three inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue. Advanced efflorescence present up to ten inches above lead
casement. Delamination present above efflorescence. Advanced granular
disintegration present within delaminated areas and at edges of
efflorescence.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue completely removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Rapid deterioration (indicated by ellipses) apparent from comparison of
previous record or marker’s inscription (recorded by University of
Pennsylvania):
Present Inscription Previous Recorded Inscription
“April … D 17 …
… ”
“April 25th A.D. 1796
… aetat LXX”

Recommended Treatments:
Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace Lead
Encasement

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-29

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
143H (92)
Name:
Steven Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-30

Image Description:
Marker before treatment, close-up of damaged area.
Marker No.:
143H (92)
Name:
Steven Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front, lower.
Date Taken:
5/27/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-31

Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
143H (92)
Name:
Steven Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-32


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
142F (92)

Name:
Stephen Trowbridge
Section No.:

Marker Type:
FS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
14 x 15.5 x 3 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present 1.5 inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue (portions previously removed). Advanced efflorescence present one to
three inches above lead casement. Delamination present at center of marker,
three inches above lead. Granular disintegration present at front left
carvings. Minor delamination.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Japanese tissue still present in places, clear presence of efflorescent salts,
evident surface loss, minor continuation of granular disintegration.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace
Lead Encasement






APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-33



Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
142F (92)
Name:
Stephen Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009









APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-34



Image Description:
Marker after tissue removal.
Marker No.:
142F (92)
Name:
Stephen Trowbridge


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-35


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
138 (104)

Name:
Stephen Whitehead
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
23.5 x 27 x 4-3.5 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present two inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue completely removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Extensive loss of inscription. Delamination throughout inscribed name. Spot
efflorescence on the bottom border design. Further efflorescence on lower
portions of stone previously covered by tissue.

Recommended Treatments:
Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace Lead
Encasement








APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-36

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
138 (104)
Name:
Stephen Whitehead


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009










APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-37

Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
138 (104)
Name:
Stephen Whitehead


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009






APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-38

Image Description:
Close-up of surface loss behind removed tissue.
Marker No.:
138 (104)
Name:
Stephen Whitehead


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-39


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
126H (69)

Name:
Timothy Prout
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
21 x 28 x 3-3.5 in.


Existing Condition:
No Lead visibly present. Stone wrapped with Japanese tissue. Granular
disintegration present throughout stone surface, particularly at carved figure
at top of marker.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.
Portions of inscription were lost during tissue removal due to delamination
and granular disintegration.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Extensive loss of inscription and carving in areas previously covered with
tissue. Extensive delamination throughout front midsection. Efflorescence
apparent above midsection (previously covered by tissue). Paint film of an
unidentified composition appears in a four-inch-wide strip along the bottom
of the marker.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace
Lead Encasement, possible Repair Patching


APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-40

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
126H (69)
Name:
Timothy Prout


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009







APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-41

Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
126H (69)
Name:
Timothy Prout


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009







APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-42

Image Description:
Close-up of damage and tissue remnants.
Marker No.:
126H (69)
Name:
Timothy Prout


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-43


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
129F (69)

Name:
Timothy Prout
Section No.:

Marker Type:
FS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
10 x 12 x 2-3 in.


Existing Condition:
Lead visibly present two inches above grade. Stone wrapped with Japanese
tissue. Granular disintegration apparent throughout surface.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Spalling occurring from top of marker to the top of the inscription, “Trout”, in
area previously covered by tissue. Tissue below inscription remains.
Complete loss of inscription legibility from last recorded survey.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Monitor Lead Encasement/Replace
Lead Encasement, possible Repair Patching










APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-44
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
129F (69)
Name:
Timothy Prout


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009




















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-45
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
129F (69)
Name:
Timothy Prout


Perspective:
Back
Date Taken:
5/27/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-46


Priority:
3
Marker No.:
114H (33)

Name:
Rebecca Hays
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
30 x 44 x 2.5 in.


Existing Condition:
No lead visibly present. Stone partially wrapped with Japanese tissue (some
portions removed). Spalling and delamination apparent three inches below
the inscription, “year of”, and two inches to the right of the inscription,
“also”. Advanced efflorescence present from below inscribed date to the
bottom of the border design carving. Staining from an unknown substance
(apparently dripped on the surface of the marker) begins at bottom of area
covered by tissue.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue completely removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Efflorescent salt deposits and
crystallization formed on back and front of stone’s surface were removed first
with medium-soft brush then, sprayed with water and brushed again.
Remaining salt residue further removed by application of non-toxic D2
cleaner (composition: proprietary, pH: 9.5, distributor: Cathedral Stone
Products, Inc.), sprayed onto surface, lightly brushing to loosen salt deposits.
Cleaner and salts thoroughly washed from surface with water.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Presence of efflorescence greatly diminished by treatment, however, is still
apparent.

Recommended Treatments:
Desalination

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-47
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
114H (33)
Name:
Rebecca Hays


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009



APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-48
Image Description:
Close-up of marker before treatment showing inscription.
Marker No.:
114H (33)
Name:
Rebecca Hays


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
6/2/2009




















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-49
Image Description:
Marker during excavation.
Marker No.:
114H (33)
Name:
Rebecca Hays


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-50
Image Description:
Marker after being raised and reset.
Marker No.:
114H (33)
Name:
Rebecca Hays


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-51

Priority:
1
Marker No.:
96 (106)

Name:
Joseph Whiting Treuse
Section No.:

Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
26.5 x 29.5 x 4.5 in.


Existing Condition:
No lead visibly present. Stone wrapped with Japanese tissue. Paint stains
present in upper left corner of stone front. Efflorescence and discoloration
apparent within inscription on upper half of stone.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.


Post-Treatment Condition:
Left-front area previously covered by tissue exhibits intensive delamination.
Further minor delamination apparent in upper right-front of stone.
Discoloration (darker complexion) demarcates areas previously covered by
tissue. Advanced efflorescence extant at edges of where tissue was removed
and is most apparent at right-front of stone. Intensive delamination occurring
at left-front.

Recommended Treatments:
Desalination, Consolidation, possible Repair Patching




APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-52
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
96 (106)
Name:
Joseph Whiting Treuse


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009







APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-53
Image Description:
Marker after removal of tissue.
Marker No.:
96 (106)
Name:
Joseph Whiting Treuse


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009











APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-54
Image Description:
Close-up showing scaling.
Marker No.:
96 (106)
Name:
Joseph Whiting Treuse


Perspective:
Front, bottom right
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-55


Priority:
3
Marker No.:
94 (62)

Name:
Abigail Pierpont
Section No.:
4
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
19 x 15-16 x 3 in. (top)
24 x 15-16 x 4 in. (bot)


Existing Condition:
No lead visibly present. No Japanese tissue present. Minor discoloration at
inscriptions. Advanced discoloration at bottom-front of stone. Advanced
efflorescence present directly below fourth (last) line of inscription. Portion of
inscription submerged below grade, indicating settling or raised grade level.

Applied Treatments:
Marker excavated, removed, and raised 5.5 inches to reveal previously
submerged inscription. Perimeter of excavation lined with landscaping fabric
to prevent soil and sand from migrating, and filling air space in gravel
backfill. Marker reset and excavation back-filled with “pond” and “pea” stone
gravel to permit breathability and allow moisture and other deleterious
solutions to escape through the ground.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Clear mineral deposition and discoloration in area previously submerged
below grade. Clear line of efflorescent salt deposits (likely from rising damp)
suggesting need for further treatment. Condition otherwise stable.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination








APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-56

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
94 (62)
Name:
Abigail Pierpont


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-57

Image Description:
Marker during excavation.
Marker No.:
94 (62)
Name:
Abigail Pierpont


Perspective:
Side, left
Date Taken:
5/27/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-58

Image Description:
Marker during resetting.
Marker No.:
94 (62)
Name:
Abigail Pierpont


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-59


Image Description:
Marker after being raised and reset.
Marker No.:
94 (62)
Name:
Abigail Pierpont


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009


















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-60


Priority:
3
Marker No.:
40H (40)

Name:
Amelia Jarvis
Section No.:
2
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Slate
Dimensions: 19.5 x 32 x 1.75 in.


Existing Condition:
No lead visibly present. Remnants of Japanese tissue or poultice present on
front surface of stone, most noticeably within the inscription. Dark staining
and spalling approximately one to two inches in diameter appear throughout
second to last line of inscription. Settling or raised grade level obscure once
visible portions of the stone.

Applied Treatments:
Marker excavated, removed, and raised six inches. Perimeter of excavation
lined with landscaping fabric to prevent soil and sand from migrating, and
filling air space in gravel backfill. Marker reset and excavation back-filled with
“pond” and “pea” stone gravel to permit breathability and allow moisture and
other deleterious solutions to escape through the ground. Excavation
revealed heavy surface deposits of soluble salts from efflorescence. Salt
deposits removed with by light scraping with putty knife and by dry-
brushing.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Minor discoloration from mineral deposition in area previously submerged
below grade. Clear efflorescent salt deposits at marker base (indicative of
rising damp). Condition otherwise stable.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination (water method only, poultice likely ineffective on
slate)


APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-61

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
40H (40)
Name:
Amelia Jarvis


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/1/2009





APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-62

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
40H (40)
Name:
Amelia Jarvis


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/1/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-63

Image Description:
Close-up showing heavy salt deposition.
Marker No.:
40H (40)
Name:
Amelia Jarvis


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
6/1/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-64

Image Description:
Marker after being raised and reset.
Marker No.:
40H (40)
Name:
Amelia Jarvis


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/1/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-65


Priority:
1
Marker No.:
41H (37)

Name:
John Hyde
Section No.:
2
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
19 x 42.5 x 2-3.5 in.


Existing Condition:
No Lead visibly present. Stone wrapped with Japanese tissue. Efflorescence
present throughout surface of stone, with highest concentrations at
inscriptions.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Delamination and granular disintegration widespread in areas previously
covered by tissue. Advanced damage apparent at base of stone below
inscription, with 0.25 to 0.5 inches of surface loss.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, Consolidation, Repair Patching






APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-66
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
41H (37)
Name:
John Hyde


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009


APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-67
Image Description:
Close-showing moisture on and around tissue.
Marker No.:
41H (37)
Name:
John Hyde


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/27/2009




















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-68
Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
41H (37)
Name:
John Hyde


Perspective:
Back
Date Taken:
5/27/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-69
Image Description:
Marker after tissue removal.
Marker No.:
41H (37)
Name:
John Hyde


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-70
Image Description:
Close-up showing surface loss behind removed tissue.
Marker No.:
41H (37)
Name:
John Hyde


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-71


Priority:
2
Marker No.:
17H (7)

Name:
Dorcas Bell
Section No.:
2
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:
19.5 x 34 x 2.5-3 in.


Existing Condition:
No Lead visibly present. Stone wrapped with Japanese tissue. Efflorescence
present throughout surface of stone, with highest concentrations at
inscriptions. Advanced delamination occurring in one inch diameter from area
covered by tissue.

Applied Treatments:
Japanese tissue partially removed by wetting stone and tissue surface with
water then, by pealing the tissue away from stone surface slowing by hand
and with a small metal mason’s trowel. Delaminated or detached portions of
the stone’s surface were firmly adhered to the back of the tissue and it was
determined that complete removal of the tissue would cause more damage
so, it was necessary not to remove all the tissue in these fragile areas.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Significant surface loss of up to 0.25 inches apparent at base of stone in area
previously covered by tissue.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination, possible Repair Patching





APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-72

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
17H (7)
Name:
Dorcas Bell


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-73

Image Description:
Close-up of lower back of marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
17H (7)
Name:
Dorcas Bell


Perspective:
Back, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-74

Image Description:
Marker after tissue removal.
Marker No.:
17H (7)
Name:
Dorcas Bell


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-75

Image Description:
Close-up of damage behind removed tissue.
Marker No.:
17H (7)
Name:
Dorcas Bell


Perspective:
Front, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-76

Image Description:
Close-up of back after tissue removed.
Marker No.:
17H (7)
Name:
Dorcas Bell


Perspective:
Back, lower
Date Taken:
5/28/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-77


Priority:
3
Marker No.:
6 (55)

Name:
Mary Hillhouse Oswald
Section No.:
2
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Sandstone
Dimensions:



Existing Condition:
No Lead visibly present. No Japanese tissue present. Efflorescence present
across bottom third of stone, with highest concentrations at inscription.
Visible remnants of poulticing present on front of stone. Portions of
inscription submerged below grade.

Applied Treatments:
Marker excavated, removed, and raised 5.5 inches. Perimeter of excavation
lined with landscaping fabric to prevent soil and sand from migrating, and
filling air space in gravel backfill. Marker reset and excavation back-filled with
“pond” and “pea” stone gravel to permit breathability and allow moisture and
other deleterious solutions to escape through the ground.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Discoloration from mineral deposition in area previously submerged below
grade. Clear presence of efflorescent salts at marker base. Condition
otherwise stable.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning, Desalination









APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-78

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
6 (5)
Name:
Mary Hillhouse Oswald


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
5/27/2009

APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-79

Image Description:
Marker after excavation.
Marker No.:
6 (55)
Name:
Mary Hillhouse Oswald


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-80

Image Description:
Marker reset in excavation lined with permeable cloth.
Marker No.:
6 (55)
Name:
Mary Hillhouse Oswald


Perspective:
Front (above)
Date Taken:
6/2/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-81

Image Description:
Marker excavation back-filled with gravel.
Marker No.:
6 (55)
Name:
Mary Hillhouse Oswald


Perspective:
Front (above)
Date Taken:
6/2/2009



















APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-82

Image Description:
Raised marker
Marker No.:
6 (55)
Name:
Mary Hillhouse Oswald


Perspective:
Front (above)
Date Taken:
6/2/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-83


Priority:
3
Marker No.:
4 (119)*

Name:
Elizabeth Kerwood
Whittelsey
Section No.:
2
Marker Type:
HS
Material:
Marble
Dimensions:
16 x 26 x 1.5-2 in.


Existing Condition:
No Lead visibly present. No Japanese tissue present. Portions of inscription
submerged below grade.

Applied Treatments:
Marker excavated, removed, and raised 4.5 inches. Perimeter of excavation
lined with landscaping fabric to prevent soil and sand from migrating, and
filling air space in gravel backfill. Marker reset and excavation back-filled with
“pond” and “pea” stone gravel to permit breathability and allow moisture and
other deleterious solutions to escape through the ground. Note stone carver
palimpsest in image of marker during excavation.

Post-Treatment Condition:
Discoloration from mineral deposition in area previously submerged below
grade. Minor efflorescence at marker base. Condition otherwise stable.

Recommended Treatments:
Cleaning











APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-84

Image Description:
Marker before treatment.
Marker No.:
4 (119)
Name:
Elizabeth Kerwood Whittelsey


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-85

Image Description:
Marker removed during excavation.
Marker No.:
4 (119)
Name:
Elizabeth Kerwood Whittelsey


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-86

Image Description:
Marker after being raised and reset.
Marker No.:
4 (119)
Name:
Elizabeth Kerwood Whittelsey


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009
APPENDIX B: Individual Marker Assessments New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | B-87

Image Description:
Close-up of marker after being reset.
Marker No.:
4 (119)
Name:
Elizabeth Kerwood Whittelsey


Perspective:
Front
Date Taken:
6/2/2009























STRUCTURAL ENGINEER’S REPORT


24 June 2009

Jonathan Appell ÷ Gravestone Conservator
27 Miles Standish Drive
West Hartford, CT 06107

Reference: Center Church on the Green

Dear Jon:

Ìt was a pleasure touring the Center Church on the Green in New Haven, CT with you back in
April. Although the scope of your work is limited to the gravestone conservation, Ì would like to
offer the Church my brief professional impressions regarding the condition of the building's
foundation and causes of the water infiltration.

For the purposes of this letter, Temple Street shall be assumed to run in the north-south
direction, and the front façade of the church facing Temple Street shall be considered ¨east¨.
Summary of Conditions
Ìn looking at the church, its history and the studies that have been performed in the past, two
major themes are apparent to me. The first theme is the dedication of the Church to protecting
and preserving the unique history of the gravestones and the crypt. Ìt is this sense of
stewardship that motivated the parish to take steps to remediate the gravestone deterioration
as early as 1879 when the crypt was paved. Ìn the same spirit, the Church later commissioned
a series of phased investigations and studies in the 1980s and 90s to determine the source of
water and deterioration of the stones. The studies mentioned above include:

1986 - Heyen Engineers - Subsurface Moisture Ìnvestigation
1987 - Columbia University - Conditions Survey and Conservation Program Phase Ì
1990 - Fraser Neiman - Archeological Test Excavations Study
1991 - University of Pennsylvania - Conservation Program Phase 2
The studies built upon each other with the 1991 Penn Report providing a comprehensive
summary of the root causes and remediation recommendations.

The second theme is the long history of water infiltration into the building. The former studies
conclude that moisture is the source of continuing deterioration of the gravestones. They go
on to identify the moisture content of the soil at the north, west and south (west end) walls as
being significantly higher than on the east wall or in the center of the building. The Penn
Report states that it is most important to treat the root source of the water infiltration which is
identified as building and surface run-off adjacent to the perimeter of the building. The studies
Center Church on the Green 24 June 2009
New Haven, CT Structures North
2
identify the soil in which the base of the foundation and gravestones sit as being ¨poorly
drained¨, in other words, when charged with water, it stays wet for quite some time.
Protecting the stones without treating the source of the moisture infiltration is only a band-aid
approach for the preservation of the gravestones, and does not provide any protection for the
foundation stone, which is also in a state of deterioration.

For reference Ì have attached the list of recommendations from the Penn Report. From what Ì
can tell, most of these were not addressed following the report and for the most part continue
to be relevant. Ìn my professional opinion, the next most logical step for the church would be
to implement these recommendations. An architect or building envelope specialist would be a
good choice for the prime consultant, and they would hire civil engineering and building
materials restoration sub-consultants to design and estimate the cost of the project. As funds
become available, the project could be put out to bid and ultimately constructed.

Ìn the north-west corner of the crypt we noted a very green deteriorating marble stone
(formerly white). We theorize that this unusual green color is likely caused by the leaching of
copper from the gutter / downspout into the soil and into the stones, further evidence that roof
runoff water is present in the crypt. The building foundation in this area is heavily stained from
water infiltration.

Work was undertaken during the last campaign to protect the stones from moisture by
wrapping the below-grade portions in lead-coated copper. As noted above, it is imperative to
treat the root cause of the problem by channeling the surface water away from the building.
Lead-coated copper sheaths may protect the gravestones from moisture in the short-term, but
a temperature analysis on the stones during the cool months should be performed as
confirmation. Ìf the stone stays warm due to the warm basement, and the soil cools at a more
rapid rate, it is possible that condensation could form on the sheath causing the introduction of
more moisture against the stone.

Structures North specializes in building materials restoration and structural engineering of
historic structures. Ìt would be our pleasure to answer any further questions or assist you on
this project in the future.


Respectfully Yours,
Structures North Consulting Engineers, Ìnc.



Elizabeth Acly, PE























PRODUCTS AND MANUFATURERS



APPENDIX C: Products and Manufacturers New England Cemetery Services
Conservation Assessment: Center Church Crypt | C-1

MANUFACTURERS

Cathedral Stone Products, Inc.
7266 Park Circle Drive
Hanover, MD 21076
P (800) 684-0901
F (800) 684-0904
info@cathedralstone.com
http://www.cathedralstone.com/

ProSoCo, Inc.
3741 Greenway Circle
Lawrence, KS 66046
P (800) 255-4255
F (785) 830-9797
http://www.prosoco.com/


























Material Safety Data Sheet
Acetone MSDS
Section 1: Chemical Product and Company Identification
Product Name: Acetone
Catalog Codes: SLA3502, SLA1645, SLA3151, SLA3808
CAS#: 67-64-1
RTECS: AL3150000
TSCA: TSCA 8(b) inventory: Acetone
CI#: Not applicable.
Synonym: 2-propanone; Dimethyl Ketone;
Dimethylformaldehyde; Pyroacetic Acid
Chemical Name: Acetone
Chemical Formula: C3-H6-O
Contact Information:
Sciencelab.com, Inc.
14025 Smith Rd.
Houston, Texas 77396
US Sales: 1-800-901-7247
International Sales: 1-281-441-4400
Order Online: ScienceLab.com
CHEMTREC (24HR Emergency Telephone), call:
1-800-424-9300
International CHEMTREC, call: 1-703-527-3887
For non-emergency assistance, call: 1-281-441-4400
Section 2: Composition and Information on Ingredients
Composition:
Name CAS # % by Weight
Acetone 67-64-1 100
Toxicological Data on Ingredients: Acetone: ORAL (LD50): Acute: 5800 mg/kg [Rat]. 3000 mg/kg [Mouse]. 5340 mg/kg
[Rabbit]. VAPOR (LC50): Acute: 50100 mg/m 8 hours [Rat]. 44000 mg/m 4 hours [Mouse].
Section 3: Hazards Identification
Potential Acute Health Effects:
Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of eye contact (irritant), of ingestion, of inhalation. Slightly hazardous
in case of skin contact (permeator).
Potential Chronic Health Effects:
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: A4 (Not classifiable for human or animal.) by ACGIH.
MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Classified Reproductive system/toxin/female, Reproductive system/toxin/male
[SUSPECTED].
The substance is toxic to central nervous system (CNS).
The substance may be toxic to kidneys, the reproductive system, liver, skin.
Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage.
p. 1
Section 4: First Aid Measures
Eye Contact:
Check for and remove any contact lenses. Immediately flush eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes,
keeping eyelids open. Cold water may be used. Get medical attention.
Skin Contact:
In case of contact, immediately flush skin with plenty of water. Cover the irritated skin with an emollient. Remove
contaminated clothing and shoes. Cold water may be used.Wash clothing before reuse. Thoroughly clean shoes
before reuse. Get medical attention.
Serious Skin Contact:
Wash with a disinfectant soap and cover the contaminated skin with an anti-bacterial cream. Seek medical
attention.
Inhalation:
If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Get
medical attention if symptoms appear.
Serious Inhalation:
Evacuate the victim to a safe area as soon as possible. Loosen tight clothing such as a collar, tie, belt or
waistband. If breathing is difficult, administer oxygen. If the victim is not breathing, perform mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation. Seek medical attention.
Ingestion:
Do NOT induce vomiting unless directed to do so by medical personnel. Never give anything by mouth to an
unconscious person. Loosen tight clothing such as a collar, tie, belt or waistband. Get medical attention if
symptoms appear.
Serious Ingestion: Not available.
Section 5: Fire and Explosion Data
Flammability of the Product: Flammable.
Auto-Ignition Temperature: 465°C (869°F)
Flash Points: CLOSED CUP: -20°C (-4°F). OPEN CUP: -9°C (15.8°F) (Cleveland).
Flammable Limits: LOWER: 2.6% UPPER: 12.8%
Products of Combustion: These products are carbon oxides (CO, CO2).
Fire Hazards in Presence of Various Substances: Highly flammable in presence of open flames and sparks, of heat.
Explosion Hazards in Presence of Various Substances:
Risks of explosion of the product in presence of mechanical impact: Not available.
Slightly explosive in presence of open flames and sparks, of oxidizing materials, of acids.
Fire Fighting Media and Instructions:
Flammable liquid, soluble or dispersed in water.
SMALL FIRE: Use DRY chemical powder.
LARGE FIRE: Use alcohol foam, water spray or fog.
Special Remarks on Fire Hazards: Vapor may travel considerable distance to source of ignition and flash back.
Special Remarks on Explosion Hazards:
Forms explosive mixtures with hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, nitric acid, nitric acid + sulfuric acid, chromic anydride,
chromyl chloride, nitrosyl chloride, hexachloromelamine, nitrosyl perchlorate, nitryl perchlorate, permonosulfuric acid,
thiodiglycol + hydrogen peroxide, potassium ter-butoxide, sulfur dichloride, 1-methyl-1,3-butadiene, bromoform, carbon,
air, chloroform, thitriazylperchlorate.
p. 2
Section 6: Accidental Release Measures
Small Spill:
Dilute with water and mop up, or absorb with an inert dry material and place in an appropriate waste disposal
container.
Large Spill:
Flammable liquid.
Keep away from heat. Keep away from sources of ignition. Stop leak if without risk. Absorb with DRY earth,
sand or other non-combustible material. Do not touch spilled material. Prevent entry into sewers, basements or
confined areas; dike if needed. Be careful that the product is not present at a concentration level above TLV.
Check TLV on the MSDS and with local authorities.
Section 7: Handling and Storage
Precautions:
Keep locked up.. Keep away from heat. Keep away from sources of ignition. Ground all equipment containing
material. Do not ingest. Do not breathe gas/fumes/ vapor/spray. Wear suitable protective clothing. In case of
insufficient ventilation, wear suitable respiratory equipment. If ingested, seek medical advice immediately and
show the container or the label. Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Keep away from incompatibles such as
oxidizing agents, reducing agents, acids, alkalis.
Storage:
Store in a segregated and approved area (flammables area) . Keep container in a cool, well-ventilated area.
Keep container tightly closed and sealed until ready for use. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat and avoid all
possible sources of ignition (spark or flame).
Section 8: Exposure Controls/Personal Protection
Engineering Controls:
Provide exhaust ventilation or other engineering controls to keep the airborne concentrations of vapors below their
respective threshold limit value. Ensure that eyewash stations and safety showers are proximal to the
work-station location.
Personal Protection:
Splash goggles. Lab coat. Vapor respirator. Be sure to use an approved/certified respirator or equivalent.
Gloves.
Personal Protection in Case of a Large Spill:
Splash goggles. Full suit. Vapor respirator. Boots. Gloves. A self contained breathing apparatus should be
used to avoid inhalation of the product. Suggested protective clothing might not be sufficient; consult a specialist
BEFORE handling this product.
Exposure Limits:
TWA: 500 STEL: 750 (ppm) from ACGIH (TLV) [United States]
TWA: 750 STEL: 1000 (ppm) from OSHA (PEL) [United States]
TWA: 500 STEL: 1000 [Austalia]
TWA: 1185 STEL: 2375 (mg/m3) [Australia]
TWA: 750 STEL: 1500 (ppm) [United Kingdom (UK)]
TWA: 1810 STEL: 3620 (mg/m3) [United Kingdom (UK)]
TWA: 1800 STEL: 2400 from OSHA (PEL) [United States]Consult local authorities for acceptable exposure limits.
Section 9: Physical and Chemical Properties
Physical state and appearance: Liquid.
Odor: Fruity. Mint-like. Fragrant. Ethereal
Taste: Pungent, Sweetish
p. 3
Molecular Weight: 58.08 g/mole
Color: Colorless. Clear
pH (1% soln/water): Not available.
Boiling Point: 56.2°C (133.2°F)
Melting Point: -95.35 (-139.6°F)
Critical Temperature: 235°C (455°F)
Specific Gravity: 0.79 (Water = 1)
Vapor Pressure: 24 kPa (@20°C)
Vapor Density: 2 (Air = 1)
Volatility: Not available.
Odor Threshold: 62 ppm
Water/Oil Dist. Coeff.: The product is more soluble in water; log(oil/water) = -0.2
Ionicity (in Water): Not available.
Dispersion Properties: See solubility in water.
Solubility: Easily soluble in cold water, hot water.
Section 10: Stability and Reactivity Data
Stability: The product is stable.
Instability Temperature: Not available.
Conditions of Instability: Excess heat, ignition sources, exposure to moisture, air, or water, incompatible materials.
Incompatibility with various substances: Reactive with oxidizing agents, reducing agents, acids, alkalis.
Corrosivity: Non-corrosive in presence of glass.
Special Remarks on Reactivity: Not available.
Special Remarks on Corrosivity: Not available.
Polymerization: Will not occur.
Section 11: Toxicological Information
Routes of Entry: Absorbed through skin. Dermal contact. Eye contact. Inhalation.
Toxicity to Animals:
WARNING: THE LC50 VALUES HEREUNDER ARE ESTIMATED ON THE BASIS OF A 4-HOUR EXPOSURE.
Acute oral toxicity (LD50): 3000 mg/kg [Mouse].
Acute toxicity of the vapor (LC50): 44000 mg/m3 4 hours [Mouse].
Chronic Effects on Humans:
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: A4 (Not classifiable for human or animal.) by ACGIH.
p. 4
DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Classified Reproductive system/toxin/female, Reproductive system/toxin/male
[SUSPECTED].
Causes damage to the following organs: central nervous system (CNS).
May cause damage to the following organs: kidneys, the reproductive system, liver, skin.
Other Toxic Effects on Humans:
Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of ingestion, of inhalation.
Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (permeator).
Special Remarks on Toxicity to Animals: Not available.
Special Remarks on Chronic Effects on Humans:
May affect genetic material (mutagenicity) based on studies with yeast (S. cerevisiae), bacteria, and hamster
fibroblast cells. May cause reproductive effects (fertility) based upon animal studies.
May contain trace amounts of benzene and formaldehyde which may cancer and birth defects. Human: passes
the placental barrier.
Special Remarks on other Toxic Effects on Humans:
Acute Potential Health Effects:
Skin: May cause skin irritation. May be harmful if absorbed through the skin.
Eyes: Causes eye irritation, characterized by a burning sensation, redness, tearing, inflammation, and possible
corneal injury.
Inhalation: Inhalation at high concentrations affects the sense organs, brain and causes respiratory tract irritation.
It also may affect the Central Nervous System (behavior) characterized by dizzness, drowsiness, confusion,
headache, muscle weakeness, and possibly motor incoordination, speech abnormalities, narcotic effects and
coma. Inhalation may also affect the gastrointestinal tract (nausea, vomiting).
Ingestion: May cause irritation of the digestive (gastrointestinal) tract (nausea, vomiting). It may also affect the
Central Nevous System (behavior), characterized by depression, fatigue, excitement, stupor, coma, headache,
altered sleep time, ataxia, tremors as well at the blood, liver, and urinary system (kidney, bladder, ureter) and
endocrine system. May also have musculoskeletal effects.
Chronic Potential Health Effects:
Skin: May cause dermatitis.
Eyes: Eye irritation.
Section 12: Ecological Information
Ecotoxicity:
Ecotoxicity in water (LC50): 5540 mg/l 96 hours [Trout]. 8300 mg/l 96 hours [Bluegill]. 7500 mg/l 96 hours
[Fatthead Minnow]. 0.1 ppm any hours [Water flea].
BOD5 and COD: Not available.
Products of Biodegradation:
Possibly hazardous short term degradation products are not likely. However, long term degradation products may
arise.
Toxicity of the Products of Biodegradation: The product itself and its products of degradation are not toxic.
Special Remarks on the Products of Biodegradation: Not available.
Section 13: Disposal Considerations
Waste Disposal:
Waste must be disposed of in accordance with federal, state and local environmental
control regulations.
Section 14: Transport Information
DOT Classification: CLASS 3: Flammable liquid.
p. 5
Identification: : Acetone UNNA: 1090 PG: II
Special Provisions for Transport: Not available.
Section 15: Other Regulatory Information
Federal and State Regulations:
California prop. 65: This product contains the following ingredients for which the State of California has found to
cause reproductive harm (male) which would require a warning under the statute: Benzene
California prop. 65: This product contains the following ingredients for which the State of California has found to
cause birth defects which would require a warning under the statute: Benzene
California prop. 65: This product contains the following ingredients for which the State of California has found to
cause cancer which would require a warning under the statute: Benzene, Formaldehyde
Connecticut hazardous material survey.: Acetone
Illinois toxic substances disclosure to employee act: Acetone
Illinois chemical safety act: Acetone
New York release reporting list: Acetone
Rhode Island RTK hazardous substances: Acetone
Pennsylvania RTK: Acetone
Florida: Acetone
Minnesota: Acetone
Massachusetts RTK: Acetone
Massachusetts spill list: Acetone
New Jersey: Acetone
New Jersey spill list: Acetone
Louisiana spill reporting: Acetone
California List of Hazardous Substances (8 CCR 339): Acetone
TSCA 8(b) inventory: Acetone
TSCA 4(a) final test rules: Acetone
TSCA 8(a) IUR: Acetone
Other Regulations:
OSHA: Hazardous by definition of Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200).
EINECS: This product is on the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances.
Other Classifications:
WHMIS (Canada):
CLASS B-2: Flammable liquid with a flash point lower than 37.8°C (100°F).
CLASS D-2B: Material causing other toxic effects (TOXIC).
DSCL (EEC):
R11- Highly flammable.
R36- Irritating to eyes.
S9- Keep container in a well-ventilated place.
S16- Keep away from sources of ignition - No
smoking.
S26- In case of contact with eyes, rinse
immediately with plenty of water and seek
medical advice.
HMIS (U.S.A.):
Health Hazard: 2
Fire Hazard: 3
Reactivity: 0
Personal Protection: h
p. 6
National Fire Protection Association (U.S.A.):
Health: 1
Flammability: 3
Reactivity: 0
Specific hazard:
Protective Equipment:
Gloves.
Lab coat.
Vapor respirator. Be sure to use an
approved/certified respirator or
equivalent. Wear appropriate respirator
when ventilation is inadequate.
Splash goggles.
Section 16: Other Information
References:
-Material safety data sheet issued by: la Commission de la Santé et de la Sécurité du Travail du Québec.
-The Sigma-Aldrich Library of Chemical Safety Data, Edition II.
-Hawley, G.G.. The Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11e ed., New York N.Y., Van Nostrand Reinold, 1987.
LOLI, RTECS, HSDB databases.
Other MSDSs
Other Special Considerations: Not available.
Created: 10/10/2005 08:13 PM
Last Updated: 11/06/2008 12:00 PM
The information above is believed to be accurate and represents the best information currently available to us. However, we
make no warranty of merchantability or any other warranty, express or implied, with respect to such information, and we
assume no liability resulting from its use. Users should make their own investigations to determine the suitability of the
information for their particular purposes. In no event shall ScienceLab.com be liable for any claims, losses, or damages of any
third party or for lost profits or any special, indirect, incidental, consequential or exemplary damages, howsoever arising, even
if ScienceLab.com has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
p. 7
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET PROSOCO, Inc.
I PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
MANUFACTURER’S NAME
AND ADDRESS:
PROSOCO, Inc.
3741 Greenway Circle
Lawrence, KS 66046
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST Monday-Friday:
NON-BUSINESS HOURS (INFOTRAC):
785/865-4200
800/535-5053
PRODUCT TRADE NAME:
Conservare
®
HCT (Hydroxylating Conversion Treatment)
II HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
CHEMICAL NAME (COMMON NAME) CAS NO. NFPA CODE
ACGIH
TLV/TWA
OSHA PEL/TWA
Contains no hazardous ingredients greater than 1%




III PHYSICAL DATA
BOILING POINT
(°F)
VAPOR
PRESSURE
(mm Hg)
VAPOR DENSITY
(Air = 1)
EVAPORATION RATE
(Butyl Acetate = 1)
Contains no hazardous ingredients greater than 1%





SPECIFIC
GRAVITY
pH
SOLUBILITY
IN WATER
APPEARANCE AND
ODOR
HCT (Hydroxylating Conversion
Treatment)
1.009 4.0 100% Clear liquid, slight odor


IV FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

EMERGENCY OVERVIEW
Conservare
®
HCT is a clear liquid with a slight odor.


FLASH POINT (METHOD): Not determined.
FLAMMABLE LIMITS: Not applicable.
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA: Not applicable.
SPECIAL FIRE FIGHTING PROCEDURES: None.
UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS: None.
Conservare
®
HCT (Hydroxylating Conversion Treatment) - Page 2 of 4
V HEALTH HAZARD DATA
PRIMARY ROUTES OF EXPOSURE: Skin, eyes, ingestion.
CARCINOGEN INFORMATION: Not listed (OSHA, IARC, NTP).
MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY OVEREXPOSURE: No applicable information found.
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE: no harmful effects have been reported.
EYE CONTACT: May cause irritation.,
SKIN CONTACT: May cause irritation.
INHALATION: No harmful effects from exposure to vapor are expected. Direct contact with mists may irritate mucus membranes.
INGESTION: No harmful effects have been reported,
EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES:
EYE CONTACT: If in eyes, flush with large amounts of water for 15 minutes, holding eyelids apart to ensure flushing of the entire eye
surface. If persistent irritation occurs, get medical attention.
SKIN CONTACT: Wash exposed area with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing. If persistent irritation occurs, get medical
attention.
INHALATION: No harmful effects expected from exposure to vapors.
INGESTION: Do NOT induce vomiting! If vomiting occurs, keep head below hips to prevent liquid from entering lungs. Never give
anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Get medical attention.
VI REACTIVITY DATA
STABILITY: Stable.
CONDITIONS TO AVOID: None.
INCOMPATIBILITY (MATERIALS TO AVOID): None.
HAZARDOUS COMBUSTION OR DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: Unknown.
VII SPILL OR LEAK PROCEDURES
SPILL, LEAK, WASTE DISPOSAL PROCEDURES: Wear appropriate protective safety equipment. Control spill with absorbent pads
or brooms. If necessary, apply granular or loose sorbent to spill. When absorbed, sweep or otherwise collect and dispose of
properly. Floors may be slippery, care should be exercised to avoid falls.
WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS: Dispose of in a manner approved for this material. As of this writing, the product is not considered to
be a hazardous waste, however, federal regulation prohibits disposal of liquid materials of any kind in a sanitary landfill.
Solidify cleanup residuals before disposal. After minor pH adjustment, liquid residuals may be rinsed into a sanitary drain with
permission of the receiving treatment plant. As local and state regulations may vary, consult with appropriate state and local
regulatory agencies to ascertain proper disposal procedures.
Empty containers must not be reused. Drain all liquid possible from the container before disposal in a sanitary landfill.
Conservare
®
HCT (Hydroxylating Conversion Treatment) - Page 3 of 4
VIII SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Use a NIOSH approved dust/mist respirator as necessary to avoid unnecessary inhalation of mists
during application.
VENTILATION: No special ventilation required.
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING: Wear protective clothing such as long sleeved work shirt and pants, work boots, and rubber gloves to
avoid skin contact. Do not allow clothing to become saturated with product. If work practices cannot be adjusted to avoid
excess clothing saturation, splash resistant or Tyvek clothing and boots may be required.
PROTECTIVE GLOVES: Wear rubber or PVC gloves as required to avoid prolonged skin contact.
EYE PROTECTION: Safety glasses with side shields are recommended during use. If work practices and application techniques
cause a risk of splashing or excessive wind-drift, then splash resistant goggles may be required.
OTHER PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: Access to an eyewash is recommended.
IX SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS
WORK PRACTICES: Proper work practices and planning should be utilized to avoid contact with workers, passersby, and non-
masonry surfaces. Do not atomize during application. Beware of wind drift. . Always follow published application rates. See
the Product Data sheet and label for specific precautions to be taken during use. Smoking, eating and drinking should be
prohibited during the use of this product. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of a shift.
PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING AND STORAGE: Wear appropriate safety equipment and clothing. Do not get in
eyes, on skin, or clothing. Do not take internally. Avoid breathing mist. Never touch face with hands or gloves that may be
contaminated with this product.
Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place. Keep containers tightly closed when not dispensing product. Use care around
spilled material because it will be slippery.
OTHER PRECAUTIONS: None known.
X REGULATORY INFORMATION
SHIPPING: This material is non-hazardous for shipping via domestic or international ground or air transport.
NATIONAL MOTOR FREIGHT CLASSIFICATION: #149980 Sub 2 Class rate: 55
SARA 313 REPORTABLE:
CHEMICAL NAME CAS UPPERBOUND CONCENTRATION % BY WEIGHT
N/A
CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65: This product contains no substances listed under California's Proposition 65.
RCRA Waste Classification: This product is not classified as a hazardous waste under federal regulations.
Conservare
®
HCT (Hydroxylating Conversion Treatment) - Page 4 of 4
XI OTHER
MSDS Status: Date of Revision: October 27, 2008
For Product Manufactured After: N/A – no change in formulation
Changes: Updated Section IX.
Item #: 42040
Approved By: Regulatory Department
DISCLAIMER:
The information contained on the Material Safety Data Sheet has been compiled from data considered accurate. This data is
believed to be reliable, but it must be pointed out that values for certain properties are known to vary from source to source.
PROSOCO, Inc. expressly disclaims any warranty express or implied as well as any liability for any injury or loss
arising from the use of this information or the materials described. This data is not to be construed as absolutely
complete since additional data may be desirable when particular conditions or circumstances exist. It is the responsibility of
the user to determine the best precautions necessary for the safe handling and use of this product for his unique application.
This data relates only to the specific material designated and is not to be used in combination with any other material. Many
federal and state regulations pertain directly or indirectly to the product's end use and disposal of containers and unused
material. It is the purchaser's responsibility to familiarize himself with all applicable regulations.
DATE OF PREPARATION: May 15, 2001
Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment - Page 1 of 4
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
I PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION

MANUFACTURER'S NAME PROSOCO, Inc.
AND ADDRESS: 3741 Greenway Circle
Lawrence, Kansas 66046
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM CST Monday-Friday: 785/865-4200
NON-BUSINESS HOURS (INFOTRAC): 800/535-5053
PRODUCT TRADE NAME: Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment
II HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
CHEMICAL NAME (COMMON NAME) CAS NO. NFPA CODE
ACGIH
TLV/TWA
OSHA PEL/TWA
Di-n-butyltindilaurate (-) 77-58-7 1,3,0,- Not Established Not Established
Organic Tin Compound (-) - Unknown 0.1 mg/m
3
0.1 mg/m
3
Ethyl Alcohol (Ethanol) 64-17-5 3,3,0,- 1000 ppm 1000 ppm
Tetra ethyl silicate (Ethyl Silicate) 78-10-4 2,2,0,- 10 ppm 100 ppm
* Contains some or all of the listed ingredients.
III PHYSICAL DATA
BOILING POINT
(°F)
VAPOR
PRESSURE
(mm Hg)
VAPOR
DENSITY
(Air=1)
EVAPORATION
RATE
(1=Butyl
Acetate)
Di-n-butyltindilaurate N/A N/A N/A N/A
Organic Tin Compound >401 0.2 (320qF) N/A Very Slow
Ethyl Alcohol 180 33 (68°F) 3.0 1.9
Tetra ethyl silicate 302 1.0 (68°F) Unknown Unknown
SPECIFIC
GRAVITY
SOLUBILIT
Y IN WATER
APPEARANCE
AND ODOR
Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment 0.997(@ 77°F) Negligible Clear liquid, alcohol
odor
IV FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA
EMERGENCY OVERVIEW
Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment is a clear liquid with a mild alcohol odor. It is a combustible liquid, remove all potential
sources of ignition. Product may irritate skin upon contact and may cause lung damage if inhaled. Wear appropriate respiratory
protection.
FLASH POINT (Method): 104qF (40qC) (closed cup)
FLAMMABLE LIMITS: Not determined.
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA: Carbon dioxide, dry chemical, alcohol-resistant foam, sand or water-mist. Do not use direct water stream. Do
not use direct water stream. Avoid accumulation of water as product will float.
SPECIAL FIRE FIGHTING PROCEDURES: Do not enter confined fire space without proper protective equipment including a
NIOSH/MSHA approved self-contained breathing apparatus. Cool fire exposed containers, surrounding equipment and structures
with water.
Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment - Page 2 of 4
UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS: Vapors are heavier than air and may accumulate in low areas or areas inadequately
ventilated. Vapors may also travel along the ground to be ignited at location distant from handling site; flashback of flame to
handling site may occur. Never use welding or cutting torch on or near drum (even empty) because product (even just residue)
can ignite explosively. As a result of hydrolysis, flammable vapors may accumulate in the container head space.
COMBUSTIBLE! Keep container tightly closed. Isolate from oxidizers, heat, and open flame. Closed containers may explode if
exposed to extreme heat. Applying to hot surfaces requires special precautions.
V HEALTH HAZARD DATA
PRIMARY ROUTES OF EXPOSURE: Inhalation, skin, eyes.
CARCINOGEN INFORMATION: Not listed (OSHA, IARC, NTP).
MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY OVEREXPOSURE: This product is damaging to the liver and kidneys, and is also toxic to
the lungs. Product also causes acute dermatitis and has a narcotic effect.
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE: Highly irritating to eyes. Moderately irritating to skin. High concentrations may produce anesthetic or
narcotic effect. May cause kidney and liver damage and temporary disorder of sight.
EYE CONTACT: Liquid is highly irritating to the eyes. Vapors are also irritating. Possible moderate corneal injury and temporary disorder
of sight.
SKIN CONTACT: Liquid is moderately irritating to the skin. Repeated, prolonged contact can result in defatting to the skin which may
lead to dermatitis.
INHALATION: Breathing high vapor concentrations or prolonged breathing of lower concentrations can cause nose and throat irritation
and may cause headache, dizziness and loss of consciousness.
INGESTION: Liquid ingestion may result in vomiting; aspiration of liquid into the lungs must be avoided as liquid contact with the lungs
can result in chemical pneumonitis and pulmonary edema/hemorrhage.
EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES:
EYE CONTACT: If in eyes, flush with large amounts of water for 15 minutes, holding eyelids apart to ensure flushing of the entire eye
surface. Get medical attention immediately.
SKIN CONTACT: Remove material with a waterless skin cleaner, then wash with plenty of soap and water. Remove contaminated
clothing and do not reuse until laundered. If persistent irritation occurs, get medical attention.
INHALATION: Remove victim to fresh air and provide oxygen if breathing is difficult. Give artificial respiration if not breathing. Get
immediate medical attention. Designate the product.
INGESTION: DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING! Get immediate medical attention. Designate the product. If vomiting occurs spontaneously,
keep victim's head below hips to prevent breathing vomitus into lungs.
VI REACTIVITY DATA
STABILITY: Stable at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure
CONDITIONS TO AVOID: None known.
INCOMPATIBILITY (MATERIALS TO AVOID): Oxidizing materials, acids, and alkalis, water
HAZARDOUS COMBUSTION OR DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, silicon dioxide and traces of
incompletely burned hydrocarbons. Ethyl alcohol from hydrolysis.
VII SPILL OR LEAK PROCEDURES
SPILL, LEAK AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROCEDURES: STEPS TO BE TAKEN IN CASE MATERIAL IS RELEASED OR SPILLED:
Eliminate potential sources of ignition. Wear appropriate respirator and other protective clothing. Shut off source of leak only if
safe to do so. Dike and contain to prevent migration to sewers, soil and surface and ground water. Remove with explosion-proof
equipment. Soak up residue with a noncombustible absorbent such as clay or vermiculite; place in drums for proper disposal.
WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS: Dispose of in a facility approved under RCRA regulations for hazardous waste. Containers must be
leak-proof and properly labeled.
Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment - Page 3 of 4
VIII SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Do not breath mists. Wear a NIOSH approved dust/mist respirator as necessary. If Threshold Limit
Value (TLV) of the product or any component is exceeded, a NIOSH/MSHA jointly approved air-supplied respirator is advised in
absence of proper environmental control. Engineering or administrative controls should be implemented to reduce exposure.
VENTILATION: Provide sufficient general and/or local exhaust ventilation to maintain exposure below TLV(s). Use explosion-proof
ventilation as required to control vapor concentrations below the TLV(s). Ventilation may be required during product drying and
curing.
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING: Wear protective clothing as required to prevent skin contact.
PROTECTIVE GLOVES: Wear solvent-resistant gloves, such as butyl rubber.
EYE PROTECTION: Chemical splash goggles in compliance with OSHA regulations are recommended. Do not wear contact lenses
because they may contribute to the severity of an eye injury.
OTHER PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: Solvent-resistant boots and headgear as required. An eyewash should be easily accessible from
the work area. Access to a safety shower is recommended.
IX SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS
WORK PRACTICES: Proper work practices and planning should be utilized to avoid contact with workers, passersby, and non-masonry
surfaces. Do not atomize during application. Beware of wind drift. Over-application may contribute to fume problems. Always
follow published application rates. See the Product Data sheet and label for specific precautions to be taken during use. This
product is combustible! Always bond and ground containers during transfer. Eliminate all sources of ignition, even remote
sources, as vapors may travel some distance. Smoking, eating and drinking should be prohibited during the use of this product.
Wash hands before breaks and at the end of a shift.
This product will continue to evolve vapor during drying and ethyl alcohol during curing. Continue ventilation as needed during
curing.
PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING AND STORAGE: Store away from oxidizing materials, in a cool, dry place with adequate
ventilation. Keep away from heat and open flames. Keep container tightly closed when not dispensing product. Wash up with
soap and water before eating, drinking, smoking or using toilet facilities. Launder contaminated clothing before reuse.
Containers of this material may be hazardous when emptied, since emptied containers retain product residues (vapor, liquid,
and/or solid). All hazard precautions given in the Data sheet must be observed.
Ground equipment to prevent accumulation of static charge. Containers must be bonded and grounded when pouring or
transferring materials.
OTHER PRECAUTIONS: Environmental Hazards - Keep out of surface water and watercourses or sewers entering or leading to surface
waters.
X REGULATORY INFORMATION
SHIPPING: This product is not regulated when shipped domestic ground in its original, complete packaging. The product is reclassified
as a hazardous material for shipping by air, ocean, or in international commerce. Consult with PROSOCO’s Regulatory
Department for shipping information.
SARA 313 Reportable:
Chemical name CAS Upperbound Concentration % by Weight
None - -
Conservare
®
OH100 Consolidation Treatment - Page 4 of 4
XI OTHER
MSDS Status: Date of Revision: August 3, 2006
For Product Manufactured After: September 27, 2000
Changes: NA – Review Only
Item #: 42015
Approved By: Regulatory Department
DISCLAIMER:
The information contained on the Material Safety Data Sheet has been compiled from data considered accurate. This data is
believed to be reliable, but it must be pointed out that values for certain properties are known to vary from source to source.
PROSOCO, Inc. expressly disclaims any warranty express or implied as well as any liability for any injury or loss
arising from the use of this information or the materials described. This data is not to be construed as absolutely complete
since additional data may be desirable when particular conditions or circumstances exist. It is the responsibility of the user to
determine the best precautions necessary for the safe handling and use of this product for his unique application. This data
relates only to the specific material designated and is not to be used in combination with any other material. Many federal and
state regulations pertain directly or indirectly to the product's end use and disposal of containers and unused material. It is the
purchaser's responsibility to familiarize himself with all applicable regulations.
DATE OF PREPARATION: August 3, 2006
0
0
1
0
Material Safety Data Sheet: D/2 BIOLOGICAL SOLUTION
Version No. 24005 Date of Issue: March 2008
ANSI-Z400.1-2003 Format
Section 1: PRODUCT & COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
Product Name: D/2 Biological Solution
Exclusively Distributed By: Manufactured By:
Cathedral Stone
®
Products, Inc.
7266 Park Circle Drive
Hanover, MD 21076
Sunshine Makers, Inc.
15922 Pacific Coast Highway
Huntington Harbour, CA 92649
Telephone: 410-782-9150 Telephone: 800-228-0709
Fax: 410-782-9155 Fax: 562-592-3830
Emergency Phone: Chem-Tel 24-Hour Emergency Service: 800-225-3924
Use of Product D/2 Biological Solution is an easy-to-use liquid that aids in the removal of a broad spectrum of soils.
It is designed for use on outdoor sculpture, monuments, decorative fountains, stone, brick, terra cotta,
concrete, stucco, and other architectural surfaces.
Section 2: HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
D/2 Biological Solution is a colorless liquid with a very faint detergent-like odor. It is non-flammable, non-
combustible, non-explosive, and non-reactive.
Hazard Rating (NFPA/HMIS) Rating Scale
Health = 1* Reactivity = 0 0 = Minimal 1 = Slight 2 = Moderate
Fire = 0 Special = 0 3 = Serious 4 = Severe
* Mild eye irritant, non-mutagenic and non-carcinogenic
Eye Contact:
Eye Irritant.
Skin Contact:
Prolonged skin contact with D/2 Biological Solution may irritate the skin. Repeated daily application to the skin
without rinsing, or continuous contact of D/2 Biological Solution on the skin may lead to irritation.
Ingestion:
Essentially non-toxic. May cause stomach or intestinal upset if swallowed.
Inhalation:
No adverse effects expected under typical use conditions. Adequate ventilation should be present when using D/2
Biological Solution over a prolonged period of time. Open windows or ventilate via fan or other air-moving
equipment if necessary. Mucous membranes may become irritated by concentrate mist.
Carcinogens:
No ingredients are listed by OSHA, IARC, or NTP as known or suspected carcinogens.
Medical Conditions:
No medical conditions are known to be aggravated by exposure to D/2 Biological Solution.
Section 3: COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Ingredients CAS Number OSHA PEL ACGIH TLV
Surfactants Proprietary None established
Wetting Agents Proprietary None established
Buffers Proprietary None established
Section 4: FIRST AID MEASURES
If in Eyes: Immediately rinse the eye with large quantities of cool water; if present, contact lenses should be removed after 5
minutes of rinsing; continue rinsing 10-15 minutes more. Both upper and lower lids should be lifted to facilitate
thorough rinsing.
If on Skin: Minimal effects, if any, from diluted product; rinse skin with water, rinse shoes and launder clothing before reuse. -
Reversible reddening may occur in some dermal-sensitive users; thoroughly rinse area.
If Inhaled: Use in well-ventilated area, or use adequate protection from inhaling mist during spray applications. Prolonged
exposure of workers to concentrate-mist during spray application may cause mild irritation of nasal passages or throat.
If this happens, relocate workers to fresh air.
If Ingested: Give several glasses of milk or water to dilute; do not induce vomiting. If stomach upset occurs, consult physician.
Pg 1 of 3
Material Safety Data Sheet: D/2 BIOLOGICAL SOLUTION
Material Safety Data Sheet: D/2 BIOLOGICAL SOLUTION
Version No. 24005 Date of Issue: March 2008
ANSI-Z400.1-2003 Format
Section 5: FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
Extinguishing Media: Not flammable/non-explosive. No special procedures required.
Special Fire Fighting Procedures: None required.
Section 6: ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
Personal Precautions: Avoid contact with eyes. Do not rub eyes with hands during cleanup. No special precautions for dermal
contact are needed. Wash hands thoroughly after cleaning up spill or leak.
Procedure to follow in case of spill or leak: Evacuate area. Identify source of leak or spill and contain with sand, earth, or
containment bin. Then proceed to clean up spill or leak.
Method for cleaning up: Recover all usable material. Residual may be removed by wipe or wet mope. Rinse area with plenty of
water and mop to sanitary sewer.
Section 7: HANDLING AND STORAGE
No special handling is required. Keep in a closed plastic container. Store at ambient temperature. Avoid contact with eyes.
Wash hands thoroughly after handling. This product is non-hazardous for storage and transport according to the U.S.
Department of Transportation Regulations.
This material does not meet the definition of a hazardous material according to 49 CFR, ICAO, IMDG and the UN Orange
Book.
Section 8: EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION
Precautionary measures: No special requirements under normal use conditions.
Exposure Limits: The D/2 Biological Solution formulation presents no health hazards to the user, other than mild eye
irritancy.
Eye protection: Caution, including reasonable eye protection, should always be used to avoid eye contact where
splashing may occur, such as during spray applications.
Respiratory Protection: No special precautions required.
Ventilation: No special ventilation is required during normal use.
Skin protection: No special precautions required; rinse completely from skin after contact.
General hygiene conditions: There are no known hazards associated with this material when used as recommended. The
following general hygiene considerations are recognized as common good industrial hygiene
practices:
- Avoid breathing vapor or mist.
- Avoid contact with eyes.
- Wash thoroughly after handling and before eating, drinking, or smoking.
Section 9: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Appearance: Clear Liquid Freezing Point: -9
o
C (16
o
F)
Odor: Very faint detergent-like odor Boiling Point: 98
o
C (209
o
F)
pH: 9.5 Specific Gravity: 1.011
Evaporation Rate: 0.4 (butyl acetate = 1) Vapor Pressure: 20.7 mm Hg
Water Solubility: 100% Vapor Density: 1.3 (air = 1)
Section 10: STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
Stability: Stable.
Materials to Avoid: Contains ammoniated compounds – do not mix with bleach, tub & tile cleaner,
mold/mildew removers, or chlorinated compounds.
Hazardous Decomposition Products: None expected
Pg 2 of 3
Material Safety Data Sheet: D/2 BIOLOGICAL SOLUTION
Material Safety Data Sheet: D/2 BIOLOGICAL SOLUTION
Version No. 24005 Date of Issue: March 2008
ANSI-Z400.1-2003 Format
Section 11: TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Toxicity Data: Available from relevant laboratory testing of ingredients or similar mixtures.
Acute Toxicity: Oral LD
50
: >2.0 g/kg body weight Dermal LD
50
: Not estimated
Eye Irritation: With or without rinsing with water, the irritation scores in rabbits at 24 hours did not exceed 17 (mild
irritant) on a scale of 110 (extremely irritating); all scores were normal at seven days.
Dermal Irritation: In a standard test on rabbits, mild irritation was found at 72 hours; well-defined reddening was observed at
7 and 14 days after exposure.
Dermal Sensitization: No allergic reactions occurred in guinea pigs treated with D/2 Biological Solution.
Carcinogenicity: D/2 Biological Solution contains no carcinogenic compounds as defined by the National Toxicology
Program (NTP), the international Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC), or the Occupational
Health and Safety Administration (OSHA).
Section 12: ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Biodegradability: All components are inherently biodegradable.
Ecotoxicity: Not Tested.
Section 13: DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Unused Product: * Dilute with water 1:10 (1 part D/2 Biological Solution to 10 parts water) and dispose by sanitary sewer.
Used Product: *Used product may be hazardous depending on the cleaning application and resulting contaminants.
Empty Containers: *Triple-rinse with water and offer for recycling if available. Otherwise, dispose as non-hazardous waste.
*Dispose of used or unused product, and empty containers in accordance with the local, State, Provincial, and Federal regulations for
your location. Never dispose of used degreasing rinsates into lakes, streams, and open bodies of water or storm drains.
Section 14: TRANSPORT INFORMATION
IATA Proper Shipping Name: Detergent solution Hazard Class: Non hazardous
Section 15: REGULATORY INFORMATION
*Reportable components: None. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that propylene glycol
ethers are not included within the listed category "glycol ethers" under either EPCRA §313 Toxic Release Inventory or
Clean Air Act §112 Hazardous Air Pollutants (both lists include only ethylene glycol ethers). Nor are propylene glycol
ethers included in the various EPA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and Clean Water Act lists, nor the California
Proposition 65 lists.
All components are listed on: EINECS and TSCA Inventory
No components listed under: Clean Air Act Section 112
RCRA Status: Not a hazardous waste. CERCLA Status: No components listed
TSCA TRI Reporting: Not required / Not listed CA PROP. 65 Status: No components listed
Section 16: OTHER INFORMATION
For Safety Information, Sales Applications and Availability contact:
CATHEDRAL STONE
®
PRODUCTS, INC.
7266 Park Circle Drive, Hanover, MD 21076
Telephone: 410-782-9150 Fax: 410-782-9155
DISCLAIMER: All information appearing herein is based upon data obtained by the manufacturer and recognized technical sources.
Judgments as to the suitability of information herein for purchaser’s purposes are necessarily purchaser’s responsibility. Therefore,
although reasonable care has been taken in the preparation of this information, Sunshine Makers, Inc. or its distributors extends no
warranties, makes no representations and assumes no responsibility as to the suitability of such information for application to
purchaser’s intended purposes or for consequences of its use.
Pg 3 of 3
Material Safety Data Sheet: D/2 BIOLOGICAL SOLUTION
MSDS – Jahn Mortars (M-Products) Page 1 of 2 1/18/2008

Cathedral Stone
®

Products
7266 Park Circle Drive
Hanover, Maryland 21076
(800) 684-0901 FAX: (410) 782-9155
www.cathedralstone.com


Jahn Restoration Mortar (Jahn M-Products)
Material Safety Data Sheet
Section I –Product and Company Identification
Trade Name: Jahn Restoration Mortar Date Prepared: 9/10/2008
Supplier: Cathedral Stone Products Manufacturer: Cathedral Stone Products
Address: 7266 Park Circle Drive Address: 7266 Park Circle Drive
Hanover, Maryland 21076, U. S. A.
Hanover, Maryland 21076, U. S. A.
Emergency Number: Chemtrec (800) 424-9300 Customer Code: CDTS
Telephone Number: (410) 782-9150
Fax Number: (410) 782-9155
Section II –Composition/ Information on Ingredients
Ingredient Names OSHA PEL ACGIH TLV NOISH (RTECS)#
Silicon Dioxide (Quartz) (CAS: 14808-60-7) See table Z3 0.1 mg/m
Rdust; 9293
VV7330000
Non-Hazardous Aggregate N/A N/A 1000314NH
Tricalcium Silicate (CAS: 12168-85-3) N/A N/A 1004122TS
Dicalcium Silicate N/A N/A 1004278DS
Tricalcium Aluminate (CAS: 12042-78-3) N/A N/A 1004124TA
Calcium Oxide (CAS: 1305-78-8) 5mg/m 2mg/m EW3100000
Non-Hazardous Ingredients: Inorganic pigments N/A N/A 10000314NH
Section III – Physical/Chemical Characteristics
Boiling Point: N/A Specific Gravity: 1400/1700 kg/m3
Vapor Pressure: N/A Melting Point: N/A
Vapor Density (Air=1): N/A Evaporation Rate: N/A
Solubility in Water (20º C): Negligible Solubility in Other Solvents: N/A
Color: White to Pastel Odor: No Odor
Section IV – Fire and Explosion Hazard Data
Flash Point: N/A
Extinguishing Media: Media Suitable for Surrounding Fire (FP N).
Special Fire Fighting Procedure: Wear NIOSH / MSHA Approved SCBA & Full Protective Equip. (FP N).
Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Not Relevant
Section V – Reactivity Data
Stability: Yes Conditions to Avoid Stable (Stability): N/A
Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): N/A
Hazardous
Polymerization: No
Conditions to Avoid
(Hazardous Polymerization): Not Relevant

MSDS – Jahn Mortars (M-Products) Page 2 of 2 1/18/2008
Cathedral Stone Jahn Mortars
Material Safety Data Sheet
Section VI – Health Hazard Data
Primary Routes of Entry: Inhalation Ingestion
Health Hazard acute and Chronic: Eye and Skin Irritation, Removes Oil From Skin.
Other Potential Health Risks: None
Carciogenicity – NTP: Yes
Carciogenicity – IARC: Yes
Carciogenicity – OSHA: No
Explanation Carciogenicity: Not Relevant
Signs / Symptoms of Exposure: See Health Hazards
Medical Condition Aggravated by Exposure: None Specified by Manufacturer.
Contact with Eyes:
IMMEDIATELY FLUSH WITH POTABLE WATER FOR A MINIMUM OF 15 MINUTES, SEEK ASSISTANCE
FROM MD (FP N). INHALATION: REMOVE TO FRESH AIR. SUPPORT BREATHING (GIVE 0*2/ARTF
RESP) (FP N). INGESTION: CALL MD IMMEDIATELY (FP N).
Section VII – Safe Handling and Use Information
Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled: Normal Clean Up.
Neutralizing Agent: None Specified by Manufacturer.
Waste Disposal Method: If This Material as Provided by the Manufacturer, Becomes a Waste, It Doesn’t
Meet the Criteria of a Hazardous Waste as Defined by the EPA Under Authority of the RCRA. Disposal
Must be in Accordance With Federal, State, or Local Regulations (FP N).
Precautions-Handling / Storage: Store Dry
Other Precautions: Avoid Contact Between Skin Surfaces and Wet Mortar, or Clothing Saturated With Wet
Mortar. Wash Clothing in Clean Water.
Normal Use: Mix With Water and Use Within 30 Minutes. Do Not Use Under 5°C (41°F).
Section VIII – Control Measures
Protective Gloves: Impervious Gloves Recommended.
Respiratory Protection: NIOSH / MSHA Approved Dust Respirator.
Ventilation: N/A
Eye Protection: Chemical Worker’s Goggles.
Other Protective Equipment: None Specified by Manufacturer.
Work Hygienic Practices: None Specified by Manufacturer.
Suppl. Safety and Health Data: None Specified by Manufacturer.
Section IX – Label Data
Label Required: Yes
Label Status: G
Common Name: Cementitious Mortar
Special Hazard Precautions: Inhalation: Pulmonary Diseases. Dust Can Cause Inflammation of the Lining
Tissue of the Interior of the Nose and Inflammation of the Cornea.
Label Name: Cathedral Stone Products, Inc.
Label Street: 7266 Park Circle Drive
Label City: Hanover
Label State: Maryland
Label Zip Code: 21076
Label Emergency Number: (410)782-9150 Fax: (410)782-9155
Section XX – Transportation
DOT Shipping: N/A DOT Hazard: N/A
Section XXI
Disclaimer:
Although reasonable care has been taken in preparation of this document, we extend no warrantees, and
make no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of information Contained therein, and assume
no responsibility regarding the suitability of this information for the user’s intended purposes or for the
consequences of its use. Each individual should make a determination as to the suitability of the information
for his or her particular purpose.

Sure Klean
®
Light Duty Restoration Cleaner - Page 1 of 4
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET PROSOCO, Inc.
I PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
MANUFACTURER’S NAME
AND ADDRESS:
PROSOCO, Inc.
3741 Greenway Circle
Lawrence, KS 66046
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST Monday-Friday:
NON-BUSINESS HOURS (INFOTRAC):
785-865-4200
800/535-5053
PRODUCT TRADE NAME:
Sure Klean
®
Light Duty Restoration Cleaner
II HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
CHEMICAL NAME (COMMON NAME) CAS NO. NFPA CODE
ACGIH
TLV/TWA
OHSA PEL/TWA
Glycolic Acid (Hydroxyacetic Acid) 79-14-1 3,0,0,- Not listed Not listed
Amidosulfonic Acid (Sulfamic Acid) 5329-14-6 2,1,1,- Not listed Not listed
Hydrogen Fluoride (< 1%) (Hydrofluoric Acid) 7664-39-3 4,0,1,- 3 ppm 3ppm
III PHYSICAL DATA
BOILING POINT
(°F)
VAPOR
PRESSURE
(mm Hg)
VAPOR DENSITY
(Air = 1)
EVAPORATION RATE
(Butyl Acetate = 1)
Glycolic Acid 234qF 17.5 (68°F) 1.7 N/A
Amidosulfonic Acid 408qF < 0.01 (68°F) N/A N/A
Hydrofluoric Acid 224 27 (70qF) 2.21 @70qF N/A
SPECIFIC
GRAVITY
SOLIBILITY
IN WATER
APPEARANCE AND
ODOR
Light Duty Restoration Cleaner 1.122 Complete
Clear gelled liquid, mild
odor
IV FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA
EMERGENCY OVERVIEW
Sure Klean
®
Light Duty Restoration Cleaner is a moderately corrosive material that may cause damage to skin, eyes and mucous
membranes. Burns from this product may not be immediately painful or evident. Wear proper safety equipment to avoid exposure.
Wash immediately after exposure. Exposures may require fluoride specific treatment.
FLASH POINT (METHOD): None.
FLAMMABLE LIMITS: No applicable information found.
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA: No applicable information found.
SPECIAL FIRE FIGHTING PROCEDURES: Wear NIOSH/MSHA approved self-contained breathing apparatus with a full face piece
operated in pressure demand or other positive pressure mode and full body protective clothing when fighting fires. Generates
heat upon addition of water with possible spattering. Water may be used to keep fire-exposed containers cool until fire is out.
Water or foam may cause frothing which can be violent and endanger the life of the fire fighter, especially if sprayed into
containers of hot, burning liquid.
Sure Klean
®
Light Duty Restoration Cleaner - Page 2 of 4
UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS: Reacts with most metals to release hydrogen gas which can form explosive mixtures
with air. Flammable and explosive mixtures are unlikely except in poorly ventilated or confined areas.
V HEALTH HAZARD DATA
PRIMARY ROUTES OF EXPOSURE: Skin, eyes, inhalation.
CARCINOGEN INFORMATION: Not listed (OSHA, IARC, NTP).
MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY OVEREXPOSURE: No applicable information found.
EFFECTS OF OVER EXPOSURE: Causes severe damage to eyes. Causes burns to skin. Breathing of mist or dust can damage
nasal and respiratory passages. Swallowing results in damage to mucous membranes and deep tissue; can result in death
on penetration to vital areas. Bronchitis, pulmonary edema and chemical pneumonitis may occur from inhalation of vapors or
mists.
EYE CONTACT: Liquid or concentrated vapors can cause eye irritation, severe burns and permanent damage.
SKIN CONTACT: Vapors, mists and liquid are corrosive to the skin. Vapors will irritate the skin. Liquid and mists will burn the skin.
Prolonged liquid contact will burn or destroy surrounding tissue. Burns from this product may be delayed as long as 24 hours
after initial exposure.
INHALATION: Vapors and mists are corrosive to the nose, throat, and mucous membranes. Bronchitis, pulmonary edema, and
chemical pneumonitis may occur. Irritation, coughing, chest pain, and difficulty in breathing may occur with brief exposure.
Prolonged exposure may result in more severe irritation and tissue damage.
INGESTION: Vapors, mists, and liquid are corrosive to the mouth and throat. Swallowing the liquid burns the tissues, causes
abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and collapse. Swallowing large quantities can cause death.
EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES:
EYE CONTACT: Irrigate eyes for 15-30 minutes with water, keeping eyelids apart and away from eyeballs during irrigation. Get
medical attention immediately, preferably an eye specialist. If a physician is not immediately available, apply 1 or 2 drops of
0.5% Pontocaine
®
Hydrochloride solution followed by a second irrigation for 15 minutes. Do not use the solution described
for skin treatment.
Irrigate with 1% calcium gluconate in normal saline for 1 to 2 hours to prevent or lessen corneal damage.
SKIN CONTACT: Immediately place under a safety shower or wash the burned area with a water hose. Remove all contaminated
clothing while washing continuously. Keep washing with large amounts of water for 15 to 20 minutes. After washing, the
burned area should be immersed in a solution of 0.13% Zephiran
®
Chloride. If immersion is not practical, towels should be
soaked with the above solution and used as compresses for the burned area. The compresses should be changed every 2
minutes and continue until pain is relieved, up to 4 to 6 hours. Alternatively, 2.5% calcium gluconate gel may be promptly and
continuously massaged into the burned area until the pain is relieved. Seek medical attention immediately for all burns.
INHALATION: Immediately remove to fresh air. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. If not breathing, give artificial respiration, but NOT
mouth-to-mouth.
INGESTION: Drink large amounts of water to dilute. DO NOT induce vomiting. Several glasses of milk or several ounces of milk of
magnesia may be given for their soothing effect. Seek medical attention.
NOTE TO PHYSICIAN: For larger burns, if pain is not relieved by soaking in Zephiran
®
or by calcium gluconate gel, inject sterile 5%
aqueous calcium gluconate solution subcutaneously beneath, around, and in the burned area. Initially use no more than 0.5
cc per square centimeter and do not distort appearance of skin. If pain is not completely relieved, additional treatment is
indicated. (5% calcium gluconate solution may be prepared by mixing equal parts of 10% calcium gluconate solution with
normal saline. For burns of large skin areas, (greater than 25 square inches), for ingestion and for significant inhalation
exposure, severe systemic effects may occur. Monitor and correct for hypocalcemia, cardiac arrhythmias, hypomagnesemia
and hyperkalemia. In some cases renal dialysis may be indicated. For certain burns, especially of the digits, use of intra-
arterial calcium gluconate may be indicated. Effectiveness of treatment is indicated by cessation of pain.
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VI REACTIVITY DATA
STABILITY: Stable.
CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Contact with strong bases (alkali), can cause violent reaction generating large amounts of heat. Avoid
heat, sparks, or open flame.
INCOMPATIBILITY (MATERIALS TO AVOID): Alkaline materials, metals, oxidizing materials, cyanides, sulfides, combustible
materials, organic peroxides, strong reducing agents, carbides, chlorates, nitrates, picrates, fulminates and reducing
materials.
HAZARDOUS COMBUSTION OR DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen when in contact with
metal. May release sulfur dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, or hydrogen sulfide.
VII SPILL OR LEAK PROCEDURES
SPILL, LEAK, WASTE DISPOSAL PROCEDURES: Provide adequate ventilation. Evacuate immediate area where concentrated
fumes are present. Cleanup personnel must wear proper protective equipment. Contain spilled material with dikes, etc., and
prevent runoff into ground and surface waters or into sewers.
Dilute spilled product with water to reduce fuming during cleanup work and from reaction with neutralizing substances. Spills
and leaks should be neutralized by pouring dry soda ash or lime over the affected area to absorb as much liquid as possible.
Allow powdered material to remain on spill for five to ten minutes and flush thoroughly with water. Neutralized material, both
liquid and solid, must be recovered for proper disposal.
WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS: Recovered solids or liquids may be disposed of in a permitted waste management facility.
Neutralized materials may be discharged to a sanitary sewer with approval of the receiving treatment plant. Typical pH range
of 6-10 is generally considered appropriate for discharge. Consult federal, state, and/or local authorities for approved
procedure. For additional information regarding handling and disposal of rinse-water, please review Technical Bulletin 200-
CW “Controlled Handling of Cleaning Wastewater”. Empty containers must be triple rinsed before disposal in a permitted
sanitary landfill. Check local restrictions.
VIII SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Vapor concentrations are unlikely to exceed the 3 ppm TLV. However, if you notice irritation or if air
monitoring indicates concentrations above the TLV, wear a NIOSH approved half-mask respirator with acid vapor cartridges.
A dust/mist respirator should be worn to avoid exposure to mists generated during application or removal of this product.
VENTILATION: Provide sufficient general and/or local exhaust ventilation to maintain exposure below the TLV.
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING: Wear acid-resistant neoprene or PVC rain suit and rubber boots with protective pants outside.
PROTECTIVE GLOVES: Rubber gloves with gauntlets.
EYE PROTECTION: Chemical splash goggles and/or full face shield. Do not wear contact lenses because they may contribute to the
severity of an eye injury.
OTHER PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: An eyewash and safety shower should be nearby and ready for use.
IX SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS
WORK PRACTICES: Proper work practices and planning should be utilized to avoid contact with workers, passersby, and non-
masonry surfaces. Do not atomize during application. Beware of wind drift. Wind-drift hazards may be diminished by pre-
rinsing with low-pressure water before pressure washing. Divert pedestrian traffic around work areas. See the Product Data
sheet and label for specific precautions to be taken during use. Smoking, eating and drinking should be discouraged during
the use of this product. Wash hands after handling or use.
PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING AND STORAGE: Use proper safety equipment (see section VIII) when handling.
Store in a cool, well-ventilated area. Separate from oxidizing agents, nitric acid, alkalis, chlorates, sulfides, etc. (see section
VI). Store in proper acid-resistant containers such as rubber-lined steel, glass, or plastic. Emptied containers retain product
residues (vapor, liquid, and/or solid). All hazard precautions given in this data sheet must be observed.
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OTHER PRECAUTIONS: Do not get in eyes, on skin or on clothing. Can cause injury or blindness. Avoid breathing mist or vapor.
Provide ventilation sufficient to limit employee exposure below OSHA permissible limit. Do not take internally. Wash
thoroughly after handling. Empty containers should be treated as if they were full.
X REGULATORY INFORMATION
SHIPPING: The proper shipping description for this product is UN1760, Corrosive liquid, N.O.S. (Hydroxyacetic and Sulfamic
Acid), 8, II when shipped in its original factory packaging. This product and packaging combination is not allowed in air
transport.
NATIONAL MOTOR FREIGHT CLASSIFICATION: 44157 Sub 3 Class Rate: 85
SARA 313 REPORTABLE:
CHEMICAL NAME CAS UPPERBOUND CONCENTRATION %BY WEIGHT
Hydrogen Fluoride 7664-39-3 < 1%
CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65: This product contains no chemicals listed under California’s Proposition 65.
XI OTHER
MSDS Status: Date of Revision: April 18, 2007
For Product Manufactured After: N/A – No product reformulation
Changes: Updated Shipping Description (Section X) for DOT Regulation Compliance
Item #: 20039
Approved By: Regulatory Department
DISCLAIMER:
The information contained on the Material Safety Data Sheet has been compiled from data considered accurate. This data is
believed to be reliable, but it must be pointed out that values for certain properties are known to vary from source to source.
PROSOCO, Inc. expressly disclaims any warranty express or implied as well as any liability for any injury or loss arising from
the use of this information or the materials described. This data is not to be construed as absolutely complete since additional
data may be desirable when particular conditions or circumstances exist. It is the responsibility of the user to determine the
best precautions necessary for the safe handling and use of this product for his unique application. This data relates only to
the specific material designated and is not to be used in combination with any other material. Many federal and state
regulations pertain directly or indirectly to the product's end use and disposal of containers and unused material. It is the
purchaser's responsibility to familiarize himself with all applicable regulations.
DATE OF PREPARATION: April 18, 2007

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