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Mi neSi ght

f or Engi neer s
Sur f ac e (Level 2)
Wor k book
E002
Rev. B
2002, 2001, 1994, and 1978 by MINTEC, inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this document shall be
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted
by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording or otherwise, without written permission from
MINTEC, inc.
All terms mentioned in this document that are known to
be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respec-
tive companies have been appropriately identified.
MineSight

is a registered trademark of MINTEC, inc.


Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Table of Contents
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page TOC-1
MineSight for Engineers Surface Level 2
Table of Contents
Using This MineSight Workbook ................................................................... Intro-1
MineSight Overview ...................................................................................... 1-1
Familiarization with Deposit .......................................................................... 2-1
Initializing the Pit Optimization Files ............................................................. 3-1
Pit Optimization Symbol Maps ...................................................................... 4-1
Running Pit Optimization Programs .............................................................. 5-1
Pit Optimization Display and Analysis .......................................................... 6-1
Complex Pit Design ....................................................................................... 7-1
Displaying Pit Designs .................................................................................. 8-1
Reserves Calculations .................................................................................. 9-1
Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler ....................... 10-1
M821V1 Summary ......................................................................................... 11-1
Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler ........................... 12-1
Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner ......................................... 13-1
Quaterly Planning with MS-IP........................................................................ 14-1
Plotting in MineSight 3-D............................................................................... 15-1
Appendix A - M821V1 Summary .................................................................... A-1
Appendix B - ePit Basics ............................................................................... B-1
Appendix C - Overview of Python Scripting .................................................. C-1
Appendix D - How to Build Python Scripts .................................................... D-1
Table of Contents Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page TOC-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Using this Mintec Workbook
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page Intro-1
Notes:
Using this Mintec Workbook
The objective of this workbook is to provide hands on training and experience with
the MineSight Operations software package. This workbook does not cover all the
capabilites of MineSight, but concentrates on typical mine geologists duties using a
given set of data.
Introduction to the Course
To begin, we would like to thank you for taking the opportunity to enrich your
understanding of MineSight through taking this training course offered by Mintec
Technical Support. Please start out by reviewing this material on workbook conventions
prior to proceeding with the training course documentation.
This workbook is designed to present concepts clearly and then give the user
practice through exercises to perform the stated tasks and achieve the required results.
All sections of this workbook contain a basic step, or series of steps, for using
MineSight with a project. Leading off each workbook section are the learning objectives
covered by the subject matter within the topic section. Following this is an outline of the
process using the menu system, and finally an example is presented of the results of the
process.
MineSight provides a large number of programs with wide ranges of options within
each program. This may seem overwhelming at times, but once you feel comfortable
with the system, the large number of programs becomes an asset because of the
flexibility it affords. If you are unable to achieve these key tasks or understand the
concepts, notify your instructor before moving on to the next section in the workbook.
What You Need to Know
This section explains for the student the mouse actions, keyboard functions, and
terms and conventions used in the Mintec workbooks. Please review this section
carefully to benefit fully from the training material and this training course.
Using the Mouse
The following terms are used to describe actions you perform with the mouse:
Click -press and release the left mouse button
Double-click - click the left mouse button twice in rapid succession
Right-click - press and release the right mouse button
Drag - move the mouse while holding down the left mouse button
Highlight - drag the mouse pointer across data, causing the image to reverse in color
Point - position the mouse pointer on the indicated item
Using this Mintec Workbook Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page Intro-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Terms and Conventions
The following terms and conventions are used in the Mintec workbooks:
Actions or keyboard input instructions in running text - are printed in Times New
Roman font, italics, embedded within arrow brackets and keys are separated with a +
when used in combination, for example, to apply bold face to type is indicated by
<ctrl+shift+b>.
Button/Icon - are printed in bold with the initial letter capitalized, in Times New
Roman font, for example Print, on a button, indicates an item you click on to produce a
hard copy of a file; or , the Query icon, is clicked on to determine which
polyline you need to edit.
Menu Commands - are printed in Arial font, bold, with a vertical bar, as an example
File I Open means access the File menu and choose Open.
Parameters - are printed in Arial font, lower case, in bullet format, as an example,
the project coordinate units (metric or imperial)
the project type (3-D, GSM, BHS, SRV).
Select - highlight a menu list item, move the mouse over the menu item and click the
mouse.
Questions or Comments?
Note: if you have any questions or comments regarding this training documentation,
please contact the Mintec Documentation Specialist at (520) 795-3891 or via e-mail at
market@mintec.com.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. MineSight Overview
Part#: E002 Rev B Page 1-1
Notes:
MineSight Overview
Learning Objectives
When you have completed this section, you will know:
A. The basic structure and organization of MineSight.
B. The capabilities of each MineSight module.
C. Ways to run MineSight programs.
What Is MineSight?
MineSight is a comprehensive software package for the mining industry containing
tools used for resource evaluation and analysis, mine modeling, mine planning and
design, and reserves estimation and reporting. MineSight has been designed to take raw
data from a standard source (drillholes, underground samples, blastholes, etc.) and
extend the information to the point where a production schedule is derived. The data
and operations on the data can be broken down into the following logical groups.
Drillhole Data Operations
A variety of drillhole data can be stored in MineSight, including assays, lithology and
geology codes, quality parameters for coal, collar information (coordinates and hole
orientation), and down-the-hole survey data. Value and consistency checks can be
performed on the data before it is loaded into MineSight. After the data has been stored
in the system, it can be listed, updated, geostatistically and statistically analyzed, plotted
in plan or section and viewed in 3-D. Assay data can then be passed on to the next
logical section of MineSight which is compositing.
Digitized Data Operations
Digitized data is utilized in the evaluation of a project in many ways. It can be used to
define geologic information in section or plan, to define topography contours, to define
structural information, mine designs and other information that is important to evaluate
the ore body. Digitized data is used or derived in virtually every phase of a project from
drillhole data through production scheduling. Any digitized data can be triangulated and
viewed as a 3-D surface in MineSight.
Compositing Operations
Composites are calculated by benches (for most base metal mines) or mineral seams
(for coal mines) to show the commodity of interest on a mining basis. Composites can
be either generated in MineSight or generated outside the system and imported.
Composite data can be listed, updated, geostatistically and statistically analyzed, plotted
in plan or section and viewed in 3-D. Composite data is passed on to the next phase of
MineSight, ore body modeling.
Modeling Operations
Within MineSight, deposits can be represented by a computer model of one of two
types. A 3-D block model (3DBM) is generally used to model base metal deposits, such
as porphyry copper or other non-layered deposits. A gridded seam model (GSM) is used
for layered deposits, such as coal or oil sands. In both models, the horizontal
components of a deposit are divided into blocks that are usually related to a production
unit. In a 3DBM, the deposit is also divided horizontally into benches, whereas in a
MineSight Overview Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 1-2 Part#: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
GSM the vertical dimensions are a function of the seam and interburden thicknesses. For
each block in the model, a variety of items may be stored.
Typically, a block in a 3DBM will contain grade items, geological codes, and a
topography percent. Many other items may also be present. For a GSM, the seam top
elevation and seam thickness are required. Other items, such as quality parameters, seam
bottom, partings, etc. can also be stored. A variety of methods can be used to enter data
into the model. Geologic and topographic data can be digitized and converted into codes
for the model, or they can be entered directly as block codes. Solids can also be created
in the MineSight 3-D graphical interface for use in coding the model directly. Grade
data is usually entered through interpolation techniques, such as Kriging or inverse
distance weighting. Once the model is constructed, it can be updated, summarized
statistically, plotted in plan or section, contoured in plan or section, and viewed in 3-D.
The model is a necessary prerequisite in any pit design or pit evaluation process.
Economic Pit Limits & Pit Optimization
This set of routines works on whole blocks from the 3-D block model, and uses either
the floating cone or Lerchs-Grossmann technique to find economic pit limits for
different sets of economic assumptions. Usually one grade or equivalent grade item is
used as the economic material. The user enters costs, net value of the product, cutoff
grades, and pit wall slope. Original topography is used as the starting surface for the
design, and new surfaces are generated which reflect the economic designs. The designs
can be plotted in plan or section, viewed in 3-D, and reserves can be calculated for the
grade item that was used for the design. Simple production scheduling can also be run
on these reserves.
Pit Design
The Pit Design routines are used to geometrically design pits that include ramps,
pushbacks, and variable wall slopes to more accurately portray a realistic open pit
geometry. Manually designed pits can also be entered into the system and evaluated. Pit
designs can be displayed in plan or section, can be clipped against topography if desired,
and can be viewed in 3-D. Reserves for these pit designs are evaluated on a partial block
basis, and are used in the calculation of production schedules.
Production Scheduling
This group of programs is used to compute schedules for long-range planning based
upon pushback designs (or phases), and reserves computed by the mine planning
programs. The basic input parameters for each production period include mill capacity,
mine capacity, and cutoff grades. Functions provided by the scheduling programs
include:
Calculation and reporting of production for each period, including mill production
by ore type, mill head grades and waste
Preparation of end-of-production period maps
Calculation and storage of yearly mining schedules for economic analysis
Evaluation of alternate production rates and required mining capacity
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. MineSight Overview
Part#: E002 Rev B Page 1-3
Notes:
Ways to Run MineSight Programs
MineSight consists of a large group of procedures and programs designed to handle
the tasks of mineral deposit evaluation and mine planning. Each procedure allows you
to have a great amount of control over your data and the modeling process. You decide
on the values for all the options available in each procedure. When you enter these
values into a procedure to create a run file, you have a record of exactly how each
program was run. You can easily modify your choices to rerun the program. To allow
for easier use, the MineSight Compass menu system has been developed. Just select the
procedure you need from the menu. Input screens will guide you through the entire
operation. The menu system builds run files behind the scenes and runs the programs for
you. If you need more flexibility in certain parts of the operations, the menus can be
modified according to your needs, or you can use the run files directly. The MineSight
3-D graphical interface provides a Windows-style environment with a large number of
easy-to-use, intuitive functions for CAD design, data presentation, area and volume
calculations and modeling.
Basic Flow of MineSight
The following diagram shows the flow of tasks for a standard mine evaluation project.
These tasks load the drillhole assays, calculate composites, develop a mine model,
design a pit, and prepare long-range schedules for financial analysis. There are many
other MineSight programs which can be used for geology, statistics, geostatistics,
displays, and reserves.
MINESIGHT OVERVIEW Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 1-4
Initialize
Update
List
PCF
Drillhole Assays
Enter
Scan
Load
Edit
List
Dump
Rotate
Add Geology
Statistics
Variograms
Plot Collars
Plot Sections
Special Calculations
3-D Viewing and Interpretation
Composites
Load
Edit
List
Dump
Add Geology
Add Topography
Statistics
Variograms
Variogram Validation
Plot Sections
Plot Plans
Special Calculations
Sort
3-D Viewing and Interpretation
Mine Model
Initialize
Interpolate
Add Geology
Add topography
List
Edit
Statistics
Reserves
Special Calculations
Plot Sections
Plot Plans
Contour Plots
Sort
3-D Viewing & Solids Construction
Digitized Data
Digitize
Load
Edit
List
Dump
Plot
3-D Viewing
Pit Designs
Creat Pit Optimization Model
Run Pit Optimization
Pit Optimization Reserves
Pit Optimization Plots
Run Pit Design
Pit Design Reserves
Pit Design Plots
Reserves
3-D Views
Planning &
Scheduling
Long Range
Short Range
Flow of Tasks
for a Standard
Mine Evaluation
Project
Part# E002 Rev B
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. MineSight Overview
Part#: E002 Rev B Page 1-5
Notes:
MineSight Capacities
Drillholes
No limit to the number of drillholes; only limited by the total number of assays in
the system
99 survey intervals per drillhole
524,285 assay intervals per file
8,189 assay intervals per drillhole
99 items per interval
Multiple drillhole files allowed (usually one is all that is required)
Composites
524,285 assay intervals per file
8,189 composites per drillhole
99 items per composite interval
Multiple composite files allowed (usually one is all that is required)
Geologic Model
3-D block model limit of 1000 columns, 1000 rows and 400 benches
Gridded seam model limit of 1000 columns, 1000 rows and 200 seams
99 items per block
Multiple model files allowed (usually one is all that is required)
Digitized Point Data
4,000 planes per file - either plan or section
20,000 features (digitized line segments) per plane
100,000 points per plane
99 features with the same code per plane and a unique sequence number
Multiple files allowed
Pit Optimization (Floating cone/Lerchs-Grossman programs)
600 row by 600 column equivalent (rows * columns < 360000)
Multiple files are allowed
Reserves
20 material classes
20 cutoff grades for each material class
10 metal grades
Multiple reserves files allowed
Slice Files for Interactive Planning and Scheduling
2,000,000 blocks containing one item (the number of blocks allowed drops as
the number of items per block rises)
Unlimited benches and sections
30 items per block
MineSight Overview Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 1-6 Part#: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Blastholes
524,285 blastholes per file with standard File 12
8,189 blastholes per shot with standard File 12
4,194,301 blastholes per file with expanded limit File 12
1,021 blastholes per shot with expanded limit File 12
99 items per blasthole
Multiple blasthole files allowed (usually one is all that is required)
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Familiarization with Deposit
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 2-1
Notes:
Familiarization with Deposit
Learning Outcome
When you have completed this section, you will know:
A. The type and extent of the deposit.
B. The basic assumptions for the project such as operating costs, metal prices, mining
parameters, mill recovery and capacity and processing costs.
C. The major items for the 2-D and 3-D models.
D. The current topographical surface.
E. The mineralized zone and the oxide/sulfide boundary.
F. How to create Gradeshells at different CU cut offs.
Basic Assumptions
The sample metals project is a potential open pit mine with copper and moly assay
values. The objective of the workbook is to demonstrate the use of MineSight with the
3-D block model of the deposit for surface mine design and mine planning. If this
course is being taught using mine site data, these parameters should be evaluated prior
to proceeding further.
The sample project deposit area is approximately 2500m square, with topography
elevations ranging from 3400m to 4360m, divided into 15m benches. Thirty-six
drillholes have been drilled in the area on nominal 150m centers.
The basic assumptions for the project are:
A. The ore will be processed by a plant recovering copper and moly. The mill
recoveries for both copper and moly are estimated at 80%. The plant capacity is
20,000,000 tonnes per year.
B. The metal prices for the base case are $1.00/lb for copper and $8.00/lb for moly.
C. The mine will be an open pit with 40 degree pit wall slope. The roads will be
30m wide with a maximum grade of 10%. The mining cost for both ore and
waste will be $1.00 /tonne. The bench height will be 15m.
D. The operating cost for the mine is estimated at $9.00/tonne of ore milled. This
includes, for each ton of ore, the mining cost, plant processing cost, and
administration costs. Fixed costs have been included in the cost per ton based
upon the production rate.
E. The concentrate from the plant will be shipped to a smelter refinery. For the
copper ore, the cost of shipping, smelting, refining, marketing, etc. is assumed to
be $0.30/lb.
F. The average density is 2.56 tonnes/m
3
for both ore and waste. This is a
pre-feasibility study, so many of these assumptions are yet to be confirmed and
Familiarization with Deposit Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 2-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
the mining plan may be changed at a later date to optimize the schedule. In
advanced courses, both the modeling and mine planning will be studied in more
detail.
Project Files
The following project files have already been created. Again, if youre using your
own data for training, appropriate versions of these files should be created prior to
continuing the course. The project directory contains the following files:
METR10.DAT - Project Control File
METR11.DAT - Drillhole Assay File
METR12.DAT - Drillhole Collar/Survey File
METR09.DAT - Drillhole Composite File
METR13.DAT - 2-D Surface File
METR15.DAT - 3-D Block Model File
METR25.TOP - Plan View VBM file for topographical data
METR25.EWX - West-East sectional VBM file for geologic data.
This information is accessible by clicking on the Setup tab of MineSight Compass.
Project Limits
The sample project deposit is a medium sized copper/molybdenum deposit. The
coordinates are defined in metric units and cover the following area:
Eastings: 9500E to 12000E
Northings: 9500N to 12000N
Elevations: 3400m to 4360m
Block Sizes
The block size in the model is 25m by 25m by 15m. Applying this block size over the
modeled area results in a model with:
100 rows 100 columns 64 levels/benches
This information is available for review by clicking on the Extent tab in the
MineSight Compass interface.
2-D Surfaces
The 2-D surface file has the following items:
TOPOG - is the gridded topographical surface.
PIT1-4- surfaces can hold either economic or designed pits.
THICK - thickness between surfaces
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Familiarization with Deposit
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 2-3
Notes:
3-D Block Model
The 3-D Block model has the following items:
TOPO - % of the block below the surface.
CUIDS - block cu grade by inverse distance weighting.
CUPLY - block cu grade by assignment from nearest hole.
CUKRG - block cu grade by Kriging.
EQCU - equivalent copper grade for the block.
MOLY - block moly grade by inverse distance weighting (IDW).
DIST - Distance to the nearest hole in IDW interpolation.
ZONE - mineralization code for the block.
1 = waste, 2 = mineralized
OTYP - reserve classification code for the block.
1 = oxide, 2 = sulfide mineralization
NCOMP - number of composites used in IDW interpolation.
The model items and their minimum, maximum, and precision values are available
for review in the project file editor, found on the Project tab in MineSight Compass.
These parameters can also be viewed on the Info tab of the Model View Properties
dialog in MineSight 3-D.
MineSight Views
VBM
The VBM files contain polylines that define a region on one or both sides of the
polylines. A polylines can have a three digit code for each side of the line, e.g., 101202.
Normally, only the right side of the polylines will be given a code. Minimize MineSight
Compass.
<Create a folder in the MineSight 3-D Data Manager by highlighting <unnamed>,
then clicking the right mouse button. Name the folder vbm.>
Plan
<Click on the new folder, then click right and select Import I VBM File. Select the
appropriate PCF file (metr10.dat for the sample project), then the VBM file metr25.top
(or equivalent). Click OK.
Click the All Planes button, then click the Features tab. Click the All Features
button, and click Apply.>
The topographical contours, object 901, and the mineralized zone boundary contours,
object 2 have been imported. In addition, a planar gridset named metr25.top_gridset
has been created, based on the planes on which the imported data resides.
<Close the VBM Import dialog. Note that the VBM file remains open as long as the
VBM import dialog is open, so close this dialog as soon as youve finished importing
the desired data.
In the MineSight 3-D Data Manager, select the four features, and close them.>
Familiarization with Deposit Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 2-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
WE Section
Now import the West-East sectional VBM data. <In Data Manager, click folder
VBM, click right and select Import I VBM File. Select the PCF file Metr10.dat, then
the VBM file Metr25.ewx, or its equivalent if using custom data. Click OK.
Click the All Planes button, then click the Features tab. Click All Features and click
Apply.
Close the VBM Import window.>
Two features have been imported. Object 1701 is the mineralization limit as defined
on section using drillholes. Object 310 is the oxide mineralization zone, also defined by
the drillholes. Again, a gridset, this time oriented W-E and named metr25.ewx_gridset,
has been created during the import operation.
<Close folder VBM; note that all objects within the folder are closed recursively.>
2-D Surfaces
<Create a folder in the Data Manager by highlighting <unnamed>, then clicking the
right mouse button. Name the folder file13. Click on the new folder, then click right and
select New I Model View. Name the model view topog. Select Metr10.dat and
Metr13.dat from the respective file browser windows.> Note: if youre using a custom
data set, the 2D surface model (File 13) must be initialized and should already contain
the gridded topography data.
<Click the Cutoffs button on the Display tab in the MineSight Model View Editor
dialog. In the Cutoff Face Colors window, click the I ntervals button. In the Cutoff
Intervals window, enter 3400, 4360, and 20 for the minimum, maximum, and intervals,
respectively.
Click right in the interval listing, and choose Select all. Click the Properties button.
In the Object Properties window, click the Set Color by Rangebutton. Click OK. Click
OK to close the Object Properties window, and again to close the Cutoff Face Colors
window. Click OK once more to close the MineSight Model View Editor dialog.> The
gridded topographical surface is now displayed in the MineSight 3-D Viewer using the
defined color cutoffs.
<Close the file13 folder.>
3-D Model
<Create a folder in the Data Manager by clicking <unnamed>, then click right.
Name the folder file15.>
MineSight 3-D Model View of Topo%
<Click on the new folder, then click right and select New I Model View. Name the
model view topo. Select Metr10.dat and Metr15.dat from the appropriate file browser
windows. Change the Primary display item to topo. Click the Cutoffs button in the
MineSight Model View Editor window.
In the Cutoff Face Colors window, type 50 in the box with 0. Click on the <50 box,
then click Properties I Global Color I Blue. Click on the 50 box, then click
Properties I Global Color I Red.
Click the Rangetab, and set the 3-D display limits to display all columns, all rows
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Familiarization with Deposit
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 2-5
Notes:
and all levels.
Click Apply.> The blocks that are coded with 50% or greater topo% are in red, and
the ones that are less are in blue.
MineSight 3-D Model View of CUIDW
<Click the Displaytab and change the model view name to cuidw. Change the
Primary display item to cuidw. Click the Cutoffs button in the MineSight Model View
Editor window. In the Cutoff Face colors window, click the I ntervals button. In the
Cutoff Intervals window, enter .2, 2.4 and .2 for the minimum, maximum and intervals,
respectively.> The ore/waste cutoff is assumed to be .2.
<Click right in the interval listing and then Select all. Click the Properties button. In
the Object Properties window, click the Set Color by Rangebutton and check the
brightness contrast. Click OK twice. Click on the <.2 box, then Properties; uncheck the
Show Surfaces toggle.> This will prevent the waste blocks from being displayed.
<Under the Display in 3D Views header, set the Style to 3D Blocks. Change to the
Options tab and check the box under Secondary item limiting. Select zone, enter 2 for
the greater than/equal tovalue, and 3 for the less than value.> Zone values of 2
indicate blocks within the mineralized zone.
<Click Apply.> The display now shows all blocks within the mineralized zone that
have an interpolated value above the ore/waste cutoff of .2.
Combined View
Now lets examine all of the information we have displayed in MineSight so far.
Open the topog member in the file13 folder. <Open the 1701 member in the vbm
folder.> The view shows that the interpolated blocks were limited to the mineralized
zone defined by the 1701 contours. There is a small amount of overburden below
topography and the top of the ore zone.
Ortyp
To view the ortyp mineralization, create a new view called ortyp. <Click the Display
tab and change the model view name to ortyp. Change the Primary display item to
ortyp.
Click the Cutoffs button in the MineSight Model View Editor window. In the Cutoff
Face colors window, click the I ntervals button. In the Cutoff Intervals window, enter 1,
2, and 1 for the minimum, maximum and intervals, respectively. Ortyp of 1is oxide, and
ortyp 2 is sulfide. Set cutoff 1 to cyan, and 2 to pink.
Change to the Options tab, and check the box under Secondary item limiting. Select
cuidw, and enter .2 for the greater than/equal tovalue, and 3 for the less than value.
Recall that cuidwvalues above .2 are ore.
Click Apply.> The display shows the ore blocks that are coded as oxide and sulfide
blocks.
Oxide
To view just the oxide mineralized blocks, <click the Cutoffs tab, then click 2 I
Properties I Surfaces. Uncheck Show faces.> The display now shows the oxide
mineralized blocks based on the cuidw interpolated values.
<Open the 301 member in the vbm folder.> The 301 polygons were digitized based
on the drillhole data.
Familiarization with Deposit Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 2-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
<Close all open views.>
Gradeshells
Gradeshells are solids based on the 3-D Model views. Gradeshells can be based on
values above or below a certain grade or between grades.
Now we will create a gradeshell of cuidw showing blocks between .2 and 1.4 cutoffs
for the sulfide material. <Create a new member called cu.2-1.4. Set the Primary display
item to cuidw. Set the 3-D display type to Gradeshell.
Click the Rangetab, and set the 3-D display limits to include all levels.
Click the GradeShell tab, and set the Gradeshell primary item to cuidw, with the
greater than/equal tovalue of .2, and the less than value of 1.4. Set the Limit by
secondary item to ortyp, and set the greater than/equal tovalue of 2, and the less than
value of 3.> The display shows the sulfide mineralized blocks with interpolated grades
between .2 and 1.4.
<Close all open views.>
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Initializing the Pit Optimization Files
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 3-1
Notes:
Initializing the Pit Optimization Files
In this section you will condense the mine model to a Pit Optimization model. This is
required before designing pits.
Learning Outcome
When you have completed this section, you will know:
A. What the Pit Optimization series of programs does
B. The moving cone method of pit design
C. How to condense from a 3-D block model to a Pit Optimization model
The Pit Optimization Programs
The Pit Optimization series of programs are used to create economically feasible pit
designs using a condensed version of the mine model. They can also plot out pit designs
and calculate reserves.
The condensed version of the mine model is composed of two files:
The S-File, created from File 13, contains the initial topography for the pits
The B-File, created from File 15, contains the one item from the 3-D block model
that is to be used in the economic calculations. It may be:
A single grade value interpolated with MineSight 600-series programs
An equivalent value representing two or more grade values
A dollar value representing gross or net profit
Floating Cone Logic
Pit Optimization pits can be created by a moving cone method which can rapidly
generate a series of pits based on economic criteria. The objective of the moving cone is
to find maximum total profit pit limits.
1. Each block is assigned a dollar value.
Negative value for waste
Positive values for ore
Zero values for air
2. Cone geometry.
Cone base radius (DX/2 or DY/2)
Cone centered on ore blocks at bottom or center
Initializing the Pit Optimization Files Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 3-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Variable slopes or constant slopes
3. Dollar value of cone = sum of dollar values of whole blocks within cone. If the
value of the cone is positive, all blocks within the cone are mined.
4. Movement of cone is from top down.
Trial and error method
5. Possible problems:
Multiple pit bottoms
Incorrect search sequence
Initial pit to expose ore
Block size
General Procedure For Using Pit Optimization with Floating Cone
1. Initialize the Pit Optimization B- and S-Files using program M717V2.
2. Transfer data into the B-File and S-File using program M718V1.
3. Print plan maps of the B-File for checking purposes. Use program M722V1. The
topography or S-File can be displayed with M721V1.
4. Run Program M723V1 to calculate geologic reserves from the B-File.
5. Use program M720V1 or M720V2 to enter economic criteria, slope criteria, and
area constraints and then create the pit design(s) for the specified economic
parameters.
6. Display resulting in plan pits with program M721V2.
7. Analyze the set of pits you created in terms of profitability and reserves and
generate a preliminary mining schedule.
Initializing the Pit Optimization Model
<On the MineSight Compass Menu tab, select the Group Pit Optimization and the
Operation I nitialize; from the Procedure list, select the procedure p71702.dat -
I nitialize Pit Optimization files. Fill out the panels as described.>
Panel 1 - Initialize a Pit Optimization Model
On this initial panel, we specify the names of the Pit Optimization files, and the
necessary parameters for the item to condense. Lets call the B-file METRDP.BLK and
the S-file METRDP.P00; <enter EQCU as the item to condense, and specify
appropriate minimum, maximum and precision values (e.g., 0, 2.5 and 0.01
respectively).>
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Initializing the Pit Optimization Files
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 3-3
Notes:
Panel 2 - Initialize a Pit Optimization Model
This panel allows us to specify the ore and waste SG/Tonnage Factor, a description
printed in the report file, and optional run and report filename extensions. <Use a value
of 2.56 for the SG of both ore and waste, and enter an appropriate description such as
Sample Pit #1.>
Panel 3 - Please Read the Following
This panel provides important information regarding certain limitations of the Pit
Optimization series of programs. <If your project requires more than 99 Pit
Optimization file sets, you must first delete one or more existing Pit Optimization sets
using program M717TS.>
Condensing the Pit Optimization Model File
<On the MineSight Compass Menu tab, select the Group Pit Optimization and the
operation Data Convert. From the Procedure list, select the procedure p71890.dat -
Condense Model (Pit Optimization). Fill out the panel as described.>
Program M718V1 transfers topography data from File 13 to the S-file and grade data
from File 15 to the B-file.
Panel 1 - Condense a Pit Optimization File
The single panel for this procedure accepts the names of the B- and S-files, TOPOG
and condensing item (with appropriate minimum and maximum values), and the lowest
level to be condensed.
When M718V1 is finished, M721V1 is run and the report file is shown on the screen.
It contains a symbol map of the S-file. Check it for general validity. In the next section,
we will plot the grades stored in the B-file and check them.
Initializing the Pit Optimization Files Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 3-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Running Pit Optimization Programs
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 5-1
Notes:
Running Pit Optimization Programs
Prior to this section you must have condensed the mine model to a Pit Optimization
model. In this section, you will use the Pit Optimization programs to develop several pit
shells based on different copper prices. Following this you can analyze the shells and
display them.
Learning Outcome
When you have completed this section, you will know how to:
A. Use an Area Specification Line to define cone movement
B. Design a series of pits with M720V1
Cone Movement
The Area Specification Line is used within the run file to define cone movement. It
can be used to force mining in a certain area even though it is not economical. These
lines are entered into the run file after the end line. The procedure we will use will do
this for you.
jop1 jop2 jop3 iz1 iz2 ix1 ix2 iy1 iy2 s-file
where combinations of jop1, jop2 and jop3 are used for different cone mining
alternatives.
Examples include:
-1 0 0 = Read in new economic parameters on next line
1 0 0 = Mine all cones regardless of economics
0 -1 0 = Mine economic cones within area
0 n 1 = Mine economic cones within area and with base blocks within n blocks of
surface
The cone movement is by column (ix) within rows (iy) by levels (iz).
iz1,iz2=Define the levels for the cone movement
(iz2 >> iz1)
ix1,ix2=Define the area and direction of cone movement by columns
(ix1 >> ix2 or ix2 >> ix1)
iy1,iy2=Define the area and direction of cone movement by rows
(iy1 >> iy2 or iy2 >> iy1)
s-file =The name of the pit surface file that will be created.
Running Pit Optimization Programs Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 5-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Multiple Pit Design Example
In this example we will generate economic pit limits for six different copper prices.
The costs and overall recovery will remain constant at:
Waste Mining Cost: $1.00/tonne
Ore Mining & Processing Cost: $9.00/tonne
Copper Treatment Cost: $0.30/pound cu
Recovery = 80%
The copper prices we will use, plus the cutoff grades and net value/pound figures
associated with those prices, are listed below:
Copper Price
($/lb)
Net Value
($/lb)
Mine Cutoff
(% EQCU)
Mill Cutoff
(% EQCU)
Optimized Pit
Surface File
0.67 0.30 1.361 1.120 metrdp.p30
0.92 0.50 0.816 0.726 metrdp.p50
1.05 0.60 0.680 0.605 metrdp.p60
1.17 0.70 0.583 0.518 metrdp.p70
1.30 0.80 0.510 0.454 metrdp.p80
1.42 0.90 0.454 0.403 metrdp.p90

Designing a Pit
<On the MineSight Compass Menu tab, select the Group Pit Optimization and the
Operation Calculation. From the Procedure List, choose the procedure p72092.dat -
Economic Pits (Variable Costs). Fill out the panels as described.>
Panel 1 - Pit Optimization Economic Pit Limits
<Use this panel to enter the names of the B-file (METRDP.BLK) and METRDP.P00,
the original topography. Also define the type of condensed model item and the feed and
waste units to use.>
Panel 2 - Pit Optimization Economic Limits
This panel is used to enter the pit optimization parameters. <Leave Mill and Mine
cutoffs blank and the program will calculate them for you. Enter the values for waste
mining cost, ore cost, and net value; use 40 degrees as the general pit slope.>
Panel 3 - Area Specification lines
<Create a sequence of six pits using the filename extensions P30, P50, etc..> The pit
surfaces will be stored in S-files, which can then be plotted and evaluated. Weve
already determined that the mining area can be limited to benches 11 - 54, rows 20 - 80,
and columns 20 - 80. <Accept the default base cone radius.>
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Running Pit Optimization Programs
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 5-3
Notes:
Panel 4 - Variable Economic Parameters
These are the same parameters specified in Panel 2 for the 0.30 net value pit. They
now have to be set for the rest of the pits. Remember to enter the net value under the
column headed Prod Price, as shown below.
Results
The program will make two passes per set of economics. It changes the N-S search
direction from S_N to N_S on the second pass. Multiple passes (a maximum of four) are
run to ensure that all economic material on the skin of the pit limit is accounted for.
Below is an example of the results from Pass# 3, which is the first pass at 0.50 net
value.
Running Pit Optimization Programs Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 5-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Pit Optimization Display and Analysis
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 6-1
Notes:
Pit Optimization Display and Analysis
Learning Outcome
When you have completed this section, you will know how to:
A. Create a plotter plan map of pit geometry and clip it into the original topo
B. Analyze the set of pit shells generated in the previous section
Plotter Plan Map of Pit Geometry
Program M721V2 plots the difference between two Pit Optimization pits. Two
surface files, the initial, or smaller, pit surface and the larger pit surface, are required as
input.
<On the MineSight Compass Menu tab, select the Group Pit Optimization and the
Operation Plot. From the Procedure List, select the procedure plndip.dat - Plot
Optimized Pit Plan Map. Fill out the panels as described.>
Panel 1 - Advanced User Standard Plotting Panel
This panel allows you to enter the area to plot; well plot the entire project limits at a
scale of 2000.
Panel 2- Advanced User Standard Plotting Panel
This panel allows you to enter specifications from the plot grid, as well as definition
and specification of various formats of overlay files. Well use a grid spacing of 250 m,
and create a metafile called p50.hmf.
Panel 3 - Plot a Pit Optimization Pit in Plan
<Plot a plan view of the difference between the original topography (METRDP.P00)
and the pit (METRDP.P50); remember to enter the name of the B-file (METRDP.BLK)
as well. Plot every second bench for clarity, using pen number 3 and a 0.5 annotation
size. Create a file called plt721.paa.>
Results and Plot
The plot will be previewed automatically in program M122mf. <After viewing the
plot on the screen, exit and type M to make a metafile.>
Pit Optimization Display and Analysis Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 6-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Exercise
Rerun the procedure with every bench plotted and this time make a VBM ASCII
input file called P50.VBM with Feature code 750.
Exercise
Repeat for S-File METRDP.P70. First view every other bench of the pit with the Plot
file option (panel 2) and make a metafile P70.hmf. Second, make a VBM ASCII input
file of every bench with the file name P70.VBM and Feature code 770.>
Clip the $ .70 pit (METRDP.P70) into the original topography
and store as PIT1 in File 13
<On the MineSight Compass Menu tab, select the Group Pit Optimization and the
Operation Data Convert. From the Procedure List, select the procedure p72993.dat -
S-file to 2D Grid. Fill out the panels as described.>
Panel 1 - Pit Optimization S-File Elevations
<Enter the S-file name for the original topography (METRDP.P00) as the first
DIPPER pit file and METRDP.P70 as the second.> Gridded values of the $.70 net
value pit and surrounding topography are written to item PIT1 in File 13.
<To view the $0.70 pit clipped at original topography, create a new model view in the
File 13 folder in MineSight 3D. Change the primary display item to pit1. Click the
Cutoffs icon, and then click the Copybutton. Select TOPOG as the cutoff item to copy.
Click the GSM/Surfaces tab, and change the Surface Elevation Item to Pit1. Click
Apply. Import the VBM contours for the $0.70 pit into the VBM folder. Close the VBM
and File 13 folders.>
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-1
Notes:
Complex Pit Design
Learning Objectives
In this section, you will learn how to use the Expansion Tool in MineSight 3-D.
When you have completed this section, you will know how to:
A. Produce smooth toe and crest lines from the Pit Optimization shells (block outlines
from Floating cone routine)
B. Add roads and berms
C. Use different design criteria (i.e., variable bench face angles, variable berm widths,
etc.)
D. Perform double benching
E. Design bottom up and top down expansions
F. Use multiple pit bottoms
G. Add slots
Overview of MineSight 3-D Pit Expansion Tool
For mine planning, the Pit Expansion Tool in MineSight 3-D allows the mine planner
to:
1. Smooth out the full block outlines of the Pit Optimization pit shells and create toe
and crest lines.
2. Expand a pit up or down, inwards or outwards from a base level outline of the toe
according to specified bench height(s) and either interramp slope/bench face angle
specifications or catch bench width/bench face angle specifications.
3. Use variable slopes or berm widths.
4. Show toes only or toes and crests of each expansion level.
5. Edit a pit as it expands.
6. Triangulate pit outlines.
7. Add roads with or without switchbacks into the expansion.
8. Add safety berms.
9. Add slots for conveyor belts.
10. Provide for adequate mining widths.
11. Use double/triple etc. benching geometry.
12. Expand bench-by-bench or many benches at once.
13. Produce surfaces showing the pit geometry at the end of each mining phase in the
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
overall life of the mine. The phase designs produced interactively with the Pit
Expansion Tool provide the basis for detailed mineable reserve summaries and
annual scheduling.
14. Design dumps.
Interramp Pit Slope and Catch Bench Width Criteria
Input of the following interrelated items pertaining to slope design are allowed:
1. Catch Bench Width (W) (Also referred to as Berm Width)
2. Bench Height (H)
3. Bench Face Angle (B) (Also referred to as Bank Angle)
4. Interramp Slope Angle (I) (Also referred to as Default Slope Angle)
The following formula illustrates the interrelationship between these items:
W = H(1/tan I - 1/tan B), where I and B are in degrees
There are two options:
1. Define constant or variable face and pit slope, and let MineSight 3-D determine
the berm width based on a given bench height. You can still define a minimum
berm width value (also constant or variable), which will be honored first.
2. Define constant or variable face slope and berm width, and let MineSight 3-D
calculate the pit slope based on a given bench height. You can assign a maximum
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-3
Notes:
pit slope (constant or variable), which will be honored first.
Exercise 1
Constant Interramp Slope, Constant Bench Face Angle, and Constant
Catch Bench Width Throughout the Pit (No Roads)
For consistency in the Pit Expansion exercises, well use prepared data from another
similar MineSight project. In MineSight 3-D, follow these steps:
Step 1
1. Highlight <unnamed> in the Data Manager, and create a new folder. Name the
folder Optimized Pits.
2. Highlight the folder Optimized Pits and import the MineSight VBM ASCII file
P20.VBM (this file represents a $0.20 net value optimized pit).
3. Accept the horizontal orientation.
4. Folder Optimized Pits will now contain feature 701, and a corresponding Grid
Set.
5. Create a new folder under <unnamed>. Name the new folder pits.
6. Click Tools and then Pit Expansion.
7. Create a new Geometry Object under the folder pits. Name the object pit1.
8. The Pit Expansion panel will appear on the screen.
9. Under the Expansion tab, turn on the Digitize and closed options, change the
level to 2495 and click Add.
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Page 7-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Step 2
Digitize a pit bottom string on level 2495 (use the Point Snap option if needed).
Click right when you are done. The string will change color (brown).
Step 3
1. Under the Expansion option, click on Multiple Expansion (13 steps), and make
the Start Level equal to 2495.
2. Select the Required tab. Fill in the table as shown below (start at 2495, step size
of 15, 1 step, face slope of 70, pit slope of 45, berm of 0).
Elevation Step size Step/berm Face slope Pit slope Berm
2495 15 1 70 45 0

Use the Face and Pit Slope option with the Up and Outward switches ON. A
face slope of 70 and a pit slope of 45 will be used throughout the pit, whereas the
berm width will be calculated (constant value of 9.56m).
3. Select the Parameter Sets tab. Type exercise1 in the Save Parameter Set box.
Click Save. All the input information is stored in exercise1.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-5
Notes:
Step 4
1. Go back to the Expansion tab and click Apply (or Preview if you want to see it
first before saving the results).
2. On the screen, you will see the toe (blue) and crest (purple) outlines (close feature
701 if you want to).
Exercise 2
Variable Interramp Slope, Constant Bench Face Angle, and Variable
Catchbench Width (No Roads).
In this exercise, we will vary the pit slope based on codes from the model.
Step 1
Make sure the VBM file MSOP25.TOP has features 1, 2, and 3 in the area of interest
(around feature 701). If not, load file slp1.ia to the VBM. Features should be on
elevation 2953.
Step 2
Use procedure p66701.dat from the Compass menu tab to code the model. See the
panel descriptions below for the procedure panel entries.
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Panel 1 - Compute Block Codes from VBM Outlines
Use the VBM file msop25.top, and enter the elevation of the source data as the lower
and upper bounds (2953).
Panel 2 - Optional, User-defined Model Limits
Leave this panel blank to accept the default values.
Panel 3 - Compute Block Codes from VBM Outlines - Output
Options
Check the box to load data to the model; use the File 15 as the model file, and SLP1
as the item to load. The rest of the panel can be left blank.
Panel 4 - Compute Block Codes from VBM Outlines
Enter 2000 as the search distance to look for the closest VBM plane; leave the
remaining windows blank.
Panel 5 - Compute Codes and/or Partials from VBM Outlines
Well use three VBM features to code the model, named 1, 2, and 3; map these
features to the same model codes in the Feature Codes table.
Panel 6 - Compute Block Codes from VBM Outlines
Leave this panel blank and run the procedure; answer yes to the question about
loading the codes to the model.
Step 3 - Check the model in MineSight 3-D
1. Close object pit1.
2. Create a new folder under New Resource Map, and name it model.
3. Under the folder model, create a new Model View. Name the view slope1.
4. Pick the PCF (MSOP10.DAT) and model (MSOP15.DAT) .
5. Select item SLP1 and assign cutoff colors (click the icon next to the Select Display
Item box to select an item, and click the Cutoff button to create cutoff colors).
6. In the Cutoff Face Colors panel, click Intervals. Use a minimum cutoff of 1, a
maximum of 3, and an increment of 1.
7. Highlight all the cutoffs in the Cutoff Table, and click Properties. Click Set
Color by Range.
8. Close the Properties window and the Cutoff window.
9. Step through the model to see if, indeed, you have codes (use the level sliders
under the Range tab).
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-7
Notes:
Step 4
1. Close the Model View Properties dialog and unload the model.
2. Load feature 701.
3. Click Tools I Pit Expansion and create a new Geometry Object in folder pits.
Call it pit2.
4. Click the Optional tab. Click the icon next to the Optional Slope/Berm Source
box and select the model view you just created.
Step 5
1. Under the Pit Slope column, click the Model/Code Table switch. Click the icon
to Choose Model View Item and select item SLP1. Click Codes and enter the
codes as shown below.
2. Leave the rest of the settings the same as in Exercise 1.
3. Click the Parameter Sets tab and save the settings we used as Exercise 2.
4. Click the Expansion tab and digitize a base feature again, as in Exercise 1.
5. Click Apply.
6. Close the Pit Expansion window.
Code Slope
1 43
2 46
3 50

Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
7. Unload feature 701. You will have a pit like the one shown below:
8. Check the results. Using Point Snap, snap to a point on a toe line and then move
to a point on an upper crest line. Check the slope and distance in the status bar at
the bottom of the viewer. Do the same from toe to toe to check the pit slope.
Exercise 3
Variable Interramp Slope, Constant Bench Face Angle, and Variable Catch
Bench Width (with Roads).
Step 1
1. Create a new Object in folder pits. Call this Object 701base.
2. Open Object pit2.
3. Select the base feature and copy it to the new object 701base. To make sure you
select the base feature, temporarily switch OFF the Show Polylines option under
the Properties of materials Pit Crest and Pit Toe (under the material folder).
Use the Copy to Object option under the Selection menu.
4. Close object pit2 and restore properties for the Pit Crest and Pit Toe materials.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-9
Notes:
Step 2
1. Open the Pit Expansion tool. Create a new Object and call it pit3.
2. Keep the same set open and click the Road tab.
3. Click Add and then Edit.
4. Fill in the road panel and digitize points, as shown below:
5. To digitize a starting point, click the Starting Point icon, and then click on the
desired starting point for the road in the viewer.
6. Close the road table.
Step 3
1. Go to the Expansion tab. Click Copy, then click Add, and click the string on the
screen. Click Apply to expand.
2. Save this set-up as exercise3.
3. Close the Pit Expansion window.
4. The roads have been saved with different material types; therefore, they have
different properties.
Level Width Grade Direction
2495 30 0.1 1

Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-10 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Step 4 Check the slopes.
You can also view and compare the toe/crest lines bench-by-bench along with
DIPPER outlines (object 701).
1. Load object 701.
2. Click the Viewer Properties icon.
3. Click the green grid icon.
4. Select Object p20.vbm_gridset. Click the Change to 2d Mode button.
5. Step through the planes.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-11
Notes:
Exercise 4
Variable Interramp Slope, Constant Bench Face Angle, and Variable Catch
Bench Width (with Roads and Multiple Base Features).
For this exercise we are going to use DIPPER outlines that represent a higher net
value ($0.38). We also need to adjust the slope codes in the model.
Step 1 - In MineSight Compass:
1. Open VBM file MSOP25.TOP for editing using procedure p65002.
2. Delete features 1, 2 and 3.
3. Import the ASCII file SLP2.IA.
4. Repeat procedure p66701.dat. Keep the panels the same as last time, with the
only exception of the name of the item to which to load codes; change this item to
SLP2.
5. Close MineSight Compass and verify the model codes in MineSight 3-D.
6. Create a new model view under folder model. Name the view slope2 (the view of
item SLP2).
7. Close folder model after checking the model.
8. Close any other object that may have been left on the screen.
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-12 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Step 2
1. Import VBM ASCII file P38.VBM to folder Dipper. Feature 704 will appear in
the Viewer.
2. Look at the 704 DIPPER pit geometry on benches 2210 through 2345. Note how
the multiple pit bottoms eventually merge on bench 2345.
3. Digitize the base features (as planar polylines) at elevations 2210, 2225, 2240,
and 2255. Follow the example below. Store features to a new Object in folder
pits. Call this object 704base. Snap an Edit Grid to the above elevations, and use
a combination of Plane Snap and Point Snap to create the planar polylines, as
shown below.
Step 3
1. Open a new Object in folder pits for editing. Name it pit4.
2. Open the Pit Expansion tool. Save the parameters used in Exercise 4 and start
modifying parameters.
3. Start at elevation 2210.
4. Copy and Add all four base features.
5. Pick model view slope2 and item SLP2.
Step 4 Add a Road.
Follow the examples below to add a road. The road does not need to start until
elevation 2240.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-13
Notes:
Step 5 Make a Multiple Expansion.
Click Preview to make a multiple expansion up to elevation 2255. Check the results.
Notice that there is a kink in the road that may need straightening. Furthermore, there is
no road access to the 2255 pit bottom.
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-14 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: Step 6 - Correct the Kink in the Road.
To correct the kink in the road, if desired, you must edit object 704base on elevation
2240 (see below).
1. Cancel Preview, and click the Expansion tab. Click the Edit strings option.
2. Edit the base feature at elevation 2240.
Click Preview and see if the road is smoothed. Modify the base features as necessary
until you get a result to your satisfaction.
Step 8 - Single Expansion
1. Change the expansion to Single Expansion and click Apply until you reach the
toe elevation of 2255.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-15
Notes:
2. Now you need to access the 2255 bottom.
3. Edit the toe line at elevation 2255 so it follows the shape of feature 704base on
elevation 2255 (see below).
4. Add one more road at elevation 2255.
5. Delete the base feature at 2255.
6. Expand up to elevation 2345.
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-16 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
7. Using volume clipping and after loading object 704, step through the planes to
see how close the pit outlines are to the DIPPER outlines.
8. Go to elevation 2345. Edit toe line at elevation 2345 to match the DIPPER outline.
9. Expand up to elevation 2810. See the figure below for the final result:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-17
Notes:
Step 9 - Clip Final Pit to Topography
To see the final pit clipped to the topography:
1. Triangulate pit4 by clicking the Triangulate Pit button on the Expansion tab.
2. Store the results in a new Object called pit4tri in the pits folder.
3. Import VBM file 901.vbm to folder topo.
4. Triangulate 901 to 901tri.
5. Intersect 901tri and pit4tri to a new Object in the pits folder, pit4clip.
Exercise 5
Variable Interramp Slope, Variable Bench Face Angle, and Constant Catch
Bench Width.
In Exercise 3, we used the following slope design parameters:
In this exercise, we will set the catch bench width to 7.10 meters, and expand the pit
based on bench face angles that vary by sector in accordance with the interramp angles.
Sector Interramp Angle Bench face Angle Catch Bench Width
1 43 70 10.68
2 46 70 9.04
3 50 70 7.1

Sector Interramp Angle Bench face Angle Catch Bench Width
1 43 59 7.1
2 46 63.5 7.1
3 50 70 7.1

Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-18 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Step 1
1. Open Object 701base. For the sake of simplicity, we are not going to use roads in
this exercise.
2. Create and open object pit5 in folder pits for editing.
3. Create a new Parameter Set called exercise5.
4. Start at elevation 2495.
5. Click the Optional tab and click the Face Slopes-Sector Table switch. Click the
Sectors button.
6. Click the Sector Center icon and click inside the base feature.
7. Enter the azimuths and face slopes as shown below.
8. On the Required tab, click the Face Slope and Berm option, and enter 7.1 as the
berm width and 50 degrees as maximum pit slope.
Azimuth Face Slope
40 59
170 63.5
320 70

Elevation Step size Step/berm Face slope Pit slope Berm
2495 15 1 70 50 7.1

Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-19
Notes:
9. Make 10 expansions.
10. Check results.
Notice that the distance from crest to toe is always 7.1. Pit slopes were also
calculated, and they should be 43
o
, 46
o
and 50
o
for different sections of the pit (sectors
1, 2 and 3, respectively).
Exercise 6
Double Benching with Constant Interramp Slope, Constant Bench Face
Angle, and Constant Catch Bench Width.
For this exercise, we are going to use base feature 701base on plane 2495. We will
expand the pit to 2690 using double benching and a constant interramp slope of 50
degrees, and a bench face angle of 60 degrees. The catch bench width for a 50 degree
interramp, 60 degree bench face angle and a 30m bench height is 7.85.
Step 1
1. Open object 701base.
2. Make a new object ( pit6) in folder pits.
3. Open the Pit Expansion tool and make a new Parameter Set ( Exercise 6).
4. Use a step size of 30 in the Bench Table.
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-20 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
5. Check the results. You should get a toe and a crest every 30 meters.
Exercise 7
Double Benching with Variable Interramp Slope, Constant Bench Face
Angle, and Variable Catch Bench Width.
We are going to repeat Exercise 3 (see table), but with double benching.
If we assume the same interramp angles and the constant 70 degree bench face angle,
then for a 30m bench height, the catch bench widths will be:
Sector 1 - 21.25
Sector 2 - 18.05
Sector 3 - 14.25
Elevation Step size Step/berm Face slope Pit slope Berm
2495 30 1 60 50 0

Sector Interramp Angle Bench face Angle Catch Bench Width
1 43 70 10.68
2 46 70 9.04
3 50 70 7.1

Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-21
Notes:
Step 1
1. Create Object pit7 and set up exercise7.
2. Start from 2495 and use the model view slope1 to vary the pit slopes.
3. Check the results.
Step 2
Try the same exercise using a step size of 15 and a step number of 2. You will get all
the crest lines between the toe lines.
Exercise 8
Top-down Design Approach with Ramp Switchback.
1. Open object pit3.
2. Change to 2-D mode (using Grid Set p38.vbm_gridset).
3. Go to elevation 2630.
4. Make a new object, 701down, in folder pits.
5. Copy toe line (blue) to the new object ( 701down).
6. Close pit3.
7. Open feature 901 (in folder topo).
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-22 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
8. Adjust 701down using the Substring I Smooth and Point I Move functions
the pit ramp exit better matches the natural topo conditions, as shown below.
9. Close 901 and go back to 3-D mode.
10. Create object pit8 (edit mode) and Parameter Set exercise8.
11. Start from 2630, and expand downwards and inwards using the following
expansion parameters.
Elevation Step size Step/berm Face slope Pit slope Berm
2630 15 1 70 45 0

Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Complex Pit Design
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 7-23
Notes: 12. Set up a road table with a switchback. Be certain to notice the order of the lines.
Check the box marked User cam, and enter two points to define the start of the
road, as shown here.
13. Expand 8 times.
14. Check the results.
Complex Pit Design Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 7-24 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Displaying Pit Designs
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 8-1
Notes:
Displaying Pit Designs
Learning Outcome
When you have completed this section, you will know how to:
A. create surfaces
B. merge two surfaces together
C. contour the merged surface
D. display in the merged surface in plane, level by level
E. display the merged surface in section, section by section
Creating the Topo Surface
<Create a new folder in MineSight called surfaces. Open the 901 object in the vbm
folder. Select all elements and click right. Click Surface I Triangulate Surface I
with Selection and send the results to a new object, topowith material 901 in the
surfaces folder.
Save and close the 901 object. Double click on the topoobject. Click the Surfaces tab
and uncheck the Show Lines box. Check the Show Faces box.> This gives the surface a
more realistic appearance.
Merging Pit With Topo
When we created the pits, we made sure to expand the pits above the topographical
surface. As we exited the Pit Expansion Tool, we triangulated the toe-crest contours.
We will use the one of the triangulated pits in this example.
<Open triangulated pit1, object pit1tri.
Click Surface I Intersect Surfaces from the MineSight menu bar. Select the topo
as the Primary Surface and the pit as the Secondary Surface. Select Cut Surfaceand
click Preview.> The result will appear in a pale yellow color and will show the pit
merged into the topography. <Click Apply.
Select Send Results to Open Edit Object.
Select the surfaces folder. Name the object topopit, and enter 901 for the material
type.
Close the Surface Intersection window, and the topoand pit1tri objects.
Double click on the topopit object in Data Manager, and click the Surfaces tab.
Uncheck the Show Lines box, and check the Show Faces box.>
Displaying Pit Designs Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 8-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Exercise
Merge PIT2 into topo and call the result topopit2. The merged pit and topo are
displayed below:
Contour Surfaces
MineSight can contour any triangulated surface with a single click of the mouse.
<Click the Polyline I Contour Surfacefunction from the menu bar and click the Object
Select icon. Click the topopit object. The project minimum, maximum and bench height
are entered automatically. Accept the default check boxes.
Click the Applybutton and store the results in the surfaces folder as object 808.
Close the topopit object.>
Display in Plan
<Open the Viewer Properties dialog, and make sure that the installed Grid Set is
p50.vbm_gridset. Change to 2-D mode.
Click through different planes using the plane adjustment buttons under the menu
bar.>
The display will show the pit clipped by topo at the toe elevation of each bench.
<Close the 808 object.>
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Displaying Pit Designs
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 8-3
Notes:
Mid-lines In Plan
To show mid-lines, create a new Grid Set at the mid bench elevations. <Create a new
Grid Set object called Mid-lines by clicking on New Resources Map I New I Grid
Set.
Change the starting elevation to the starting mid-line, by adding 7.5 to the value. Make
64 planes with an interval of 15. Change the Grid Set used by the viewer to Mid-lines.
Open the topopit object. Click the 2-D icon.>
As you adjust the current plane, notice how the triangulated surface is displayed as
contour lines.
If you wish to create contours at midlines, <click Polyline_ Contour Surfacefrom the
menu bar, and click the Object Select icon. Click the topopit object. Change the starting
elevation to 3407.5 and click Applyto save the results in the surfaces folder as object
818. Close the topopit object.
Change the color of the 818 object to yellow. Open the 808 object.
Double click on objects 801 and 818 in the Data Manager. Click the Label tab, and
check the Show Line Elevations box. Enter 55 for the Height, 1 for Decimal precision,
and 2000 for the Line elevation offset. Close the window.
Click the Viewer Properties icon, and click the Clipping tab. Set the Volume Clipping
Rangeto Unequal, with 14.9 and 0 for the volumes.
Close the dialog and click the 3-D Volume Clipping icon. Adjust the plane viewed to
see how the pit is clipped against the topo on toe and midline elevations. Close all open
objects.>
Display in Section
To display the pit in section, we need to create a sectional Grid Set. Now we will
create one using the PCF for the West-East sections. <Create a new Grid Set, and call it
WE Section. Click the EW radio button, and base the Grid Set on the metr10.dat PCF.
Close the Grid Set EW Section. Open the Viewer Properties dialog and install the
EW Section Grid Set. Open the topopit surface, and click the 2-D icon so you can step
through the data section by section.> When you have finished, return to full 3-D
viewing.
Display CUIDW Grades Exposed on the Pit Walls
1. Open object topopit2 and close all other Geometry Objects.
2. Open the oxides model view.
3. Double-click oxides to open the Properties dialog.
4. Click the Display tab and change the Primary Display Item to CUIDW.
5. Click the Geometry tab, click the Select button, and pick topopit2 from the
dialog.
6. Click the Exposed ore button.
Displaying Pit Designs Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 8-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Exercise
Display ORTYP on Pit1_var_slope_DTM.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-1
Notes:
Reserves Calculations
Learning Objectives
When you have completed this section, you will know how to:
A. Calculate reserves bench-by-bench.
B. Calculate reserves between two surfaces.
C. Calculate reserves inside a closed solid.
D. Incorporate various parameters in the reserve calculations such as current
topography, geological codes, dilution, waste/ore types, ore percentages, recovery,
specific gravity etc.
Overview of Available Tools
There are five basic ways of calculating reserves within open pit outlines:
1. Using Programs PITRES and PITINC.
2. Bench-by-bench Interactive Approach using Program M650PX.
3. Using the Material Summary File 18 (i.e., Programs M710V1, M711V1, and
M712V1).
4. Using MineSight 3-D tools.
5. Write your own User Subroutine if you cant get the reserve breakdown you
want using the programs mentioned above.
All of these approaches calculate reserves on a partial block basis. The breakdown of
the reserves into different categories is more limited in the interactive approach when
compared to the others. However, the interactive approach displays bench maps on the
screen allowing you to see what is being calculated. The difference between the
710,711,712 approach and the PITRES/PITINC approach, is mainly in the way reserve
categories are specified. PITRES/PITINC will also calculate diluted tons and grades
based on user defined mine recovery and mine dilution factors. We will not cover
options 2 or 5 in this section.
Reserve Calculations Using PITRES/PITINC Approach
Overview of PITRES
PITRES is an MSCompass procedure used to determine the reserves of open pit
metals projects. These reserves can be generated from a MineSight pit, from polygons
properly stored in a VBM, from DIPPER pits, from external partials files (e.g., from
IGP), or from rectangular boundaries specified on the Panel requesting the easting,
northing, and elevation boundaries.
PITRES has the option to generate the incremental partials and reserves between a
larger and a smaller pit directly. Partials are determined based upon VBM closed
features, or the difference between two S-Files for DIPPER. For STRIPPER (VBM),
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Page 9-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
reserves can be determined for a pushback using a smaller pit which is contained within
a larger pit. However, this can only be done if the take ore first or ore clipped at topo
options are not being used. If the larger pit minus smaller pit, and either of these two
options are used, this operation must be done using PITINC. Using PITRES under these
circumstances will double the incremental reserves generated.
Partials
The partials can be limited to a range of benches, northings, and eastings. However, it
is important to note that, if the pit has been expanded or designed with the midpoint
stored at the bench toe elevations, the toe elevations must be specified. And, if the
midpoint has been stored at its actual elevation, then the bench midpoint elevations must
be entered in these fields.
In order to generate the partials for pit designs with variable bench heights, every
plane of the VBM must be processed searching for the pit feature code. This will usually
trigger a number of extra WARNING messages when the partials are being generated.
These messages can be ignored. If the partials were derived using MineSight, the
partials file is output from the bottom bench up. In order to use it in PITRES, these
partials must be sorted from the top down. Click the appropriate option for the
procedure to do so.
The partials are then run against the 3-D block model to generate the reserves.
Dilution can be applied to the insitu or recovered ore for all blocks, or against the full
block for ore/waste contact blocks. A contact block is defined as a block that has more
material in it than ore, i.e., topo% > total ore%. Also, if a zone in a block has a 0%
recovery from the Zone Input File, or its grades fail to pass the ore/waste cutoff tests,
then it is considered a contact block, i.e., leach cap may be modeled, but never mined as
ore. When using contact dilution, the non-missing grades from the wasted zones over-
ride the dilution grades from the Zone Input File, and are weighted by the density of the
material being wasted.
Dilution
When applying dilution to the contact blocks only option, the dilution % is based
upon a full block volume rather than being applied to the ore% only. This allows for
consistent dilution quantity regardless of the amount of ore in the block. For example, if
a 5-foot dilution on a 50-foot bench is required, enter 10%. This means that each block
that has an ore/waste contact with a total mineable ore > (greater than or equal to) a
user-specified minimum ore% will get the same amount of dilution. The dilution for this
option is only applied against the first recoverable zone.
Either insitu, or diluted grades can be reported. The grades output to a scheduling file
are based upon this selection, i.e., if diluted grades are reported, then diluted grades are
output to the scheduling file.
Cutoffs
Reserves can optionally be reported within cutoff bins (max of 20) or cumulative
above each cutoff. Material greater than, or less than a cutoff can be wasted. The cutoffs
are used as a less than test. That is, if the cutoffs are 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 then the cutoff bins
range from >0 to <1, >1 to <2, >2 to <3, and >3, respectively. The cutoff bins are also
used as material classes for the scheduling programs. The material class label for each
cutoff can optionally be specified on the panels (1 for less than cutoff1, >cutoff1, etc.).
If the labels are not specified, they will default to ORE+nn.nn where nn.nn is the grade
cutoff value.
The Omit first grade item option is mainly used for creating scheduling material
classes from a range of ZONE codes (i.e., it is only used for binning). For example,
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-3
Notes:
zones 1-25 might be LCAP, 26-50 OXIDE, 51-75 SUP, etc. The ZONE item can then
be used as the first grade item, and the appropriate material classes are created without
having to show up in the 805/821 (scheduling) files. An alternative method is to use
MODCLS to create scheduling material classes and use that item as the zone code.
The ore/waste cutoff is for the first grade item. A similar option is available through
the Zone Input File that affects the ore/waste cutoff of each grade item. The insitu
grades are always used for the ore/waste cutoff tests regardless of whether insitu or
diluted grades are being reported. If using an ore/waste cutoff test for multiple grade
items, then the material is wasted for a zone if any grade item fails its cutoff test.
A sample with the ore/waste cutoffs is as follows:
# Grade line for matching diln and cutoff grades
#GRADES AU CU
#
Normally, any missing grade item in a block causes the entire zone to be wasted.
There is an option within PITRES that allows missing grades to be treated as a 0, thus
diluting the other one instead of wasting the zone from that block.
Zones
PITRES can handle from 1 to 10 ore/geology zones per block. PITRES automatically
appends the appropriate digit or alpha suffix (1,2,3... or A,B,C...) to all the model items
when there is more than one zone per block. If using the alpha suffix option, then all
items must have an A,B,C... suffix instead of 1,2,3,... This includes the zone, ore%,
density, and all grades items.
The names of the items are user-controlled, but if using more than 1 zone per block,
the suffix MUST BE 1, 2, 3, 4_ Both the Zone item and the Ore% item are optional. If
the ore% item is set to N/A, then blocks with a Zone >0 are considered 100% ore. If the
Zone item is set to N/A, then PITRES sets it to 1 and uses the ore/waste cutoff on the
first grade item to determine ore and waste.
Zone parameters can be input to PITRES through the panel/defaults or through the
Zone Input File. The Zone Input File is the same format as the IGP Zone Input File with
optional extra values for dilution density, grade dilution and ore/waste cutoffs by grade
item. The yield% is ignored in PITRES, but must be set to 100% for IGP. If using the
ore/waste cutoff by grade item, then a #GRADE G1 G2 G3 ... line must be used in the
Zone Input File. A dilution grade must be specified for all grade items, followed by the
cutoff grades for each grade item, and an optional set of 0/1 flags. A 0 means waste
material below the cutoff (default), and a 1 means waste material above the cutoff.
The format for the Zone Input File is:
Zone Name, Zone#, Dens, Yield%, Recov%, Diln%, Diln Dens, Diln grades,
Cutoffs Grades, Cutoff Flags. (See the example in the Cutoffs section).
DILN
DENS

DILN

CUTOFFS

CUT FLAGS
P1 1 2.7 100. 95. 3.0 2.7 0. 0. .1 .2 0 0
P2 2 2.7 100. 95. 3.0 2.6 0. 0. .1 .2 0 0
P3 3 2.7 100. 95. 3.0 2.4 0. 0. .1 .2 0 0
Q1 11 2.7 100. 95. 3.0 2.8 0. 0. .1 .2 0 0
Q2 12 2.7 100. 95. 3.0 2.9 0. 0. .1 .2 0 0
WASTE -3 2.5 100. 100. 0.0

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Page 9-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: Although you can input zone parameters in the Zone Input File, other parameters,
such as waste density, are input through the panel. Ore density by zone can be read from
a model item or from the Zone Input File. The ore% and waste% (if used on waste
reporting panel) can be stored as either a fraction between 0 and 1, or as a percentage
between 0 and 100. If using waste% items, they must be stored the same way as the
ore% items are (i.e., fraction or percentage).
Notes on the Zone Input File:
1. The Zone Input File is optional and if not used, all zones are assumed to be
between 1 and 150 and recovery is set to 100% and dilution to 0 for all zones.
2. The Zone Input File can be used exactly as is for IGP as long as the grade line is
specified as #GRADES.
3. Any zones that exist in the model but are not specified in the Zone Input File are
wasted. A WARNING message is issued.
4. If the recovery for any zone is set to 0 or it fails one of the ore/waste grade cutoff
tests, then it is only reported if the insitu grade option has been requested (i.e., it
will only show up as waste if the diluted grade option is requested).
5. The # indicates a comment and can be placed anywhere within the file.
6. If the dilution grades are not specified, they default to 0.
7. Recovery and dilution are specified as percentages.
8. An additional grade line can be specified at the start of the Zone Input File to
allow for the proper matching of grade items and dilution grades, ore/waste cutoff
grades, and the cutoff flags. An example of the format of the grade line is:
# Names of grade items on 1 line without 1,2 suffix
#GRADES AU CU AG
The dilution grades, ore/waste cutoffs, & cutoff flags from the zone lines would then
be matched up to the grade item order from the GRADES lines regardless of the order in
which they are specified on the PITRES panel.
Waste and Types of Waste
The model can optionally contain several waste types. If using waste types, the waste
item must be between 1 and 8. Waste can be reported as a volume or a tonnage (short,
long or metric). Options 2 and 3 on Panel 4 are for imperial projects only, and it is up to
the user to calculate the appropriate tonnage factor to be applied against the volume (in
cubic feet) to derive the tonnage reporting type. The ore will also be reported with the
same tonnage type. The stripping ratio will be reported as either a waste volume to ore
tonnage ratio, or a waste tonnage to ore tonnage ratio. This also depends upon the
option selected by the user.
A model item can be used for the waste density. This can be the same item used for
the ore density, i.e., each block has a single density regardless of the material. If a waste
density item is used, it over-rides all other waste densities including those assigned by
waste type. There are three different waste reporting options. In all three cases, up to
100 different waste types are handled. The waste types must be numbered between 1
and 100. If requested, the waste volume/tonnage for each waste type is reported for each
bench and for the entire run. The total waste includes all volumes/tonnages from each
type, as well as any ore losses (from the Zone Input File recovery item), any remaining
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-5
Notes:
waste (for waste percentage options where the materials do not add up to the topo%),
and any unclassified waste (waste type item is missing, or 0).
If using a single waste type item, whatever material within the block that is not ore is
classified according to the waste type item. If using waste percentage items without a
type item, then the waste is accumulated as types 1 to 4, matching the order of the waste
percentage items as requested on the panel. The name and density of each percentage
item can be specified on the panel using the Name/Density prompts. If using waste
percentage and waste type items, then the waste is accumulated for each type according
to the value of the type item. In this case, there must be a match of a type item and a
percentage item for each set.
<Fill in one type item if using option 1, and as many items as there are waste
percentage items if using option 3. Fill in as many waste percentage items as needed for
option 2 or 3.> If using option 3, then there must be one waste type item for each
percentage item and vice versa.
Ore and Waste Densities
The name and density for up to 15 types can be specified in the Name/Densities lines
of Panel 4. If there are more than 15 waste types and user-defined names, and/or
varying densities are required, then the Waste Type Input File must be used. The default
names are TYPnn where nn is 01-99. If using the Waste Type Input File, the format is:
Name Number Density
The file is in free format and with one waste type per line. The number must be
between 1 and 100.
The following two examples illustrate the way PITRES handles waste density
(PAR10) and ore density (PAR7) as entered on Panel. These two setups cover situations
where PAR7 and PAR10 are the only densities defined. They can be overridden with
densities from a Zone Input file, densities from a model item, or densities for different
waste types, respectively.
Example 1.
PITRES is setup with no Zone input file, no Density item from the model, no ORE%
item, only one ZONE per block, and using a single grade cutoff to segregate ore and
waste. In other words, the densities entered on Panel are the only values available for
converting volumes to tonnages. Waste material is identified solely by a user-defined
grade cutoff.
In this case the default Ore Density (PAR7) from Panel is used for determining
tonnages for both ore and waste since waste is based on an ore grade cutoff only. The
PAR10 value from Panel 4 (default waste density) is not used at all.
Example 2.
In this example, only an ORE% item was added; everything else is the same as in
Example 1. In this case, a block with a grade above the Ore/Waste cutoff grade, which
is the ore tonnage portion of the block, is computed with PAR7, and the waste tonnage
portion of the block is computed with PAR10.
Since you can select any grade for the ore/waste cutoff, a block that has its ORE%
grade reported as waste must have a grade that is below the user-specified Ore/Waste
cutoff grade). In this case, the entire block will report as waste. The waste tonnage from
the ORE% portion of the block will be based on PAR7 and the waste tonnage from the
remainder of the block will be based on PAR10.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: You can try these options out (and others as well) using the block at Row 66 Col 99
and Bench 20 in MSOP15.DAT. The associated coordinate boundaries (which is what
PITRES wants) are 5300N to 5320N and 2960E to 2980E and Bench 2660. Use TOPO
as the ORE% item.
Topographic Control
The topo item to use in PITRES is user-controlled. Usually, it is TOPO. An option to
use the topo item, or to set all blocks to 100% topo is available. This should usually be
used for reserves from the Pit Optimization programs as this set of programs works on a
whole block basis so that any block with topo < 50% is not condensed. Blocks with topo
greater or equal to 50 % are condensed. When the partials are created from the Dipper
S-files, blocks with < 50% TOPO do not exist. Thus, the idea is that by treating the
blocks with TOPO >50% as 100% should balance out the TOPO effects in the design. If
a Dipper S-File comes from an M718V2 user subroutine that takes partial topo blocks
into account, the item topo% MUST be used for accurate reporting. Generally, running
a non-M718V2 Dipper reserve using topo% will underestimate the total waste in the pit.
Topo Clipping and Take Ore First
Options to take ore first for surface blocks, or to take ore first for all blocks, are
available. If the ore has been interpreted so that it is clipped at the topo, you must make
sure that all the ore is mined from the surface blocks. The normal calculation is to take
the block partial x topo and apply it to all material types. For example, if an ore had
been clipped at topo such that ore%=60 and topo%=80 and 100% of the block was
being mined, the normal method would be to mine 1.0 * 0.8 * 0.6 = 0.48 for ore and 1.0
* 0.8 * 0.4 = 0.32 for the waste. This means that 12% of the ore is accounted as waste. If
the ore first option is used, it takes all the ore (60%) first, and the rest (20%) is
considered to be waste. The take ore first for all blocks should be used when the pit
bottom follows the footwall of the ore. The same example as above could be used
reversing the partial and the topo to 80% and 100% respectively.
Reports and Output Files
Output files include the report itself, the 805 scheduling file, and a reserve summary
file. If insitu, or diluted grades were requested for reporting, they will be output to both
the reserves summary file and the scheduling file. The report file can be a full detailed
report with every zone on every bench (default), just a final summary of the total for
each zone for the entire run along with the final bench summary (option 1), or the same
as option 1 with an additional summary of all zones for each bench (option 2).
In addition to controlling what is reported (i.e., insitu or diluted tons and grades), the
Report option also controls what is output to the 805/821 schedule file. The Zones and
Cutoffs option allows all zones and cutoffs to be reported in the totals section of the
report. It makes it easier for cutting and pasting into a spreadsheet. This option is only
valid when a Zone Input File is being used; it is deactivated otherwise.
Overview of PITINC
PITINC is used to determine the incremental reserves between two Reserve Summary
Files generated from PITRES. It can also be used to add two Reserve Summary Files
together, or to recreate the reserves reports for 1 summary file. Using one summary file
also allows for different reporting options from the same summary file, (i.e., reporting
cumulative grades versus within bins, summary only, etc.).
You supply the filenames of the two input Summary Files and the name of the
optional Zone Input File. The Zones and cutoffs option allows all zones and cutoffs to
be reported in the totals section of the report, this makes it easier for cutting and pasting
into a spreadsheet. The option is only valid when a Zone Input File is being used; it is
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-7
Notes:
otherwise deactivated.
The user also supplies the name of the output Reserve Summary and the output 805/
821 Schedule File. The output Reserve Summary File can then be used in subsequent
PITINC runs. The Schedule File can be used as input to the M805V1/M821V1
scheduling programs.
There is also an option to omit outputting the first grade item to the 805/821 files,
(i.e., it is only used for binning). This option is mainly used for creating 805/821
material classes from a range of ZONE codes. For example, zones 1-25 might be LCAP,
26-50 OXIDE, 51-75 SUP, etc. The ZONE item can then be used as the 1st grade item
and the appropriate material classes created without it showing up in the 805/821 files.
If the Take ore first option from PITRES is used, then PITINC should always be
used for incremental reserves rather than larger pit minus smaller pit feature codes from
PITRES. This will ensure that there is no double accounting of the ore.
Exercise 1 - Calculate reserves between the surface topography and 802
Starter pit
In the PITRES calculations the surface topography is represented by the TOPO item
(or some other user specified item) in the block model and not by a VBM feature code
such as 901. Recall that the TOPO item stores the percentage of the block that is below
the surface. The feature code for the pit that you are calculating reserves for must
consist of closed clockwise polygons. They do not have to be clipped to topographic
contour lines or snapped to follow topographic contour lines. They can be (and usually
are) expanded into air.
Before continuing you need to:
1. Export the toe lines (code of 802) from object pit3 in MineSight to the
MSOP25.TOP VBM file.
2. Export the toe lines from object pit4 in MineSight to the MSOP25.TOP VBM
file. Change the toe material VBM code to 808 To do this, select the materials
folder, then highlight item pit toe. Bring up the Properties window, select the
Material tab, and change the VBM code to 808; this way, code 808 will appear
on the list of features to export to the VBM. Since it is associated with the pit toe,
if you pick code 808, only the pit toes will be exported.
3. Import file P804.DAT to MSOP25.TOP VBM file (use M650ED).
For volumetric calculations, the program will calculate the following for each block
or partial block inside the pit feature code (i.e. 802) on each bench:
1. Calculate the % of the block inside (%Inside) the 802 polygon (i.e. % inside will
be 100 for full blocks inside, and between 1 and 99 for partial blocks inside).
2. Multiply the full block volume (block length x width x height) by % inside/100,
and by TOPO/100 to get the block volume inside the pit design and below the
current topography associated with the TOPO values in the block model.
3. Tonnages are then calculated and categorized based on user inputs and/or block
model values for densities, material types, and cutoff grades.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
For this exercise (and all the rest involving PITRES) select the following from the
MSCompass Menu tab:
Group: Pit Design
Operation: Report
Procedure: Report 3dbm Reserves - pitres.dat
On the panels additional explanations about the input data you are entering can be
displayed by clicking on any text shown in red on the panel.
Panel 1 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
This panel explains how this procedure can be set up and then used directly in
MineSight 3-D to calculate reserves without leaving the MineSight interface. (We will
do this in a later exercise.)
Panel 2 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
This panel allows you to specify the source for the reserves - either a VBM file, a pit
Optimization set, or an existing partials file. For this exercise well specify the VBM file
msop25.top. Well use the Zone Input File called zone.dat, name the reports 802, enter
802 Starter Pit as the title, and specify 802 as the Pit feature code.
If you click on the Zone Input File text (in Red on this panel) you will get an
explanation of what is in the Zone input file. It is an ASCII file with the data on each
line entered in free format. Following is a printout of the zone.dat file we are using in
this example.
Name Value Dens. Yield% Rec% Dil%
prov 1 2.7 100 100 0
prob 2 2.7 100 100 0
poss 3 2.7 100 100 0
waste 4 2.7 100 100 0

The Name is used for reporting purposes only. The value refers to the value stored in
the block for the File 15 item selected as the Zone Item on the next panel. Yield% is for
coal projects and ignored by PITRES. Recovery and dilution are self-explanatory.
Panel 3 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
This panel allows you to specify zone and grade items; for this exercise, well use one
zone per block, and ORE is the zone item. There is no ORE% item in this exercise, so
be sure to enter N/A in the appropriate window. Grade items are CUIDS, MOIDS and
EQCU.
Panel 4 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
This panel accepts input for the grade cutoff specifications. For this initial example,
well want to break down the report by CUIDS grades of 0.3, 0.6 and 1.0, and report
with two decimal places of precision. The Waste/ore cutoff grade is 0.3, based on
CUIDS (Grade item #1), and be sure to check the box to Treat missing grades as zero.
Panel 5 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
This panel allows you to enter default density values - well use 2.7 for both ore and
waste, and report waste as Tonnage (option 1). This panel also allows the breakdown of
various waste reporting options - for this example, well leave the rest of the panel
blank.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-9
Notes: Panel 6 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
This final panel in the procedure allows you to specify the way volume reduction
items such as TOPO are applied to the calculations. The only required entry on this
panel for this example is the Reporting factor of 0.001 so the reserves will be reported
in 1000s of tons; all other windows can be left blank.
PITRES runs programs M659V1 to compute partial block percentages and MTRES (a
708 User-subroutine) to compute the reserves. Three output files are produced (the last
one is optional) which are named the following for this example:
802.RPT - This reports the reserves based on the instructions provided by the user on
the input panels.
802.SUM - This file tabulates the reserves in a format required by program MTINC
which is accessed via procedure PITINC.
802.SCD - This file tabulates the reserves in a format required by the MineSight(r)
Scheduling Programs, M805V1 and M821V1.
Following is the bench-by-bench summary from file 802.RPT:
Since everyone has a slightly different design your numbers wont exactly match
those shown above but they should be close.
Exercise 2 - Reserves Between pits 804 and 802
Use PITRES with 804 as the large pit and 802 as the small pit (Panel 2). Use a file
name of 804802 and a title of 804 Phase for this exercise (again on Panel 2). These are
the only changes required.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-10 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: The bench-by-bench summary from file 804802.rpt is displayed below.
Exercise 3 - Reserves Between pits 808 and 804
Use PITRES with 808 as the large pit, and 804 as the small pit (Panel 2). Use a file
name of 808804 and a title of 808 Phase for this exercise (again on Panel 2). These are
the only changes required.
You should get something like: 371600 Ktonnes Ore at .690% Cu and 354560
Ktonnes waste.
These last two exercises show how PITRES can tabulate reserves between two pit
designs. One requirement here is that the smaller pit must be totally contained within the
larger pit. For pushbacks that expand the pit on one or two sides, only the large and
small pits will have common walls on the other sides.
This large pit/small pit feature of PITRES works fine for incremental reserves so long
as you do not invoke the Take Ore First option on panel 4. If you do use this option,
then use the procedure PITINC to get the incremental reserves between pits. Even
though we did not use the Take Ore First Option above, we are going to calculate the
reserves between 808 and 804 pits again using PITINC so you can see how it works.
The answers in this case should be identical.
Exercise 4 - Determine reserves between 808 and 804 using PITINC
PITINC uses the .SUM output files from PITRES runs. What we have to do is:
1. Rerun PITRES with 808 as the Large pit, no Small pit and a file name of 808TOT.
2. Rerun PITRES with 804 as the Large pit, no Small pit and a file name of 804TOT.
3. Then run PITINC and ask for the difference between 804TOT.SUM and
808TOT.SUM. The results should be identical to those of exercise 3 in this case.
The PITINC procedure (pitinc.dat) is found on the MSCompass Menu tab under
Group Pit Design - Operation Reports, just like PITRES is. Following are descriptions
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-11
Notes:
of the input panels for PITINC:
Panel 1 - Incremental Reserves Between 2 Reserve Summary Files
This panel allows us to specify the input and output filenames and calculation
parameters; well use 804tot as the smaller reserve summary file and 808tot as the
larger, using the Larger-smaller option. Enter zone.dat as the zone input file name and
808inc as the output file name. Use 808 Reserves as the tile, and report to 2 decimal
places.
Panel 2 - Incremental Reserves Between 2 Reserve Summary Files
This second and final panel allows you to specify reporting parameters. For this
example, well produce a detailed report, reporting all zones and cutoffs, with a factor
of .001.
Run the procedure and compare the results from file 808inc.rpt with the results from
the previous run (file 808804.rpt).
Exercise 5 - Categorize Reserves in Pit 802 by Alteration Type (File 15 item
Altr) with Different Densities for Different Rock Types
This will require a change to the Zone item on Panel 3 (we will use ALTR instead of
ORE) and a corresponding change to the Zone Input file where we will key in names
and densities for six rock types. Names are limited to five characters.
NAME VALUE DENSITY
POTAS 1 2.62
ARGI 2 2.56
PHYLL 3 2.50
BIOT 4 2.69
OXID 5 2.43
MIXED 6 2.60

Create a Zone Input File called ZONE.ALT with Names, values, and densities as
follows:
Edit the existing file ZONE.DAT to incorporate these changes and then use it in a
PITRES run. Dont forget to change the Zone item to ALTR.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-12 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: Summary of reserves by Alteration type are shown below.
XTRA2 ORE ZONE
Min Max Min Max Name
11 1 1 1 1 PRV-1
12 2 2 1 1 PRB-1
13 3 3 1 1 POS-1
14 4 4 1 1 WST-1
15 1 1 2 2 PRV-2
16 2 2 2 2 PRB-2
17 3 3 2 2 POS-2
18 4 4 2 2 WST-2

The above information (with the exception of the name) must be entered in an auxiliary
input file (call it CLASS.DAT) for use in the value assignment procedure MODCLAS.
Exercise 6 - Categorize Reserves in Pit 802 by ORE code (Proven,
probable, etc.) and by Ownership (Item ZONE)
For this exercise we will have to combine valid ORE codes (1 - 4) and valid ZONE
codes (1 - 2) into a classification item with the resulting 8 categories that we want to use
for reserve breakdown.
We will use the File 15 item XTRA2 and assign it the following values based on
block values for Items ORE and ZONE:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-13
Notes: Step 1. Reset XTRA2 values to Unset (-2) for all blocks in the model; on the MS
Compass Menu tab, select procedure p60103.dat:
Group: 3D deposit modeling
Operation: Initialize
Procedure: Reset Model item(s)
Step 2. Assign material classes based on existing block values of the ORE and ALTR
items using the procedure modcls.dat. On the MSCompass Menu tab, select:
Group: 3D Deposit Modeling
Operation: Data convert
Procedure: Assign Model Code by Item Ranges (modcls.dat)
Panel 1 - Assign a Code Item/Material Class Based on Other Items
This single panel accepts the required input for this function; the number of zones,
name of the input class definition file ( class.dat), the grades on which the redefinition is
based (ORE and ALTR), and the item to store the new values (XTRA2). There is also
an option to define a value for those blocks that do not meet any of the definition
criteria ( 11 for this example).
Step 3. Run PITRES for pit 802 again. This time dont use a zone input file and
specify XTRA2 as the Zone item on panel 3. Rename the reports to whatever
you want.
The results show that all the ore in the 802 pit belongs to Owner 2, and most of it is
proven.
Reserve Calculations Using MEDS file 18 Approach
(Programs 710, 711, 712)
This approach requires you to perform the following steps in order:
1. Initialize File 18 (the material summary file) by running Program 710. This
program requires the user to define the material categories he/she wishes to have
the reserves broken down into. A maximum of 20 material categories are allowed.
A maximum of two block model items can be used to categorize the reserves.
These block model items must have integer values (i.e., ore code, rock code,
ownership code, alteration code, etc.). For each material category defined, up to
10 different cutoff grades for reserve tabulation can be specified.
2. Compute block partials using Program M659V1. This program determines the
percentage of each block that is inside the pit outline and outputs the percentage
to an ASCII file. Blocks completely inside (i.e., 100%) the pit outline are accounted
for by default and not written to the file. Blocks cut vertically by the pit outline
have the percentage inside calculated and dumped to the file along with bench,
row, and column numbers for the block. This program must be run once for each
pit or phase for which reserves are being calculated.
3. Determine Reserves between Current Topo and Each Pit Surface using Program
711. This program tabulates reserves on a bench-by-bench basis. It uses the
material categories and cutoff grades defined in Step A and stored in File 18.
This program must be run once for each pit surface, because the reserve results
between the original or current topo, and each pit surface are required in the next
step.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-14 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
4. Determine reserves between two pit surfaces. Use Program M712. This program
gives you the opportunity to combine the previously defined material categories
into reserve classes based on cutoff grade (i.e., low grade material, mill grade
material, etc.). We will now follow this four-step procedure and compute reserves
for the Starter pit (feature code 802), an intermediate pit (feature code 804), and
the final pit (feature code 808).
Step 1 - Initialize the Reserves Summary File
Access Program 710 through the MSCompass Menu tab by selecting:
Group: Pit Design
Operations: Initialize
Procedure: Initialize Reserve File (Pit Design) - p71091.dat
Panel 1 - Pit Design Polygon Reserve Logic
This panel is mostly informative, but also accepts entry of the name for the Reserve
Summary File. <Enter MSOP18.DAT for Name of Material Reserve Summary File.>
Panel 2 - Pit Design Polygon Reserve Logic
On this panel, we specify the model items we wish to use to classify reserves with (in
this case ORE and ZONE); use 4 as both default and maximum value for ORE, and a
default of 1, maximum of 2 for the item ZONE. Specify the grades we wish to report
(CUIDS and MOIDS). The primary grade is the one for which cutoff grades will be
specified on the next panel.
Panel 3 - Pit Design Polygon Reserve Logic
On this panel, we list the Material classifications and cutoff grades we want the
reserves broken up into. The Material Classifications must be related to the model items
ORE and ZONE, which we specified in the previous panel. In this case ORE is an
integer code for proven, probable or possible ore and ZONE is an integer code for
ownership (owner 1 or owner 2). Use the table below to fill in the panel windows.
Materi al Cl ass * Cutoff grades for the materi al cl ass *
# Label (separate each cutoff wi th a bl ank or a ,)
1 prov-own1 .3 .6 1.0
2 prov-own2 -1
3 prob-own1 -1
4 prob-own2 -1
5 poss-own1 -1
6 poss-own2 -1
7 wast-own1 -1
8 wast-own2 -1
9
10
! !
+->10-char +-->Enter ALL CLASS CUTOFFS i n thi s fi el d
+->or enter 1 TOCOPY previ ous cutoffs

Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-15
Notes:
Panel 4 - Pit Design Polygon Reserve Logic
On this panel, we associate the values of ORE and ZONE with the Material Class
Number we defined in the previous panel. ORE values 1 - 4 define the columns of the
matrix table, ZONE values 1 - 2 define the rows of the matrix table, and the associated
Material classification numbers define the Matrix table entries. (These are the numbers
you enter.)

* Materi al cl ass for each ORE code by area ! Cl assLabel
------------------------------------------- ! # (10-Chars)
Area (Leave bl ank i f code and cl ass correspond 1:1 ! 1 =prov-own1
# ! 2 =prov-own2
1 1 3 5 7 ! 3 =prob-own1
2 2 4 6 8 ! 4 =prob-own2
3 ! 5 =poss-own1
4 ! 6 =poss-own2
5 ! 7 =wast-own1
6 ! 8 =wast-own2
7 ! 9 =
8 ! 10 =
9 ! 11 =
10 ! 12 =
! ! ! 13 =
! +-->Enter Cl ass#for each ORE ! 14 =
! ! 15 =
=---> Area#DOES NOT correspond to materi al cl ass <---+

Panel 5 - Pit Design Polygon Reserve Logic
In this panel, the density for each ore type is specified - well use a default Specific
Gravity of 2.7 for all four ore types. An alternative is to use the specific gravity values
stored on a block-by-block basis in the model. Note that this program initializes
MSOP18.DAT as your File 18, but it will not list it on the Setup tab of Compass.
Step 2 - Compute Block Partials
Access the pit partials Calculation program (M659V1) through the MSCompass
Menu tab by selecting:
Group: Pit Design
Operations: Data Convert
Procedure: Calculate 3D Block Partials - p65901.dat
Panel 1 - Table of Pit Design Polygons
This panel provides the user with a list of pit surface VBM features and their
associated reference number and description. This information is not used directly by
the program, and you can leave this panel blank if you want to. Its purpose is to remind
you of the correspondence between reference number and pit number when doing
reserves between two surfaces. Please note that reference number 0 is by default the
current surface, so always start your pit reference numbering from 1.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-16 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Panel 2 - Bench Toe Elevations for Reserve Calculation
On this panel, you are asked to enter the source file ( msop25.top), pit feature code, the
bottom and top elevation for the feature and the bench height. We will run this program
three times. The information for this panel for each run is shown below:
Feature
Code
Bottom
Elev
Top
Elevation
Bench
Height
802 2000 2960 15
804 2000 2960 15
808 2000 2960 15

You can do all three runs at once, using the Multi-Run function found on the
MSCompass Options tab. Try this.
Step 3 - Determine reserves between TOPO and Pit Surface
Access Program 711 for reserve calculations between the original/current surface, and
a pit surface by selecting:
Group: Pit Design
Operation: Report
Procedure: Reserves (Pit Design) - p71101.dat
Panel 1 - Table of Pit Design Polygons
This panel displays the information associating pit feature VBM with reference
number. This is presented as a reminder of the association you wish to establish in the
next panel.
The pit design outlines should go up until they are completely in air. A bottom
elevation below pit bottom can be entered and the program will flag any benches
without an outline with a warning message. Rather than try to remember the top and
bottom of each pit, just use the model limits on elevation for all pits.
This program produces an ASCII file of the partial block percentages and the location
of the blocks. The file naming convention used by the program is PRT***.ASC, where
*** is the Pit feature code. In this case, we will create files PRT802.ASC,
PRT804.ASC, and PRT808.ASC. A partial listing of the file PRT802.ASC is shown
below:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-17
Notes:
Panel 2 - Pit Design Polygon Model Reserves
On this panel, the VBM pit feature, Reference number, and Partials file all come
together for a particular pit surface. Since the reserves are by default, always calculated
from the original/current surface, you are only asked for the pit surface to which you
wish to sum reserves. We will run this program three times with the input to Panel 2 as
shown below, using the Reserve Summary File msop18.dat. (If you want to use
Multi-Run for this, go ahead.)
Pit Feature
Code
Reference
Number
Pit Partials
File
Report File
802 1 PRT802.ASC RPT711.802
804 2 PRT804.ASC RPT711.804
808 3 PRT808.ASC RPT711.808

After running this program, the reference number and the pit surface feature code are
linked together, so be sure that the Partials file, reference number, and pit feature all
relate to the same surface before running this program. This program stores in File 18,
the bench-by-bench reserves between the original/current topo and the particular pit
surface.
Step 4 - To calculate reserves between pit surfaces, access program 712 by selecting:
Group: Pit Design
Operation: Report
Procedure: Summarize Reserves
Panel 1 - For Your Information
This information panel presents a message concerning what you need to know, and
what you should have completed before attempting to run this program. The key facts
we need to know are:
A. We specified eight Material Classes when initializing File 18 in Step 1. These are:
1. Proven Ore - Owner 1
2. Proven Ore - Owner 2
3. Probable Ore - Owner 1
4. Probable Ore - Owner 2
5. Possible Ore -Owner 1
6. Possible ore - Owner 2
7. Waste - Owner 1
8. Waste - Owner 2
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-18 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
B. We specified four cutoff grades when initializing File 18. These are:
1. 0.00 (Automatically included by MineSight)
2. 0.30
3. 0.60
4. 1.00
Programs that must be run before running this program, are the programs we have run
in the previous three steps.
Panel 2 - Table of Pit Design Polygons
This panel displays the information associating VBM pit feature and reference
number.
Panel 3 - Reserves Summary
Here we must specify the filename for File 18 ( MSOP18.dat), and the reference
numbers of the two surfaces between which we want to calculate reserves. We will run
the program three times to determine reserves between the following surfaces and their
corresponding reference numbers. (If you want to use Multi-Run for this, go ahead.)
Large pit Ref # Small pit Ref # Report file
name
Reserve file
created
802 starter 1 orig. Surf 0 RPT802.000 res1.0
804 interm 2 802 starter 1 RPT804.802 res2.1
808 final 3 804 interm 2 RPT808.804 res3.2

The res files created are input files to the scheduling program 805, which we will use
in the next section.
Panel 4 - Reserves Summary
This panel asks the user to define Reserve Classes, and specify which are to be
considered ore and which are to be considered waste for strip ratio calculation purposes.
Reserve classes are simply categories where you mix and match the Material Classes
and cutoff grades to produce different reserve reports. The reserve classes are not stored
in File 18 and you can run as many different reserve reports as you want. The key is to
have defined your Material Classes and cutoff grades (Step 1) in enough detail to give
you the flexibility needed for different reserve reports now.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-19
Notes:
For this example, we will report the ore as either low grade (below .6%), or high
grade (no breakdown by proven, probable, or possible) for each owner, and report waste
as one item regardless of owner. Thus, we have the following five reserve classes:
No. 10-Character
Class Name
Description
1 Lo-Grade-1 Low grade ore - Owner 1
2 Lo-Grade-2 Low grade ore - Owner 2
3 Hi-Grade-1 High grade ore - Owner 1
4 Hi-Grade-2 High grade ore - Owner 2
5 Waste Waste - No Owner Breakdown

Panel 5 - Pit Optimization Reserves Summary
On this panel, we associate the Cutoff grades and Material class Numbers with the
Reserve Class Numbers we defined in the previous panel. Cut-off grade numbers
1 - 4 ( for 0% , .3%, .6%, and 1% respectively) define the columns of the matrix table,
Material Class Numbers 1 - 8 define the rows of the matrix table and the associated
reserve class numbers define the Matrix table entries. (These are the numbers you
enter). Note: you must fill in all eight Material Classes; this requires a single entry on
the following panel (5 5 5 5).
712 Output
This program produces two output files each time you run it: the RPT file and
RESn2.n1 file where n2 = reference number of Larger Pit, and n1 = reference number
of Smaller Pit.

Materi al Cl ass / Cutof f s: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 5 1 3 3
2 5 2 4 4
3 5 1 3 3
4 5 2 4 4
5 5 1 3 3
6 5 2 4 4
7 5 5 5 5


Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-20 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
A listing of RPT712.LA for the reserves between the 804 intermediate pit and the
802 starter pit are shown below. The associated RES2.1 file is specifically for input to
the 805 scheduling program.
Exercise
The Multi-Run function of MSCompass can be used to run multiple procedures
multiple times. Set up a Multi-Run package to do the pit partials, 711 reserves and 712
reserves that we just did, all at once.
Reserve Calculation Using MineSight 3-D
Overview
MineSight provides tools for reserve calculations:
Inside a closed solid
Between surfaces
Between surfaces and limited by a boundary.
MineSight 3-D generates a partials file in the project directory; by default, this partials
file is then used in conjunction with the MSRUNRES.BAT file, which may be set up
using PITRES (for open pits). After invoking Calculate Reserves, clicking on a
MineSight 3-D solid or surface in the viewer will report the solids reserves to the
MineSight Messages window.
A site standard location for reserves applications can be specified with the MineSight
environment variable MSIGHT_RESERVES. This variable can be set when MineSight
is installed; for example, set MSIGHT_RESERVES to c:\StdRrvsApps. Reserves
applications in the specified location are available for use from the pull down list under
Reserves Applications. If this environment variable is not set, then the local directory is
used as the site standard location.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Reserves Calculations
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 9-21
Notes:
Exercise 1 - Reserves between original surface and pit 802
(pit3).
Step 1 - Create mxpert.bat
<Make a No Run of procedure PITRES to set up the script file needed by MineSight
3-D. Check the No Run box on the Setup tab of the MSCompass interface.> What you
need to modify from previous exercises are:
Panel 2 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
<Delete the name of the VBM, and enter the file name mspart.out as the Name of the
existing partials file. Check the box indicating that the Existing partials file is from
MineSight. Enter an appropriate title, such as Starter pit from MineSight.> Leave the
remainder of the panel blank.
Panel 3 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
<Change the zone item to ORE.>
Panel 6 - Determine Reserves from Pit Optimization or Pit Design/Polygons
<Click the Do not use TOPO itemoption, since we will truncate the pit with topo in
MineSight.>
Finish running the procedure; there will be no apparent response from the program,
but a batch file called mxpert.bat has been created.
Step 2 - Generate MineSight reserves
1. From a DOS prompt in your project directory type:
COPY MXPERT.BAT MSRUNRES.BAT
2. Start MS2.
3. Create a new Geometry Object in folder pits. Call it pit3tri, and change it to Edit
mode.
4. Select all elements of object pit3, and triangulate.
5. Close pit3. Open object 901tri (initial topography) and one model view.
6. Click Surface$Calculate Reserves.
7. Pick the top (initial topography) and bottom (triangulated pit) surfaces. The names
of the surfaces can appear in the reserves window if attributes have been set for
those objects (under Element- Attribute).
8. The reserves report will appear on the screen.
Reserves Calculations Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 9-22 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Exercise 2 - Reserves inside pit3 (creating a closed solid).
1. Create object pit3solid in folder pits. Change it to Edit mode.
2. Open object pit3tri and 901tri.
3. Intersect pit3tri and 901tri (use the Intersect Surfaces tool).
4. Pick Topo as the primary surface and pit as the secondary surface. Use the Cut
Solid option.
5. Calculate reserves, this time using the Inside solid (pit3solid) option. Results
should be very close to those from exercise 1.
Exercise 3 - Reserves between pit3 and pit4.
1. Create and change to Edit mode, object pit3merge.
2. Intersect objects pit3 and 901tri. Use the Intersect Surfaces tool. Pick the topo
as the primary surface, and pit3 as the secondary. Use the Cut Surface option.
Result should be pit3 merged with the topo.
3. Calculate reserves between pit3merge and pit4.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 10-1
Notes:
Generating Reserve Files for MineSight
Strategic Scheduler
Learning Objectives
When you have completed this section, you will know how to:
A. Make partials files for each phase design using MineSight 3-D. (MS3D)
B. Use the partials files with MineSight Compass Procedure PITRES to make bench
by bench reserve files for the scheduler
Making Partials Files in MS3D
Partials refer to the percentage of each 3-D block that is inside each pit design.
Partials range from 0 to 100%. They are used in reserve calculations to produce accurate
volume and tonnage figures. The best way to calculate the partial block percentages is
to use MineSight, and triangulated surfaces of the phase designs.
For this training, course we have four phase designs ranging from a small starter pit
(Phase 1), out to a final pit limit (phase 4). The orebody is a large porphyry copper/moly
deposit. The four phase designs are stored as MS2 objects, P1 through P4, in folder
Phases. These are all triangulated surfaces. Object TOPO is the triangulated original
topography.
Take a minute to view these objects in MS2. You can also view objects 801 through
804 which are midline representations of the phases stored at toe elevations. Step
through them in plan and section using the appropriate Grid Sets.
We must calculate partials between each of the four pit phases in order to calculate
phase-by-phase reserves for scheduling purposes. To do this, we need to first create a
triangulated surface of each phase merged into the original topography.
Step 1
Use the Intersect Surfaces tool to merge the triangulated surface of each phase with
the triangulated surface of the original topography. The MS2 objects to use as input
surfaces and output surfaces are summarized below:
Following are the instructions for doing the first one.
1. Open object Topo and object P1.
2. Click on Surfaces=>Intersect Surfaces and pick Topo as the Primary Surface,
and pick P1 as the Secondary Surface. (Note: There are two ways of doing this;
1. pick them from the viewer with the mouse; or 2. pick them from a menu using
the Object Contents Browser (OCB - red box icon) option. The advantage of
Primary Surface Secondary Surface Merged Surface
Topo P1 P1merged
Topo P2 P2merged
Topo P3 P3merged
Topo P4 P4merged

Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 10-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
the OCB option is that any surface can be picked from the menu, it does not have
to be displayed.)
3. Pick the option Cut Surface, and click Preview. If the results look good, click
Apply.
4. A window will appear with output options. Pick Send Results to Open Edit
Object, and in the menu that comes up, highlight folder Phases. Enter the name
P1merged.
5. Take object P1merged out of Open Edit mode by clicking on the yellow box
icon for Unsetting edit object.
Repeat these steps to create object P2merged in folder Phases. Note: if you use the
OCB option for picking the surfaces, you do not have to open them for display.
Step 2
Use the Generate Partials tool to create partials files associated with the merged
surfaces created in Step 1 and the phase designs.
The partials files being created are cut partials files defining the blocks and partial
blocks inside each incremental phase design. The surfaces involved in the calculations
and the partial file generated are summarized below:
Following are the instructions for doing the first one.
1. Create a File 15 model view of any item, and limit display to one or two blocks.
2. Click Surface=>Generate Partials and the Generate Partials dialog will appear:
3. Click Between Surfaces, and click the Red box icon to activate the OCB option
for selecting the Top Surface. The Object Contents Browser dialog will appear:
4. Click the Red box icon, and pick object Topo from the menu.
5. Under the Objects Contents list, click Surfaces (1) to move it over to the
Geometry Contents list. Click OK.
6. Follow the same steps (C, D, and E) to pick P1 as the bottom surface.
7. Click the Model View icon, and pick the model view created in Step A above.
8. Enter PP1.dat for the Cut Partials name. (Leave the Fill Partials file name as the
default; we wont be using it in the reserve calculations). Click Apply.
9. File PP1.dat is created.
Repeat these instructions to create file PP2.dat. The others have already been created.
Top Surface Bottom Surface Cut Partials File
Topo P1 PP1.dat
P1Merged P2 PP2.dat
P2Merged P3 PP3.dat
P3Merged P4 PP4.dat

Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 10-3
Notes:
Use PITRES to Make a Reserve File
Using PITRES to Make a Reserve File for each Phase, for Input to the
Scheduler
Procedure PITRES runs a reserve calculation user subroutine that utilizes the partials
files generated by MineSight. The program accesses the 3-D block model, and
computes and categorizes the reserves based on model items such as: rock type,
alteration type, confidence code, grade cutoffs, etc. The procedure panels allow the user
to specify how the reserves are to be categorized. For complex reporting, an Auxiliary
Zone Input file is available. For more details, please see the on-line help file for this
procedure, or consult the documentation listing at the end of this section.
We will run procedure PITRES four times in a multi-run to generate the phase-by-
phase reserve files in the format required by the scheduler. An additional standard
reserve report file is also produced for each phase. The input/output file names used for
each run are as follows:
<Open MS Compass. Click the Multirun tab, select New Multirun, and click Open.
Select the procedure pitres.dat, and click SETUP.>
Procedure PITRES Panels
Panel 1
Leave blank. This panel contains instructions for running PITRES from the Calculate
Reserves tool in MS2. Running reserves from MS2 Compass (as we are doing) provides
more flexibility.
Panel 2
<On this panel, use ?01.dat for the name of the partials file, and check the box saying
it was generated by MineSight. Use ?01 for the name of the reporting files. Files with
the .scd extension are the ones required by the Scheduler.>
A multi-run panel will appear, asking you to replace ?01 with its actual value for the
run. <Click Add Value four times, fill in the four filenames from above, and click
Continue.>
Panel 3
On this panel, we specify the number of geologic zones we have per block (one in our
case), optional Zone and Ore% items (N/A in our case), and the grades we want to
report (CUIDS and MOIDS).
Panel 4
On this panel, we specify cutoff grades for material classification purposes and
reporting. The cutoff between ore and waste is also specified. For this case cutoffs are in
terms of CUIDS grade (Grade Item #1).
Partials File File Name for Reports
PP1.dat PP1
PP2.dat PP2
PP3.dat PP3
PP4.dat PP4

Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 10-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: Panel 5
Here we specify densities to use to convert volumes to tones. The remainder of the
panel deals with more detailed waste breakdowns in the report, and recovery/dilution
handling options.
Panel 6
Topo considerations have already been accounted for in the partials files generated by
MineSight 3-D. <Therefore, check the box instructing the program not to use topo item
from model.>
This is the last PITRES panel. The Multirun panel will appear next. <Click FileI Save
I Packageand then click Run.>
This program will produce three output files for each pit phase. PP1.rpt is the
standard reporting file; PP1.sum is a file used by procedure PITINC (used with Take
Ore First option); and PP1.scd is the file used by the M821 scheduler. Note: the unit for
tonnage in the .scd files is always actual tonnes even if you specify Ktonnes for the
standard report file.
Partial printouts of PP1.rpt and PP1.scd follow:
PP1.rpt
** RESERVES FOR PP1
BENCH INSITU INSITU RUN OF WASTE ROM INSITU GRADES
TOE

ORE

ORE

MINE

TOTAL

S/R

CUIDS

MOIDS


(BCMS)

(TONNES)

(TONNES)

(TONNES)


2660.0

27.

72.

72.

35.

0.49

0.250

0.101

2645.0

411.

1110.

1110.

1545.

1.39

0.355

0.086

2630.0

1979.

5342.

5342.

1708.

0.32

0.481

0.079

2615.0

2175.

5874.

5874.

699.

0.12

0.632

0.082

2600.0 1949. 5261. 5261. 293. 0.06 0.810 0.089
2585.0 1662. 4487. 4487. 121. 0.03 0.855 0.092
2570.0 1374. 3709. 3709. 29. 0.01 0.867 0.099
2555.0 1073. 2898. 2898. 26. 0.01 0.955 0.110
2540.0 795. 2148. 2148. 30. 0.01 1.053 0.121
2525.0 564. 1524. 1524. 0. 0.00 1.040 0.130
2510.0 348. 939. 939. 0. 0.00 1.018 0.133
2495.0 175. 471. 471. 0. 0.00 1.112 0.134
TOTAL 12532. 33836. 33836. 4486. 0.13 0.771 0.095

Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 10-5
Notes:
PP1.scd
PIT FROM PITRES
4 2
>=0.2 >=0.4 >=0.6 WASTE
CUIDS MOIDS
20 1 0.72251992E+05 0.25022420E+00 0.10078476E+00
20 4 0.35154000E+05
21 1 0.71992813E+06 0.27653009E+00 0.77216454E-01
21 2 0.35315994E+06 0.48121113E+00 0.10281195E+00
21 3 0.37097996E+05 0.67882097E+00 0.97379915E-01
21 4 0.15445071E+07
22 1 0.27959543E+07 0.28782114E+00 0.49889956E-01
22 2 0.11422620E+07 0.47852221E+00 0.79987258E-01
22 3 0.14037295E+07 0.86890376E+00 0.13695560E+00
22 4 0.17081266E+0
23 1 0.18106721E+07 0.27594370E+00 0.33759542E-01
23 2 0.13267796E+07 0.47583410E+00 0.57125777E-01
23 3 0.27361753E+07 0.94385403E+00 0.12631699E+00
23 4 0.69886806E+06
24 1 0.98641838E+06 0.29642785E+00 0.27577600E-01
24 2 0.11532784E+07 0.49376437E+00 0.47481380E-01
24 3 0.31217340E+07 0.10887047E+01 0.12327681E+00
24 4 0.29322003E+06
25 1 0.53314213E+06 0.30607101E+00 0.22306286E-01
25 2 0.91821631E+06 0.50208169E+00 0.44682413E-01
25 3 0.30352270E+07 0.10577236E+01 0.11883071E+00
25 4 0.12101400E+06
26 1 0.37292400E+06 0.31562555E+00 0.24009556E-01
26 2 0.62434813E+06 0.49321988E+00 0.46940830E-01
26 3 0.27121998E+07 0.10291246E+01 0.12081125E+00
26 4 0.29322000E+05
27 1 0.13608000E+06 0.33739284E+00 0.31988095E-01
27 2 0.55080013E+06 0.49185291E+00 0.46082348E-01
27 3 0.22112973E+07 0.11078724E+01 0.13090932E+00
Generating Reserve Files for MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 10-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. M821V1 Summary
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 11-1
Notes:
M821V1 Summary
PROGRAM SUMMARY
M821V1 schedules ore mining and waste stripping for open pit mines using
incremental reserves from, for example, M712V1 or PITRES based upon availabilities
and capacities of trucks and shovels, material destinations, haulage cycle times,
operational constraints, production parameters, and economic parameters.

- Mill production required
- Total mining capacity
- Production parameters
- Destination parameters
- Quality materials required
- Truck and shovel parameters
- Cutoff grades
- Operational constraints
- For production period:
Mill and Leach tons and grade
Waste Mining
- Stockpile
- Usage of trucks & shovels
- Usage of destinations
- Economics of schedules
- Mining report by pushback and
period
- Truck and shovel hours
- Usage of destinations
- Economics of the schedules
- PCF
- Pit Reserve Files for each
sequential pit computed by
M712V1or PITRES
- Haulage cycle-time file
- Destination capacity file
RUN FILE:
CALCS:

INPUT:

OUTPUT:

REQUIREMENTS AND CONSIDERATIONS
M821V1 computes a schedule for production periods from mining sequences
summarized by, for example, M712V1 or PITRES. For each production period, the
required mill feed, up to three qualities, and waste mining must be specified. M821V1
computes a schedule satisfying six items within specified ranges, e.g., Type1 mill feed
(sulfide), Type2 mill feed (oxide), Waste (rest of materials), Quality1 material, Quality2
material, and Quality3 material, as well as the availabilities and the capacities of trucks,
shovels and destinations.
PROGRAM FLOW DIAGRAM
M821V1 Summary Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 11-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
The input for the program includes:
The reserves for each sequence are summarized in separate Pit Reserve Files. A
maximum of twenty (20) reserve classes are allowed as input to M821V1. Note:
all the summarized sequences must have the same reserve classes. Each Pit Reserve
File contains the reserves between two pit designs (i.e., incremental reserves).
The pre-production periods and the production requirements for each period are
input. For each period, the range limits on the six (6) items and cutoff rules are
entered.
Truck round trip haulage cycle time in minutes, excluding loading time, for all
possible combinations between all of the material origins and destinations.
Capacities of destinations
Precedence constraints
Assumptions
The mining sequences input to M821V1 are ordered so that they represent a logical
sequence of mining and may be geometrically related. In order to mine a bench, all
benches above it within the same sequence must be mined and that bench in the
previous sequence must have been mined if geometrically related. Also ore and waste
can be mined in different rates on bottom benches.
Scheduling Steps and Logic
M821V1 computes a mining schedule based upon the input data using the following
steps:
1. The pit reserves are read and regrouped in up to twelve (12) M821V1 classes.
These classes include two waste classes (M821V1 codes 11 and 12) and ten (10)
ore classes (M821V1 codes 1-10).
2. For each production period, the ore materials are summarized into eight (8)
production classes: waste class 1, Type1 mill feed, mid, low and sub-grade
stockpiles, Type2 mill feed, high-grade leach, and low-grade leach materials.
Waste classes 1 and 2 are based upon M821V1 codes 11 and 12. The separation of
M821V1 ore classes into eight (8) scheduling categories is based upon the
specification of which of the ten (10) ore classes are to be mapped into one of the
eight (8) scheduling categories for each period. This allows the cutoff grade to
vary by production period.
The scheduling process consists of four major components. They are:
a) Find a feasible mining pattern that meets the production targets and operating
constraints by systematically examining all the possible mining pushbacks and
benches.
b) Compute the usage of dumps, trucks and shovels via simulation of the removal of
the mined materials in step 1 so that the availability of dumps, trucks and shovels
are not violated.
c) Calculate the operating costs and revenues for the feasible mining solution which
meets the requirements of both steps a and b.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. M821V1 Summary
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 11-3
Notes:
d) Choose an optimum mining solution based on the chosen objective among all
the feasible mining solutions.
3. A feasible mining pattern (mining layouts) is determined by examining all
combinations among all the pushbacks and benches working in one period. The
program searches the feasible mining patterns in following fashion:
a) Sort all pushbacks according to economics so the pushback with the highest
ratio of NPV over its total tons is on the top of the mining order list and the
pushback with the lowest at the bottom.
b) Adjust the pushback list by precedence requirements so the mining order agrees
with both the economics and the precedence constraints.
c) Pick up k pushbacks that work in the current period according to the pushback
mining order and the permutation sequence. For k pushbacks out of n pushbacks
working, there is a total of [n!/{(n-k)!k!}] permutations. Many of them can be
dropped because of violating precedence constraints or mining targets.
d) Locate the bottom benches in each pushback based on pushback and bench mining
rate.
e) Check among all the combinations of k pushbacks for feasible mining patterns.
A feasible mining pattern consists of i pushbacks (i #k). Inside each of the I
pushbacks, there are m(i) benches mined. Of the m(i) benches, the m(i)-j>0 are
the base benches, and the j benches below (m(i)-j) benches are the bottom benches.
All the m(i)-j base benches are completely mined. The j bottom benches are mined
in fractions via linear programming with the status of direct mill feed stockpiles
considered automatically. The ore and waste may be mined in different
fractions on the bottom benches. Of the j bottom benches in the same pushback,
the total mining on an upper bench is greater than on a lower bench. A feasible
mining pattern is illustrated on page 821-4.
Whenever a feasible mining pattern is found, the usage of dumps, trucks &
shovels and the economics are calculated. A feasible solution is defined as a
feasible mining pattern that also passes the destination, truck and shovel
availability check. The economics are calculated for each feasible solution.
Each feasible solution is a candidate to be the optimum solution for current
period. During the solution enumeration, if the number of feasible solutions
exceeds a pre-defined limit, the search is stopped and the program moves to
step g.
f) All combinations of benches of k pushbacks are examined. If not all the
permutations of k out of n pushbacks are evaluated, go to step c for next
permutation. Otherwise, check if at least one feasible solution was found. If no
feasible solution was found, go to step h. If at least one feasible solution was
found, continue.
g) Exit with at least one feasible solution.
h) Exit with no feasible solution.
Throughout the feasible mining pattern search, an audit trail is provided by choice, so
that when there is no feasible mining pattern, the reason can be analyzed. The number
of pushbacks working, production targets, the cutoff grade, or the operation constraints
can be relaxed at the engineers discretion.
M821V1 Summary Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 11-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
4. Once a feasible mining pattern is found, the displacement of the required ore and
waste materials is simulated for a truck and shovel operation. The objective is to
see if the ore and the waste intended to be mined can actually be loaded and
transported to the appropriate destinations. The simulation progresses as follows:
a) Pick up a pushback from the mined pushback list.
b) Determine the amount of ore or waste that needs to be removed.
c) Find a destination (lift) based on the shortest distance, the permitted connection
and the available physical, period, and spread dumping capacity. If there is no
viable destination, go to step i.
d) Find a loader with available hours from the loader list in a top to bottom fashion.
The loader could have multiple units with the same characteristics, such as the
loading cycle, the availability, the percent of use and the operating costs. If there
are no loader hours available, go to step i.
e) Find a truck with available hours from the truck list also in a top to bottom
fashion. The truck selected could have multiple units with the same haulage
cycle, availability, the percent of use and the operating costs. If there are no truck
hours available, go to step i.
f) Set the amount of ore or waste to the minimum of the amount permitted by steps
c, d, and e. Update the usage of destinations, trucks and shovels.
g) Check if all the materials of step b are removed. If not, go to step b. If yes, check
if all the mined materials from all the pushbacks are removed. If not, go to step
a. If yes, continue.
h) The feasible mining pattern is a feasible solution. Hence, exit to calculate the
costs and revenues for this feasible solution.
i) Error exit. The feasible mining pattern under evaluation is dropped. An audit trail
is provided by choice to examine why the solution was infeasible.
Special rules added to the simulation:
Available hours and operating costs of trucks & shovels can be changed among
four distinct time spans to reflect the equipment at different ages.
Spread dumping to simulate the actual haulage and dumping environment. The
spread dumping is based on a pre-defined dumping rate for each destination. In
other words, if a closer destination A reached its spread dumping capacity, the
material has to go to a destination B further away with spread dumping capacity.
Only after all the destinations with connections reached their respective spread
dumping capacities, can the materials be dumped on destination A again in any
one period.
A destination may be specified as available or non-available or must be dumped
to up to a pre-defined period.
Multiple material types (e.g., ore, waste, stockpile and so forth) can be sent to
distinct destinations.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. M821V1 Summary
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 11-5
Notes:
5. After a feasible solution is determined, the shovel loading hours and the truck
haulage hours are available. The operating costs for trucks and shovels are
calculated. Based on which ore destination the ore materials are sent to, different
recoveries and processing costs are used. With fixed mining costs added, the
overall revenues and costs are calculated. The net cash value from the feasible
solution is obtained. In the developed method, no taxation is considered.
6. As an alternative; the materials mined from all pushbacks can be allocated to
available material destinations by linear programming on a pushback to destination
basis. The materials on each bench are then allocated to individual lifts based on
LP results using more detailed cycle times.
7. Twelve criteria are set up to filter all the feasible mining solutions. They are the
maximization and minimization of the following six items:
net value
primary mineral content
stripping ratio
haulage and loading cost
haulage hours
exposed ore
At the end of the solution enumeration for any one period, one feasible solution,
which fits into the period objective, usually, maximum net value, would be selected to
be the period optimum solution.
This process of locating feasible mining patterns, computing the use of dumps, trucks
& shovels, calculating the economics, filtering the feasible solutions based on the 12
criteria, and selecting the optimum solution, continues one period at a time until all
the periods are sequenced.
Re-running, based on the mining solutions obtained from previous periods, can alter a
mining sequence in order to examine more scenarios. The cutoffs can be changed from
period to period to enhance the mine NPV.
M821V1 Summary Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 11-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
AN EXAMPLE OF PUSHBACK SEQUENCING
(CROSS-SECTION VIEW)

Minimum
phase
operating
width
G
C
D
E
F
A
B
Base Benches
Bottom Benches
A feasible mining pattern (layout)
Two pushbacks (phases) working in one period consists of base benches and bottom
benches.
NOTE: The base benches are completely mined. The bottom benches may be partially
mined.
Definition of Exposed Ore
The amount of exposed ore shows how much ore is available in the next period.
This calculation is not shown in any report. The following describes how the amount of
exposed ore is computed.
1. Once a mining solution is obtained for the current period, the boundary of mining
for the current period is known.
2. Using this boundary as a starting surface, M821 determines how much more
mining can be done in each pushback (phase) in the next period based on the
maximum mining rate. A new boundary is defined. The amount of material
between the current mining boundary and the next periods maximum possible
mining boundary is the maximum amount that can be mined in the next period.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. M821V1 Summary
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 11-7
Notes:
Diagram


Mining boundary in
<-----current period

Mining boundary in
<-----current period
Obviously, the higher the mining rate, the more material will be available for mining
in the next period.
3. The amount of ore and waste is summarized based on the next periods cutoff grade
by bench and by phase for the materials within the next periods reach.
4. The cumulative ore and waste is computed by bench within each phase. A stripping
ratio is computed based on cumulative ore and waste for each bench.
5. Compute the amount of exposed ore based on a cutoff stripping ratio (All 4
benches of phase 1 and 2 are within reach in the next period based on maximum
mining rates.)
At cutoff stripping ratio =4:
The amount of ore in phase 1 = 400
The amount of ore in phase 2 = 400
Total amount of exposed ore = 800
phase 1 + phase 2.

At cutoff stripping ratio =3:
The amount of ore in phase 1 = 300
The amount of ore in phase 2 = 300
Total amount of exposed ore = 600
phase 1 + phase 2.
Only top 3 benches of phase 1 and 2
are included.
At cutoff stripping ratio =2:
The amount of ore in phase 1 = 0
The amount of ore in phase 2 = 300
Total amount of exposed ore = 300
phase 1 + phase 2.
Only top 3 benches of phase 2 are
included.
At cutoff stripping ratio <2:
The amount of ore in phase 1 = 0
The amount of ore in phase 2 = 0
Total amount of exposed ore = 0 phase
1 + phase 2.
None of the benches in phases 1 and 2
are included.

NOTE: Phase 1 and 2 are assumed independent in above calculations. The amount of
exposed ore considers all available phases, not just the phases working in one
period.
The actual amount of exposed ore could be less than the amount indicated because of
mining precedence.
Example:
Phase 1 Phase 2
---bench--- ---cumulative--- ---bench--- ---cumulative---

bench ore waste core cwaste cS.R. bench ore waste core cwaste cS.R.
1 100 500 100 500 5 1 100 400 100 400 4
2 100 300 200 800 4 2 100 200 200 600 3
3 100 100 300 900 3 3 100 0 300 600 2
4 100 700 400 1600 4 4 100 1000 400 1600 4

M821V1 Summary Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 11-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-1
Notes:
Long Range Planning with MineSight
Strategic Scheduler
Learning Objectives
When you have completed this section, you will know how to use the MineSight
Strategic Scheduler interface.
Introduction
The interface for Mintecs Long Range Open-Pit MineSight Strategic Scheduler
(formerly known as M821V1 scheduler) has been under further development and
consolidation in the past year. This interface will minimize the inputs for the users to
develop long-range open pit schedules, while it preserves the full power for the
development of a realistic strategic schedule for the operating mines.
Data preparation for the schedule calculations can now be completed with the help of
a data preparation wizard, which is guided by a series of dialogs. A project exploration
tree is also provided so that a user is aware of where he/she is with regard to the input
data preparation at all the times, and he/she can jump to a particular dialog as he/she
wishes.
On each dialog, one can save inputs/changes by selecting <Previous (dialog), Next >,
or Finish, or discard the inputs/changes by clicking the Cancel button.
A Help button is available on every dialog to provide help for the dialog. A Help
menu item is also available for the overall help. (The help files are not completed yet at
this moment.)
During the past year, schedule reporting and chart producing using Excel within
MineSight Scheduler interface were tested with some success. This indicates that at least
some of the schedule reports and charts can be automatically produced by the interface.
Examples of these reports and charts are provided with this workshop.
The engine for the MineSight Strategic Scheduler, M821V1.EXE, was improved as
well. The improved engine:
A. Attempts to always provide a feasible mining layout. In other words, where there
is no feasible mining layout, the schedule constraints will be relaxed to produce a
solution.
B. Provides options for automatically balancing the stripping ratios or primary metal
contents for designated periods.
This section focuses on the MineSight Strategic Scheduler interface and schedule
reporting.
Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 12-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Basic Features of the MineSight Strategic Scheduler Interface
The interface consists of a set of menu items and an explorer style tree display.
Depending on particular user-specified options, some tree items or dialogs will not be
displayed, reducing unnecessary user input.
The menu items are:
File
New Project
Open Project
Open Project Resource File
Open Run File
Save Project
Save Project Resource File
Save Run File
Print (not implemented at this time)
Exit
Data Preparation
(Bring up Project Explorer)
Schedule Calculation
(Executes M821V1.EXE with input prepared by the interface)
View Results
View Standard Report
View Assumptions
View Detailed Audit Report
Close Report Windows
Reporting
Export to Excel Spreadsheet
Generate Reports
Generate Charts
Help
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-3
Notes:
Flow Chart of the MineSight Strategic Scheduler Interface Menu Items

Fi l e
St ar t
New
Pr oj ec t ?
Yes
No
Open Pr oj ec t
I f ex i st s, Open
Run Fi l e
I f ex i st s, Open
Resour c e Fi l e
Dat a Pr epar at i on (See {Pr oj ec t Ex pl or er Tr ee
f or Dat a Pr epar at i on St eps)
Sc hedul e Cal c ul at i ons
Vi ew Resul t s
Repor t i ng
A*
(see nex t page)
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Page 12-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Flow Chart of MineSight Strategic Scheduler Interface Menu Items (contd.)

A*
Save Run Fi l e
Yes
No
Save Run Fi l e
as?
Save Resour c e
Fi l e as?
Yes
No
Save Resour c e Fi l e
Save Resour c e
Fi l e mnu821.r s
Ex i t (St op)
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-5
Notes: The Project Explorer Tree for Data Preparation:
Data Preparation for Schedule Calculations
Define Working Directory
Read in PCF File
Project Input Configuration
Define Model Bench Tables
Project Options
Miscellaneous Options
Run Options
Haulage Options
Define Trucks
Define Shovels
Define Truck/Shovel Sets
Enter Average Haul Cycle Times
Define Optional Detailed Haulage Cycle Time
Locate Reserve Files
Select Grades
Define Production Classes
Define Phase (Labels)
Optional Control By Bench By Phase
Optional Control By Phase By Period
Define Destinations
Define Lift Capacities
Dumping Rate By Period
Define Mining Costs - Economics I
Set Variable Cost By Bench
Destination Economics - Economics II (Or Economics by Schedule Material
Type)
Define Precedence
Define Precedence By Period
Define Precedence By Bench
Schedule Title/Options By Period
Define Target Constraints
Balance Target
Production Class To Schedule Material Conversion
Launch Scheduler
Note that the items in normal font indicate necessary inputs. The items in an
underlined font represent optional secondary inputs. The items in italic font are optional
items for the inputs involving trucks, shovels and destinations. The sequence of data
preparation wizard dialogs is from top to bottom.
Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 12-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: Flow Chart of Viewing Results

Viewing Result s
Close Report Windows
View
Assumpt ions
View Det ailed
Audit Report
View St andard
Report
Flow Chart of Reporting

Report ing
Generat e
Report s
Generat e
Chart s
Export t o Excel
Spread Sheet
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-7
Notes:
Base Case Input
Base Case Input through the MS3D Strategic Scheduler Interface
<To access the Interface, click Start=>Program=>mnu821=>mnu821.
Click File=>New Project to get started.>
To enter the data and scheduling
parameters for our Base Case, we will
be selecting the input windows listed
under Data Preparation for Schedule
Calculations in Top-Down Order.
<Click Define Working Directoryto get
started; then for the successive windows,
click Next at the bottom of each window
to continue to the next dialog.>
Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 12-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: The following figures show the windows in Top-Down order, and the input
requirements for the base case schedule.
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-9
Notes:
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Page 12-10 Part #: E002 Rev. B
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-11
Notes:
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-13
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-19
Notes:
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Page 12-20 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: <Click Finish in the last input window.>
Before running the base case schedule, we will save the inputs to resource file Bcase.rs,
and to run file Run821.bc. <Do this by selecting File=>Save Project=>Project
Resource File and File=>Save Project=>Run file.
To compute the base case schedule, click Schedule Calculations.>
The standard M821 Report file (RPT821.TMP) will appear on the screen. A portion
is shown below.
* BASE CASE
SUMMARY OF MINING (PERIOD# 1 PRD1)
MIN & MAX TYPE 1 FEED TONS REQUIRED : 10000. 10000.
MIN & MAX TYPE 2 FEED TONS REQUIRED : 0. 0.
MIN & MAX WASTE TONS REQUIRED: 0. 400000.
PHASE BENCH %FEED1 %FEED2 %WMINE -FEED1- -> GRADES WASTE1
TOTAL STRIP
TONS CUIDS MOIDS _____ TONS TONS RATIO

PHS1 2660.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 0. 0.000 0.000 0.000 35. 107. 999.00
PHS1 2645.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 37. 0.679 0.097 0.000 1545. 2655. 70.56
PHS1 2630.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 1404. 0.869 0.137 0.000 1708. 7050. 4.02
PHS1 2615.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 2736. 0.944 0.126 0.000 699. 6572. 1.40
PHS1 2600.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 3122. 1.089 0.123 0.000 293. 5555. 0.78
PHS1 2585.0 0.871 0.000 0.871 2642. 1.058 0.119 0.000 105. 4011. 0.52
PHS1 SUB-TOTAL 9941. 1.008 0.125 0.000 4385. 25951. 1.61
PHS2 2660.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 0. 0.000 0.000 0.000 15. 74. 999.00
PHS2 2645.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 0. 0.000 0.000 0.000 716. 2254. 999.00
PHS2 2630.0 1.000 1.000 1.000 59. 0.678 0.075 0.000 1762. 4922. 82.70
PHS2 SUB-TOTAL 59. 0.678 0.075 0.000 2493. 7250. 122.29
PERIOD TOTAL 10000. 1.006 0.124 0.000 6878. 33201. 2.32
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-21
Notes: <To close the window showing the report, click Viewing results=>Close Report
Window.>
Sum821.rpt is an additional output file produced that is used to generate an Excel
Spreadsheet of the scheduling results and associated charts.
<To make the spreadsheet reports, click Reporting=>Export to Excel Spreadsheet.>
This will create the spreadsheet. <Answer YES to the query about saving changes to
Sum821.rpt. Then save them as file type Microsoft Excel Workbook, and as file name
Sum821.xls.> This file contains five worksheets:
Mining Results
Truck Usage
Shovel Usage
Destination Usage and Economics
Sum821
The information in the spreadsheet can then be used to generate a Summary Mining
Report which will be stored as an additional worksheet in the spreadsheet file. <Click
Reporting=>Generate reports.>
Make sure Sum821.xls is shown as the Spreadsheet file, and then highlight Summary
Mining Reports. Click Next. (See the figure below.)
Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 12-22 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
<Fill in the next window as shown below, using the Apply Selection button. Then
click the Produce Reports button.>
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Long Range Planning with MineSight Strategic Scheduler
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 12-23
Notes:
<Answer Yes to the Save Changes? query, and view the new worksheet called
Summary Mining Reports in Excel.> A portion of this worksheet is shown below:
Summary Mining
Period Ore1 Grade Grade Pounds Pounds Waste Total Strip
# (tons) CUIDS MOIDS CUIDS MOIDS Type 1 Tons Ratio

1 10000 1.006 0.124 221857 27415 6878 33200 2.32
2 19997 0.822 0.097 362374 42704 1779 29235 0.46
3 40001 0.695 0.088 612671 77220 59754 137125 2.43

Total 69998 0.776 0.095 1196901 147338 68411 199560 1.85

Summary Leach 2 Mining
Period Leach2 Grade Grade Pounds Pounds
# (tons) CUIDS MOIDS CUIDS MOIDS
1 10948 0.286 0.043 69114 10377
2 7460 0.296 0.032 48598 5280
3 37370 0.285 0.033 234708 26985
Total 55778 0.287 0.035 352419 42642

The scheduling results in the spreadsheet can also be displayed in chart form and
saved as another Worksheet in the file SUM821.xls. <To do this select Reporting =>
Generate Charts.>
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Page 12-24 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 13-1
Notes:
Introduction to the MineSight Interactive
Planner
Interactive Planner Object - Overview
Short and medium term mine planning is accomplished in MS3D using the Interactive
Planner Object (IP Object), which creates cuts and computes reserves for a mine model.
The plan parameters, cut geometry and attributes, and finally reserves are stored in an
ODBC compliant database that can be accessed by scripts, queries, reports, or third
party tools. Thus the reserves can be computed and displayed using a variety of
methods.
The IP Object data consists of Areas and Material Sets (which control reporting logic
and cutoff binning methodology), the cut geometry and attributes, and the reserves.
To begin, a connection needs to be made to the database and an IP Set must be
defined. The IP Set is the collection of IP Object data, as it exists in the database.
The reporting parameters and methodology for binning the reserves as defined by the
Areas and Material Sets are set in the IP Tool dialog. Cuts are made in the Cut Design
dialog by digitizing in the viewer or by selecting existing geometry objects. When a cut
is saved, reserves are computed based on the cuts Area and Material Set parameters
and the reserves are stored in the database. The reserves can be displayed in various
ways, either by using Script files supplied with MS3D or by accessing the database
using external software.
Initializing an IP Object
<Copy the sample database file Attrdb.mdb (provided with MS3D) to your working
directory and give it a suitable name. Create a new IP Object by selecting
File=>New=>Interactive Planner Object from the Data Manager. After selecting a
name for the IP Object you will be prompted to make a connection to your database
with the ODBC connection manager available under Windows. Make the connection by
selecting your Data Source from the list on the Machine Data Source page.>
Each IP Object corresponds to an IP Set in the database. The IP Set is the collection
of the IP Objects Areas, Material Sets, and cuts (geometry, attributes, and reserves).
The database may contain many IP Sets, each with a unique name; and one or many IP
Objects can reference each IP Set.
When the first IP Object is created, no IP Sets exist in the database. <Select Create
New for the type of IP Set and give the IP Set a name. Use Exposed Geometry for the
new set to store polygonal cuts as XYZ points in the database.> While this storing
method is less efficient, it allows external programs easier access to the data. The
Exposed Geometry option can only be assigned to a new IP Set and cannot be used to
change the store method for existing sets. If you do not want to access the polygonal cut
points from any external program, you do not need to choose this option.
If the database already contains IP Sets, you can choose to Clone an IP Set for use
with the new IP Object by selecting the set from the popdown. By default, all Areas,
Material Sets, and cuts will be cloned in the database and grouped into the new IP Set.
You can choose to clone only the sets Areas and Material Sets by toggling the Settings
Only option. Or you can choose to clone only some of the cuts by selecting the Filter
Attribute option. This allows you select cuts from the attributed database based on the
cut attributes location or cut attributes. <To filter by location, check the Constrain by
Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 13-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Location toggle, and fill in the appropriate coordinate limits. To filter by attribute,
select an attribute, an operation and a value (ie. SchedID = 5 or cutPerID Like
January).> You can create compound selections by choosing AND or OR, and
specifying another attribute selection.
Similarly, you can connect to an existing IP Set (also selected from the popdown) or
to a subset of an existing IP Set (using Filter Geom). But the new IP Object can modify
changes to cuts shared by other IP Objects, so connecting to an existing IP Set should be
used with caution.
IP Tool
After creating an IP Set or when an IP Object is opened from the Data Manager, the
IP Tool dialog is activated. The Areas and Material Sets for the IP Object are defined in
this dialog. Closing the IP Tool dialog will close the IP Object and vice versa.
An Area is a reference to a model and the items in the model and specifies the
parameters that control reporting logic such as the grade, topography percent, and
whether or not the grade is averaged or accumulated.
A Material Set is based on a single Area and defines the cutoff logic for the Areas
grade item, the binning methodology, and the density specified by the zone/rock code.
At least one Area and Material Set must exist in order to define cuts. A cut always
references a Material Set and a Material Set always references an Area. Thus, each cut
corresponds to exactly one Material Set and exactly one Area.
The IP Tool dialog opens on the Area notebook page. Start by defining an Area. Fill
out the values on the Area tab and save the area. Once an Area is defined, move to the
Material Sets page and build one or more Material Sets based on the Area.
When at least one Material Set is defined, use the Design Cuts button to activate the
Cut Design dialog.
Note that the File menu options New, Open, Save, Save As, and Delete and their
corresponding tool bar buttons operate according to the current page in the notebook.
For example, if the Area page is current, then File=>New will create a new (blank)
Area and File=>Save will save the current Area. Delete allows you choose which Area
or Material Set to delete.
Deleting an Area or Material Set will automatically delete all corresponding cuts. A
notice will appear displaying the number of cuts, or in the case of deleting an Area, the
number of cuts and Material Sets, which will also be deleted.
Area
An Area references the model for which reserves will be computed. Thus a model
view and at least one Grade Item must be selected in order to define an Area. All other
items on the Area page are, in general, optional.
For most mine planning, a single Area definition is sufficient. It is, however, possible
to define multiple Areas to correspond to different models if, for example, you have two
deposits separated by a large distance that are being mined simultaneously. In this case,
the Areas and models need to have the same items (e.g., thickness, topo, copper, gold,
etc.).
Reserves can be computed for plan or sectional planes in a 3DBM or for levels in a
GSM model view. The model view will automatically be opened when selected. Only
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 13-3
Notes:
model views based on a file 15 (3DBM or GSM) are allowed. Note that cuts can occur
on any model bench or section regardless of the display range in the model view
definition.
The selected model view determines the items available for the Area definition. In
addition, the model dimensions control possible cut locations and slice thickness. The
cuts are on planes corresponding to the model bench or level or, if using a 3DBM with
sectional planes, to the EW or NS sectional grids. The reserves will be computed based
on the items and extent of the selected model.
Note that some Area options are disabled, notably Grid Set and Partials Mapping.
These options will be available in future upgrades.
The Thickness Item will be used for the cut thickness and will override the bench
height or sectional width. You must specify a Thickness Item (e.g., LNGTH) when
using a GSM model view.
You can also specify a Volume Reduction or Mined Out item. This would be a
percentage item (i.e., a model item with a minimum value of zero and a maximum value
of 1 or 100), which contains the percent of the model block that exists (Volume
Reduction) or the percent that is missing (Mined Out). To account for Topo% in the
block model, use the Volume Reduction toggle. To account for a mined out percent in
an underground operation, use the Mined Out toggle.
The Number of Slices is the number of slices through each model block when
computing partials for polygonal cuts (partials for solid cuts use the project subcell
count for volume calculations, available under File=>Project Settings=>Volumes).
The slice direction can be switched by toggling Switch Slice Direction. For
example, given a planar cut, the partials slices are usually in the EW direction and
spaced NS. However, if the cut is very long in the EW direction and short in the NS
direction, you could switch the direction and use NS slices to better compute the
partials. The slice directions are shown as a function of cut orientation in the table
below.

North
East

Cut

model blocks
Sices
Planar Cut - EW slices spaced NS (switch off)
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Page 13-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:

North
East

model blocks
Sices
Planar Cut - NS slices spaced EW (switch on)
Cut

The Area also has a single Ore Item consisting of a set of model view items and
parameters that determine the reserves binning methodology.
Only a Grade Item is required to define an Ore Item. The other parameters are
optional. The cutoffs for the Grade Item are set when the Material Set is defined. Note
that up to 20 Grade Items can be selected. The first one is referenced when specifying
cutoff values on the Material Set cutoff table. To compute reserves based on an
accumulated grade (as opposed to an average grade), toggle the Accum box to the right
of the Grade Item. This could be used to accumulate Ounces/block or Barrels of
Oil/block.
The Zone Item is a model item containing integer values corresponding to the Value
in the Material Set definition. If no Zone Item is specified the material will be assigned
to the default zone in the Material Set. Obviously only one zone, the default, will be
used for binning if no Zone Item is specified.
The Ore% Item is a percent item containing the percent ore per model block. The
tonnage in the block based on the Ore% item and the associated grade will get reported
to the ore class (if defined), and the remaining material, with 0.0 grade, will be reported
to the default material.
The Density Item is the model item used to compute the tonnage and will override the
Density in the Material Set definition. If an Ore% Item is also selected, the reported
waste tonnage will use the density of the default Zone in the Material Set. The Density
Item can be one of three types: Tonnage Factor (TF), Specific Gravity (SG), or Factor
which would usually be used to indicate that the Density Item values correspond to the
actual tonnage in the block.

Partials Slice Direction as a Function of Cut Orientation and Switch Toggle

Cut Orientation Switch OFF Switch ON
Planar EW slices spaced NS NS slices spaced EW
EW EW slices spaced vertically Up and down slices spaced EW
NS NS slices spaced vertically Up and down slices spaced NS
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 13-5
Notes:
Material Set
Every cut has an associated Material Set. Therefore, at least one Material Set must
exist before cuts can be defined.
An Area can have multiple Material Sets in order to specify different reserves logic
within an Area. Thus reserves could be reported for one period with a certain set of
cutoffs and for a different period with another set of cutoffs. However, this is not the
usual case and, in general, only a single Material Set would be defined.
To define a Material Set, first select an Area and then define the zones in the table.
Up to 100 zones are allowed in each Material Set.
Each zone has a Zone Name which is the label used for reporting this zone. Any row
in the table with a non-blank Zone Name will be part of the Material Set. One of the
zones must be the default where material will go that doesnt fit in any other zone. It is
typical that a Material Set would have at least one zone corresponding to waste.
A zone also has a Value which is a non-negative integer corresponding to the models
Zone Item value, a Density which is used to compute tonnage if the Area does not have
a Density Item, and Cutoffs.
The cutoffs correspond to the Areas first Grade Item and will be sorted into
increasing order when the Material Set is saved. Note that zero is not automatically
inserted as one of the cutoff bins in order to allow negative cutoffs, and you should
generally have a zero cutoff. If you forgot to add zero, insert it at the end and save.
Properties
The properties of the IP Objects underlying Geometry View can be modified via
Edit=>Properties. The IP Object display can be styled by the selected Material Type
or by cutoffs assigned to any of the cut attributes (see Cut Design Attributes).
Recompute Reserves
You can recompute reserves by selecting Edit=>Recompute Reserves. Reserves
will be recomputed for all cuts in the database that reference the current Material Set
displayed on the Materials Sets page.
Cut Design
<Activate the Cut Design dialog by clicking the Design Cuts button on the IP Tool.>
You can minimize the IP Tool at this point, but closing the tool will close the IP Object.
Before designing cuts, defaults need to be set on the Defaults page. The default
parameters will be assigned to cuts when they are created, but, except for the Plane
Label, all the values can be changed when defining new cuts or editing existing cuts.
The Cut Design dialog operates on one cut called the Current Cut shown on the
Design page. From this page you can either edit a cut loaded from the list of existing
cuts on the Cuts page (File=>Open) or design a new cut using existing geometry
(File=>Geometry to cut) or by digitizing a cut in the viewer (File=>New). Note that
each of these options also has a corresponding icon on the tool bar.
When the parameters for the Current Cut are final, save the cut via File=>Save or
the corresponding tool bar button. The Current Cut will be moved into the cut list.
Reserves will automatically be computed for the saved cut and you also have the option
of running selected scripts as specified on the Scripts page when the cut is saved.
Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 13-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: Each cut has five required attributes (Cut Name, Material Set, Plane Label, Mining
Area, and Period ID). You can add additional attributes as described below under
Attributes. The cut can be given a name automatically using the Cut Auto-naming
function described below under Defaults, or you can enter a name, or leave it blank. The
cut name is to help you distinguish cuts in the cut list. Each cut must have an associated
Material Set. The Plane label is determined by the cut geometry and orientation set on
the Cut Options page and is not editable. Additionally each cut has a Mining area and
Period ID. The list of available values for these attributes is defined on the Defaults
page.
Defaults
The first time cuts are designed, a Mining Area ( note: this is not the same as the
Area defined in the IP Tool) and Period ID need to be set.
Mining Area would usually be used to describe a mining location. In an open pit
mine, the Mining Area would normally be the pushback ID or phase ID. For an
underground mine, it would normally describe the operating level or stoping area.
Period ID would typically be used to describe a period in which the cut would be
mined such as the day, week, month, or year. No attempt is made by to use the ID in any
way other than as a description. It could also be used to describe any other attribute
the user wants to associate with the cut.
A Mining Area or Period ID can be defined by clicking the Add button next to the
corresponding text field. <To remove a Mining Area or Period ID, click the Delete
button.> You can select one or all areas or IDs to delete from the list. Right clicking on
the list activates the Select All or Unselect All menu options. The number of cuts having
the selected areas or IDs is also displayed. Note that all cuts corresponding to the
deleted areas or IDs will also be deleted.
There is a provision for auto-naming cuts. Although a cut name is not required, it is
recommended to help distinguish cuts in the cut list. Auto-naming allows the
assignment of a prefix and suffix string attached to an integer value. As new cuts are
defined, the cuts will automatically be named prefix + value + suffix and the integer
value will be incremented by one.
The cut Clipping options and Model Selectability are not yet available.
Cut Options
The cut can be either a Polygon or a Solid (the 2D Extrude option is not yet
available). Only select Solid if you have existing solid geometry objects to be used in
conjunction with the File=>Geometry to Cut option as described below.
For new polygons, you can assign the cut orientation for the purpose of computing
partials. For most situations, the orientation should be computed from the cut. You can,
however, override the computed orientation and assign the cut orientation, if for
example, the cut is not quite planar.
The selected or computed orientation is displayed as part of the cuts Plane Label.
Once the orientation is assigned, it cannot be changed.
Attributes
In addition to the five required attributes (Cut Name, Material Set, Plane Label,
Mining Area, and Period ID), you can add or delete custom attributes to your IP Object.
Each cut will then be assigned a value for the new custom attribute. You can also add
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 13-7
Notes:
custom attributes after cuts have been defined. These attributes can be accessed in the
script files and external programs that use the database.
To add custom attributes, the attributes must already exist in your database. You can
add or edit the database attributes by clicking Edit on the Attributes page to activate the
Attribute Editor.
<To add custom attributes from the database to the IP Object, click the Add button. If
your database does not have any additional attributes, you will need to add some using
Edit as described above. Otherwise check the box next to the attributes to add.> The
database default values for each attribute are shown, but you can change the default for
the cuts in the current IP Object. The value for the added attributes will be applied to all
existing cuts and become the default value for all new cuts. At any time you can change
the default value on the Attributes page without affecting the default for the database
attribute and the default will be applied to new cuts. The value for individual cuts can be
modified by editing the cut.
<To delete attributes, click the Delete button and select the attributes to remove.>
The attribute values will be removed from all the IP Objects cuts in the database.
Scripts
Script files are used to conveniently display the calculated reserves.
Select an Accumulation Script using the file chooser. The Autorun option will run the
script whenever a new cut is opened or a value is changed for the Current Cut or if the
cut geometry is edited. If Autorun is not toggled, you can run the script at your
convenience by clicking the Sigma (sum) button on either the Scripts page or the tool
bar.
Up to three additional scripts can be selected. These scripts will be run when their
corresponding Go button is clicked or when a cut is saved if the Run on Save toggle is
checked. These scripts would normally be one of the following: Reporting to file (ip-
report.py), plotting to the viewer (ip-label.py), or generating an Excel file of reserves.
Design
New cuts are created or existing cuts edited on the Design page.
A new cut can be digitized in the viewer by selecting File=>New or the New Cut
button on the tool bar.
When working in 3D mode, it is best to first place an edit grid on the plane you wish
to work on, and then turn on Plane Snap. MS-IP can also be run in 2D mode, which will
make plane selection automatic. Click in the viewer to digitize a closed planar polygon.
When you finish digitizing by clicking right in the viewer, the cut is added to the
Current Cut table on the Design page. The cut will have default values for all the
required attributes and any custom attributes in the IP Object. All items except the Plane
Label are editable.
A new cut can also be defined using existing geometry by using File=>Geometry
to Cut or the Geometry button on the tool bar. If Solid is selected as the Cut Type on
the Cut Options page then you must select a solid geometry object. If Polygon is
selected, then the geometry object must be a polygon. As with digitizing a polygon, the
orientation shown in the Plane Label will correspond to the Orientation selected on the
Cut Options page regardless of the polygons actual orientation.
<Save the cut by selecting File=>Save or the Save button on the tool bar.> The cut
will be moved to the table on the Cuts page and its reserves will be calculated based on
Introduction to the MineSight Interactive Planner Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 13-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
the cuts Material Set (and thus the cuts Area) and the cuts geometry and the reserves
will be stored in the database.
The Current Cuts geometry can be edited using the usual MS3D CAD tools via the
Edit Geom button at the bottom of the Design page.
Cuts
All the cuts in the IP Object are displayed in the table on the Cuts page.
The cuts can be sorted by clicking on the column heading and reverse sorted by
clicking the heading again.
A cut can be edited by selecting it in the table and choosing File=>Open or the Open
button on the tool bar, or by right clicking in the table and selecting Open Cut. This will
move the cut into the Current Cut on the Design page where the cuts values can be
changed or its geometry edited. Saving the cut will recompute its reserves.
One or more cuts can be deleted from the IP Object by selecting them in the table and
choosing File=>Delete or the Delete button on the tool bar or by right clicking in the
table and selecting Delete Cuts.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Quarterly Planning with MS-IP
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-1
Notes:
Quarterly Planning with MS-IP
Learning Objectives
When you have completed this section you will:
A. Be able to create an ODBC connection to an existing database file
B. Create an Interactive Planner Object in MS3D
C. Generate short term planning cuts and reports
ODBC Connection
Prior to using the MineSight Interactive Planning Tool, it is necessary to create a
connection to the Attributed Database using the ODBC Manager in Windows. This can
be done outside of MineSight using Settings=>Control Panel=>Data Sources
(ODBC); alternatively, the ODBC connection can be initialized within MineSight, as
shown in this exercise.
The default Attributed Database is distributed with MineSight and is called
attrib.mdb. <Copy this file from the winexe folder to your project folder and give it an
appropriate name (well use msopip.mdb). Now, from within the MineSight Data
Manager, create a new folder called short term plans. Highlight this new folder, click
right and select New=>Interactive Planner Object. You will be prompted for a
name for the new object; enter msop plan 1 and click OK.> You are now prompted for
the Data Source. You can use an existing ODBC connection or create a new connection
in this dialog. Use the following steps to create a new ODBC connection.
1. On the Machine Data Source tab, click New
2. Select System Data Source as the data source type and click Next
3. Select Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb) and click Next
4. Click Finish
5. Enter an appropriate Data Source name; this is the name youll use when selecting
this Data Source in future.
Well use msopip as the Data Source name
6. Enter an optional description for this data source, if desired
7. Under Database, click the Select button
8. Choose the msopip.mdb database file form the project folder
9. Click OK to finish creating the ODBC connection
10. You can now select the newly created ODBC connection and click OK
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Page 14-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Initializing the IP Object
At this point, we need to specify a name for the IP Set; lets use msop01 as the IP Set
name. The IP Set is the collection of the IP Objects Areas, Material Sets, and cuts
(geometry, attributes, and reserves). The database may contain many IP Sets, each with
a unique name; and one or many IP Objects can reference each IP Set. <Click OK to
create the IP Set and go into the IP Tool.>
The next step is to create an Area; an Area is a reference to a model and the items in
the model and specifies the parameters that control reporting logic such as the grade,
topography percent, and whether or not the grade is averaged or accumulated.
To create an Area, we need to specify a Model View - the selected Model View will
be automatically opened when selected. Once the Model View is selected, specify a
thickness item if applicable, a TOPO or Mined Out item, and the desired Zone and
Grade items. For this example, well use TOPO, ORE as the Zone item, and Grade items
CUIDS, MOIDS, and EQCU; dont accumulate any of the grades. <Save the Area with
File=>Save or the Save icon. Accept the default name for this exercise.
Now, click on the Material Sets tab to set up the Material Set.> A Material Set is
based on a single Area and defines the cutoff logic for the Areas grade item, the
binning methodology, and the density specified by the zone/rock code. Fill out the
Material Set tab as shown in the following table:
Zone name Value Default Density Cutoff Cutoff Cutoff Cutoff
proven 1 2.7 0 0.3 0.6 1
probable 2 2.7 0 0.3 0.6 1
possible 3 2.7 0 0.3 0.6 1
waste 4 R 2.7 0 - - -

<Specify an Area (Area1) and save the Material Set as matset1. Click the Design
Cuts button.>
Cut Design
Before actually creating cuts, its necessary to set some default values, and you may
also wish to set some optional attributes as well. <To set the defaults, click the Defaults
tab.>
The first time cuts are designed; a Mining Area (note: this is not the same as the
Area defined in the IP Tool) and Period ID need to be set.
The Mining Area would usually be used to describe a mining location. In an open pit
mine, the Mining Area could be the pushback ID or phase ID. For an underground mine,
it could describe the operating level or stoping area.
Period ID would typically be used to describe a period in which the cut would be
mined such as the day, week, month, or year. No attempt is made by to use the ID in any
way other than as a description. It could also be used to describe any other attribute
that the user wants to associate with the cut.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Quarterly Planning with MS-IP
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-3
Notes:
A Mining Area or Period ID is defined by clicking the Add button next to the
corresponding text field. <To remove a Mining Area or Period ID, click the Delete
button.> You can select one or all areas or IDs to delete from the list. Right clicking on
the list activates the Select All or Unselect All menu options. The number of cuts having
the selected areas or IDs is also displayed. Note that all cuts corresponding to the
deleted areas or IDs will also be deleted.
There is also a provision for auto-naming cuts on the Defaults tab. Although the cut
name is optional, it is strongly recommended to help distinguish cuts in the cut list.
Auto-naming allows the assignment of a prefix and suffix string attached to an integer
value. As new cuts are defined, the cuts will automatically be named prefix + value +
suffix and the integer value will be incremented by one.
Attributes
<To set cut attributes, click on the Attributes tab.> In addition to the five required
attributes (Cut Name, Material Set, Plane Label, Mining Area, and Period ID), you can
add or delete custom attributes in your IP Object. Each cut will then be assigned a value
for the new custom attribute. You can also add custom attributes after cuts have been
defined. These attributes can be accessed in the script files and external programs that
use the database. To add custom attributes, the attributes must already exist in your
database. You can add or edit the database attributes by clicking Edit on the Attributes
page to activate the Attribute Editor.
<To add custom attributes from the database to the IP Object, click the Add button.>
If your database does not have any additional attributes, you will need to add some
using Edit as described above. Otherwise check the box next to the attributes to add.
The database default values for each attribute are shown, but you can change the default
for the cuts in the current IP Object. The value for the added attributes will be applied to
all existing cuts and become the default value for all new cuts. At any time you can
change the default value on the Attributes page without affecting the default for the
database attribute and the default will be applied to new cuts. The value for individual
cuts can be modified by editing the cut.
<To delete attributes, click the Delete button and select the attributes to remove.>
The attribute values will be removed from all the IP Objects cuts in the database. Once
the Defaults and Attributes have been specified, its time to begin creating cuts.
Scripts
MineSight 3-D includes a number of generic Python scripts for working with models
and reserves. For this exercise, well use two scripts from the folder
winexe\scripts\reserves, ip-report.py and ip-allflatreport.py. The first script displays a
screen report similar to that from previous IP versions, while the second generates a
report that is easily imported to a spreadsheet program such as Microsoft

Excel for
convenient post-processing. <Set the scripts on the Scripts tab of the IP Tool; use
ip-report.py as the Accumulation script, and ip-flatreport as the first Additional script;
check the boxes so that the scripts will run automatically on Save.>
Creating Cuts
New cuts are created or existing cuts edited on the Design page. A new cut can be
digitized in the viewer by selecting File=>New or the New Cut button on the tool bar.
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Page 14-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes: When working in 3D mode, it is best to first place an edit grid on the plane on which
you wish to work, and then turn on Plane Snap. MS-IP can also be run in 2D mode,
which will make plane selection automatic. Click in the viewer to digitize a closed
planar polygon. When you finish digitizing by clicking right in the viewer, the cut is
added to the Current Cut table on the Design page. The cut will have default values for
all the required attributes and any custom attributes in the IP Object. All items except
the Plane Label are editable.
A new cut can also be defined using existing geometry by using File=>Geometry to
Cut or the Geometry button on the tool bar. If Solid is selected as the Cut Type on the
Cut Options page then you must select a solid geometry object. If Polygon is selected,
then the geometry object must be a polygon. As with digitizing a polygon, the
orientation shown in the Plane Label will correspond to the Orientation selected on the
Cut Options page regardless of the polygons actual orientation.
<Save the cut by selecting File=>Save or the Save button on the tool bar.> The cut
will be moved to the table on the Cuts page and its reserves will be calculated based on
the cuts Material Set (and thus the cuts Area) and the cuts geometry and the reserves
will be stored in the database. The Current Cuts geometry can be edited using the usual
MS3D CAD tools via the Edit Geom button at the bottom of the Design page.
All the cuts in the IP Object are displayed in the table on the Cuts page. The cuts can
be sorted by clicking on the column heading and reverse sorted by clicking the heading
again. A cut can be selected for edited by choosing it in the table and clicking
File=>Open or the Open button on the tool bar, or by right clicking in the table and
selecting Open Cut. This will move the cut into the Current Cut on the Design page
where the cuts values can be changed or its geometry edited. Saving the cut will
recompute its reserves.
One or more cuts can be deleted from the IP Object by selecting them in the table and
choosing File=>Delete or the Delete button on the tool bar or by right clicking in the
table and selecting Delete Cuts.
Exercise
Short-Term Planning
Use MS-IP to split the long-the term annual plan for Year Two into four quarterly plans.
GIVEN: Long-term plan for Year Two (see Table 1), where three phases (892, 894 and
896) are active.
Year Two Totals: 25000 KTonnes Ore
20480 KTonnes Waste
REQUIRED: Segment the Year Two Mining Plan into four quarterly plans using
MS-IP
Quarterly Targets: 6250 KTonnes Ore
5120 KTonnes Waste
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Quarterly Planning with MS-IP
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-5
Notes:
Viewer Setup
<Attach the Grid Set igp.vbm_gridset to the MineSight Viewer, if it is not already
attached. Orient the Viewer so that the view is planar with a current plane of 2660 and
place the Viewer in 2D mode. Open the objects 892, 894, 896, and 901; adjust the
properties of the Model View so that youre viewing the ORE item limited by TOPO
greater than 0.1%.> Well begin by mining the 892 phase at this level.
1. Open the Interactive Planner Object msop plan 1.
2. Confirm that the Area and Material Set definitions are correct.
3. Click the Design Cuts button and confirm that the Attributes, Numbering and
Scripts are as desired.
4. Select the 892 contour at the 2660 level using the Geometry to cut function.
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Page 14-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
5. When you accept the cut, the requested report window(s) will be displayed,
depending on the selected reporting script. The report from the ip-report.py script
is displayed here; this is an ASCII text file called report.txt. This report, shown
below, indicates that our first cut contains just over 109 kTons, all of which is
waste.
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-7
Notes:
6. Save the cut, and another report is generated, again depending on the script chosen.
The report from the ip-allflatreport.py script is another ASCII text file,
reportallflat.txt. At this point, the cut is also moved from current status and is
listed on the Cuts tab of the IP Tool.
7. Change the level to 2645 and repeat steps 4 through 6 above.
8. The report for the 892 phase at 2645 level is shown here: this reports shows that
our total waste for the first two cuts is just over 1060 kTons, and we have now
mined just under 600 kTons of ore out of the 6250 kTon target.
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Page 14-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Quarterly Planning with MS-IP
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-9
Notes:
We have now mined a total of just over 599 kTon of the 6250 kTon required for our
quarterly schedule, so we can change to the 2630 level and repeat steps 4 through 6
again: The resulting report is displayed below.
The report indicates that we have now mined a total of 4237.5 kTon, so in order to
meet our quarterly goal, we only need an additional (6250 - 4237.5) = 2012.5 kTon.
Lets move down to the 2615 level and repeat steps 4 through 6 to obtain this remaining
ore.
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Page 14-10 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
When we choose the 892 phase at 2615, we find that we now have well over the
requirements for the quater. So well need to edit the cut. <To do this, click the Edit
geom button in the MS IP Tool; this will put the new cut into Selection mode, allowing
access to the full range of MS3-D editing tools. Well adjust the size of the cut using
these tools, eventually ending with just the Southern portion of the phase.>
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-11
Notes:
<Delete points as necessary around the North side of phase 892; each time you save
your edits, a new report will be generated with updated values.>The final cut outline to
reach our target of 6250 kTons is shown below.
The resulting report is displayed and indicates that although we have reached our
target of 6250 kTons of ore, we are short on the scheduled tonnage of waste, having
only 3306.7 kTons out of the scheduled 5120 kTons.
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Page 14-12 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
To acquire the necessary waste to meet our schedule target, well go back up to the
2645 level and mine the area between the 892 and 894 phases. This time well digitize
our cut, outlining the area between the 89, 894, and 901 features on the 2645 level, as
shown below. Use a combination of line snap and polyline snap to aid you in the task.
The report from cut % indicates that we are still a bit short on our waste target (5120 -
4363.6 = 483.4 kTons).
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Quarterly Planning with MS-IP
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 14-13
Notes:
Well move down to the 2630 level in order to access the waste to finish out our
quarterly schedule. Repeat the previous steps, and the report indicates that taking all of
the material at level 2630 will give us 6767.5 kTons of waste, so we again will edit the
cut, yielding a final cut with its report. Note that a small additional amount of ore was
mined in order to meet the quarterly waste target.
Quarterly Planning with MS-IP Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 14-14 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Plotting in MineSight 3-D
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 15-1
Notes:
Plotting in MineSight 3-D
Learning Objectives
MineSight 3-D has a convenient, simple interface for producing scaled plots using the
data that is displayed in the viewer. When you have completed this section, you will
know how to:
A. Set up the Title Block and Legend (if desired).
B. Set up the Plot Layout itself, using the desired Title Block, Legend, and Area(s).
Title Blocks
Title Blocks are one type of text data object in MineSight 3-D; other text data
includes labels such as Drillhole labels and User labels, which are used as annotation.
<To create a new Title Block, highlight the desired folder in the Data Manager, click
right, and choose New I Title Block. Name the Title block and click OK; then double-
click on the Title Block name in the Data Manager.> This will bring up the Title Block
Editor, shown below. The Title Block Editor dialog consists of two main tabs, the Title
tab and the Info tab. The Title tab is on top by default, and is where the actual creation
of the title block occurs, so that will be the main focus of this section.
The Title tab
The Title tab consists of two main areas: the large window on the left is a
representation of the Title Block, where the various entries can be edited, while the right
side of the tab has a number of toggles and windows for specification of the Title Block
size, text size and text alignment. A second window at the bottom of the right side
contains a list of the variables that can be used to automatically include selected project
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Page 15-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
information in the Title Block. A number of these listed variables are brought up as
defaults when the Title Block Editor is invoked, including the date, time and scale
factors in the x and y directions.
Creation of the Title Block generally begins with the entry of a project name in the
designated field; if a different layout of information is desired, the defaults can be edited
by clicking the desired field and typing over the default entries. If different formats for
the project data are desired, the list in the right hand window provides the variables for
the most commonly used data formats. Again, these can be edited by clicking in the
desired field and typing over the default entries. This section of the Title tab also
contains buttons that can be used to add, remove or move columns and/or rows in the
Title Block. As an example, the figure below shows the initial setup for a Title Block for
a project called Mintec inc., using a month/day/year date format and an hours/minutes
format for the time. In addition, we have chosen to add entries for the maximum and
minimum plot extents in both the x and y directions.
The right side of the Title tab allows the user to set specifications for the Row Height,
Font Size, Font Alignment, and Column Width. There are four default fonts from which
to choose; however, you can gain access to all the fonts on your system by adding an
entry to your System Registry. When changes are made in these windows, it is
necessary to either press the Tab or Enter key to set the changes before moving to
another row. Row Height and Font Size are based on rows; all boxes in the same row
will have the same height and font size. The Total Width and Total Height, displayed at
the top of this section, are calculated depending on the specifications in the windows
below and the number of rows and columns. The Title Block dimensions are calculated
and stored in absolute units - you specify whether to use centimeters or inches.
Note: this window does not visibly reflect the changes in Row or Column width and
height. To see these changes click on the Preview button.
The Info Tab
The second tab in the Title Block Editor is the Info tab, which displays relevant
information about the Title Block data object. This information includes the Name of
the Title Block, the data type, location, and size; in addition, the time and date of
creation and most recent editing are also displayed. Finally, there is a large window that
is available for the entry of User Notes. <When the Title Block has been created, click
on the Applybutton, then the Closebutton to return to your MineSight 3-D project.>
Legends
A Legend is a type of data object that can be inserted into a MineSight 3-D Plot
Layout; just as with other data objects, it is created from the Data Manager. <To create
a Legend object, highlight the desired folder in the Data Manager, click right, and
choose New I Legend.>
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 15-3
Notes:
The Properties dialog for the Legend object can be accessed by double clicking on
the Legend name in the Data Manager, or by clicking right and selecting Properties. The
Common tab allows you to define the type of data the Legend will display (Company
Logo, Cutoff Table, Drillhole View, or Model View).
Each of the choices on the Common tab activates a corresponding definition tab.
Each of the different definitions presents the selected data in a different way, and these
are shown in the figures that follow.

A Company Logo or
any other *.jpg or
*.png image file can
be inserted. This logo
can then be positioned
and/or resized as
necessary in the Plot
Layout.
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Page 15-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:

A MineSight Cutoff
Item can be
specified as the
source for the
Legend data. Either
Colors or Patterns
can be chosen for
cutoff

The Drillhole
option creates a
display showing
the name of the
DH View and any
Strips or Labels
defined.
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 15-5
Notes:

The Model
option creates a
display showing
the name of the
Model View and
the Item defining
the Display
Cutoffs.
Once you have built your Legend and are satisfied with the preview, be sure to click
Apply, then Close. We will insert the Legend into our Plot Layout as part of the next
step.
Plot Layouts
Plot Layouts are an arrangement of areas, defined and positioned using the Plot
Layout Editor. Areas can be Title Blocks or Viewers, either the current Viewer or any
other Viewer in the project. Plot Layouts are created by highlighting the desired folder
in the Data Manager, clicking right and selecting New I Plot Layout. Access the Plot
Layout Editor by highlighting the desired plot layout in the Data Manager, clicking
right, and choosing Properties from the dropdown menu. Like the Title Block editor, the
plot layout Editor also consists of two tabs the Layout tab and Info tab. The Layout
tab (shown on the next page) is where the Plot Layout creation takes place, so this will
be the main focus of our discussion.
The Layout tab
The Layout tab has two sub-tabs, the Page tab and the Area tab.
Area tab
The Layout Area tab permits a wide range of flexibility in the selection and
positioning of different areas in the scaled plot. By default, a plot contains one area that
consists of the currently active Viewer; the yellow icon on the Area tab represents this
Viewer in the Plot Layout Editor.
In order to change the Area properties, it is necessary to select the area by clicking
left on the Area tab, activating the configuration options (see display image on next
page). To change the area boundaries on the plotted page, click left on one of the drag
handles visible when the area is selected, and drag it to the desired position. The entire
area can be moved on the page by clicking anywhere else on the area and dragging it to
the desired location. Precise values for these options can also be entered in the windows,
using either absolute units (inches or centimeters, depending on the project units) or as a
percentage of the plot size. The six buttons at the top of the panel control the directions
available for direct configuration; the top row controls horizontal configuration options,
while the bottom row of buttons controls vertical configuration options. To disallow
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Notes:
moving an area, click the Lock Area checkbox. The draggability and configuration
options apply only to the selected area if there is more than one area in the Plot Layout.
The area list contains the various areas (Viewers, Title Block, Legends, etc.) currently
loaded to the Plot Layout. Additional viewers and other plot layout components can be
added, removed or rearranged using the icons on the right side of the list.
The Move Area buttons control the relative position of overlapping areas; clicking the
Up button brings the selected area up one layer, while clicking the Top button moves
the selected area to the top of the stack. Similarly, clicking the Down button moves the
selected area down one layer, while the Bottom button moves the selected area to the
bottom of the stack. To implement the selected configuration options, click the Apply
button.
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 15-7
Notes:
Add a new area with the plus icon; the new object will be a Current Viewer by
default, but once it is selected you can change its type to a named Viewer, a Title Block,
a North Arrow or a scale bar, then resize and place it as desired. Remove the selected
Area with the minus icon.
By default, the main viewers grid set is the controlling grid set. You can also select a
named viewer in the plot layout window and then check use the viewer areas grid
set box. The grid set used as the controlling grid set is the one from which plane(s) to
be plotted are selected. If you want to use the grid set limits, make the additional
settings in the Plot Settings window as described below.
By default, MineSight 3-D will automatically calculate the most appropriate scale,
depending on the page size and Viewer zoom setting. The scale is based on the project
units, either inches or millimeters.
Page tab
The second portion of the Layout tab is the Page tab, shown below. Under the Layout
tab, the Page tab allows the specification of page size and orientation using two
windows with drop-down menu selections. If none of the standard paper size selections
are appropriate, selection of the custom option activates selection windows for user
entry of page width, height and appropriate units. Orientation selections are Portrait and
Landscape. For the explanation of the Plot Page Settings button, see the following
section.
Plot Page Settings button on the Page Tab
If you want to use the grid set limits or defined limits as the limits of your plot, you
must do these things:
<On the Area tab, verify that the main viewer is the controlling viewer of the
layout, that it has an associated grid set, and that it is set for orthographic
projection on the view options tab of the viewer properties dialog.
On the Area tab, check the box to Use Grid Set or Defined Limits and make sure
the radio button is checked to use the main viewer areas grid set
On the Area tab, choose the two center area configuration icons.> These represent
distance from the left and right edges of the paper to the plot, and the distance
from top and bottom edges of the paper to the plot.
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< Set the distances to some small percentage, such as 5% or 10%.> Using these
settings will allow the page size to change with the scale.
<Now click on the Pagetab, and click on the Plot Page Settings button.> A new
dialog will come up. Leave the radio button checked to Use Viewer Grid Set limits. In
this case, only the scale, text size and text width factors are enabled. You can set the
scale here and plots will be made at the specified scale. The actual size of the plot will
depend on the size of the grid set at the chosen scale.
The line width factor is used to specify the relative thickness of lines plotted vs. their
thickness on screen. If you would like polylines to plot thicker than they currently do,
increase this factor. In both the plot preview and the actual plot, the line thickness will
be increased.
The text width factor can be increased to plot text larger than it appears on the screen
as well.
To plot the Layout, choose one of the options under the Print button; the Printer
selection sends the plot to the system default printer, while the HPGL or PostScript
options allow saving the plot to a file. If you want to save your plotting specifications,
click the Save Set button. Give the set a descriptive name. You can then return to the
plot layout at a later date and choose this set from the Plot Settings Set pulldown menu.
When finished plotting, click the Close button.
Exercise
In this exercise, you will learn how to create simple plot layouts containing title
blocks, multiple viewers, scale bar, and more.
A. <If necessary, turn off the axes by selecting File I Project settings. Click the
Properties tab, and uncheck the Show Axes option.
B. Double click on Geometry Object 901 to activate its properties. Change the
topography contours to brown, and add line elevations. Adjust the size of the
labels.> Recall that these changes are made in the Object Properties dialog.
C. <Set the viewers Azimuth to 0 and the Dip to -90.
D. In the Data Manager, create a new folder called PLOTS.
E. Highlight the folder PLOTS, click right, and select New I Plot Layout. Name
this first layout SET1.
F. Double click on SET1 to activate its properties. Click the Print button and then
the Previewoption.>
What you see is exactly what is shown in the only active MineSight viewer.
Scaled Plots
Now, lets create a scaled plot in a specific paper size and layout position. To
accomplish this, do the following:
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 15-9
Notes:
A. <In the same plot layout (SET1), set the page size to D, by scrolling down the
first down arrow on the Page tab. Set the position to Landscapeby scrolling
down the second down arrow.
B. Click the Plot Page Settings button and enter 5000 for both axes. Press the Tab
key when done entering the scale. Click Apply, then OK.
C. Go to Print I Preview to see the preview of the scaled plot of your topography
contours with line elevations.>
Note: The Preview window can be maximized by double clicking on the title bar.
Creating a Title Block
A. <Highlight the folder PLOTS, click right and select New I Title Block. Name
this Title Block for SET1. Click OK.
B. Enter MineSight for Geologists as the Project name.
C. Add a row below the project name, enter LOCATION in the first column, and
Tucson, AZ. USA in the second column. You will need to move the row you just
added, up to where you want it, as rows and columns are, by default, added to the
last position. Use the up/down arrows to the right of the window to position the
row in the desired place. Click Applyand then Preview.>
Notice the font is either too big, or the columns are too narrow. You can easily fix
this by changing the size of either one.
D. <Change the width of the columns by highlighting the second column (first row)
and entering 75 for the column width. Click Applyand then Preview.
E. Change the font style to Roman.
F. Click Applyand then Preview.>
Your final Title Block will look like this (next page):
Plotting in MineSight 3-D Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 15-10 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
G. <Close the title block preview by clicking OK, and then close the Title Block
Properties dialog.>
Adding a Title Block to the Plot Layout
To add the title block to your plot, you need to add a new area and then select the file
representing your title block.
A. <Double click on SET1 (inside the PLOTS folder) to activate the Plot Set
properties.
B. Go to the Area tab and click the Add Area button (plus icon).
C. Specify what information you want to be included on this new area. Go to Type
and scroll down (down arrow) to select the Title Block option.>
D. You can move the Title Block area by clicking the area while holding down the
left button of your mouse and dragging it. You can also use the area configuration
windows to position the Title Block. Note that the size of the Title Block cannot
be changed in the Plot Layout dialog.
E. <Click Applyand then Print I Preview to see the modified plot layout.>
In the event that you have more than one title block and you wish to select a specific
one, click the Select Object button and choose it from the browser. If you wish to
change the size of the title block horizontally and/or vertically, you can do it in the Title
Block editor by increasing or decreasing the column/row size.
Lets make our title block a little bigger.
A. <In the Data Manager, activate the properties of Title Block for SET1.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Plotting in MineSight 3-D
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page 15-11
Notes:
B. Highlight the first column, first row, and change the column width to 75. Press
the Tab key.
C. Change the row height to 15 and the font size to 5. Press the Tab key, click Apply,
then Preview.> You will notice that only the height and font size of one row was
modified. This is done so that if different font types and sizes are required for
specific rows, the user has the option to set the requirements individually for
each row.
D. <Highlight the second column in the first row and change the size to 100. Click
Apply.
E. Click Previewand close the title block properties. Answer Yes to Save the changes
to the title block? >
Next, you will want to see how the modified title block is going to look on your plot
layout. <Go back to your plot layout (SET1), which should still be in the viewer. Click
the area representing the title block.> You may need to move this added area a little, so
it is completely inside the main area; to align the edges of the Title Block with the edges
of the plot border, enter the same values for each object in the Area tab of the Plot
Layout. <Click Applyand Previewwhen you are ready to see the result.>
Creating a Legend
A legend is a data object in MineSight 3-D that can be used to add a color key or a
company logo to your Plot Layout. A legend is created in the same manner as any other
MineSight 3-D object:
A. <Highlight the folder in which the legend will reside (well use the PLOTS folder),
click right, and select New I Legend. Lets name this Legend object Mintec
logo.
B. Open the Properties dialog for the new Legend object by double-clicking Mintec
logo in the Data Manager. There are four options available on the Common tab
- Company Logo, Cutoff Table, Drillhole View, and Model View; well use the
Company Logo option initially, so check the corresponding radio button and
click on the Company tab.
C. Click the pick file icon and select the file MintecLogo.jpg; the Legend tool accepts
*.jpg and *.png format image files. Click Apply, then Preview; if the preview is
satisfactory, click Close.>
Adding a Legend to the plot layout
A legend is an additional area that needs to be added to the Plot Layout. To add the
Legend:
A. <Open the Properties of SET1.
B. On the Area tab, click the Add Area Button (plus icon) to add an area to the plot,
and click on the new area to select it.
C. Enter the correct values for aligning the Legend with the plot border as desired;
examine the values for the main plot area and/or other areas for the required
values to match existing alignments.
D. Click Apply, then Previewto see how the legend will be plotted.>
Plotting in MineSight 3-D Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page 15-12 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Adding a scale bar to the plot layout
A scale bar is also considered to be an area in your plot layout. So now you need to
incorporate an additional area into your layout, selecting the scale bar as the information
to be included on this new area.
A. <On your Plot Layout, go to the Area tab and click the Add Area Button.
B. Click left where you want this new area to be placed on the plot area (red cube
with white arrow). Adjust the size and location as desired.
C. Go to the Type option and scroll down to select the Scale Bar option.
D. Under Move Area, click the Top button. Click Applyand then Preview.>
If you wish to include grids in your plot, you can do the following:
A. <Activate the properties of the current viewer by highlighting <unnamed>and
then double clicking on the file called Viewer 1.
B. Click the Grids tab. Under Style, scroll down to select Labels and Lines.
C. Change the label size to 1.2 % of the view window and click Apply.
D. Go back to SET1 and click the Print I Preview.>
MineSight allows you to include additional information in your plot layouts, such as
multiple viewers, North Arrow, legends, etc.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. M821V1 - Long-Range Scheduling Open Pit Mines
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page A-1
Appendix A
M821V1 Summary
M821V1 - Long-Range Scheduling Open Pit Mines Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page A-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 8215


1. NAMES LINE (must be the first line entered)

MEDS- M821V1 10=filename 3=filename 23=filename 25=filename;
MEDS- M821V1 34=filename 33=filename 29=filename;
MEDS- M821V1 30=filename 31=filename 32=filename 19=filename;
MEDS- M821V1 24=filename 35=filename 36=filename 37=filename;
MEDS- M821V1 38=filename 39=filename 28=filename 20=filename
where

MEDS- M821V1 (must be the first 10 columns)
10 = the name of the PROJECT CONTROL FILE (input)
3 = the name of the REGULAR REPORT FILE (output)
23 = the name of the SCHEDULING ASSUMPTION FILE (output)
25 = the name of the AUDIT TRAIL OUTPUT FILE (output)
34 = the name of the SCHEDULE SUMMARY REPORT FILE FOR SPREADSHEET (output)
33 = the name of the OPTIONAL RESTARTING OUTPUT FILE FOR NEXT RUN (output)
29 = the name of the YEAR END MAP PLOT FILE (plt821.paa) (output)

30 = the name of the DESTINATION CAPACITY FILE (input)
31 = the name of the OPTIONAL TRUCK HAULAGE CYCLE TIME FILE (input)
32 = the name of the OPTIONAL RESTARTING INPUT FILE FOR CURRENT RUN (input)
19 = the name of the OPTIONAL ASCII FORMAT MULTI-MODEL FILE (input).
24 = the name of the OPTIONAL BENCH PARAMETER FILE (input)
35 = the name of the OPTIONAL DUMPING RATE BY DUMP BY PERIOD FILE (input)
36 = the name of the OPTIONAL #BOTTOM BENCHES BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (input)
37 = the name of the OPTIONAL MINING RATE BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (input)
38 = the name of the OPTIONAL CUTOFF GRADE BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (input)
39 = the name of the OPTIONALVERTICAL ADVANCE BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (input)
28 = the name of the OPTIONAL CASH FLOW FILE (input).
20= the name of the OPTIONAL ECONOMIC PARAMETER ADJUSTMENTS BY PERIOD FILE (input)

2. RUN INFORMATION LINE (max. of 80 columns)

A single line of text information that will be printed at the top of each page of printer output from the run (regular report
file).

3. RUN OPTIONS (in any order & free- field format)

USR = USER INITIALS (e.g., ABC)

IOP1 = THE PRIMARY GRADE ITEM TO READ
IOP2 = THE SECONDARY GRADE ITEM TO READ
IOP3 = THE TERTIARY GRADE ITEM TO READ

NOTE: The grade items refer to their order of positions in the reserve files.
Only the primary and secondary grades can be used for revenue calculations.
The tertiary grade is for reporting and blending purposes.

M821V1 LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING FOR OPEN PIT MINES
with Trucks, Shovels, Destinations, and Economics
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 8216 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002

MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 8217
IOP8 = OPTION FOR PROCESSING ALL MINED TYPE 1 MILL FEED MATERIALS
= 0 NO IMPACT
= 1 PROCESS ALL MINED TYPE 1 MILL FEED MATERIALS (I.E., NO DIRECT
MILL STOCKPILING)

IOP11 = NUMBER OF PERIODS FOR SCHEDULE RUN, E.G., IOP11 CAN BE LESS THAN THE NUMBER OF
PERIODS DEFINED ON PRODUCTION REQUIREMENT LINE (TYPE 13 INPUT)

IOP12 = SCHEDULE MATERIAL NUMBER FOR FEED MATERIALS BELOW PERIOD CUTOFF WHEN
VARIABLE CUTOFF BY PHASE OPTION IS USED (FILE 38)

IOP13 = OPTION FOR USING NET $/TON VALUES AS 1
ST
AND 2
ND
GRADES
= 0 NO IMPACT
= 1 1
ST
GRADE IS NET $/TON FOR MILL ORE FOR ECONOMIC CALCULATIONS
2
nd
GRADE IS NET $/TON FOR MATERIALS BELOW PERIOD CUTOFF GRADE, INCLUDING
WASTE
= 2 1
ST
GRADE IS RECOVERABLE GRADE FOR MILL ORE
2
nd
GRADE IS RECOVERABLE GRADE FOR LEACH ORE

NOTE: IOP13=1 is designed to handle complex variable costs and recoveries by rock types.
IOP13=2 is used only when IOP29=2.

IOP17 = OPTION FOR ALLOCATION OF MINED MATERIALS TO THEIR DESTINATIONS
= 0 MATERIAL DESTINATION BY SHORTEST HAUL (Default)
= 1 MATERIAL DESTINATION BY LINEAR PROGRAMMING BASED ON MINIMIZATION OF
HAULAGE CYCLE TIMES AMONG ALL MINED PITS AND AVAILABLE DESTINATIONS
(not implemented yet).

IOP19 = RESTARTING FLAG
= 0 PRODUCE PERIOD BY PERIOD SCHEDULES FROM PERIOD 1
= N RESTART FROM PERIOD N. THE SCHEDULE FROM PERIOD 1 TO PERIOD N-1
IS READ IN FROM FILE 32

IOP21 = CRITERIA TO CHOOSE A MINING SOLUTION
= 1 MINIMIZE NET VALUE (WHAT IF)
= 2 MINIMIZE PRIMARY MINERAL CONTENT (WHAT IF)
= 3 MINIMIZE STRIPPING RATIO
= 4 MINIMIZE HAULAGE & LOADING COST
= 5 MINIMIZE HAULAGE HOURS
= 6 MINIMIZE QUANTITY OF EXPOSED ORE (WHAT IF)
= 7 MINIMIZE NET OPERATING PROFIT (NOPAT) (WHAT IF)
= 8 MINIMIZE CASH FLOW (WHAT IF)
= 9 MINIMIZE RETURN OF CAPITAL (ROC) (WHAT IF)
= 10 MINIMIZE COST OF UNIT METAL (E.G., $/LB)
= 11 MAXIMIZE NET VALUE (Default)
= 12 MAXIMIZE PRIMARY MINERAL CONTENTS
= 13 MAXIMIZE STRIPPING RATIO
= 14 MAXIMIZE HAULAGE AND LOADING COST (WHAT IF)
= 15 MAXIMIZE HAULAGE HOURS (WHAT IF)
= 16 MAXIMIZE EXPOSED ORE TONS
= 17 MAXIMIZE NET OPERATING PROFIT (NOPAT)
= 18 MAXIMIZE CASH FLOW
= 19 MAXIMIZE RETURN OF CAPITAL (ROC)
= 20 MAXIMIZE COST OF UNIT METAL (E.G., $/LB) (WHAT IF)

NOTE: Some of the above objectives are for trial schedule purposes only. The criteria 7-10 and
17-20 are to be used with optional cash flow (File 28) inputs.
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 8218 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002

IOP22 = TYPE OF PRIMARY GRADE
= 0 PERCENT & PRODUCT SELL AS $/LB
= 1 OZ/TON & PRODUCT SELL AS $/OZ, OR GRAMS/TON & PRODUCT SELL AS $/GRAM, OR
LB/TON & PRODUCT SELL AS $/LB
= 2 PERCENT & PRODUCT SELL AS $/TON (INDEPENDENT OF GRADE)
= 3 MULTIPLY GRADE BY A FACTOR OF 0.01

IOP23 = TYPE OF SECONDARY GRADE
= 0 PERCENT & PRODUCT SELL AS $/LB
= 1 OZ/TON & PRODUCT SELL AS $/OZ OR GRAMS/TON & PRODUCT SELL AS $/GRAM, OR
LB/TON & PRODUCT SELL AS $/LB
= 2 PERCENT & PRODUCT SELL AS $/TON (INDEPENDENT OF GRADE)
If IOP29=2, THE SECONDARY GRADE IS NOT USED FOR ECONOMIC REVENUE CALCULATION
= 3 MULTIPLY GRADE BY A FACTOR OF 0.01

IOP24 = DEBUG PRINT OF ERROR MESSAGE WHEN A MATCH BETWEEN A DESTINATION (LIFT) AND
PHASE (BENCH) IS NOT FOUND
= 0 DO NOT PRINT (suggested)
= 1 PRINT ERROR MESSAGE

IOP25 = OPTION FOR PERIOD BOTTOM MINING
= 0 ALLOW DIFFERENT MINING RATE BETWEEN MILL ORE AND OTHERS
(OTHERS=WASTE, LEACH, AND STOCKPILE MATERIALS)
= 1 DO NOT ALLOW DIFFERENT MINING RATE BETWEEN ORE AND OTHERS. IF THERE IS NO
SOLUTION FOR THE SAME MINING RATE, DROP THE MINING LAYOUT AS INFEASIBLE

IOP26 = OPTION FOR RANKING PUSHBACKS BY ECONOMICS
= 0 RANK PUSHBACKS BY ECONOMICS
= 1 DO NOT RANK PUSHBACKS BY ECONOMICS

IOP27 = REPORT PRINT OPTION
= 1 PRINT MINING SUMMARY REPORTS ONLY (Default)
= 2 PRINT EQUIPMENT USAGE REPORTS ONLY
= 4 PRINT COST REPORTS ONLY
= 8 PRINT DESTINATION USAGE ONLY
= 3 PRINT MINING SUMMARY AND EQUIPMENT USAGE REPORTS
= 7 PRINT MINING SUMMARY AND EQUIPMENT USAGE AND COST REPORTS
= 15 PRINT ALL SUMMARY TABLES IN STANDARD REPORT FILE
= 19 PRINT SUMMARY REPORTS + ECONOMICS + DESTINATION USAGES

IOP28 = FLAG FOR SENDING HIGH- GRADE LEACH ORE TO LOW-GRADE LEACH ORE DESTINATIONS OR
VICE VERSA
= 0 DO NOT TURN THE FLAG ON (HIGH-GRADE LEACH ORE GOES ONLY TO HIGH- GRADE
LEACH DESTINATIONS. LOW- GRADE LEACH ONLY GOES TO LOW GRADE LEACH
DESTINATIONS.)
= 1 TURN THE FLAG ON (HIGH- GRADE LEACH MAY BE SENT TO LOW-GRADE LEACH
DESTINATIONS IF PERIOD HIGH- GRADE LEACH DESTINATION CAPACITIES ARE USED UP.
SIMILARLY, IF PERIOD LOW- GRADE LEACH DESTINATION CAPACITIES ARE USED UP, SEND
LOW- GRADE LEACH MATERIALS TO HIGH- GRADE LEACH DESTINATIONS. THE MATERIALS
WILL BE CLASSIFIED BASED ON THE DESTINATIONS TO WHICH THEY ARE SENT.
FOR EXAMPLE, HIGH- GRADE LEACH MATERIAL SENT TO LOW- GRADE LEACH
DESTINATION DUMPS WOULD BE CLASSIFIED AS LOW- GRADE LEACH. THE PRICES,
RECOVERIES, AND COSTS WILL BE APPLIED ACCORDING TO THE DESTINATION.)

NOTE: IOP28 is only used for high- grade and low- grade leach materials, e.g., when IOP29 = 1.

MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 8219
IOP29 = LEACH/MILL OPERATION
= 0 MILL and LEACH
= 1 OPERATION HAS LEACH DUMPS ONLY AND TARGET ON MINERAL CONTENTS
= 2 OPERATION HAS MILL ORE (MILL ORE LIMIT IN TONS), OXIDE ORE (LEACH ORE LIMIT IN
TONS), HIGH- GRADE LEACH (NO LIMIT), LOW-GRADE LEACH (NO LIMIT). SXEW TARGET ON
MINERAL CONTENTS IS REQUIRED FROM ALL LEACH SOURCES, E.G., OXIDE ORE, HIGH-
GRADE, AND LOW-GRADE LEACH DUMPS
= 3 OPERATION HAS CRUSH LEACH & RUN-OF-MINE LEACH & TARGET ON METAL
= -1 OPERATION HAS MILL, OXIDE LEACH (LIMIT CAPACITY), RUN-OF-MINE LEACH
= -2 THE SAME AS IOP29=0 EXCEPT MILL RATE WILL BE RELAXED TO MEET MINERAL
CONTENTS (E.G., POUNDS OF COPPER)

IOP30 = ACCOUNT FOR THE LOW GRADE LEACH AS HIGH GRADE LEACH FOR STRIPPING RATIO
CALCULATION WHEN IOP29 = 1?
= 0 NO
= 1 YES

NOTE: IOP28, IOP29=1, IOP30, are designed for the type of operation which targets on pounds of copper with
high- grade & low-grade leach materials as ore.

IOP31 = OPTION FOR CHANGING THE NUMBER OF PITS WORKING IN ONE PERIOD
= 0 THE NUMBER OF PITS WORKING DOES NOT CHANGE
= 1 THE NUMBER OF PITS WORKING MAY BE CHANGED AUTOMATICALLY BY THE PROGRAM

IOP32 = ALLOW USE OF THE DEFAULT CYCLE TIME IF NO CYCLE TIME AVAILABLE IN THE DETAILED
CYCLE TIME FILE 31
= 0 YES
= 1 NO

IOP33 = OPTION FOR READING THE VARIABLE MINING COST BY BENCH
= 0 NO
= 1 YES

IOP34 = NUMBER OF ITERATIONS FOR EACH WORKING COMBINATION OF PUSHBACKS BEFORE
PROGRAM TERMINATES THE MINING LAYOUT SEARCH FOR THE CURRENT PERIOD
= N (Default = very large number, suggest 500,000)

IOP35 = 0 MINE ORE/WASTE BY THE SAME PROPORTIONS ON ALL BENCHES, ACCORDING TO
STRIPPING RATIOS
= 1 READ FLAGS BENCH BY BENCH, TO DETERMINE ORE/WASTE MINING ORDER

NOTE: Please refer to optional bench parameter file (File 24) for more details when IOP35=1.

IOP36 = OPTION FOR VARIABLE PROCESSING RATE
0 = NO IMPACT
1 = THE 3
RD
GRADE IS PROCESSING RATE IN 1000 TONS/HOUR

NOTE: If IOP36=1, the targets for the 3
rd
metal are processing hours. All the mined Type 1 ore in the period will
be processed, e.g., the mill throughput is controlled by processing hours.
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82110 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002

IOP301 = DEFAULT WASTE TYPE, E.G., ONE OF THE 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, AND 106 WASTE TYPES FOR
WHEN A TYPE 1 MILL FEED DESIGNATE PRODUCTION CLASS IS BELOW THE PERIOD
CUTOFF (REFER TO TYPE 13 DATA INPUT)

IOP401 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PHASES (50)

IOP402 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PHYSICAL MEDIUM, LOW, AND SUB- GRADE TYPE 1 MILL FEED
STOCKPILES (30)

IOP403 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF BENCHES INCLUDING ALL PHASES (I.E., FROM THE HIGHEST BENCH
IN ANY PHASE TO THE LOWEST BENCH IN THE SAME OR ANY OTHER PHASE) (100)

IOP404 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PERIODS IN THE SCHEDULE (100)

IOP405 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PRODUCTION OR PIT PRECEDENCE CONSTRAINTS
(PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENTS I, II, III, AND IV) (2,000)

IOP406 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF TRUCK FLEETS (100)

IOP407 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF SHOVEL FLEETS (20)

IOP408 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF DETAILED HAULAGE RECORDS (200,000)
(TOTAL LINE ENTRIES IN THE DETAILED HAULAGE CYCLE TIME FILE (INPUT FILE 31)

IOP409 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF RESERVE CLASSES AS DEFINED BY THE RESERVE ROUTINES
(E.G., PITRES OR M712V1) (100)

IOP410 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF GRADES AS DEFINED BY THE RESERVE ROUNTINES
(E.G., PITRES OR M712V1, 20)

IOP411 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF ORE PHYSICAL DESTINATIONS
INCLUDING ALL BUT WASTE DESTINATIONS (90)

IOP412 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF WASTE PHYSICAL DESTINATIONS (30)

IOP413 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF LIFTS FOR AN ORE DESTINATION, E.G.,
IF THE NUMBER OF LIFTS FOR DESTINATIONS 1,2,3, AND 4 ARE 45, 48, 50, 2
RESPECTIVELY, IOP413 = 50 (50)

IOP414 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF LIFTS (SUB_REGIONS) FOR A WASTE DESTINATION, E.G.,
IF THE NUMBER OF LIFTS (SUB_REGIONS) FOR DESTINATIONS 1,2,3, AND 4 ARE 45, 48, 50, 2
RESPECTIVELY, IOP414 = 50 (50)

IOP417 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PCF MODELS (10)

IOP418 = MAXIMUM NUMBER OF TYPE1+TYPE2 MILL PHYSICAL DESTINATIONS
INCLUDING ALL BUT WASTE DESTINATIONS (30)

IOP451 = NUMBER OF ORE PRODUCTION CLASSES (30) (IOP451 is set to = 10 if IOP451 < 10, no default)

MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82111

IOP452 = ACTUAL NUMBER OF WASTE TYPES ( 6). AS AN OPTION, EACH WASTE TYPE CAN HAVE
MULTIPLE DESTINATIONS (DUMPS) DEFINED BY THE DUMP SUB REGION CODES WITHIN
THE DESTINATION CAPACITY FILE (FILE 30)

NOTE: Waste types have a maximum of six and are assigned one of the following integer codes: 101, 102, 103, 104, 105
or 106. For each waste type required (101-106) you must initialize at least one waste dump per waste type even if the
dump is a dummy, i.e. no material is sent there (see TYPE 4 and TYPE 5 input). Dump capacity entries are also required
in File30 (destinations capacity file).


IOP453 = DEFAULT LIMIT ON VERTICAL ADVANCES IN NUMBER OF BENCHES IN A PERIOD
= 0 NO LIMIT
= N DEFAULT LIMIT ON VERTICAL ADVANCES IN NUMBER OF BENCHES IN A PERIOD

NOTE: This can be varied on a pushback basis only as defined on the pushback details Line # 1
(TYPE 8 INPUT LINE), as well as on a phase and period basis as defined by input File 39. If both
pushback only and pushback plus period values are entered, the program will use File 39 input.

IOP458 = WASTE DESTINATIONS (DEFINED BY INPUT FILE 30) HAVE SUB- REGIONS WITHIN
THE DUMP FOR PREFERENTIAL PLACEMENT OF DIFFERENT WASTE TYPES OR IT IS
REQUIRED TO SEND MORE THAN 1 WASTE TYPE TO A PARTICULAR DUMP
= 0 NO, DO NOT USE WASTE SUB- REGIONS
= 1 YES, USE WASTE SUB- REGIONS

IOP459 = AUTOMATICALLY RETRIEVE SECONDARY (MEDIUM, LOW AND SUB- GRADE) STOCKPILES
= 0 NO
= 1 YES

NOTE:
Use precedence constraints (DONT MINE) to turn off stockpile reclaim (refer TYPE 17 INPUT DATA
Precedence Requirement I) for particular periods.

IOP459 must be turned on (=1) for the scheduler to reclaim only stockpiles at the end of the mine life when
all pit sources have been exhausted.

This option will treat stockpiles as if a bottom bench within a pushback. If there is a significant quantity of
material within the stockpiles a feasible solution may be achieved very easily by simply reclaiming from a
stockpile without having to mine any of the phases. This is of course not optimum. In order to force the program
to search for an optimum solution examining multiple feasible solutions it is recommended to set PAR13
(#feasible solutions in a period) to >100. This will ensure first and easiest solution is not accepted for the period.


IOP460 = OPTION FOR COST CLASSES USED TO DEFINE VARIABLE COSTS AS WELL AS LOADING
AND HAULING PRODUCTIVITIES BY MATERIAL TYPE BY RE- MAPPING OF 30 (MAX) ORE
AND 6 (MAX) WASTE PRODUCTION CLASSES

= 0 NO
= 1 ADJUST MINING & PROCESSING COSTS
= 2 ADJUST EQUIPMENT OPERATING COSTS, LOAD, AND HAULAGE PRODUCTIVITIES BY
COST CLASSES
= 3 ADJUST BOTH MINING & PROCESSING COSTS AND EQUIPMENT OPERATING COSTS,
LOAD, AND HAULAGE PRODUCTIVITIES BY COST CLASSES

NOTE: Maximum of 10 cost classes allowed.

M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82112 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
PAR1 = ANNUAL DISCOUNTING RATE, IN PERCENT (Default=15%)

PAR2 = NUMBER OF OPERATING DAYS IN ONE YEAR (Default=365, used also for NPV calculation)

PAR3 = NUMBER OF NO MINING YEARS TO ADJUST FOR NPV CALCULATION

PAR4 = DIVIDER FOR RESERVES (E.G., 1 or 1,000, Default=1)

PAR5 = CONSTANT TO BE ADDED TO 2
ND
GRADE WHEN IOP13=1

NOTE: MineSight File 18 does not store negative $/ton values. PAR5 is designed to recover the actual
negative $/ton if a constant had been added to the 2
nd
grade (PAR5 0.0)

PAR6 = OPERATING HOURS PER DAY (Default=20)

PAR7 = TONNAGE UNITS (INCLUDING PAR4) (Default=1,000)

PAR11 = ESTIMATED HAULAGE & LOADING COST FOR RANKING PUSHBACKS

PAR13 = NUMBER OF FEASIBLE SOLUTIONS NEEDED IN ONE PERIOD

NOTE: After PAR13 feasible solution(s) is found, program skips checking the rest of the combinations. This
increases the processing speed.

PAR14 = PERIOD NUMBER FOR FEASIBLE SOLUTION DEBUGGING

PAR15 = DEFAULT NUMBER OF BOTTOM BENCHES WITHIN A PUSHBACK (DEFAULT=1)

PAR16 = FIXED ORE MINING COST IN $/TON

PAR17 = FIXED WASTE MINING COST IN $/TON

PAR18 = FIXED ALLUVIUM MINING COST IN $/TON

PAR19 = FIXED LOW GRADE (LEACH) MINING COST IN $/TON (DEFAULT = PAR16)

PAR20 = OPTIONAL NUMBER OF ITERATIONS ALLOWED ON PUSHBACK SELECTION

PAR21 = OPTIONAL NUMBER OF PERIODS FOR REPORTING PUSHBACK RESERVES

PAR22 = OPTIONAL PERCENT INCREASE TO PUSHBACK MINING RATES
IF PAR22=200, THE MINING RATES WILL BE RELAXED (5 MILLION TONS/DAY)

PAR23 = DEFAULT CYCLE TIME IN MINUTES FOR TOTAL DESTINATION CAPACITY CHECK
IF PAR23>0, ALL DESTINATIONS WILL BE CONNECTED TO ANY PUSHBACK

PAR31 = OPTIONAL MILL THROUGHPUT CAPACITY PER YEAR

PAR32 = OPTIONAL TOTAL MINING CAPACITY PER YEAR

PAR33 = OPTIONAL TOTAL METAL PROCESSING CAPACITY (E.G. POUNDS OF CU PER YEAR)

NOTE: PAR20-PAR33 are designed for when iop29=2.
PAR16-PAR19 account for drilling & blasting, overhead, etc. and serve as default values for PAR401-
PAR436.


MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82113

PAR400 = PERCENTAGE LIMIT FOR AUTOMATIC RECLAIM OF STOCKPILES (IOP459=1). IT IS APPLIED
AS: THE TOTAL TONS OF RECLAIMED MATERIALS FROM ALL STOCKPILE SOURCES
(PERIOD TYPE 1 MILL ORE TARGET - TOLERANCE) * PAR400 * .01. (Default=100%).

PAR401 = MINING COST FOR TYPE 1 ORE IN $/TON

PAR406 = MINING COST FOR TYPE 2 ORE IN $/TON

PAR411 = MINING COST FOR MID-GRADE STOCKPILE IN $/TON

PAR412 = MINING COST FOR LOW- GRADE STOCKPILE IN $/TON

PAR413 = MINING COST FOR SUB-GRADE STOCKPILE IN $/TON

PAR422 = MINING COST FOR HIGH- GRADE LEACH IN $/TON

PAR423 = MINING COST FOR LOW- GRADE LEACH IN $/TON

PAR430 = MINING COST FOR MATERIAL BELOW PERIOD PRODUCTION CUTOFF IN $/TON

PAR431 = MINING COST FOR WASTE TYPE 1 IN $/TON

PAR432 = MINING COST FOR WASTE TYPE 2 IN $/TON

PAR433 = MINING COST FOR WASTE TYPE 3 IN $/TON

PAR434 = MINING COST FOR WASTE TYPE 4 IN $/TON

PAR435 = MINING COST FOR WASTE TYPE 5 IN $/TON

PAR436 = MINING COST FOR WASTE TYPE 6 IN $/TON

NOTE:
PAR401 to PAR436 are average fixed mining costs for each of the Destination classes (Schedule materials)
(refer Type7 Inputs for Destination class definition). These average fixed mining costs would typically
include all but haulage and loading costs. These average fixed mining costs can also be adjusted by adding or
subtracting cost increments to the Cost classes (refer TYPE 7-1 INPUTS for Cost class definition). The
haulage and loading costs can be based on equipment haulage and loading operating hours or on variable
mining costs by bench. The haulage and loading costs and variable mining costs by bench can also be
adjusted by parameters according to Cost classes.
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82114 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002

PAR451 = % ADJUSTMENT FOR MINING COST PER PERIOD (Default = 0)

PAR452 = % ADJUSTMENT FOR PRIMARY METAL PRICE PER PERIOD (Default = 0)

PAR454 = % ADJUSTMENT FOR SECONDARY METAL PRICE PER PERIOD (Default = 0)

PAR456 = % ADJUSTMENT FOR FIXED COST AT A DESTINATION (Default = 0)

PAR457 = % ADJUSTMENT FOR SHOVEL OPERATING COST PER PERIOD (Default = 0)

PAR458 = % ADJUSTMENT FOR TRUCK OPERATING COST PER PERIOD (Default = 0)

NOTE:
PAR451 PAR458 are defined as %s. For example, the adjustment factor for period n for mining cost is
(1+(PAR451/100))**n. The % adjustment of PAR451, PAR457, and PAR458 is computed based on a base
cost first, this % adjusted cost will then be added to corresponding costs during schedule runs. The base
mining cost is PAR401. The base shovel operation cost is OCST1 (refer to Type 11 input, line#2 for
shovel). The base truck operation cost is OCST1 (refer to Type 11 input, line#2 for truck).

More detailed adjustment parameters can be input in File 20. In that case, PAR451 PAR458 will be
ignored.

MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82115
I-O = DEBUG LEVEL
= 1 ECHO INPUT DATA (AFTER END LINES) ON SCREEN
= 2 ECHO INPUT RESERVES ON THE SCREEN
= 7 DISPLAY INFORMATION WHEN A FEASIBLE MINING LAYOUT IS FOUND
= 41 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14. LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
TYPE 1 ORE REQUIREMENTS REGARDLESS OF OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 42 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14. LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
TYPE 2 ORE REQUIREMENTS REGARDLESS OF OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 43 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14. LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
WASTE REQUIREMENTS REGARDLESS OF OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 44 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14, LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
QUALITY 1 MINERAL CONTENT REQUIREMENT REGARDLESS OF OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 45 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14, LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
QUALITY 2 MINERAL CONTENT REQUIREMENT REGARDLESS OF OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 46 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14, LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
QUALITY 3 MINERAL CONTENT REQUIREMENT REGARDLESS OF OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 47 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14. LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET THE
TYPE 1 ORE REQUIREMENTS AND ALL THE QUALITY REQUIREMENTS REGARDLESS OF
OTHER CONSTRAINTS
= 48 SOLUTION SCREENING, USED WITH PAR14. LIST MINING LAYOUTS THAT MEET ALL THE
CONSTRAINTS
= 99 MINING LAYOUT SEARCH TRAIL PRINT (ALL COMBINATIONS)
= 100 TRUCK & SHOVEL HAULAGE AUDIT TRAIL PRINT
= -101 PRINT DESTINATION ASSIGNMENT DETAILS

NOTE: When I-O > 0, the audit printout goes to the audit output (File 25) when it is not output on the screen.

FMT1 = INPUT RESERVE FILE DATA FORMAT, E.G., (2I4, 21F16.0)
DEFAULT FORMAT FOR RESERVE FILES: FMT1 = (2I4, 21E16.8)

END

M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82116 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
4. TYPE 4 INPUT DATA - LIMITS (one line)

npit nmils nmilx nhlch nllch nmstp nlstp nsstp nwdmp1 nwdmp2 nwdmp3 ndwdmpN

where:

npit = number of pits (pushbacks,phases), npit IOP401.
nmils = number of Type 1 ore mills (e.g., sulphide)
nmilx = number of Type 2 ore mills (e.g., oxide)
nmil= nmils + nmilx + nhlch + nllch + nmstp + nlstp + nsstp IOP411
nhlch = number of high- grade leach destinations
nllch = number of low- grade leach destinations
nmstp = number of mid- grade stockpile destinations
nlstp = number of low- grade stockpile destinations
nsstp = number of sub- grade stockpile destinations
nwdmp1 = number of waste dumps for Type 1 waste
Nwdmp2 = number of waste dumps for Type 2 waste
Nwdmp3 = number of waste dumps for Type 3 waste

nwdmpN = number of waste dumps for Type N waste
nwdmp1 + nwdmp2 + nwdmp3+ + ndwdmpN P412

NOTE: N must match IOP452. This is true even if IOP458=1 and there are not as many physical destinations for
schedule run, i.e., one needs to have dummy destinations for the additional types of wastes.

Last destination must always be a dummy destination for each material group if IOP17>0.


5. TYPE 5 INPUT DATA - LABELS (10 arguments/line )

crunm1 - crunm n dump1 - dump n pushback1 - pushback n
where:

crunm n = nmils+nmilx+nhlch+nllch+nmstp+nlstp+nsstp
dump n = nwdmp1+nwdmp2+nwdmp3+ + nwdmpIOP452
pushback n = npit

Add more lines as needed.

NOTE: The labels are limited to 5 letters each.


6. TYPE 6 INPUT DATA - DESTINATION ECONOMIC PARAMETERS

crunm pprice prec sprice srec fcost iper1 iper2

where:

crunm = destination (or crusher) number
pprice = price for primary mineral
prec = recovery in percentage for primary mineral
sprice = price for secondary mineral
srec = recovery in percentage for secondary mineral
fcost = fixed cost for this ore destination ($/ton)
iper1 = starting period (Default=1)
iper2 = ending period (Default=100)
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82117

NOTE: The destination number corresponds to the sequence in which the destinations are read in the TYPE 5 input. Add
one more line for each additional destination which needs the economic parameter input. Default economic parameters are
set to 0 for destinations not present in inputs. A waste crusher should only have fcost assigned. The processing costs for a
destination can be adjusted by additional costs defined according to cost classes.

The fixed processing cost for a stockpile is used as a re- handle cost. This cost is added to the Type 1 mill processing cost
when the stockpile is re-claimed. Only mining cost is charged to the stockpile when the materials are stockpiled.

If IOP29=2, prec=100%, srec=0.0%.


7. TYPE 7 INPUT DATA - CLASSIFICATION OF RESERVE CLASSES

Line #1 = ncls

where:

ncls = number of reserve classes (ncls IOP409)

Line#2 = icls1 icls2 icls3 .. icls10
(mapping between first 10 reserve classes and 36 production classes comprising up to 30 ore production
classes with codes 1 to 30 and up to 6 waste production classes with codes 101, 102, 103, 104, 105 and
106)

where:

icls1 = first reserve class
icls2 = second reserve class
.
.
icls10 = tenth reserve class

Line#3 = repeat of Line#2 except for second 10 reserve classes and 36 production Classes

Add more Line#3 type of lines as needed.

Example:

17 / Number of reserve classes (Line#1)
1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 / (Line#2) The first 10 reserve classes mapped to 6 ore production classes
6 6 101 102 103 103 103 / (Line#3) a further 2 reserve classes are mapped to the 6
th
ore production
class with the last 5 reserve classes being mapped to 3 waste types
(101,102, and 103)

This example mapped 17 reserve classes into 6 ore production classes and 3 waste types. The six ore production
classes can then be further classified as any one of the available scheduling materials or Destination classes by period,
e.g., Type 1 mill feed, Type 2 mill feed, high_grade leach, low_grade leach, mid- grade stockpile, low- grade stockpile, sub-
grade stockpile, and waste materials.


PRODUCTION CLASS - DESTINATION CLASS MAPPING (refer TYPE 13 INPUT)

The production classes obtained from Type 7 input are:

Production class 1
Production class 2
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82118 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
Production class 3

Production class n (nIOP451)
Waste Type 1 (101)
Waste Type 2 (102)
Waste Type 3 (103)

Waste Type m (100+m) (mIOP452)

During the schedule periods (see the section on Type 13 input), each production class can then be classified as one of the
following destination classes:

1 for Type 1 mill feed (e.g., sulfide mill)
2 for mid(medium)- grade Type 1 mill feed stockpile
3 for low-grade Type 1 mill feed stockpile
4 for sub- grade Type 1 mill feed stockpile
5 for Type 2 mill feed (e.g., oxide mill)
6 for high- grade leach
7 for low-grade leach
101 for Type 1 waste
102 for Type 2 waste
103 for Type 3 waste
104 for Type 4 waste
105 for Type 5 waste
106 for Type 6 waste

The waste types are distributed and tracked by dumps and dump sub regions as defined in the input File 30. In normal
circumstances the six reserve waste classes would map directly to the six production (101 to 106) waste classes.


Example from reserve classes to production classes and schedule materials:


M821V1 Schedule Materials

Reserve

M712V1
Reserve
Class#

Production
Class#

Period
1

Schedule
Material
(Destination Class)

Period
2

Schedule
Material
(Destination Class)

High Grade

1

1

1

Type 1 Mill Feed

1

Type 1 Mill Feed

Low Grade

2

2

2

Mid-Grade Stockpile

1

Type 1 Mill Feed

Stockpile

3

3

4

Sub- Grade Stockpile

4

Sub- Grade Stockpile

Waste

4

101

-

Type 1 Waste

-

Type 1 Waste



If IOP460>0, program will input COST CLASSES as below.

7-1. TYPE 7-1 INPUT DATA - COST CLASS MAPPING OF PRODUCTION CLASSES

Production classes can also be mapped to cost classes that are used to define mining and processing cost variability that
is linked to material characteristics. These cost classes are also used to adjust the average fixed mining costs (PAR401-
PAR436), processing costs, mining equipment operating costs and mining equipment loading and haulage productivities
(refer Type 11 input data).
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82119

Line#1 = number of production classes npcls (IOP451+IOP452)

Line#2 = c#1 c#2 c#3 .. c#10
(mapping between first 10 production (ore) classes (defined by production ore class number) and 10 cost
classes (defined by position on Line#2))

where:

c#1 = production class 1
c#2 = production class 2
c#3 = production class 3

c#10 = production class 10

Line#3 = repeat of Line#2 except for second 10 production (ore) classes to 10 costs classes

Line#4 = repeat of Line#3 except for third 10 production (ore) classes to 10 costs classes

Add more line#4 if needed.

If IOP460=1 OR 3, program will read mining and processing cost adjustments by cost classes as below.

7-2. TYPE 7-2 INPUT DATA-MINING AND PROCESSING COST ADJUSTMENTS BY COST CLASSES

Line#1 = number of cost classes nccls (10)

Line#2 = mcadj1 mcadj2 mcadj3 mcadj10
(mining cost adjustments for 10 costs classes in $/ton)

where:

mcadj1 = mining cost adjustment for cost class 1
mcadj2 = mining cost adjustment for cost class 2
mcadj3 = mining cost adjustment for cost class 3

mcadj10 = mining cost adjustment for cost class 10

Line#3 = pcadj1 pcadj2 pcadj3 pcadj10
(processing cost adjustments for 10 costs classes in $/ton)

where:

pcadj1 = processing cost adjustment for cost class 1
pcadj2 = processing cost adjustment for cost class 2
pcadj3 = processing cost adjustment for cost class 3

pcadj10 = processing cost adjustment for cost class 10

If IOP33=1, program will read variable mining cost adjustments by cost classes as Line#4.

Line#4 = vmcadj1 vmcadj2 vmcadj3 vmcadj10
(variable mining cost by bench adjustments for 10 costs classes in $/ton)

where:

vmcadj1 = variable mining cost adjustment for cost class 1
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82120 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
vmcadj2 = variable mining cost adjustment for cost class 2
vmcadj3 = variable mining cost adjustment for cost class 3

vmcadj10 = variable mining cost adjustment for cost class 10

NOTE: The variable mining cost adjustment is applied for every bench inside a pushback.

Consolidated Example (data input in free format, comments after /):

17 / Number of reserve classes (Line#1)
1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 / (Line#2) First 10 reserve classes production classes mapping
6 6 101 102 103 103 103 / (Line#3) Remaining reserve class production class mapping
9 / Number of production classes (Line#1) comprising 6 ore and 3 waste production classes
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 / mapping of 9 production classes to 3 cost classes (Line#2)
3 / number of cost classes (Line#1)
-0.15 0.05 0.10 / mining cost adjustments in $/ton for the 3 cost classes (Line#2)
-0.07 -0.02 0.45 / processing cost adjustments in $/ton for the 3 cost classes (Line#3)
-0.001 0.001 0.0002 / variable mining cost adjustments in $/ton for the 3 cost classes (Line#4)


Explanation of the consolidated example:
Seventeen (17) reserve classes are mapped into 6 ore (1,2,3,4,5,and 6) and 3 waste (101,102, and 103) production
classes. This resulted in 9 total production classes. The 9 production classes are further mapped into 3 cost classes, i.e.,
production class 1 = cost class 1
production class 2 = cost class 1
production class 3 = cost class 1
production class 4 = cost class 1
production class 5 = cost class 1
production class 6 = cost class 1
production class 7 (waste 101) = cost class 1
production class 8 (waste 102) = cost class 2
production class 9 (waste 103) = cost class 3

Assuming production class 1 is classified as Type 1 mill ore,
the mining cost for cost class 1 materials at 4600m = fixed mining cost for Type1 mill ore (PAR(401)) +fixed mining
cost adjustment (-0.15) + variable cost (4600m) adjustment (-0.001)
the processing cost for cost class 1 materials = Processing cost of Type 1 mill ore at ore destination (Type 6 Input
fcost)+ processing cost adjustment(-0.07)


Where,
Variable cost by bench is either based on user input (IOP33=1) or operating costs of haulage and loading equipments.
The processing cost at Type 1 mill ore destination is from user by Type 6 data input.














MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82121
8. TYPE 8 INPUT DATA - PUSHBACK DETAILS

Line #1 = pid mrate pcf# ztop bh nzpcf botb# vadv#

where:

pid = pushback reserve file name (10 characters)
mrate = mining rate of pushback pid (tons/day)
(mrate is at the same magnitude as the reserves [Default=5000/par7])
pcf# = pcf set number for pushback pid (Pushbacks may come from different areas with different model crests and
bench heights. One model is referred to as one pcf set)
The number of pcf# is limited to 10. The default is pcf# = 1
ztop = model crest for pcf# (no default)
bh = bench height for pcf# (no default)
nzpcf = number of benches in pcf# (no default)
botb# = number of bottom benches for pid (Default=1)
vadv# = vertical rate of advance in number of benches (Default=IOP453)

NOTE: If pcf#=0 or 1, the pcf file on the names line will be used. If ztop, bh, nzpcf are defined for pcf#, the pcf tables will
be produced according to the ztop, bh, nzpcf for pcf#. If pcf#>1 and there is no ztop, bh, nzpcf defined for a pcf#, the pcf
table must be read in from File 19. It is not necessary to define ztop, bh, nzpcf for each pushback. The ztop, bh, nzpcf for
any pcf# needs to be input only once. Pcf#, ztop, bh, nzpcf, botb#, and vadv# are optional. File 19 input will overwrite the
setup by ztop, bh, nzpcf for a pcf#.

Line #2 = cycm1 - cycm n cycl1 - cycl n cycs1 - cycs n cycd1 - cycd n cycp1 - cycp n (10/line)

where:

cycm1 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and ore destination 1 (in minutes)
cycm2 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and ore destination 2 (in minutes)
cycm3 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and ore destination 3 (in minutes)

cycmn = average or default cycle time between pit pid and ore destination nmils+nmilx (in minutes)

cycl1 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and leach destination 1 (in minutes)
cycl2 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and leach destination 2 (in minutes)
cycl3 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and leach destination 3 (in minutes)

cycln = average or default cycle time between pit pid and leach destination nhlch+nllch (in minutes)

cycs1 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and stockpile destination 1 (in minutes)
cycs2 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and stockpile destination 2 (in minutes)
cycs3 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and stockpile destination 3 (in minutes)

cycsn = average or default cycle time between pit pid and stockpile destination nmstp+nlstp+nsstp (in minutes)

cycd1 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and dump destination 1 (in minutes)
cycd2 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and dump destination 2 (in minutes)
cycd3 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and dump destination 3 (in minutes)

cycdn = average or default cycle time between pit pid and dump destination ndmp1+ndmp2+ +ndmpN (in minutes)

cycp1 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and pushback 1 (in minutes)
cycp2 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and pushback 2 (in minutes)
cycp3 = average or default cycle time between pit pid and pushback 3 (in minutes)

cycpn = average or default cycle time between pit pid and pushback npit (in minutes)
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82122 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002

NOTE: The Line#2 input fields correspond one to one to Type 5 input fields. The cycle time entry position should match
the labels read in the Type 5 input.

For each additional pushback, add additional lines. (If the material from a pit should not go to a destination, the haulage
cycle time between the pit and the destination should be set to 0.) Even if the average haul time is not to be used between
a pit and a destination, a non- zero haul time still should be entered here. The program checks for connection before
looking into the more detailed truck cycle file. A zero entry indicates no connection.

The cycle time input between pid and pushbacks is needed for compatibility with previous version of M821V1. It was
intended for backfill. A backfill is now handled by defining a dump destination and specifying the destination as a
pushback (refer to File 30 input).


9. TYPE 9 INPUT DATA - READ DESTINATIONS CAPACITY FILE

Input by File 30 (see section entitled DESTINATIONS CAPACITY FILE [File 30]).


10. TYPE 10 INPUT DATA - NUMBER OF FLEETS OF TRUCKS & SHOVELS

ntrk nshl

where:

ntrk = number of fleets of trucks (ntrk IOP406) (For example: a fleet of Cat 789s and a fleet of Cat 785s, ntrk = 2.)
nshl = number of fleets of loading units (NSHLIOP407) (For example: a fleet of shovels at 42 cu- yd capacity, a fleet
of shovels at 34 cu- yd capacity. There is a total of 2 shovel fleets, nshl = 2)

NOTE: Always add dummy fleets. The dummy fleets could be the projected future purchases. Otherwise, the program
stops with no feasible solution for the period in which the capacities of the trucks or shovels have run out.

Haulage is carried out by pushback, by bench, and by production classes. The truck and shovel fleets will be picked up in
the same order as the TYPE 11 input.























MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82123
11. TYPE 11 INPUT DATA - TRUCK AND SHOVEL CHARACTERISTICS (two lines for each truck/shovel fleet)

For each TRUCK fleet:

Line# 1 = trknm pavl htyp ocap wcap %effci ntrks

where:

trknm = truck name
pavl = period in which the truck becomes available
htyp = haulage type
0 = both ore and waste
1 = ore only
2 = waste only
ocap = haulage capacity in tons for ore
wcap = haulage capacity in tons for waste
%effci = percent of efficiency
ntrks = number of trucks in this fleet

Line# 2 = hrmk1 %avl1 ocst1 hrmk2 %avl2 ocst2 hrmk3 %avl3 ocst3 hrmk12 %avl12 ocst12

Where:

hrmk1 = hours before which %avl1 and ocst1 are used
%avl1 = percent available before hrmk1
ocst1 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk1
hrmk2 = hours before which %avl2 and ocst2 are used
%avl2 = percent available before hrmk2
ocst2 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk2
hrmk3 = hours before which %avl3 and ocst3 are used
%avl3 = percent available before hrmk3
ocst3 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk3

hrmk12 = hours before which %avl12 and ocst12 are used
%avl12 = percent available before hrmk12
ocst12 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk12

If IOP460 > 1, program will input adjustment parameters by cost classes for this truck fleet as Line#3 - #6.

Line#3 = hfadj1 hfadj2 hfadj3 hfadj10

Where:

hfadj1 = haulage capacity adjustment in tons/truck load for cost class 1
hfadj2 = haulage capacity adjustment in tons/truck load for cost class 2
hfadj3 = haulage capacity adjustment in tons/truck load for cost class 3

hfadj10 = haulage capacity adjustment in tons/truck load for cost class 10

Line#4 = ocstadj1 ocstadj2 ocstadj3 ocstadj10

Where:

ocstadj1 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 1
ocstadj2 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 2
ocstadj3 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 3

M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82124 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
ocstadj10 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 10

Line#5 = hcadj1 hcadj2 hcadj3 hcadj10

Where:

hcadj1 = detailed haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for cost class 1
hcadj2 = detailed haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for cost class 2
hcadj3 = detailed haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for cost class 3

hcadj10 = detailed haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for cost class 10

Line#6 = hfbadj1 hfbadj2 hfbadj3 hfbadj10

Where:

hfbadj1 = detailed haulage fuel burn rate adjustment in gal/hour or liter/hour for cost class 1
hfbadj2 = detailed haulage fuel burn rate adjustment in gal/hour or liter/hour for cost class 2
hfbadj3 = detailed haulage fuel burn rate adjustment in gal/hour or liter/hour for cost class 3

hfbadj10 = detailed haulage fuel burn rate adjustment in gal/hour or liter/hour for cost class 10

NOTES:
1. There is a maximum of 12 availability and operating cost bins (or 36 Line#2 items, read in one line)
2. Add additional Line#1,2,3,4,5 and 6 for additional truck fleets
3. After hrmk12 hours, the truck availability and operating cost decreases to 0
4. The hrmk#s are haulage hours utilized, e.g., hrmk# = elapsed hour * %availability
5. The haulage type of the truck fleet htyp is used when IOP460 < 2
6. The Line#5 and line#6 adjustment parameters are applied to each haulage profile (e.g., between every pushback
bench and dump lift combination)

Example:

Trk1 1 0 320 320 83 100 / truck fleet ID and parameters (Line#1)
5000 97 100 10000 93 110 15000 90 120 20000 85 155 25000 93 120 60000 92 130 / truck hour bins: %avl ocst
10.0 15.50 -8.30 / haulage capacity adjustment in tons/load for cost classes 1,2, and 3
2.50 17.55 10.23 / operating cost adjustments in $/hour for cost classes 1,2, and 3
2.50 10.00 5.00 / detailed haulage cycle time adjustments in minute for cost classes 1,2, and 3
0.50 0.200 -1.00 / detailed haulage fuel burn rate adjustments in gal/hour or liter/hour for cost classes 1,2, and 3


















MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82125
For each SHOVEL fleet:

Line# 1 = shlnm pavl ltyp %effci nshls

where;

shlnm = shovel name
pavl = period in which the shovel becomes available
ltyp = loading type
0 = ore and waste
1 = ore only
2 = waste only
%effci = percent of efficiency
nshls = number of shovels in this fleet.

Line# 2 = hrmk1 %avl1 ocst1 hrmk2 %avl2 ocst2 hrmk3 %avl3 ocst3 hrmk12 %avl12 ocst12

Where:

hrmk1 = hours before which %avl1 and ocst1 are used
%avl1 = percent available before hrmk1
ocst1 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk1
hrmk2 = hours before which %avl2 and ocst2 are used
%avl2 = percent available before hrmk2
ocst2 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk2
hrmk3 = hours before which %avl3 and ocst3 are used
%avl3 = percent available before hrmk3
ocst3 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk3

hrmk12= hours before which %avl12 and ocst12 are used
%avl12= percent available before hrmk12
ocst12 = operating cost in $/hour before hrmk12

If IOP460 > 1, program will input shovel adjustment parameters by cost classes as Line#3 - #5.

Line#3 = lmflg1 lmflg2 lmflg3 lmflg10

Where:

lmflg1 = shovel fleet loading flag for cost class 1 (1 shovel fleet can load or 0 shovel fleet cant load)
lmflg2 = shovel fleet loading flag for cost class 2 (1 shovel fleet can load or 0 shovel fleet cant load)
lmflg3 = shovel fleet loading flag for cost class 3 (1 shovel fleet can load or 0 shovel fleet cant load)

lmflg10= shovel fleet loading flag for cost class 10 (1 shovel fleet can load or 0 shovel fleet cant load)

Line#4 = lcadj1 lcadj2 lcadj3 lcadj10

Where:

lcadj1 = loading time adjustment in minutes/load cycle for cost class 1
lcadj2 = loading time adjustment in minutes/load cycle for cost class 2
lcadj3 = loading time adjustment in minutes/load cycle for cost class 3

lcadj10 = loading factor adjustment in minutes/load cycle for cost class 10



M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82126 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
Line#5 = ocstadj1 ocstadj2 ocstadj3 ocstadj10

Where:

ocstadj1 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 1
ocstadj2 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 2
ocstadj3 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 3

ocstadj10 = operating cost adjustment in $/hour for cost class 10

NOTES:
1. There is a maximum of 12 availability and operating cost bins (or 36 Line#2 items, read in one line)
2. Add additional Line#1,2,3,4, and 5 for additional shovel fleets
3. After hrmk12 hours, the shovel availability and operating cost decreases to 0
4. The hrmk#s are service hours utilized, e.g., hrmk# = elapsed hour * %availability
5. The loading type of the shovel fleet ltyp is used when IOP460 < 2

Example:

Shv1 1 0 70 20 / shovel fleet ID & parameters
5000 93 400 10000 92 430 15000 90 450 50000 88 500 55000 87 510 / shovel hour bins: %avl ocst (Line#2, ONE LINE)
1 0 1 / Shovel can or cant load flags for each of 3 cost class (Line#3)
0.02 0.35 -0.10 / (Line#4) loading cycle time adjustment in minutes/load cycle for cost classes 1,2,3
5.0 15.50 10.27 / (Line#5) operating cost adjustments in $/hour for cost classes 1,2,3

































MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82127
12. TYPE 12 INPUT DATA - LOADING CYCLE FOR SHOVEL & TRUCK COMBINATION

Loading cycle time in minutes (free format):

loaderfleet1 vs. truckfleet1 loaderfleet1 vs. truckfleet2 loaderfleet1 vs. truckfleet3 loaderfleet1 vs. truckfleet12

loaderfleet2 vs. truckfleet1 loaderfleet2 vs. truckfleet2 loaderfleet1 vs. truckfleet3 loaderfleet2 vs. truckfleet12



loaderfleetN vs. truckfleet1 loaderfleetN vs. truckfleet2 loaderfleetN vs. truckfleet3 .loaderfleetN vs. truckfleet12


NOTE: N = #of shovel fleets. A maximum of twelve (12) loader fleet vs. truck fleet combinations are allowed here. If
NTRK > 12, the loading time will be defaulted to loaderfleet# vs. truckfleet1. A zero loading cycle time means that the
loader fleet cannot load the truck fleet.


12-1. TYPE 12-1 INPUT DATA - RE-HANDLE CYCLE TIMES FOR STOCKPILES

Line #1 = stkpid

where:

stkpid = stockpile name (5 characters)

Line #2 = cycm1 cycm2 cycm3 - cycm n (10/line)

where:

cycm1 = cycle time in minutes between stockpile stkpid and destination 1
cycm2 = cycle time in minutes between stockpile stkpid and destination 2 (optional)
cycm3 = cycle time in minutes between stockpile stkpid and destination 3 (optional)

cycm n = cycle time in minutes between stockpile stkpid and destination n (= nmils+nmilx+nhlch+hllch) (optional)

Add additional lines for each 10 entries.
The total number of input lines for Line #2 input = INT [(nmils+nmilx+nhlch+hllch-1)/10] + 1 (refer to Type 4 input).

Line #3 = ShlFleet TrkFleet

where:

ShlFleet = Shovel fleet label (5 letters) (must be one of the shovel fleet defined by Type 11)
TrkFleet = Truck fleet label (5 letters) (must be one of the truck fleet defined by Type 11)


NOTE: For each additional stockpile, add additional lines of #1, #2,and #3. (If the material from a stockpile should not go
to a destination, the haulage cycle time between the stockpile and the destination should be set to 0.) The cycle time entry
position should match the labels read in the Type 5 input. For a destination of mill type, a cycle time, a designated shovel
and truck fleet must be input to accommodate reclaim of direct mill feed stockpile materials. A blank line must be entered
to signal the end of stockpile re- handle cycle times.

Example:
SMG / stockpile label
5 / cycle time between stockpile & type 1 mill destinations
FEL C785 / reclaim shovel fleet and truck fleet
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82128 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
13. TYPE 13 INPUT DATA - PRODUCTION REQUIREMENT (3 lines required per period)

Line #1 = Period schedule identification (up to 10 characters)

Line #2 = lpit m1r m1t m2r m2t w1 w2 opd c1 c2 c3 c
IOP451
rsr stkpl ndmil nostp nobj stplmt

where
lpit = minimum limiting number of pits working at one time (lpit 15)
m1r = Type 1 ore mill feed requirement in tons or 1000 tons (agrees with the reserve magnitude) (e.g., sulfide)
m1t = tolerance on Type 1 ore mill feed requirement in tons or 1000 tons (agrees with the reserve magnitude)
m2r = Type 2 ore mill feed requirement in tons or 1000 tons (agrees with the reserve magnitude) (e.g., oxide)
m2t = tolerance on Type 2 ore mill feed requirement in tons or 1000 tons (agrees with the reserve magnitude)
w1 = lower limit on waste requirement in tons or 1000 tons (agrees with the reserve magnitude)
w2 = upper limit on waste requirement in tons or 1000 tons (agrees with the reserve magnitude)
opd = operating days for this period
c1 = schedule material code (Destination class) for production ore class 1
c2 = schedule material code (Destination class) for production ore class 2
c3 = schedule material code (Destination class) for production ore class 3

c
IOP451
= schedule material code(Destination class) for maximum production ore class as defined by IOP451 (>=10)

NOTE: IOP451 must be defined. Each production ore class (c1 to c
IOP451
above) is assigned an integer value based
on the destination class that they are to be individually mapped to. The destination classes integer codes to
assign to the production ore classes in Line#2 above are as follows:

Destination class c# = 1 Type 1 mill feed (e.g., sulfide mill)
Destination class c# = 2 mid (or medium) grade Type 1 mill feed stockpile
Destination class c# = 3 low - grade Type 1 mill feed stockpile
Destination class c# = 4 sub - grade Type 1 mill feed stockpile
Destination class c# = 5 Type 2 mill feed (e.g., oxide mill)
Destination class c# = 6 high grade leach
Destination class c# = 7 low grade leach
Destination class c# = 9 waste material below cutoff for Type 1 mill feed designated production class
Destination class c# = 101 Type 1 waste material
Destination class c# = 102 Type 2 waste material
Destination class c# = 103 Type 3 waste material

Destination class c# = 106 Type 6 waste material

rsr = required maximum stripping ratio for exposed ore
stkpl = stockpile material to be retrieved into other ore destinations
ndmil = ore destination number for stockpile materials (usually 1, i.e., mill destination, ref. Type 5 input)
nostp = designated stockpile for stockpile material retrieval (usually 0, if defined, only one stockpile can be retrieved in
this period)
nobj = period objective to override global objective (Reference IOP21 for objective choices)
stplmt = period stockpile reclaim limit in % of period Type 1 mill ore target. Stplmt overrides PAR400.

NOTE: If the number of production classes is less than 10, zeros should be entered as place holders on Line#2
for c1, c2, c3, , c
IOP451
. For example, 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 for 3 production classes.

When m1t, m2t are greater than 0.0005, the tolerance because of Type 1 and 2 direct feed stockpile
capacities are ignored. Otherwise, the usages and capacities of direct mill feed stockpiles will
automatically adjust the tolerances m1t, m2t.
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82129
If a production class is classified as Type 1 mill ore and is below period cutoff (destination class c#=9),
the schedule code defined by IOP12 is the new schedule code (could be stockpiles, leach, and waste). If
IOP12 has a code value for waste, IOP301 can be used to designate the default waste type as one of the
101, 102, 103, , or 106 waste types.

If IOP29=-1 or IOP29=2, m2t is not related to stockpile status. There is no stockpile for Type 2 ore. The
Type 2 ore destinations are leach dumps with multiple lifts.


Line# 3 = q1l q1u q2l q2u q3l q3u

where:

q1l = lower limit on quality 1 in mineral content
q1u = upper limit on quality 1 in mineral content
q2l = lower limit on quality 2 in mineral content
q2u = upper limit on quality 2 in mineral content
q3l = lower limit on quality 3 in mineral content
q3u = upper limit on quality 3 in mineral content

NOTE:
Economic values can be calculated for qualities 1 and 2 based on their values. q3 is only a blending item or a
reporting item, though q1 and q2 can be blending items and reporting items too. The default values for q1u, q2u
and q3u are 99000000. The default values for q1l, q2l and q3l are -99000000.

The mineral contents are contained pounds, ounces and grams depending on IOP22 and IOP23 for quality 1 and 2
and reserve magnitude (e.g., tons or 1000 tons).

When q1u, q2u, and q3u are less than or equal to 100, the target is assumed to be in %.
When q11, q21, and q31 are less than or equal to 100 and greater than 0, the target is also assumed to be in%.

If any one of q1u, q2u, q3u, q11, q21 or q31 is input as % target, the corresponding pair (e.g., q1u vs. q11,
q2u vs. q21, and q3u vs. q31) is assumed as % target also.

For a quality item to be defined as % item, the item should be in % values in the reserve files.

When IOP22=0, the primary mineral content item cannot be targeted on %.
When IOP23=0, the secondary mineral content item cannot be targeted on %.

When IOP36=1, q3l=minimum mill processing hours, q3u=maximum mill processing hours.
For example, q3l=90% of mill processing capacity, q3u=95% of mill processing capacity.

Add three lines for each additional period. Number of periods IOP404. End input with a blank line or
end of file. The tonnages and mineral contents should agree with the magnitude of the reserves on input.
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82130 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
14. TYPE 14 INPUT DATA - RESERVES

Files are generated by programs like M712V1 or PITRES (see section on RESERVE FILE FORMAT).


15. TYPE 15 INPUT DATA DETAILED HAULAGE CYCLE TIME

Input by File 31 (see section on DETAILED TRUCK HAULAGE CYCLE FILE FORMAT [File 31])


16. TYPE 16 INPUT DATA VARIABLE MINING COSTS BY BENCH IF IOP33=1.

Pushback# bench1 bench2 cost inc

where:

pushback# = pushback number (pushback input sequence number, refer Type 5 input)
bench1 = upper bench toe elevation
bench2 = lower bench toe elevation
cost = base cost in $/Ton corresponding to the upper bench
inc = incremental cost (as $/Ton per bench)

Add more lines as needed. End input by a blank line.



17. TYPE 17 INPUT DATA - PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT I


PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT CATEGORY 1

iper1 DONT MINE pitnm iper2

where:
iper1 = limiting period#1
If iper2=0 or blank, iper1= n ==> dont mine pitnm in period n, iper1=- n ==> dont mine pitnm up to period n
including n.
DONT MINE = keyword for constraint of type Don't mine this pushback or stockpile in defined periods.
pitnm = pushback (pit) or stockpile name as in Type 5 input
Iper2 = limiting period#2
If iper2>0, dont mine pitnm from period# iper1 to period# iper2 including iper1 and iper2

NOTE: This constraint (DONT MINE) is used to turn off stockpile reclaiming if IOP459 is set to automatically
reclaim.


PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT CATEGORY 2

iper MUST MINE pitnm elev

where:
iper = limiting period
MUST MINE = keyword for constraint of type Must mine at least to this bench and continue if you wish."
pitnm = pushback (pit) name as in Type 5 input
elev = toe elevation of the limiting bench


MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82131

PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT CATEGORY 3

iper MINE TO pitnm elev ipct1 ipct2 ipct3

where:
iper = limiting period
MINE TO = keyword for constraint of type Must mine at least to this bench and mine exactly 'ipct' percent on this
bottom bench."
pitnm = pushback (pit) name as in Type 5 input
elev = elevation of the limiting bench
ipct1 = limiting percent on bottom bench for Type 1 ore
ipct2 = limiting percent on bottom bench for Type 2 ore (Default=ipct1, ipct2<0==>ipct2=0)
ipct3 = limiting percent on bottom bench for other materials (Default=ipct1, ipct3<0==>ipct3=0)


PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT CATEGORY 4

iper NMORE THAN pitnm elev

where:
iper = limiting period
NMORE THAN = keyword for constraint of type Don not mine below this bench. "
pitnm = pushback (pit) name as in Type 5 input
elev = elevation of the limiting bench


PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT CATEGORY 5

iper1 MUST INCLD pitnm iper2

where:
iper1 = limiting period# 1
MUST INCLD = keyword for constraint of type Must consider this phase between period iper1 and iper2.
pitnm = pushback (pit) name as in Type 5 input
iper2 = limiting period# 2 (Default = iper1)

Add more lines as needed. No more than one constraint should be entered for each one pit. End input with a blank line or
end of file.

NOTE: If Type 18 precedence is to follow and there is no Type 17 precedence constraint, enter / END OF
PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT I indicating the end of Type 17 input.
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82132 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
18. TYPE 18 INPUT DATA - PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT II

Pit A AFTER Pit B

where:

Pit A = a pit name
AFTER = key word
Pit B = a pit name

This constraint means: A bench of Pit A will be mined only after a bench of Pit B on the same elevation is mined. This is
to prevent undercut mining.

Pit A APEND Pit B

where:

Pit A = pit name
APEND = key word
Pit B = pit name

This constraint means: A bench of Pit A will start to be mined only after the bottom bench of Pit B starts to be mined.

NOTE: End Type 18 input with the line
/ END OF PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT II. If there is no Type 18 constraint, enter the line
/ END OF PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT II, when Type 19 input data is to follow.


19. TYPE 19 INPUT DATA - PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT III

Pit A AFBND Pit B #Bench iper1 iper2

where:

Pit A = a pit name.
AFBND = key word.
Pit B = a pit name.
#Bench = number of benches (e.g., 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, )
iper1 = limiting period#1 to start
iper2 = limiting period#2 to end

This constraint means: A bench of Pit A will be mined after bench of Pit B but within a number of benches (#Bench).
This is to provide binding among working pushbacks (pits).


NOTE: End Type 19 input with the line
/ END OF PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT III. If there is no Type 19 constraint, enter the line
/ END OF PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT III, when Type 20 input data is to follow.

If Pit A or Pit B is going to be mined out in a period, one should relax the constraint for that period.
Otherwise, this constraint will force the two phases binding together, preventing the other phase from
advancing further below.





MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82133

20. TYPE 20 INPUT DATA - PRECEDENCE REQUIREMENT IV


Pit B bench b HINDE Pit A bench a

where:

Pit A = a pit name
bench a = bench toe elevation
HINDE = key word
Pit B = a pit name
bench b = bench toe elevation

This constraint means: Bench a of Pit A will be mined only after bench b of Pit B is mined or started mining (if bench b of
Pit B is in mining, bench a of Pit A can start mining).

NOTE: The total number of TYPE 17, TYPE 18, TYPE 19, and TYPE 20 precedence constraints is limited by IOP405.
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82134 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
DESTINATIONS CAPACITY FILE (FILE 30)

For each destination (mill ore, leach dump, stockpile or waste material):

Line#1 = crelev lfthght dmpr spdd iper1 iper2 used_flg bfll_pback

Where:
crelev = crest elevation of the destination
lfthght = lift height of the destination
dmpr = destination rate in tons/day (agrees with reserve units and defaults to unlimited, i.e., a very large rate)
spdd = spread dumping divider (Default = no spread dumps)
0 or 1 = no spread dumping
12 = monthly spread dumping among dumps in annual schedule
iper1 = period# the destination becomes available
iper2 = period# the destination becomes not available (e.g., used up)
used_flg = flag for reading in existing stockpile tons and grades
0 = do not read
1 = read
bfll_pback= label of pushback that becomes a backfill automatically in the next period after the pushback has been
completely mined

Line#2 = destid lftelev [subzid w1 w2 w3 .w
IOP452
] tcap pcap %sd drate [szcyc] [existtons existpg existsg existtg]

Where:
destid = destination identification or name (5 letters)
lftelev = lift crest elevation

For waste dumps and IOP458=1, input [subzid w1 w2 w3 .w
IOP452
]:
subzid = destination sub- zone or cell identification within a dump lift to control the preferential placement of
particular production waste (5 letters)
w1 = indicator for accepting Type 1 waste (w1 = 0 means no or 101 means yes)
w2 = indicator for accepting Type 2 waste (w2 = 0 means no or 102 means yes)
w3 = indicator for accepting Type 3 waste (w3 = 0 means no or 103 means yes)

w
IOP452
= indicator for accepting Type IOP452 waste (w
IOP452
= 0 means no or 100+IOP452 means yes)
(IOP452 6)

tcap = total capacity of destination lift (sub- zone) (agrees with the reserve magnitude)
pcap = period capacity of destination lift (sub- zone) (agrees with the reserve magnitude)
%sd = percent limit for spread dumping for that lift (sub- zone) (Default 100%)
drate = lift (sub- zone) dumping rate in tons/day (agrees with reserve units and defaults to whole destination rate)

For waste dumps and IOP458=1, Input [szcyc]:
szcyc = additional cycle time in minutes for the sub- zone

If reading in existing stockpile tons and grade for this lift (sub- zone) (used_flg=1):
existtons = existing tons on this stockpile lift (sub-zone) (in the same magnitude as the reserves , e.g., 1000 tons)
existpg = average grade for primary metal of the existing tons on this stockpile lift (sub- zone)
existsg = average grade for secondary metal of the existing tons on this stockpile lift (sub- zone)
existtg = average grade for tertiary metal of the existing tons on this stockpile lift (sub- zone)

Add more lines of Line#2 if more lifts or sub- zones are needed. At the end of Line#2 input, a blank line is required to
signal the end of input for the Line#2. This blank line also signals the end of input for the destination.

Add more lines of Line#1 and Line#2 for each additional destination.

Both Line#1 and Line#2 inputs are read in free format.
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82135

NOTE:

The input of the destination capacities must follow the same sequence in which the destination labels were read in as
the Type 5 input.

The destination capacities must agree with the reserves in magnitude, e.g., both are in tons or 1000 tons.

Lift heights do not need to be the same height within the same destination.

The default sequence of dumping or filling sub zones within a lift follows the order in which they appear within this
destination capacity file.

The default sequence of dumping or filling lifts within a destination follows the order in which they appear within this
destination capacity file.

The maximum number of total lifts (sub- regions) for all waste destinations (dumps) is defined by IOP414 and by
IOP413 for all ore (mill, leach, and stockpile) destinations.

The maximum number of ore (mill, leach, and stockpile) destinations is defined by IOP411 and by IOP412 for waste
destinations (dumps).

A direct mill feed stockpile should be provided with each mill destination as a second lift of the mill destination. This
is to allow a tiny amount of overflow over the mill throughput being accepted as direct mill feed stockpile materials.
Otherwise, the program may terminate with an error message: No place to send the SFEED or XFEED, due to
floating point precision differences. During schedule run, the program will automatically put in and retrieve the
materials in the second lift of the mill destination. A sample capacity for the second lift of the mill is 500,000 tons.

If IOP17>0, a dummy destination must be provided for each type of material (Type 1 mill ore, Type 2 mill ore, high-
grade leach, low- grade leach, etc.). In any other case, it is recommended that a dummy dump and a dummy lift for
each type of material be defined.

M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82136 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002

SAMPLE DESTINATIONS CAPACITY FILE (FILE 30) (DMP821.TMP) (IOP458=1)


315 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
CRUSH 315 999999999 999999999 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
CRUSH 316 999999999 999999999 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

315 15 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SMG 315 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SMG 330 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

540 15 5000 1 26 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
MG495 540 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
MG495 555 999999999 999999999 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

330 15 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SLG 330 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SLG 345 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

450 45 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
ED 450 S1 101 102 0 0 0 0 20000 20000 100 5000 -5 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate,szcyc
ED 495 S2 101 0 0 0 0 0 60000 60000 100 5000 5 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate,szcyc

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
TD 1 S1 101 102 103 104 105 106 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 2 S2 101 102 103 104 105 106 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 3 S3 101 102 103 104 105 106 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 4 S4 101 102 103 104 105 106 30000 30000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 5 S5 101 102 103 104 105 106 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD1 1 S1 0 102 103 104 105 106 995474 995474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD1 2 S2 0 0 0 0 0 0 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD1 3 S3 0 0 0 0 0 0 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD2 1 S1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5474 5474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD2 2 S2 0 0 0 0 0 0 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD2 3 S3 0 0 0 0 0 0 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD3 1 S1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5474 5474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD3 2 S2 0 0 0 0 0 0 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD3 3 S3 0 0 0 0 0 0 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD4 1 S1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5474 5474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD4 2 S2 0 0 0 0 0 0 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD4 3 S3 0 0 0 0 0 0 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,subzid,w1,w2,...,w6,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82137

SAMPLE DESTINATIONS CAPACITY FILE (FILE 30) (DMP821.TMP) (IOP458=0)


315 15 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SMG 315 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SMG 330 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

540 15 5000 1 26 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
MG495 540 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
MG495 555 999999999 999999999 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

330 15 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SLG 330 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SLG 345 100000 100000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

450 45 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
ED 450 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
ED 495 60000 60000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
TD 1 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 2 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 3 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap, %sd,drate
TD 4 30000 30000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
TD 5 20000 20000 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 0 PHS1 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2,used_flg, bfll_pback
SD1 1 995474 995474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD1 2 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD1 3 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD2 1 5474 5474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD2 2 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD2 3 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD3 1 5474 5474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD3 2 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD3 3 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

1 1 5000 1 1 100 / crelev,lfthight,dmpr,spdd,iper1,iper2
SD4 1 5474 5474 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD4 2 20456 20456 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate
SD4 3 23605 23605 100 5000 / destid,lftelev,tcap,pcap,%sd,drate

M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82138 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
RESERVE FILE FORMAT

One pushback (pit) needs one reserve file. The reserve file names are entered from run file as Type 8 input data. The
maximum of pushbacks (pits) allowed is defined by IOP401 (e.g., 50).

Line #1 and #2

The first two lines of each reserve file are comment lines and are ignored by the program. These two lines must be present.

Line #3

The third line has two arguments. NCLS, NGRD

where:

NCLS = Number of reserve classes (NCLS 100).
NGRD = Number of grade items (NGRD 20, only three will be read in for schedule and standard reporting)

Line #4

The fourth line has labels of reserve classes. The value of NCLS should be the number of reserve classes. Enter 5 labels
on each line. A max of 4 lines is allowed for reserve labels. The reserve labels are limited to 10 characters.

Line #5

The next line contains the grade labels. The value of NGRD should be the number of grade labels. The grade labels are
limited to 5 characters.

The above inputs are in free format.


The rest of file contains reserves in the following formats:

Bench# Reserve# Reserve_Tonnage 1st_grade 2nd_grade ... NGRDth_grade

Default Fortran format = (2I4, 21E16.8); The reserve input format can also be specified in run file with keyword FMT1.
M821V1 will schedule based on a maximum of three grades. Refer to IOP1, IOP2, and IOP3 for how to pick the three
grades out of NGRDs.


NOTE:
Maximum benches from each pushback are limited by IOP403 (e.g., 100). Reserves with more than three grades can
be input, however only three grades will be scheduled and reported in the standard report. Additional grades are
reported in summary report file for spreadsheet.
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82139
OPTIONAL DUMPING RATE BY DUMP BY PERIOD FILE (FILE 35)

For each destination (ore and waste):

Line #1 = destination name (no more than 5 letters)

Line #2 = pd#1 dr#1 pd#2 dr#2 pd#3 dr#3 pd#4 dr#4 pd#5 dr#5 pd#6 dr#6
(up to six pairs of period# and dump rate in tons/day)


where:

pd#1 dr#1 = up to period pd#1, dump rate dr#1 in tons/day is used
pd#2 dr#2 = up to period pd#2, dump rate dr#2 in tons/day is used
pd#3 dr#3 = up to period pd#3, dump rate dr#3 in tons/day is used
... ...

pd#6 dr#6 = up to period pd#6, dump rate dr#6 in tons/day is used

Both Line #1 and Line #2 are read in by free format.


NOTE:

If more periods are needed, enter additional Line #2" with distinct period#s.
A blank line will end the input for Line #2" and for the destination.

If more than one destination is to be read in, add more lines following the above Line #1 and Line #2 format. Again, a
blank line would signal the end of input for a destination.

Only the destinations, which require variable dumping rate by period, are needed to be input in this file. The default
dumping rate in tons/day is the rate entered in destination capacity file (File 30) for a destination.

The dumping rate tons/day is on the same scale as the magnitude of reserves. If the reserves are in tons, the
dumping rate is tons/day. If the reserves are in 1,000 tons, the dumping rate is 1000 tons/day.

The maximum number of period permitted is defined by IOP404 (e.g., 100).
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82140 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
OPTIONAL #BOTTOM BENCHES BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (FILE 36)

For each pushback (pit):

Line #1 = Pit name (no more than 5 letters).

Line #2 = (up to six pairs of period# and number of bottom benches)

pd#1 bb#1 pd#2 bb#2 pd#3 bb#3 pd#4 bb#4 pd#5 bb#5 pd#6 bb#6

where:

pd#1 bb#1 = up to period pd#1, number of bottom bench within pushback pit name is bb#1
pd#2 bb#2 = up to period pd#2, number of bottom bench within pushback pit name is bb#2
pd#3 bb#3 = up to period pd#3, number of bottom bench within pushback pit name is bb#3
... ...

pd#6 bb#6 = up to period pd#6, number of bottom bench within pushback pit name is bb#6

Both Line #1 and Line #2 are read in by free format.


NOTE:

If more periods are needed, enter additional Line #2" with distinct period#s.
A blank line will end the input for Line #2" and for the pushback.

If more than one pushback is to be read in, add more lines following the above Line #1 and Line #2 format. Again, a
blank line would signal the end of the input for a pushback.

Only the pushbacks, which require variable number of bottom benches by period, are needed to be input in this file.
The default number of bottom benches is the number of bottom benches entered in M821V1 run file for the pushback.

The maximum number of period permitted is defined by IOP404 (e.g., 100).
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82141
OPTIONAL MINING RATE BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (FILE 37)

For each pushback (pit):

Line #1 = Pushback name (no more than 5 letters).

Line #2 = (up to six pairs of period# and mining rate in tons/day)

pd#1 mr#1 pd#2 mr#2 pd#3 mr#3 pd#4 mr#4 pd#5 mr#5 pd#6 mr#6

where:

pd#1 mr#1 = up to period pd#1, mining rate mr#1 in tons/day is used
pd#2 mr#2 = up to period pd#2, mining rate mr#2 in tons/day is used
pd#3 mr#3 = up to period pd#3, mining rate mr#3 in tons/day is used
... ...

pd#6 mr#6 = up to period pd#6, mining rate mr#6 in tons/day is used

Both Line #1 and Line #2 are read in by free format.


NOTE:

If more periods are needed, enter additional Line #2" with distinct period#s.
A blank line will end the input for Line #2" and for the pushback.

If more than one pushback is to be read in, add more lines following the above Line #1 and Line #2 format. Again, a
blank line would signal the end of input for a pushback.

Only the pushbacks, which require variable mining rate by period, are needed to be input in this file. The default
mining rate in tons/day is the rate entered in run file for the pushback.

The mining rate tons/day is on the same scale as the magnitude of reserves. If the reserves are in tons, the mining
rate is tons/day. If the reserves are in 1,000 tons, the mining rate is 1000 tons/day.

The maximum number of period permitted is defined by IOP404 (e.g., 100).
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82142 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
OPTIONAL CUTOFF GRADE BY PHASE BY PERIOD FILE (FILE 38)

For each pushback (pit):

Line #1 = Pit name (no more than 5 letters).

Line #2 = (up to six pairs of period# and cutoff grade number)

pd#1 cn#1 pd#2 cn#2 pd#3 cn#3 pd#4 cn#4 pd#5 cn#5 pd#6 cn#6

where:

pd#1 cn#1 = up to period pd#1, the cutoff number for pushback pit name is cn#1
pd#2 cn#2 = up to period pd#2, the cutoff number for pushback pit name is cn#2
pd#3 cn#3 = up to period pd#3, the cutoff number for pushback pit name is cn#3
... ...

pd#6 cn#6 = up to period pd#6, the cutoff number for pushback pit name is cn#6

Both Line #1 and Line #2 are read in by free format.


NOTE:

If more periods are needed, enter additional Line #2" with distinct period#s.
A blank line will end the input for Line #2" and for the pushback.

If more than one pushback is to be read in, add more lines following the above Line #1 and Line #2 format. Again, a
blank line would signal the end of input for a pushback.

Only the pushbacks, which require variable cutoff by period, are needed to be input in this file. The default cutoff is
defined on production requirement input (Type 13) input. The cutoff number defined in this file refers to the position
of cutoff (to the left) in reference to the c# production classes. For example,

ore-1 ore-2 ore-3 ore-4 ore-5 ore-6 ore-7 ore-8 ore-9 ore-10
Position#: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Grades(Cu%): -0.2 0.20 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80
If the cutoff grade is 0.50%Cu,
Default cutoff is: 9 7 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

where,
1 = mill
2 = mid- grade stockpile
7 = low- grade leach
9 = waste

If variable cutoff by pushback is required, an equivalent cutoff number for 0.50%Cu cutoff is 4. An equivalent cutoff
number for 0.65%Cu is 7. The materials below the cutoff number will be classified as defined by IOP12. In other
word, only one schedule class is permitted. For example, if IOP12=6, the materials below the cutoff number will be
scheduled as high- grade leach. If IOP12=9, the materials below the cutoff number will be scheduled as a waste type
defined by IOP301 (101=Type 1 waste, 102=Type 2 waste, 103=Type 3 waste, , 106=Type 6 waste).

The maximum number of period permitted is defined by IOP404 (e.g., 100).




MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82143

OPTIONAL VERTICAL ADVANCE BY PHASE BY PERIOD (FILE 39)

For each pushback (pit):

Line #1 = Pit name (no more than 5 letters).

Line #2 = (up to six pairs of period# and Maximum vertical rate of advance bench number)

pd#1 vadv#1 pd#2 vadv#2 pd#3 vadv#3 pd#4 vadv#4 pd#5 vadv#5 pd#6 vadv#6

where:

pd#1 vadv#1 = up to period pd#1, maximum vertical rate of advance vadv#1 in number of benches is used
pd#2 vadv#2 = up to period pd#2, maximum vertical rate of advance vadv#2 in number of benches is used
pd#3 vadv#3 = up to period pd#3, maximum vertical rate of advance vadv#3 in number of benches is used
... ...

pd#6 vadv#6 = up to period pd#6, maximum vertical rate of advance vadv#6 in number of benches is used

Both Line #1 and Line #2 are read in by free format.


NOTE:

If more periods are needed, enter additional Line #2" with distinct period#s.
A blank line will end the input for Line #2" and for the pushback.

If more than one pushback is to be read in, add more lines following the above Line #1 and Line #2 format. Again, a
blank line would signal the end of input for a pushback.

Only the pushbacks, which require variable vertical advance in number of benches by period, are needed to be input in
this file. The default vertical advance in number of benches is the vertical advance entered in the run file for the
pushback.

The maximum number of period permitted is defined by IOP404 (e.g., 100).





















M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82144 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
DETAILED TRUCK HAULAGE CYCLE FILE FORMAT (FILE 31)

If the haulage cycle time should be applied as from each bench of a pushback (pit) to each lift of a dump or ore destination
(see explanation under "belev"), you should input the cycle time for each combination.

When program needs a cycle time, it will look into the haulage file for the combination. If there is no match, the program
may use the average haulage time between the pit and the dump or the ore destinations, depending on IOP32.

The haulage cycle time is entered one combination for per line.

The input is as:

pitid belev dest delev cyct fbrat

where:

pitid = pit name (use the labels from the Type 5 input data)
belev = bench toe elevation
dest = destination
delev = dump crest lift elevation (when there are no multiple lifts, enter an arbitrary number, e.g., 1.
However, the lifts should agree with dump lifts and individual lift input).
cyct = cycle time in minutes for the base truck fleet
fbrat = fuel burn rate in gallon/hour or liter/hour


The input is free format. A blank line or end of file specifies end of input. The maximum number of lines for cycle time
entry is limited by IOP408 (e.g., 200,000)


NOTE: The cycle time file must be sorted by pushbacks (pits) according to Type 5 label input.
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82145

SAMPLE DETAILED TRUCK HAULAGE CYCLE FILE (FILE 31) (CYC821.TMP)


PHS1 300 CRUSH 315 30.00 10.00 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 CRUSH 315 32.23 10.23 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 420 CRUSH 315 27.76 10.76 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 ED 525 14.21 10.21 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 ED 495 13.74 10.74 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 SLG 480 44.00 10.00 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 SLG 465 43.10 10.10 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 SMG 510 47.10 10.10 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 SMG 495 45.56 10.56 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 TD 17 34.73 10.73 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS2 435 TD 15 30.58 10.58 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 435 CRUSH 315 26.39 10.39 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 420 CRUSH 315 25.98 10.98 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 465 ED 525 21.19 10.19 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 465 ED 495 21.08 10.08 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 435 SLG 480 38.16 10.16 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 435 SLG 465 37.26 10.26 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 435 SMG 510 41.26 10.26 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 435 SMG 495 39.72 10.72 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 525 TD 19 35.56 10.56 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS3 525 TD 18 32.64 10.64 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 375 CRUSH 315 12.94 10.94 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 360 CRUSH 315 13.77 10.77 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 450 ED 525 12.61 10.61 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 450 ED 495 12.14 10.14 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 375 SLG 480 24.32 10.32 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 375 SLG 465 24.69 10.69 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 375 SMG 510 27.37 10.37 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 375 SMG 495 27.11 10.11 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 525 TD 19 27.99 10.99 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS4 525 TD 18 25.06 10.06 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 CRUSH 315 16.65 10.65 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 495 CRUSH 315 22.39 10.39 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 SLG 330 16.50 10.50 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 SLG 345 17.83 10.83 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 SMG 315 14.60 10.60 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 SMG 330 16.50 10.50 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 TD 1 30.21 10.21 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS5 510 TD 2 25.68 10.68 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat
PHS6 300 CRUSH 315 30.00 10.00 / pitid,belev,dest,delev,cyct,fbrat


M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82146 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
MULTIPLE MODEL FILES IN ASCII FORMAT (FILE 19) OPTIONAL

This file contains up to 10 models in ASCII format. Starting from line#3, each column provides an entry for a model in
space or comma delineated free format. Up to 10 models can be input. The total number of lines for bench elevation
input is dependent on the model with the most number of benches. For example, if there are 4 models, model 1 has 64
benches, model 2 has 5 benches, model 3 has 10 benches, model 4 has 15 benches, the total number of lines for bench
elevation input will be 64. The entries for other models beyond their elevation input must be filled with 0s. The input
format for this file is given below.

Line# 1 = PCF file (e.g., msop10.dat)

Line# 2 = Imperial or metric unit flag (e.g., metric)

Line# 3 = Model labels delineated by comma (e.g., Model 1, Model 2 - variable, Model 3, ...)

Line# 4 = Constant or variable bench height indicators (e.g., constant variable constant ...)

Line# 5 = Number of benches (e.g., nbench1 nbench2 nbench3 ...)

where:
nbench1 = number of benches for model 1
nbench2 = number of benches for model 2
nbench3 = number of benches for model 3
......
nbenchN = number of benches for model N (N10)

Line# 6 = Bench heights (e.g., height1 height2 height3 ...)

where:
height1 = bench height for model 1
height2 = bench height for model 2
height3 = bench height for model 3
......
heightN = bench height for model N (N10)

NOTE: The bench heights for variable bench height models are usually set at -1.

Line# 7 = Crest elevation of models (e.g., crest1 crest2 crest3 ...)

where:
crest1 = crest elevation for model 1
crest2 = crest elevation for model 2
crest3 = crest elevation for model 3
......
crestN = crest elevation for model N (N10)

Line# 8 = Bench elevation at toe for models (e.g., elev1 elev2 elev3 ...)

where:
elev1 = bench toe elevation for model 1
elev2 = bench toe elevation for model 2
elev3 = bench toe elevation for model 3
......
elevN = bench toe elevation for model N (N10)

Add more of Line#8 inputs for additional bench elevations.

MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82147
BENCH PARAMETER FILE (FILE 24) OPTIONAL

This file contains optional bench control parameters input by phase by bench. The control parameters are mining rate,
shovel fleet number and truck loading factor. If IOP35=1, the truck loading factor will be replaced with ore/waste
mining order. In this case, 0 means that the ore and waste should be mined according to the stripping ratio of the
bench, and 1 means that the ore can be completely mined before mining begins on the waste on that bench. The input
format for this file is given below:

Line# 1 = header line - comment of input fields (no significance to schedule run)

Line# 2 = phaseID phaseN elev benchN mrate shlN loadF

where:

phaseID = phase label ( 5 letters, corresponding to Type 5 input, e.g., PHAS1)
phaseN = phase sequence number (e.g., 5)
elev = bench toe elevation (e.g., 2945)
benchN = bench number (e.g., 1)
mrate = bench mining rate in x- tons/day (x corresponds to the reserve magnitude,
for example, x=1000 or k-ton/day if the reserves are in 1000 tons. An example
of mining rate can be 500kt/day).
ShlN = shovel fleet number (e.g., 1 which may correspond to 4100 shovel fleet)
LoadF = truck loading factor (e.g., 75, meaning 75% of loading factor)
If IOP35=1, the loadF corresponds to ore/waste mining order.

Add more Line#2 for additional bench parameters.


NOTE: Only the benches, which require control parameters, need to be input. The default mining rate for each
bench is the phase mining rate. The shovel fleet used will be based on shovel fleet priority (input order) and
availability. The default loading factor is 100%. The truck capacity can also be adjusted by cost classes according to
material type if IOP460 > 1 (refer to input for TRUCK and SHOVEL CHARACTERISTICS)
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82148 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
ECONOMIC PARAMETER ADJUSTMENTS BY PERIOD INPUT FILE (FILE 20) OPTIONAL

This file contains optional adjustments to economic parameters by period. The economic parameters are: mining cost,
primary metal price, secondary metal price, destination (processing) cost, shovel operating cost, and truck operating
cost. The input format for this file is given below:

Line# 1 = header line - comment of input fields (no significance to schedule run)

Line# 2 = mncostadj ppriceadj spriceadj fcostadj shcostadj tkcostadj iper1 iper2

where:

mncostadj = mining cost adjustment in $/ton from iper1 to iper2
ppriceadj = primary metal price adjustment in $/unit from iper1 to iper2
spriceadj = secondary metal price adjustment in $/unit from iper1 to iper2
fcostadj = adjustment for the destination fixed cost in $/ton from iper1 to iper2
shcostadj = shovel operating cost adjustment in $/hour from iper1 to iper2
tkcostadj = truck operating cost adjustment in $/hour from iper1 to iper2
iper1 = starting period number for the adjustment taking effect
iper2 = ending period number for the adjustment

Add more Line#2 for additional adjustment in different period spans.


NOTE: The adjustment parameters are required only for the periods in which economic parameters need to be
adjusted. The default values of the adjustments = 0. File 20 input overrides the parameters PAR451 PAR458.
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82149
CASH FLOW TABLE INPUT FILE (FILE 28)

Cash flow input:

Line# 1 = ntydp nsydp iadtk iadsh iadtn iadsn iadtr iadsr taxrt yshft

where,

ntydp = number of years for truck fleet depreciation (Default=7, max=10)
nsydp = number of years for shovel fleet depreciation (Default=15, max=20)
iadtk = fleet number for the characteristics of the automatically added truck fleet (Default=1)
iadsh = fleet number for the characteristics of the automatically added shovel fleet (Default=1)
iadtn = number of trucks in the automatically added truck fleet because of fluctuation (Default=5)
iadsn = number of shovels in the automatically added shovel fleet because of fluctuation (Default=1)
iadtr = number of trucks in the automatically added truck fleet when replacing fleet iadtk
(Default=the number of trucks in the fleet iadtk)
iadsr = number of shovels in the automatically added shovel fleet when replacing fleet iadsh
(Default=the number of shovels in the fleet iadsh)
taxrt = tax rate in percent (Default=30%)
yshft = shift value for Net Present Value (NPV) time reference from year-end, e.g., 0.5 for half year. There is no
default when File 28 is present. (Default=0.5 when File 28 is not present)

Line# 2 = tcpcs1 tcpcs2 tcpcs3 tcpcs4 tcpcs5 tcpcs6 tcpcs7 tcpcs8 tcpcs9 tcpcs10 (10 trucks/line)

where,
tcpcs1= Capital investment cost per truck for truck fleet number 1 (Default=$2.3 million)
tcpcs2= Capital investment cost per truck for truck fleet number 2 (Default=$2.3 million)
tcpcs3= Capital investment cost per truck for truck fleet number 3 (Default=$2.3 million)
......
tcpcs10= Capital investment cost per truck for truck fleet number 10 (Default=$2.3 million)

Add more Line#2 lines for more truck fleets.

Line# 3 = scpcs1 scpcs2 scpcs3 scpcs4 scpcs5 scpcs6 scpcs7 scpcs8 scpcs9 scpcs10 (10 shovels/line)

where,
scpcs1= Capital investment cost per shovel for shovel fleet number 1 (Default=$8.0 million)
scpcs2= Capital investment cost per shovel for shovel fleet number 2 (Default=$8.0 million)
scpcs3= Capital investment cost per shovel for shovel fleet number 3 (Default=$8.0 million)
......
scpcs10= Capital investment cost per shovel for shovel fleet number 10 (Default=$8.0 million)

Add more Line# 3 lines for more shovel fleets.


Line# 4 = tdprt1 tdprt2 tdprt3 tdprt4 tdprt5 tdprt6 tdprt7 tdprt8 tdprt9 tdprt10 (10 rates/line)

where,
tdprt1= depreciation rate in percent for trucks for year 1
tdprt2= depreciation rate in percent for trucks for year 2
tdprt3= depreciation rate in percent for trucks for year 2
......
tdprt10= depreciation rate in percent for trucks for year 10

Add more Line#4 lines for more depreciation rates (default depreciation is straight line).


M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82150 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
Line# 5 = sdprt1 sdprt2 sdprt3 sdprt4 sdprt5 sdprt6 sdprt7 sdprt8 sdprt9 sdprt10 (10 rates/line)

where,
sdprt1= depreciation rate in percent for shovels for year 1
sdprt2= depreciation rate in percent for shovels for year 2
sdprt3= depreciation rate in percent for shovels for year 2
......
sdprt10= depreciation rate in percent for shovels for year 10

Add more Line# 5 lines for more depreciation rates (default depreciation is straight line).


Table Input for Cash Flow (period 1 - 10):

Line# 6 = Fixed portion of cost of sales by period

Line# 7 = Fixed portion of depreciation & amortization by period

Line# 8 = Other income (expenses) by period

Line# 9 = Fixed portion of capital expenditure by period

Line# 10 = Working capital movement by period

Line# 11 = Other cash adjustments by period

Line# 12 = Total assets by period

Line# 13 = Total capital by period


Table Input for Cash Flow (period 11 - 20) (if applicable):

Line# 6 = Fixed portion of cost of sales by period

Line# 7 = Fixed portion of depreciation & amortization by period

Line# 8 = Other income (expenses) by period

Line# 9 = Fixed portion of capital expenditure by period

Line# 10 = Working capital movement by period

Line# 11 = Other cash adjustments by period

Line# 12 = Total assets by period

Line# 13 = Total capital by period

Add more Line# 6 - Line# 13 lines as blocks if there are more than 20 periods (total number of lines 36).


NOTE: If File 28 is not in input, the default cash flow input will be generated.
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82151




SAMPLE FOR CASH FLOW INPUT FILE: cashfl.inp

7 7 1 1 5 1 17 2 35.0 0.0/ #of yrs for trk&shl depr.; Add trk&shl char, #of trk,shl; #of trk&shl; Tax rate,
Shift for NPV
2300 2300 2300 2300 2300 / capital cost per truck for truck fleets
7500 7500 7500 / capital cost per shovel for shovel fleets
50 10 10 10 10 5 5 / truck depreciation rate% for years 1 - 7
40 10 10 10 10 10 10 / shovel depreciation rate% for years 1 - 7
51567 12932 11342 14685 16931 13063 17009 15572 14692 14400 / cost of sales (period 1-10)
0 2954 2769 3286 3139 3164 3095 3167 3066 2960 / depreciation & amortization
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / other income (expenses)
3969 5557 6347 5614 2481 3559 508 398 348 355 / capital expenditure
0 5534 5186 5872 5802 5444 3849 3250 4888 4803 / working capital
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / other cash adjustments
546133 548394 551790 556708 555294 554252 551009 549144 549581 547872 / total assets
528276 527508 534399 536882 536186 534797 531084 529106 529134 528307 / total capital
14157 14742 14940 45193 44062 44601 44140 45809 45809 44809 / cost of sal es ( per i od 11- 20)
3175 3036 2862 6694 6694 6694 6694 5508 5508 5508 / depreciation & amortization
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / other income (expenses)
440 400 440 5582 4955 481 841 3245 3245 3247 / capital expenditure
6217 6842 5663 5590 5742 5690 5579 4525 4525 4525 / working capital
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / other cash adjustments
549584 549842 554613 548352 547225 553919 539837 538926 538324 537739 / total assets
527732 527521 531436 524342 523860 520682 517476 515789 515810 515848 / total capital
45809 17874 17874 17874 16874 16874 16874 18874 16874 17874 / cost of sales (period 21-30)
5508 35636 39761 37292 38232 38802 38110 37665 37384 39855 / depreciation & amortization
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / other income (expenses)
3546 6399 45515 3592 3332 26172 7092 8055 45350 6479 / capital expenditure
6125 88881 88888 153273 45549 65278 25106 55583 55138 53599 / working capital
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / other cash adjustments
538876 508477 508827 572236 538953 525612 593565 579242 576800 590684 / total assets
514647 503774 503112 537204 500745 513632 549959 531640 526045 590628 / total capital
18874 18874 18874 18874 0 / cost of sal es ( per i od 31- 35)
35062 38833 36557 34012 34012 / depreciation & amortization
0 0 0 0 0 / other income (expenses)
3291 3395 599 0 0 / capital expenditure
53268 53832 52152 0 0 / working capital
0 0 0 0 0 / other cash adjustments
223125 184412 519979 6381 3555 / total assets
169850 132208 216890 0 0 / total capital
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82152 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
SAMPLE RUNFILE FOR M821V1 (RUN821.A)

MEDS-821V1 10=msop10.dat 3=rpt821.mat 34=sum821.mat 29=plt821.mat;
MEDS-821V1 33=rst821.tmp 23=ass821.mat 25=dtl821.mat 30=dmp821.mat;
MEDS-821V1 19=ascpcf.tab 24=vbp821.prn 35=drt821.prn 36=vbn821.prn;
MEDS-821V1 37=mrt821.prn 38=vct821.prn 39=vad821.prn 20=eaj821.prn;
MEDS-821V1 32=rst821.dat
* MSOP - mill+2 leach+3 stockpile+4 waste types+reclaim stockpile schedule
DOC DOC

USR = abc / user id Tuesday,May 07,2002 03:26 PM

IOP1 = 2 / Location of primary grade
IOP2 = 3 / Location of secondary grade
IOP3 = 1 / Location of third grade
IOP8 = 1 / Option for processing all the mined type 1 mill ore materials
COM 0= No impact
COM 1= Process all the mined type 1 mill ore materials
IOP11 = 16 / #of periods for schedule run
COM N= #of periods for schedule run, IOP11 can be less than
COM #of periods defined in production requirements.
IOP12 = 102 / Schedule material number for materials below cutoff
COM Schedule material number for materials below period cutoff
COM when variable cutoff by phase option is used (file 38).
IOP13 = 1 / Option for using net$/ton values as 1st and 2nd grades.
COM 0= No impact
COM 1= 1st grade is net $/ton for mill ore for economic calculations.
COM 2nd grade is net $/ton for materials below period cutoff grade
COM including waste.
IOP14 = 4 / Option for VB interface - Mine Operations.
COM 1= Mill(Plant) - Ore/Waste
COM 2= Mill(Plant) - Ore/Stockpile/Waste
COM 3= Mill - Ore/Leach/Waste
COM 4= Mill - Ore/Leach/Stockpile/Waste
COM 5= Crushed Leach/Waste
COM 6= Crushed Leach/ROM Leach/Waste
COM 7= ROM High-Grade Leach/ROM Low-Grade Leach/Waste
COM 8= Mill/Crushed Leach/ROM Leach/Waste
COM 9= Mill/Crushed Leach/ROM Leach/Stockpile/Waste
COM 10= Other
IOP15 = 1 / Option for VB interface - Trucks & Shovels & Destinations
COM 0= Do not use Trucks & Shovels & Destinations
COM 1= Use Trucks & Shovels & Destinations
IOP17 = 1 / Option for allocating mined materials to their destinations.
COM 0= Material destination by shortest haul
COM 1= Material destination by linear programming based on minimization
COM of haulage cycle times among all mined phases and avail. destinations.
IOP19 = 2 / Option for restart.
COM 0= Produce period by period schedules from period 1
COM N= Restart from period N, the schedules from period 1
COM to period N-1 is read in from file 32.
IOP21 = 11 / Criteria to choose a mining solution
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82153
COM 1= Minimize net value (what if)
COM 2= Minimize primary mineral content (what if)
COM 3= Minimize stripping ratio
COM 4= Minimize haulage & loading cost
COM 5= Minimize haulage hours
COM 6= Minimize amount of exposed ore (what if)
COM 7= Minimize net operating profit (NOPAT)(what if)
COM 8= Minimize cash flow (what if)
COM 9= Minimize return of capital (what if)
COM 10= Minimize cost of unit metal (e.g., $/lb)
COM 11= Maximize net value
COM 12= Maximize primary mineral content
COM 13= Maximize stripping ratio (what if)
COM 14= Maximize haulage & loading cost (what if)
COM 15= Maximize haulage hours (what if)
COM 16= Maximize amount of exposed ore
COM 17= Maximize net operating profit (NOPAT)
COM 18= Maximize cash flow
COM 19= Maximize return of capital (ROC)
COM 20= Maximize cost of unit metal (e.g., $/lb)(what if)
IOP27 = 15 / Report print option
COM 1= Print mining summary reports only (default)
COM 2= Print equipment usage reports only
COM 4= Print cost reports only
COM 8= Print destination usage only
COM 3= Print mining summary and equipment usage reports
COM 7= Print mining summary and equipment usage and cost reports
COM 15= Print all summary tables in standard report file
COM 19= Print summary reports+economics+destination usages
IOP31 = 1 / Can the number of phases working in one period be changed?
COM 0= The number of phases working can not be changed
COM 1= The number of phases working can be changed by program
IOP33 = 1 / Read de-watering cost?
COM 0= No
COM 1= Yes
IOP34 = 500000 / Number of iterations for each working combination
COM of phases before program terminates the mining
COM layout search for a period.
COM = N (default = very large number)
IOP301 = 102 / Default waste type when below period cutoff
COM IOP301=one of the following: 101,102,103,104,105,and 106.
IOP401 = 6 / Max number of phases <=50
IOP402 = 3 / Max number of (mid,low,and sub-grade) stockpiles <=30
IOP404 = 17 / Max number of periods <=100
IOP405 = 17 / Max number of precedence constraints <=2000
IOP406 = 4 / Max number of truck fleets <=100
IOP407 = 4 / Max number of shovel fleets <=20
IOP408 = 1 / Max number of detailed haulage records <=200000
IOP409 = 20 / Max number of reserve classes from res routines <=100
IOP411 = 6 / Max number of ore physical destinations <=90
IOP412 = 6 / Max number of waste physical destinations <=30
IOP413 = 6 / Max number of lifts for an ore destination <=50
IOP414 = 5 / Max number of lifts for a waste destination <=50
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82154 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
IOP415 = 6 / Max number of sub-regions for an ore destination <=50
IOP416 = 5 / Max number of sub-regions for a waste destination <=50
IOP417 = 3 / Max number of PCF models <=10
IOP418 = 1 / Max number of type1+type2 mill physical destinations <=30
IOP451 = 18 / Number of ore production classes <=30
IOP452 = 6 / Actual number of waste types <=6
IOP458 = 1 / Waste destinations have sub-regions?
COM 0= No, do not use waste sub-regions
COM 1= Yes, use waste sub-regions
IOP459 = 1 / Automatically retrieve secondary (mid,low, and sub-grade) stockpiles
COM 0= No
COM 1= Yes, automatically reclaim secondary stockpiles
IOP460 = 3 / Option for cost classes to adjust economic and operational parameters
COM 0= No
COM 1= Adjust mining and processing costs
COM 2= Adjust equipment operating costs, load, and haulage parameters
COM 3= Adjust both (1) and (2)

PAR1 = 15 / Annual discounting rate in percent (default=15%)
PAR2 = 330 / Number of operating days in one year
PAR4 = 1000 / Divider for reserves (e.g.,1 or 1000, default=1)
PAR6 = 24 / Operating hours per day (default=20)
PAR7 = 1000 / Tonnage units (including PAR4) (default=1000).
PAR11 = 0.375 / Estimated haulage & loading cost for ranking pushbacks
PAR13 = 5 / Number of feasible solutions needed in one period (eg,5-10)
PAR14 = 1 / Period number for feasible solution auditing
PAR15 = 1 / Default number of bottom benches within a pushback (default=1)
PAR16 = 0.4 / Fixed ore mining cost in $/ton
PAR17 = 0.4 / Fixed waste mining cost in $/ton
PAR18 = 0.4 / Fixed alluvium mining cost in $/ton
PAR19 = 0.4 / Fixed low grade (leach) mining cost in $/ton (default=PAR16)



END
6 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 / #of phases,mill1,mill2,hgleach,lgleach,mgstkp,lgstkp,sgstkp,waste1-6
CRUSH HGLCH LGLCH MGSTP LGSTP SGSTP WAST1 WAST2 WAST3 WAST4 / destination & phase labels
WAST5 WAST6 PHS1 PHS2 PHS3 PHS4 PHS5 PHS6 / destination & phase labels
1 0.7 87 2.4 80 3 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
2 0.4 40 0 0 0 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
3 0.6 15 0 0 0 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
4 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
5 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
6 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
7 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
8 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
9 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
10 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
11 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
12 0 0 0 0 0.1 1 100 / Dest# pprice prec sprice srec fcost frprd toprd
/ End of destination economics input
20 / Number of reserve classes
101 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 / Reserve classes to production classes
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82155
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 101 / Reserve classes to production classes
19 / Number of production classes
1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 / Production classes to cost classes
4 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 / Production classes to cost classes
10 / Number of cost classes
-0.15 0.05 0.1 -0.1 -0.1 0.1 0.1 0.05 -0.05 0.1 / mining cost adjustment for 10 cost classes
-0.55 0.25 0.3 -0.3 -0.2 0.2 0.2 0.35 -0.55 0.5 / processing cost adjustment for 10 cost classes
-0.05 0.15 0.1 -0.2 -0.1 0.1 0.1 0.02 -0.1 0.1 / variable mining cost adjustment for 10 cost classes
res1.scd 5000 1 2960 15 64 0 8 / reserve file name & phase parameters
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
res2.scd 5000 1 2960 15 64 0 8 / reserve file name & phase parameters
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
res3.scd 5000 1 2960 15 64 0 8 / reserve file name & phase parameters
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
res4.scd 5000 1 2960 15 64 0 8 / reserve file name & phase parameters
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
res5.scd 5000 1 2960 15 64 0 8 / reserve file name & phase parameters
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
res6.scd 5000 1 2960 15 64 0 8 / reserve file name & phase parameters
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 / average cycle time between phases & destinations
4 4 / number of truck and shovel fleets
T240A 1 0 240 240 83 50 / truck fleet ID & parameters
1000 90 120 3000 86 125 4500 82 130 6000 78 135 9000 90 120 10000 86 125 11000 82 130 12000 78 135 13000 90 120
14000 86 125 15000 82 130 60000 78 135 / truck availabilities, operating costs up to hours
10 15 10.5 -10 -20 -10 10 20 10 -15 / haulage capacity adjustment in tons per trip for 10 cost classes
20 15 20.5 -20 -10 -20 20 30 20 -10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
2 5 0.5 -2 -1 -2 2 3 2 -1 / haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
0.2 0.6 0.5 -1 -2 -3 5 4 2 -1.5 / fuel consumption adjustment in gal or litre for 10 cost classes
T240B 1 0 240 240 83 500 / truck fleet ID & parameters
1000 90 120 3000 86 125 4500 82 130 6000 78 135 9000 90 120 10000 86 125 11000 82 130 12000 78 135 13000 90 120
14000 86 125 15000 82 130 60000 78 135 / truck availabilities, operating costs up to hours
10 15 10.5 -10 -20 -10 10 20 10 -15 / haulage capacity adjustment in tons per trip for 10 cost classes
20 15 20.5 -20 -10 -20 20 30 20 -10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
2 5 0.5 -2 -1 -2 2 3 2 -1 / haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
0.2 0.6 0.5 -1 -2 -3 5 4 2 -1.5 / fuel consumption adjustment in gal or litre for 10 cost classes
TKSTP 1 0 195 195 83 500 / truck fleet ID & parameters
15000 86 100 30000 82 105 45000 78 110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / truck
availabilities, operating costs up to hours
10 15 10.5 -10 -20 -10 10 20 10 -15 / haulage capacity adjustment in tons per trip for 10 cost classes
20 15 20.5 -20 -10 -20 20 30 20 -10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
2 5 0.5 -2 -1 -2 2 3 2 -1 / haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
0.2 0.6 0.5 -1 -2 -3 5 4 2 -1.5 / fuel consumption adjustment in gal or litre for 10 cost classes
TKMIL 1 0 45 45 100 5 / truck fleet ID & parameters
50000 100 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / truck availabilities,
operating costs up to hours
10 15 10.5 -10 -20 -10 10 20 10 -15 / haulage capacity adjustment in tons per trip for 10 cost classes
20 15 20.5 -20 -10 -20 20 30 20 -10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82156 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
2 5 0.5 -2 -1 -2 2 3 2 -1 / haulage cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
0.2 0.6 0.5 -1 -2 -3 5 4 2 -1.5 / fuel consumption adjustment in gal or litre for 10 cost classes
4100A 1 0 70 10 / shovel fleet ID & parameters
2000 92 200 4000 88 205 6000 84 210 7500 82 220 9000 92 200 10000 88 205 11000 84 210 12000 82 220 13000 92 200
15000 88 205 16000 84 210 60000 82 220 / shovel availabilities, operating costs up to hours
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 / shovel loading flag (0=no,1=yes) for 10 cost classes
0.01 0 1 0.2 0.5 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.5 1 / loading cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
5 0 10 20 5 0 -10 -20 -5 10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
4100B 1 0 70 100 / shovel fleet ID & parameters
20000 92 200 40000 88 205 60000 84 210 75000 82 220 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / shovel
availabilities, operating costs up to hours
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 / shovel loading flag (0=no,1=yes) for 10 cost classes
0.01 0 1 0.2 0.5 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.5 1 / loading cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
5 0 10 20 5 0 -10 -20 -5 10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
SHSTP 1 0 60 100 / shovel fleet ID & parameters
15000 92 150 30000 88 155 45000 84 160 60000 82 165 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / shovel
availabilities, operating costs up to hours
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 / shovel loading flag (0=no,1=yes) for 10 cost classes
0.01 0 1 0.2 0.5 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.5 1 / loading cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
5 0 10 20 5 0 -10 -20 -5 10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
SHMIL 1 0 60 100 / shovel fleet ID & parameters
15000 92 150 30000 88 155 45000 84 160 60000 82 165 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 / shovel
availabilities, operating costs up to hours
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 / shovel loading flag (0=no,1=yes) for 10 cost classes
0.01 0 1 0.2 0.5 0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.5 1 / loading cycle time adjustment in minutes for 10 cost classes
5 0 10 20 5 0 -10 -20 -5 10 / operating cost adjustment in $ per ton for 10 cost classes
2 2 2 2 / loading cycle time between shovel and trucks
2 2 2 2 / loading cycle time between shovel and trucks
0 0 2 0 / loading cycle time between shovel and trucks
0 0 0 2 / loading cycle time between shovel and trucks
MGSTP / stockpile label
10 / cycle time between stockpile & type 1 mill destinations
SHSTP TKSTP / designated shovel & truck fleets
LGSTP / stockpile label
10 / cycle time between stockpile & type 1 mill destinations
SHSTP TKSTP / designated shovel & truck fleets
SGSTP / stockpile label
10 / cycle time between stockpile & type 1 mill destinations
SHSTP TKSTP / designated shovel & truck fleets
CRUSH / stockpile label
1 / cycle time between stockpile & type 1 mill destinations
SHMIL TKMIL / designated shovel & truck fleets
/ End of stockpile cycle time inputs
PRD1 / period ID 1
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5000 1 4 11 25 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD2 / period ID 2
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD3 / period ID 3
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 99000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2000 1 5 11 50 / production
MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc. M821V1LONG-RANGE SCHEDULING-OPEN PIT MINES


Revised: 31-May-2002 DOCUMENTATION Page 82157
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD4 / period ID 4
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD5 / period ID 5
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 99000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD6 / period ID 6
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD7 / period ID 7
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD8 / period ID 8
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD9 / period ID 9
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD10 / period ID 10
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD11 / period ID 11
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 99000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD12 / period ID 12
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 98800 99000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD13 / period ID 13
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 89765 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production
requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD14 / period ID 14
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 0 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD15 / period ID 15
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 0 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD16 / period ID 16
2 8843 0.1 0 0.0 0 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production requirements
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
PRD17 / period ID 17
2 40000 0.1 0 0.0 0 800000 330 102 103 104 7 6 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 / production requirements
M821V1LONG RANGE SCHEDULINGOPEN PIT MINES MineSight Proprietary Software: Mintec, Inc.


Page 82158 DOCUMENTATION Revised: 31-May-2002
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 / min & max quality 1&2&3 requirements
/ End of production requirements
1 2675 2420 0.05 0.01 / variable mining cost by bench
2 2690 2360 0.05 0.01 / variable mining cost by bench
3 2735 2240 0.05 0.01 / variable mining cost by bench
4 2780 2210 0.05 0.01 / variable mining cost by bench
5 2885 2240 0.05 0.01 / variable mining cost by bench
6 2915 2240 0.05 0.01 / variable mining cost by bench
/ End of variable mining cost by bench input
1 DONT MINE MGSTP 12 / precedence requirement type 1
1 DONT MINE LGSTP 12 / precedence requirement type 1
1 DONT MINE SGSTP 12 / precedence requirement type 1
5 DONT MINE PHS6 0 / precedence requirement type 1
17 MUST MINE PHS6 2240 / precedence requirement type 2
17 MINE TO PHS5 2240 100 100 75 / precedence requirement type 3
/ End of precedence requirement I
PHS2 AFTER PHS1 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS3 AFTER PHS2 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS4 AFTER PHS3 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS5 AFTER PHS4 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS6 AFTER PHS5 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
/ End of precedence requirement II
PHS2 AFBND PHS1 3 1 100 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS3 AFBND PHS2 2 1 100 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS4 AFBND PHS3 1 1 100 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS5 AFBND PHS4 1 1 100 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
PHS6 AFBND PHS5 2 1 100 / precedence constraint to prevent undercut mining
/ End of binding precedence requirement
PHS5 2240 HINDE PHS6 2255 / precedence constraint to preserve structures
/ End of precedence requirement III
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. ePit Basics
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page B-1
Notes:
Appendix B
ePit Basics
In this section you will learn the basic principles of Pit Optimization. This is followed
by the study of the basic techniques used in designing optimized pits.
Learning Outcome
When you have completed this section, you will know:
A. What the Pit Optimization series of programs does
B. The moving cone method of pit design
C. How to initialize a special Pit Optimization File 13
The Pit Optimization Programs
The Pit Optimization series of programs (MSOPIT, MSPTSP, MSVALP) are used to
create economically feasible pit designs using the 3D mine model in conjunction with a
specifically initialized Pit Optimization File 13. Then MS2 can plot out pit designs and
reserves can be calculated using other MSCompass procedures such as pitres.dat.
Floating Cone Logic
Optimized pits can be created by a moving cone method which can rapidly generate a
series of pits based on economic criteria. The objective of the moving cone is to find
maximum total profit pit limits.
1. Each block is assigned a dollar value.
a. Negative value for waste
b. Positive values for ore
c. Zero values for air
2. Cone geometry.
a. Cone base radius (DX/2 or DY/2)
b. Cone centered on ore blocks at bottom or center
c. Variable slopes or constant slopes
3. Dollar value of cone = sum of dollar values of whole blocks within cone. If the
value of the cone is positive, all blocks within the cone are mined.
4. Movement of cone is from top down, using an iterative trial and error method.
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Page B-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
5. Possible problems:
a. Multiple pit bottoms
b. Incorrect search sequence
c. Initial pit to expose ore
d. Block size
How MSOPIT, MSPTSP and MSVALP Work Within MineSight
Using the Pit Optimization programs is a matter of following a sequence of individual
steps. The steps are:
1. Set up a special Pit Optimization file 13 using the procedure P60110.dat. The
only inputs required are the file name, elevation limits and elevation precision.
It is convenient to use a separate Pit Optimization file 13 for each series of pits.
2. Use MSPTSP to add slope data to the Pit Optimization file 13 from the 3DBM.
The procedure is PSPTSP.DAT
3. Use program MSOPIT to design ultimate pits or a series of pits. The resulting pits
are stored as surfaces in the Pit Optimization file 13. Both floating cone and LG
options are available, using the procedure PSOPIT.DAT.
4. Use MineSight to display or plot the pits. The pits can be displayed as a model
view or contoured to display as bench toes.
5. MSVALP is used to verify the economics and compute reserves for the pits.
MSVALP can also develop schedules and optimize the cutoff grades. The
procedure used is PSVALP.DAT.
6. Block partials can be computed between pits or from the original surface for
reserve calculations and analysis. All the normal resource calculation programs
can be used with the partials.
7. If desired, more detailed schedules can be created with M821V1.
Initialize Pit Optimization File 13
The Pit Optimization File 13 can be initialized using the procedure p60110.dat or
through the MSCompass project file editor, accessed through the Project tab in the
Compass dialog. Since the items and most of the precisions in the Pit Optimization File
13 are fixed, only these two methods should be used for initializing this file.
The procedure p60110.dat is a simple one-panel procedure; enter the file extension
for your special Pit Optimization File 13 (pto is the default extension if none is
specified), the minimum, maximum and precision values for project elevations, and the
name of the original File 13 from which the TOPOG values will be extracted. There is
an option for specifying file extensions for the run and report files, if desired (pto is the
default file extension if none is specified).
Using the MSCompass project file editor to initialize the Pit Optimization File 13 is
just as simple, requiring you to specify only the elevation parameters (minimum,
maximum and precision) and the source File 13 for the TOPOG item. You can specify
the file extension for the new file as it is saved. Although the project file editor requires
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. ePit Basics
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page B-3
Notes:
a bit less input from the user, it is not possible to use this technique within an
MSCompass multi-run; in this instance it is necessary to use the procedure.
Design Variable Considerations
MSOPIT reads the block model and either extracts or computes the Design Variable.
The Design Variable is the basis for the pit optimization and is used in either the FC or
LG algorithms to compute value directly from the variables. There are three options for
the Design Variable:
Grade, Units ( ounces or grams) , or Value per ton
Profit per block
Net per block
In all 3 cases the Design Variable can read from the block model or computed from a
number of items within the block model.
The advantage of using Grade per ton is that the cutoff grade can be varied. In
designing a series of pits using Grade per ton as the Design Variable the Value per unit
can be varied automatically also varying the cutoff grade. The problem is that this is
only possible if a single grade or an equivalent grade is used with a single process for
ore.
The Profit per block or Net per block allows for multiple grades and processes with
variable process costs, recoveries, and metal prices.
The difference between Profit per block and Net per block is that in the Profit per
block case only blocks that are processed as ore are assigned a value, waste blocks need
not be assigned a Design Variable value. For the Net per block case every block has a
value, even waste blocks, and this allows for variable waste costs.
Value Calculations
The value calculation logic is designed to be flexible, yet not overly complex. If the
value calculation is very complex, the Value can be computed with a USER subroutine
or M612RP and stored in the block model and read from the block model.
The basic logic assumes up to 5 grades, 10 metallurgical classes and 10 processes.
The grades are read from the block model, as is the metallurgical code.
The metallurgical code should be from 1 to 10. For each process and each
metallurgical code the processing cost must be defined, and for each metal the price,
recovery and the factor to convert from grade to payable units defined.
Also it is possible to have metallurgical types, which can have multiple processing
methods. In this case MSOPIT selects the best process based upon economics.
The calculation of mining costs has 3 options; the mining cost can be stored in each
block and read from the model; average ore and waste mining costs per ton can be
specified; or variable additional mining costs for ore and waste by bench
The second 2 options can be used together.
ePit Basics Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page B-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Use of Ore Percent.
An ore percent item can be used from the model. The Ore percent is the portion of the
block which is ore, or potential ore, and the grades and MET code apply to this portion
of the block only. The remainder of the block is assumed to be waste. Specific gravity
and mining costs can be assigned for both portions of the block (SGO, SGW, CMO,
CMW).
Topography Percent and Percent Mined
The TOPO model item is usually used to store the percentage of the block which is
below topography and is used as a volume reduction item in the value calculations. In
addition, a percent mined (MPCT) can be specified which is applied against the whole
block and used in the value calculations.
Using other model items
The following is a list of all the model items that can be used. To use them the label
of the item in the current 3D block model must be specified in the procedure.
Item Ref Name Description
TOPO Percent below topography
GRADE1 If the Design variable is read, it is assumed to be the first
grade
RSCOD Mining restriction; if this value is positive, the block can not
be mined
GRADE2 Second grade
GRADE3 Third grade
GRADE4 Fourth grade
GRADE5 Fifth grade
MET Metallurgical code 1 to 10. Only used in value calculation
for Design Variable
IUSE Resource class. Code from 1 to N, with 1 having the highest
confidence. The maximum value to include as ore can be
specified.
OPCT Ore percent; grades and MET code apply to this portion of
block
SGO Specific gravity for ore percent
SGW Specific gravity for waste
MCO Mining cost per ton for ore percent
MCW Mining cost per ton for waste
MPCT Mined percent

The Item Ref Name is used for reference in the documentation and procedure. The
model item names have no restrictions.
The following items can be stored back in the block model from MSOPIT.
CCPRO Calculated process code
VALPB Calculated value per block
VALPT Calculated value per ton

These items can only be calculated and stored in the block model if the Design
Variable is Value per block calculated from the 3DBM
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page B-5
Notes:
Pit Slopes
There are two options for pit slopes. Slopes can be defined by azimuths or complex
slopes can be defined by surfaces and sector codes.
If the number of complex slope surfaces is specified as 0, the azimuth method is
assumed, otherwise complex slopes will be used.
Pit Slopes by Azimuth
Up to 50 slopes can be specified for azimuths from 0 to 360 degrees. The pit slope to
any block from the base block is determined by computing the azimuth from the base
block to the block in question and computing an average slope based upon the weighted
average of the slopes for the closest defined azimuths. A more detailed method is to use
a set of pit slope azimuths for different base bottom limits.
Complex Slopes
Up to 4 surfaces defined as grids in the Pit Optimization file 13 can be used; for each
surface each grid point has a sector code which is tied to a table of slopes. From this
information a template defining the pit wall is calculated. In previous Pit Optimization
programs such as M720V2 and M720V4 this template was computed for every base
block. In MSOPIT there are 2 options for handling the computation of the template to
minimize compute time using the floating ray method.
Use Base pit to define template. A previously designed pit is used to compute a
template just once, which is used for the FC or LG pit designs. Obviously it is
very fast, for irregular shaped pit bottoms it is not accurate.
Recompute template for each bench based upon bench above geometry in FC.
Not allowed now, but I guess we need to allow either the recalculation of the
template by block or the use of multiple templates.
Assigning Complex Slope data to the DIPPER file 13
Program MSPTSP and procedure PSPTSP are used to assign the 4 surfaces and sector
codes from an item in the 3DBM.
ePit Basics Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page B-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Overview Python Scripting
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page C-1
Notes:
Appendix C
Overview Python Scripting
Introduction
Scripting support has been added to MineSight 3-D (MS3D). This section focuses on
the uses of scripting within MS3D, complete with examples and options. Different areas
of use including model access, reserves manipulation and reporting will be discussed.
Scripts to manipulate model, reserve and geometry data will be demonstrated.
Python is the language used to implement scripting in MS3D. Python is a high level
scripting language built into MS3D. Its syntax is relatively simple and straightforward.
It is object oriented but does not require you to use that form if you do not feel
comfortable with that style. It has many extensions; one can import libraries to do things
such as make dialog boxes, link to Microsoft

Excel or do a multitude of other things.


The official website for Python is www.python.org.
What are scripts going to do for us now that we have them? Since scripts are
interpreted at runtime, and not at compile time, they are much more flexible then hard
code. They can be tailored to a users unique need. Does this mean that every user needs
to write scripts? Absolutely not! Default scripts are in place that provide good default
reports. You may not however want to see all your grades being reported for each cut as
it is reported in the default window. You may want a routing code calculated based on
multiple grades and impurities. These calculations can be scripted and displayed
automatically when you make your cuts. On the model side you may want to code an
item based on how many waste blocks are touching each ore block (for contact block
dilution calculation). This can be done quite easily with scripts.
Scripts allow the user to tailor MS3D to exactly their requirements. Calculations that
used to be done in post processing can now be done on the fly. Data can be read in from
external sources and used in calculations or assigned to attributes on the cuts (for the
reserves side). There are many possibilities. However there is no requirement for any
user to meddle with scripts. The default scripts will work just fine. Mintec staff are, of
course, available to customize scripts on request.
Running scripts
Scripts in MS3D can be run in two different places, depending on the type of script.
Reserve scripts are run from within the IP tool, and Model scripts are run from the
model view properties page. Reserve scripts are used to report reserves to the
accumulation windows as well as to output reserves to various report files. Model
scripts are used to read item data from the model in slabs, manipulate it and optionally
write it back.
Overview Python Scripting Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page C-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Figure 1. Reserve Script Selection Tab
Reserve scripts can be accessed from the Scripts tab in the IP Cut Design dialog,
which is part of the MineSight IP Tool. There are two distinct areas for scripts, the
accumulation script and additional scripts. The accumulation script is intended to be run
on the current cut and will give a warning if you try to run it without a current cut. It is
the script that is responsible for updating the accumulation windows. It has a toggle,
which can be used to turn on and off its auto run behavior. The Sigma symbol will run
the accumulation script; you can also see that there is a Sigma button on the toolbar,
which does the same.
The additional scripts are meant for functions such as reporting or calculating a
custom attribute value. There is a Run on Save toggle that runs the scripts (in the order
of the list) when the user saves the current cut.
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Overview Python Scripting
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page C-3
Notes:
Figure 2. Model Script Selection Tab
Model scripts can be run from the Scripts tab on the properties dialog from the Model
View object. Model scripts are very similar to user subroutines in their capabilities. The
major difference (and advantage) is that there is no need to compile or link. Scripts can
be used to reset an item, perform complex calculations, or run calculations based on
multiple blocks, etc.
Examples
Reserve scripts are used for a multitude of things. The most important thing is that
they are what update the default accumulation windows used while planning. The
default accumulation script has two windows, one for the current cut reserves and one
for the period and plan reserve totals. As these values are all calculated in a script that is
read in and executed at run time, what is displayed in these windows is HIGHLY
customizable. For example if you wanted to assign a routing code based on a
combination of cutoffs or perhaps a cutoff matrix, this could be programmed into the
script (or even an externally run program in which the reserve values are passed in and
results are read back) and then the results reported in the window. However if you dont
feel the need to customize them then the default ones provide the information most
users require.
Examples of custom reporting include dumping reserves straight to a Microsoft

Excel spreadsheet or any other COM based application. You could also have it produce
custom ASCII reports. Libraries exist to interface scripts to e-mail clients, database
engines, GUI toolkits and a plethora of other clients.
Overview Python Scripting Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page C-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Figure 3. Microsoft

Excel Report
Scripts can also be used to augment current capabilities. A good example is routing
codes. A script can be used to determine a routing code based on multiple grades and or
rock types. This routing code can then be assigned to a user-defined attribute that is
carried with the cut. The user can, if they wish, override this assigned code and assign
their own. The data used for this routing code determination does not have to be static
and preprogrammed into the script either but can be gathered at runtime from a variety
or sources.
Figure 4. ASCII Report
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Overview Python Scripting
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page C-5
Notes:
Figure 5. Auto Setting of a Routing Code
Scripts can also be quite useful for creating geometry for plotting purposes. A user
has access to all the data about a cut including its geometry, reserves, custom attributes
(like routing code in above example), and a multitude of other useful information. To
visualize this we need to create text and or geometry. Scripts can do this for us. A user
has access to the geometry of the cuts so we can get centroids, bounding boxes and
boundaries for labeling. Creation of all basic types of geometry is supported,
polylines/polygons, markers, shells, semi-transformed text. Using these tools and the
information provided about the cuts, it is possible to automate quite a bit of the plotting
process in regards to cuts.
Model scripts are a very powerful addition to the scripting lineup. As shown above
they are not part of the IP Tool but rather run from the Model View properties dialog
box under the Scripts tab. Model scripts are both powerful and dangerous as they allow
you full control and access to your model. This means you can read and write to your
model. So if you make an error in your script, it is conceivable you could overwrite
valuable data in your model. Be careful when using the write feature in model scripts.
Overview Python Scripting Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page C-6 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Figure 6. Plotting Overlay
Figure 7. Zone Item
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. Overview Python Scripting
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page C-7
Notes:
Figure 8. Contact Blocks Coded by Number of Adjacent Waste Blocks
Conclusion
Scripts mean flexibility. What used to have to be done in separate steps can now be
automated. Many phased processes can now be tied together especially in the area of
short range planning. This was not at the expense of the users who do not need this level
of customization, but in addition to it. The default scripts produce excellent reports for
most users. Model scripts are an extremely powerful tool. When you must go beyond
simple single cell calculations your only choice used to be to write a user subroutine.
This required knowledge of Fortran as well as a compiler. With scripting, access to the
model has been made much easier.
Overview Python Scripting Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page C-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Notes:
Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc. How to Build Python Scripts
Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-1
Appendix D
How to Build Python Scripts
Scripting support has been added to MineSight 3-D (MS3D). This section focuses on the uses of scripting within
MS3D, complete with examples and options. Different areas of use including model access, reserves manipulation and
reporting will be discussed. We also will go over the mechanics of script writing in this section
Python is the language used to implement scripting in MS3D. Python is a high level scripting language built into
MS3D. Its syntax is relative simple and straightforward. It is object oriented, but does not require you to use that form if
you do not feel comfortable with that style. It has many extensions; one can import libraries to do things like make dialog
boxes, link to Microsoft

Excel or do a multitude of other things. The official website for Python is www.python.org.
What are scripts going to do for us now that we have them? Since scripts are interpreted at runtime and not at compile
time they are much more flexible then hard code. They can be tailored to a users unique need. Does this mean that every
user needs to write scripts? Absolutely not! Default scripts are in place that provide good default reports. You may not
however want to see all your grades being reported for each cut as it is reported in the default window. You may want a
routing code calculated based on multiple grades and impurities. These calculations can be scripted and displayed
automatically when you make your cuts. On the model side you may want to code an item based on how many waste
blocks are touching each ore block (for contact block dilution calculation). This can be done quite easily with scripts.
Scripts allow the user to tailor MS3D to exactly their requirements. Calculations that used to be done in post
processing can now be done on the fly. Data can be read in from external sources and used in calculations or assigned to
attributes on the cuts (for the reserves side). There are many possibilities. However there is no requirement for any user
to meddle with scripts. The default scripts will work just fine. Mintec staff are of course available to customize scripts on
request.
Tools & Syntax
The editor of choice that comes with the Python install is called IDLE. It has most of the functionality you would
expect from an editor plus some extras you will need for Python specifically. IDLE will color your code based on
keywords it recognizes (see figure 1). It will also use smart indenting, which is critical given that spacing in general is an
important concept in Python for determining where code blocks start and end. IDLE also includes the standard search
and replace functions and most other editor functions you expect from a modern editor. The one glaring feature missing
from this editor is a print function.
How to Build Python Scripts Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page D-2 Part #: E002 Rev. B
Figure 1. IDLE Interface
Lets explore this idea of indentation defining the start and end of code blocks in Python scripts as it is so critical and
can lead to problems further down the road. Some languages use sentinels or brackets of some sort to surround blocks of
code. By blocks of code I mean pieces of code which are to be executed in a loop or if a conditional expression is met. In
Python this is determined by indentation level alone. This brings up one big problem; tabs are not the same as spaces.
You may look at a piece of code and it may look indented properly but there could be tabs in place of spaces. IDLE has
an option on its toolbar under edit to untabify. I highly recommend keeping all your scripts with spaces only to avoid any
issues like this. The default scripts provided with MS3D all use spaces for indentation. If you have two lines of code one
indented four spaces and then the next only three they are not considered to be in the same block of code. This makes for
very tight and neat code but can lead to confusion when you are starting out.
Other tools at your disposal are the many libraries, some provided by us like reslib.py (Reference Table A) and others
provided by default with the Python install like string handling. Use the provided libraries whenever possible. This is
especially true when it comes to reslib.py. Reslib.py is a helper library for getting the reserves information from the
reserves dictionary (explained below). When the reserves structure is changed reslib.py will be changed along with it so
any scripts that were written using it will still work. However if you parsed the reserves dictionary yourself there is a
good possibility that any changes in the structure of the reserves dictionary could break your script. Libraries can be
found under the ./python21/lib directory (not libs). There is no reason why you cannot make your own libraries and in
fact it is encouraged. It promotes code reuse and limits errors.
To make use of any function you must define it first. This is also why you must import libraries at the top of your
script as well for this defines all the functions within it. Here is a clip from a script.
import reserves
import core
import gview
import string
import geomview
import reslib
def main():
hRes = reserves.hGetCurResRef() # Get reserves handle
dRes = reserves.dGetRes(hRes) # Get the whole reserves structure
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-3
# we are assuming one area with one material set here
numbins = reslib.getnumbins(dRes)
fillmain(dRes, numbins)
if dRes[curcut] >= 0:
fillcut(dRes, numbins)
main()
You can see we import quite a few libraries and then define a function, which we call at the bottom. You can also see
the form in which functions are called. Functions from within libraries are called using the library name dot function
name.
There is quite a bit more to syntax and general Python programming than what I have just covered but there are many
good books, which cover it as well. There are also many good online tutorials as well. I will now concentrate on the
MS3D aspects of scripting.
Anatomy of a Reserves Script
All reserves scripts share a few things in common; they only start to diverge when it comes to where they are going to
route their output to. All reserves scripts will need to import the same libraries; reserves, core and reslib at the very least.
They also share the same two lines of code as follows:
hRes = reserves.hGetCurResRef() # Get reserves handle
dRes = reserves.dGetRes(hRes) # Get the whole reserves structure
The first line gets the reserves handle. The reserves handle is a numeric identifier for this plan. This is then used in the
call to dGetRes, which returns to us our reserves dictionary. A dictionary is a free form data structure in Python.
This one holds all our reserve data for the current plan. It does not hold the actual geometry data although that data can
be obtained through further calls if desired. Here is where reslib.py comes into play. You could parse the dictionary
yourself which is not recommended or you could use the functions provided and described in Reference Table A to
obtain the values you need for reporting purposes. If for some reason the function you require is not present or you are
just curious, the structure of the reserves dictionary is shown in Reference Table B.
Assuming we are making an accumulation script we need to know how to pop up those nice grid windows and
populate them. I have included the source code for the default accumulation script in Reference Table C. To use the
accumulation windows you must import the library called gview.
def fillmain(dRes, numbins):
phndl = gview.OpenStdGrid(3+(3+reslib.getnumgrades(dRes)) * (numbins + 1), 3, 1)
labelrows(phndl, dRes)
gview.SetWinLev(phndl, 1)
fillcurrentperiod(phndl, dRes, numbins)
fillplan(phndl, dRes, numbins)
gview.CloseStdGrid(phndl)
gview.DisplayStdGrid(phndl)
Here is a clip from the default script that deals with the period and plan accumulation window. The call OpenStdGrid
takes three arguments. The first two can be easily figured out - they are row and column. The last argument is for
window instance. We can have multiple windows; this is how we know which window to pop up or refresh. There is no
difference between popping up a new window or refreshing an old one. If the instance is being used the existing window
will be refreshed. If it is not being used a new window will be created. There is no limit to the number of windows you
can create.
Clearly you should consider multiple monitors if you decide to take this to excess. A few lines farther down we set the
How to Build Python Scripts Proprietary Information of Mintec, inc.
Page D-4 Part #: E002 Rev. B
focus level of the window, SetWinLev. This is how we can tell the window to always be on top if this is what we desire -
values range from one to four. Finally at the bottom of the code clip are the CloseStdGrd, which closes it for editing, and
DisplayStdGrid, which displays it or updates it depending on the existing state.
File output is not so difficult either. The default IP script is included in Reference Table D. It follows the same logic as
in most of other languages, you open the file write to it, close it. I have included a clip to illustrate; I have included some
error handling as well.
try:
fl = open("report.txt", w)
except IOError:
return 0
fl.write("%10.0f \n" % 12.4)
fl.write("test" + "\n")
fl.close()
core.vSysSpawn ("notepad","report.txt")
The format specifiers used in Python are very similar to FORTRAN and C/C++. You can use "f" for float, "d" for
decimal and "s" for strings. A full listing is on the Python website and in the many books written on the subject. There is
also a call here, which spawns an external process. In this case we are spawning Notepad with our newly created file.
This function can be used to spawn other process as well.
Lets take a closer look at what reslib.py has to offer. The first function we should look at is getcontolgrade(). This
returns the control grade on which the cutoffs are based. It is used in many places so we should get used to using it. It has
two arguments but only one is required. The first argument, and one that is used in almost all calls to reslib, is the
reserves dictionary. The second and optional argument is an area index. We can use multiple areas but their use and
scripting for them is beyond the scope of this discussion.
The next group of calls is the bin calls like Getcuttonsmaterialbin and getcutgradematerialbin. When you think bin
you can think cutoff. There are a whole series of calls to get tons, volumes, grades by cutoff. There are also bin calls,
which do not break it down by material or cut either such as, getbintons, getbinvol and getbingrade. Many of these calls
are not meant as a final product but rather to be used together to get to the desired result. There are many other utility
functions in reslib.py. This is really the heart of reserves scripting. Make sure to have Reference Table A with you
anytime you plan on writing reserves scripts.
When trying to make your own reserve script it is recommended that you start by trying to modify the existing scripts
first (backing up the originals first). Once you feel comfortable then you can start branching out and doing more
adventurous reserves scripts.
Anatomy of a Model Script
Model scripts are a very powerful tool. They provide you complete read and write access to you model. As with
reserve scripts they start off with a few required imports and one required line of code. The imports are as follows:
import model
from Numeric import *
We import the model library as our interface into our MineSight model. The Numeric import is quite different however
and deserves some discussion on its own. The Numeric library allows us to work with very large arrays of numerical data
efficiently in Python, which is critical with model data. This brings up another good point about model scripts. Model
scripts are based around the idea of a slab of data. This slab can span multiple benches and multiple items. It could span
your whole model and all of your items. I doubt many users have a computer that could fit their whole model in RAM.
Thus even though you are allowed to try this it is not recommended. You can probably load your whole model if you are
only getting one or two items and you could definitely load a slab the size of a bench with all your items. The point is
that instead of limiting the usefulness of the tool by putting in artificial limitations, we put the onus on the script authors
to think about memory usage before making their scripts.
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-5
Included in Reference Table E is a contact block dilution script. In this script every ore block is checked against
adjacent blocks to see how many waste blocks it borders. Then an item is coded with this value. To minimize memory
usage no more than three single bench slabs are loaded in memory at one time. When a new one is loaded an old one is
stored back and freed, moving down through the model. Lets see how to work with a model.
SlabDesc = {}
ModelDesc = model.dGetActiveModelDesc()
SlabDesc[NumberItems] = 2
SlabDesc[ItemList] = [ZONE,VALPT]
SlabDesc[Origin] = [0,0,0]
SlabDesc[Extents] = [ModelDesc[Extents][0],ModelDesc[Extents][1],1]
Mid = model.dGetSlab(ModelDesc, SlabDesc)
Here is a clip from the dilution script. In the first line we are declaring an empty dictionary. It is here we are going to
describe the slab we want returned (which we will read and write to, then return for updating). The next line is where we
get the information about the current model, with a call to dGetActiveModelDesc(). It returns a dictionary with
information such as origin, extents, rotation and item list. A script that lists all its data is included as Reference Table F.
Then we define the slab we want to retrieve in our empty dictionary and retrieve it with a call to dGetSlab.
To access the items in the model use a form as follows,
Mid[item][level][row][col] = value
It should be noted that the level, row and column are relative to the slab origin not the model origin. So if they do not
correspond then they will not be the same values. For example if your slab only encompasses the fourth bench then the
level value would not be 4 but rather 0 as it is the first level in the slab even though it is not the first in the model. Note
that in Python, indexes start at 0, not 1 as they do in Fortran. The item value is not a name but rather an index based on
the position of the item in the item list given in the slab description. Once we are finished reading and possibly writing
new values to our slab we need to update and free the slab.
model.vSetSlab(ModelDesc, SlabDesc, Top)
model.vFreeSlab(Top)
Here we call vSetSlab to update the MineSight(r) model with our changed values. VFreeSlab frees the memory. You
do not need to call vSet slab if you do not need the data updated. Always remember to free your slabs, they are very large
and you will run out of memory very fast.
Scripts (above and beyond)
We have barely scratched the surface of what scripts can do. Another powerful feature of MS3D scripts is the ability to
automatically update custom attributes. Here is an example.
import core
import string
import geomview
import reslib
def main():
hRes = reserves.hGetCurResRef() # Get reserves handle
dRes = reserves.dGetRes(hRes) # Get the whole reserves structure
reslib.assignavggrade(dRes, reslib.getcontrolgrade(dRes))
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def assignavggrade(dRes, grade):
for cut in dRes[cuts]:
ttons = 0.0
tgrade = 0.0
for res in cut[reserves]:
if res[tons] > 0.0:
tgrade = (tgrade * ttons + reslib.getgrade(grade, res) * res[tons]) / (ttons + res[tons])
ttons = ttons + res[tons]
# assign to cut
geomview.vSetAttr(cut[geomkey], Avg_Grade, tgrade)
main()
The first seven lines or so should look familiar; they are the same for all reserve scripts. Then we call assigneavggrade
with our control grade conveniently given to us from reslib.py. In assignavggrade we loop over all our cuts and calculate
the average grade for our controlling grade and then assign it to a custom attribute named Avg_Grade. Now while this
script may not be the most useful in the world it illustrates a very useful principal. You can assign attributes to be carried
with cuts based on multiple grades and or external data. Routing codes comes to mind. There are many possibilities here.
If we are auto-assigning codes here the user still has the ability to override the generated code so you are not constrained
by any means.
Although not covered here, there is also a library called Easyexcel for simplifying the interface with Microsoft

Excel.
There is also geometry import and export. These are not things to be implemented in the future; these are things that are
available now.
Reference Table A (reslib.py)
Import reslib
getcontrolgrade(dRes,<aidx>)
Returns name of controlling grade given the reserves dictionary and area index. If the area index is not specified an
area index of 0 is assumed.
Getcuttonsmaterialbin(cut, matname, bin)
Returns the tons for a cut given the cut dictionary, material name and bin number. If the material or bin is not found
it returns 0.
Getcuttonsmaterial(dRes, cut, matname)
Returns the tons for a cut given the material name
getcutvolmaterialbin(cut, matname, bin)
Returns the volume for a cut given the cut dictionary, material name and bin number. If the material or bin is not
found it returns 0.
Getcutvolmaterial(dRes, cut, matname)
Returns the volume for a cut given the material name
getcutgradematerialbin(cut, gname, matname, bin)
Returns the grade for a cut given the cut dictionary, grade name, material name and bin number. If the material or bin
is not found it returns 0.
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getnumgrades(dRes, areaidx = 0)
Returns the number of grades given the reserves dictionary and area index. If the area index is not specified an area
index of 0 is assumed.
getgradename(dRes, i, areaidx = 0)
Returns the grade name given the reserves dictionary, grade index and area index. If the area index is not specified
an area index of 0 is assumed.
getgrade(gname, res)
Returns the grade given a grade name and a reserves list. If not found it will return 0.
attrexists(cut, attrname)
Returns 1 if the attribute exists given a cut dictionary and attribute name, otherwise returns none.
getcustomattr(cut, attrname)
Returns the value of a custom attribute given a cut dictionary and attribute. Returns none if the attribute is not found.
getmatreserves(cut, matname)
Returns reserves structure given a cut structure and material name. Returns none if not found.
getcuttons(cut)
Returns total tons for a cut given a cut dictionary.
getbintonsperiod(dRes, period, bin)
Returns tons for a given period and bin, also needs the reserves dictionary.
getbinvolperiod(dRes, period, bin)
Returns volume for a given period and bin, also needs the reserves dictionary.
getbingradeperiod(dRes, period, bin, gradename)
Returns grade for a given period and bin, also needs the reserves dictionary and gradename.
getbintons(dRes, bin)
Returns tons for a given bin, needs the reserves dictionary as an argument.
getbinvol(dRes, bin)
Returns volume for a given bin, needs the reserves dictionary as an argument.
getbingrade(dRes, bin, gradename)
Returns grade for a given bin, needs the reserves dictionary and grade name as well for arguments.
getnumbins(dRes, areaidx = 0)
Returns number of bins given resource dictionary and area index. If the area index is not specified an area index of 0 is
assumed.
isgradeaccum(dRes, grade)
Returns 1 if the grade is accumulated otherwise returns a 0. Required arguments are the reserves dictionary and grade
name.
gettonscutbin(cut, bin)
Returns tons given a cut dictionary and a bin.
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Page D-8 Part #: E002 Rev. B
getvolcutbin(cut, bin)
Returns volume given a cut dictionary and a bin.
getgradeperiod(dRes, period, gradename)
Return grade for plan given reserves dictionary, period and grade name.
getgradeplan(dRes, gradename)
Return grade for plan given reserves dictionary and grade name.
getdefarea(dRes)
Return default area given reserves dictionary.
getdefmaterial(dRes)
Return default material given reserves dictionary.
Getmaterial (dRes, material)
Return material, given reserve dictionary and material name
GetNumMaterials (dRes)
Return number of materials, given reserve dictionary
GetArea(dres, cut)
Return area, given reserves dictionary and cut
errprint(msg, fname = "scripterr.txt")
Generic error printing function supply your message and optional filename with path if desired. If no filename is supplied
it will default to scripterr.txt in the active directory.
Reference Table B (Reserves dictionary structure)
planname - plan name
volredpct - true if volume reduction / mined out is represented by a percent
imperial - imperial flag
curcut - current cut index; -1 if there is no current cut
numcuts - number of cuts
numareas - number of areas
curarea - current area
curminearea - current mining area
curperiod - current period
cuts - list of cut dictionaries (use numerical index)
geomkey - key to geometry segment
planelabel - plane label
name - cuts name
area - cuts area
miningarea - cuts mining area
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-9
period - cuts period
numres - number of cut reserves
numcustom - number of cuts custom attributes
attributes - list of customs attribute dictionaries
name - attribute name
type - attribute type (integer, double, string)
value - value of attribute in above type
reserves - list of reserve dictionaries
material - material name
numgrades - number of grades
cutoff - cutoff index
tons - tons of this reserve item
volume - volume of this reserve item
gradenames - list of grade names
gradevalues - list of grade values (floats)
areas - list of area dictionaries
name - area name
thicknessitem - thickness item name
volreditem - volume reduction item name
partialsitem - partials item name
model - model handle
partialsmodel - partials model handle
flags - dont use
volreduction - volume reduction flag, 1 if volume reduction item was used
zoneitem - zone item name
orepctitem - ore percent item
densityitem - density item
sgflag - 1 if using SG
numgrades - num grades
grades - list of grades dictionaries
name - grade name
accum - integer flag accumulated -vs- averaged
materials - list of material dictionaries
name - material name
index - materials index
default - 1 if this is the default material
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Page D-10 Part #: E002 Rev. B
numcutoffs - number of cutoffs
density - default density for this material
cutoffs - list of cutoff values (floats)
Reference Table C (Default Accumulation Script)
reportingunits = 1
import reserves
import core
import gview
import string
import metafile
import geomview
import reslib
def main():
hRes = reserves.hGetCurResRef() # Get reserves handle
dRes = reserves.dGetRes(hRes) # Get the whole reserves structure
# we are assuming one area with one material set here
numbins = reslib.getnumbins(dRes)
fillmain(dRes, numbins)
if dRes[curcut] >= 0:
fillcut(dRes, numbins)
def fillmain(dRes, numbins):
phndl = gview.OpenStdGrid(3 + (3 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes)) *
(numbins + 1), 3, 1)
gview.SetWinLev(phndl, 1)
labelrows(phndl, dRes)
fillcurrentperiod(phndl, dRes, numbins)
fillplan(phndl, dRes, numbins)
gview.CloseStdGrid(phndl)
gview.DisplayStdGrid(phndl)
def setuppanel(phndl, numbins, numgrades, nummaterials):
for i in range(nummaterials):
gview.SetColumnColor(phndl, i * 2, 128, 128, 128)
gview.SetColumnColor(phndl, 0, 128, 128, 128)
gview.SetRowColor(phndl, 0, 128, 128, 128)
gview.SetRowColor(phndl, 1, 128, 128, 128)
gview.SetRowColor(phndl, 2, 128, 128, 128)
for i in range(numbins + 1):
gview.SetRowColor(phndl, 3 + i * (3 + numgrades), 128, 128, 128)
def fillcutmaterial(dRes, phndl, cut, material, startrow, numbins):
ttons = 0
tvol = 0
activerow = startrow
labelrow = activerow + 1
tonsrow = activerow + 2
volrow = activerow + 3
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-11
graderow = activerow + 4
mat = reslib.getmaterial(dRes, material)
if not mat:
return
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, activerow, 1, "Material:")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, activerow, 2, material)
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, labelrow, 1, "Cutoff")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, tonsrow, 1, "Tons")
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, volrow, 1, "Volume (BCY)")
else:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, volrow, 1, "Volume (BCM)")
# lets label the edge
grow = graderow
for graderec in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, grow, 1, graderec[name])
grow = grow + 1
# Lets label the top
for i in range(mat[numcutoffs]):
bin = (numbins - 1 - i)
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, labelrow, i + 2, ">%5.2f" % mat[cutoffs][i])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, labelrow, numbins + 2, "Totals")
# lets label the tons
tons = 0
ttons = 0
for i in range(numbins):
tons = reslib.getcuttonsmaterialbin(cut, material, i)/reportingunits
ttons = ttons + tons
gview.SetCellValue(phndl , tonsrow, i + 2, "%d" % round(tons))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, tonsrow, numbins + 2, "%d" % round(ttons))
# lets label the volume
vol = 0
tvol = 0
for i in range(numbins):
vol = reslib.getcutvolmaterialbin(cut, material, i)/reportingunits
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
vol = vol/27.0
tvol = tvol + vol
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, volrow, i + 2, "%d" % round(vol))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, volrow, numbins + 2, "%d" % round(tvol))
for graderec in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
agrade = 0
tons = 0
vol = 0
ttons = 0
gval = 0
accum = reslib.isgradeaccum(dRes, graderec[name])
for i in range(numbins):
bin = (numbins - 1 - i)
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gval = 0
for res in cut[reserves]:
if res[cutoff] == i:
if res[material] == material:
if res[tons] > 0:
gval = reslib.getcutgradematerialbin(cut,
graderec[name], material, i)
if accum == 1:
agrade = agrade + gval
else:
agrade = (agrade * tons + gval * res[tons]) /
(tons + res[tons])
tons = tons + res[tons]
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, graderow, i + 2, "%6.2f" % gval)
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, graderow, numbins + 2, "%6.2f" % agrade)
graderow = graderow + 1
def fillcut(dRes, numbins):
srow = 1
ccut = dRes[cuts][dRes[curcut]]
numbins = reslib.getnumbins(dRes)
nummats = reslib.getnummaterials(dRes)
phndl = gview.OpenStdGrid((4 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes)) * nummats, numbins
+ 2, 2, "cutaccum.vgd")
gview.SetWinLev(phndl, 1)
for material in reslib.getmaterials(dRes):
if reslib.getcuttonsmaterial(dRes, ccut, material[name]) > 0:
fillcutmaterial(dRes, phndl, ccut, material[name], srow, numbins)
srow = srow + 4 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes)
gview.CloseStdGrid(phndl)
gview.DisplayStdGrid(phndl)
def labelrows(phndl, dRes):
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, 1, 1, "Cur Area")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, 1, 2, dRes[curarea])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, 2, 1, "Cur Period")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, 2, 2, dRes[curperiod])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, 3, 2, "Period Totals")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, 3, 3, "Grand Totals")
def fillcurrentperiod(phndl, dRes, numbins):
pttons = 0
ptvol = 0
ptgrade = 0
for i in range(numbins):
bin = (numbins - 1 - i)
oset = 4 + bin * (3 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes))
material = "%s" % reslib.getmaterials(dRes)[0][name]
high =
div =
if i == (numbins - 1):
low = ">%6.2f" % reslib.getmaterials(dRes)[0][cutoffs][i]
else:
low = "%6.2f" % reslib.getmaterials(dRes)[0][cutoffs][i]
high = "%6.2f" % reslib.getmaterials(dRes)[0][cutoffs][i + 1]
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-13
div = -
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset, 1, reslib.getcontrolgrade(dRes) + +
low + div + high)
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 1, 1, "Tons")
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 1, "Volume (BCY)")
else:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 1, "Volume (BCM)")
ptons = reslib.getbintonsperiod(dRes, dRes[curperiod], numbins - bin -
1)/reportingunits
pvol = reslib.getbinvolperiod(dRes, dRes[curperiod], numbins - bin -
1)/reportingunits
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
pvol = pvol/27.0
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 1, 2, "%d" % round(ptons) )
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 2, "%d" % round(pvol) )
j = 0
for grec in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
pgrade = reslib.getbingradeperiod(dRes, dRes[curperiod], numbins -
bin - 1, grec[name])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 3 + j, 2, "%6.2f" % pgrade )
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 3 + j, 1, grec[name] )
j = j + 1
if ptons > 0:
ptgrade = (ptgrade * pttons + pgrade * ptons) / (pttons + ptons)
pttons = pttons + ptons
ptvol = ptvol + pvol
oset = 4 + numbins * (3 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset, 1, "Totals")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 1, 1, "Tons")
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 1, "Volume (BCY)")
else:
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 1, "Volume (BCM)")
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 1, 2, "%d" % round(pttons))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 2, "%d" % round(ptvol))
j = 0
for grec in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
grade = reslib.getgradeperiod(dRes, dRes[curperiod], grec[name])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 3 + j, 2, "%6.2f" % grade)
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 3 + j, 1, grec[name])
j = j + 1
def fillplan(phndl, dRes, numbins):
ttons = 0
tvol = 0
tgrade = 0
for i in range(numbins):
bin = (numbins - 1 - i)
oset = 4 + bin * (3 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes))
tons = reslib.getbintons(dRes, numbins - bin - 1)/reportingunits
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vol = reslib.getbinvol(dRes, numbins - bin - 1)/reportingunits
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
vol = vol/27.0
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 1, 3, "%d" % round(tons))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 3, "%d" % round(vol))
j = 0
for grec in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
grade = reslib.getbingrade(dRes, numbins - bin - 1, grec[name])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 3 + j, 3, "%6.2f" % grade)
j = j + 1
if tons > 0:
tgrade = (tgrade * ttons + grade * tons) / (ttons + tons)
ttons = ttons + tons
tvol = tvol + vol
oset = 4 + numbins * (3 + reslib.getnumgrades(dRes))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 1, 3, "%d" % round(ttons))
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 2, 3, "%d" % round(tvol))
j = 0
for grec in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
grade = reslib.getgradeplan(dRes, grec[name])
gview.SetCellValue(phndl, oset + 3 + j, 3, "%6.2f" % grade)
j = j + 1
main()
Reference Table D (Default Report Script)
repfilename = "report.txt"
reportingunits = 1
import reserves
import core
import string
import reslib
def main():
try:
fl = open(repfilename, w)
except IOError:
return 0
hRes = reserves.hGetCurResRef() # Get reserves handle
dRes = reserves.dGetRes(hRes) # Get the whole reserves structure
reportcuts(fl, dRes)
reporttotals(fl, dRes)
fl.close()
core.vSysSpawn ("notepad","report.txt")
def reportcuts(fl, dRes):
i = 1
for cut in dRes[cuts]:
writecutheader(fl, cut, i, dRes)
i = i + 1
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-15
for material in reslib.getmaterials(dRes):
reportcutmaterial(fl, cut, material, dRes)
def writecutheader(fl, cut, num, dRes):
plabel = cut[planelabel]
splitlabel = plabel.split()
l = len(splitlabel)
str = "Cut%4d Slice %s Coord %s Area %s Period %s" %(num, splitlabel[l-
1], splitlabel[l-1], cut[area], cut[period])
for j in range(reslib.getnumcustomattr(dRes)):
name = reslib.getcustomattrname(dRes, j);
str = str + " %15s=%-15s " % (name, reslib.getcustomattr(cut,
name))
str = str + "\n"
fl.write(str)
str = "MATERIAL ITEM CUTOFFS ON %5s - REPORTING UNITS :%6d\n" %
(reslib.getcontrolgrade(dRes), reportingunits)
fl.write(str)
def reportcutmaterial(fl, cut, material, dRes):
# first lets check to see if there is any material to report
ttons = 0
tvol = 0
tgrade = 0
report = 0
for res in cut[reserves]:
if res[material] == material[name]:
if res[tons] > 0:
report = 1
if report == 0:
return
fl.write(\n)
reportmaterialheader(fl, material)
reportcuttons(fl, cut, material)
reportcutvolumes(fl, cut, material, dRes)
for i in range(reslib.getnumgrades(dRes)):
reportcutgrades(fl, reslib.getgradename(dRes, i), cut, material,
dRes)
fl.write(\n)
def reportcuttons(fl, cut, material):
ttons = 0
str = "%-10s TONNES " % material[name]
for i in range(material[numcutoffs]):
tons = reslib.getcuttonsmaterialbin(cut, material[name], i) /
reportingunits
ttons = ttons + tons
str = str + "%10.0f" % tons
str = str + "%10.0f" % ttons + \n
fl.write(str)
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def reportcutvolumes(fl, cut, material, dRes):
tvol = 0
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
str = " B.C.Y. "
else:
str = " B.C.M. "
for i in range(material[numcutoffs]):
vol = reslib.getcutvolmaterialbin(cut, material[name], i) /
reportingunits
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
vol = vol/27.0
tvol = tvol + vol
str = str + "%10.0f" % vol
str = str + "%10.0f" % tvol + \n
fl.write(str)
def reportcutgrades(fl, gname, cut, material, dRes):
tgrade = 0
ttons = 0
str = " %6s " % gname
accum = reslib.isgradeaccum(dRes, gname)
for j in range(material[numcutoffs]):
grade = reslib.getcutgradematerialbin(cut, gname, material[name], j)
tons = reslib.getcuttonsmaterialbin(cut, material[name], j)
if tons > 0:
# we have to determine if it is an averaged or accumulated grade
if accum == 1:
tgrade = tgrade + grade
else:
tgrade = ((grade * tons) + (tgrade * ttons)) / (tons + ttons)
ttons = ttons + tons
str = str + "%10.4f" % grade
str = str + "%10.4f" % tgrade + \n
fl.write(str)
def reportmaterialheader(fl, material):
str = " "
for co in material[cutoffs]:
str = str + "%10.2f" % co
str = str + Totals\n
fl.write(str)
def reporttotals(fl, dRes):
fl.write("*** CUMULATIVE TOTAL FOR ALL CUTS ***\n")
str = "MATERIAL ITEM CUTOFFS ON %5s - REPORTING UNITS :%6d\n" %
(reslib.getcontrolgrade(dRes), reportingunits)
fl.write(str)
fl.write(\n)
for material in reslib.getmaterials(dRes):
reportmaterialheader(fl, material)
reportmaterialtotals(fl, dRes, material)
def reportmaterialtotals(fl, dRes, material):
reportmaterialtons(fl, dRes, material)
reportmaterialvol(fl, dRes, material)
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-17
for grade in dRes[areas][0][grades]:
reportmaterialgrade(fl, dRes, material, grade[name])
fl.write(\n)
def reportmaterialtons(fl, dRes, material):
tons = 0
ttons = 0
str = "%-10s TONNES " % material[name]
for i in range(material[numcutoffs]):
tons = 0
for cut in dRes[cuts]:
tons = tons + reslib.getcuttonsmaterialbin(cut, material[name], i)
/ reportingunits
str = str + "%10.0f" % tons
ttons = ttons + tons
str = str + "%10.0f" % ttons + \n
fl.write(str)
def reportmaterialvol(fl, dRes, material):
vol = 0
tvol = 0
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
str = " B.C.Y. "
else:
str = " B.C.M. "
for i in range(material[numcutoffs]):
vol = 0
for cut in dRes[cuts]:
vol = vol + reslib.getcutvolmaterialbin(cut, material[name], i) /
reportingunits
str = str + "%10.0f" % vol
tvol = tvol + vol
if reslib.getunitsflag(dRes) == 1:
tvol = tvol/27.0
str = str + "%10.0f" % tvol + \n
fl.write(str)
def reportmaterialgrade(fl, dRes, material, gname):
gtgrade = 0
gttons = 0
str = " %6s " % gname
accum = reslib.isgradeaccum(dRes, gname)
for i in range(material[numcutoffs]):
tgrade = 0
ttons = 0
for cut in dRes[cuts]:
grade = reslib.getcutgradematerialbin(cut, gname, material[name],
i)
tons = reslib.getcuttonsmaterialbin(cut, material[name], i)
if tons > 0:
if accum == 1:
tgrade = tgrade + grade
else:
# we have to determine if it is an averaged or accumulated
grade
tgrade = ((grade * tons) + (tgrade * ttons)) / (tons + ttons)
ttons = ttons + tons
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Page D-18 Part #: E002 Rev. B
str = str + "%10.4f" % tgrade
if ttons > 0:
if accum == 1:
gtgrade = gtgrade + tgrade
else:
# we have to determine if it is an averaged or accumulated
grade
gtgrade = ((tgrade * ttons) + (gtgrade * gttons)) / (ttons +
gttons)
gttons = gttons + ttons
str = str + "%10.4f" % gtgrade + \n
fl.write(str)
main()
Reference Table E (Contact Block Dilution Script)
# Example script which codes ore blocks which contact waste blocks with the
number of waste blocks they
#
import model
from Numeric import *
zoneore = [1]
zonewaste = [2,3,4,5]
def main():
SlabDesc = {}
ModelDesc = model.dGetActiveModelDesc()
SlabDesc[NumberItems] = 2
SlabDesc[ItemList] = [ZONE,VALPT]
# Origin ()
SlabDesc[Origin] = [0,0,0]
SlabDesc[Extents] = [ModelDesc[Extents][0],ModelDesc[Extents][1],1]
Mid = model.dGetSlab(ModelDesc, SlabDesc)
for lev in range(1, ModelDesc[Extents][2] + 2):
if(lev < ModelDesc[Extents][2]):
SlabDesc[Origin][2] = lev
Bot = model.dGetSlab(ModelDesc, SlabDesc)
for row in range(ModelDesc[Extents][1]):
for col in range(ModelDesc[Extents][0]):
if row > 0:
if diffzone(Mid[0][0][row][col], Mid[0][0][row - 1][col]) ==
1:
Mid[1][0][row][col] += 1
if row < ModelDesc[Extents][1] - 1:
if diffzone(Mid[0][0][row][col], Mid[0][0][row + 1][col]) ==
1:
Mid[1][0][row][col] += 1
if col > 0:
if diffzone(Mid[0][0][row][col], Mid[0][0][row][col - 1]) ==
1:
Mid[1][0][row][col] += 1
if col < ModelDesc[Extents][0] - 1:
if diffzone(Mid[0][0][row][col], Mid[0][0][row][col + 1]) ==
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Part #: E002 Rev. B Page D-19
1:
Mid[1][0][row][col] += 1
if lev > 1:
if diffzone(Mid[0][0][row][col], Top[0][0][row][col]) == 1:
Mid[1][0][row][col] += 1
if lev < ModelDesc[Extents][2] - 1:
if diffzone(Mid[0][0][row][col], Bot[0][0][row][col]) == 1:
Mid[1][0][row][col] += 1
if lev > 1:
SlabDesc[Origin][2] = lev - 2
model.vSetSlab(ModelDesc, SlabDesc, Top)
model.vFreeSlab(Top)
Top = Mid
Mid = Bot
def diffzone(zone1, zone2):
# There are three possible outcomes
# same zone, diffrent zone, cant find one of the zones
# The third case can be addressed in a number of ways but will
# not be at this time
type1 = 0
type2 = 0
for code in zoneore:
if zone1 == code:
type1 = 1
if zone2 == code:
type2 = 1
if type1 == type2:
return 0
else:
return 1
main()
Reference Table F (Model description)
# Example script which dumps all the information form a models description
dictionary
#
import model
from Numeric import *
def main():
SlabDesc = {}
ModelDesc = model.dGetActiveModelDesc()
fl = open(Out.txt, a)
fl.write(Number of items: %d\n % ModelDesc[NumberItems])
fl.write(Origin: %f, %f, %f\n %
(ModelDesc[Origin][0],ModelDesc[Origin][1],ModelDesc[Origin][2]))
fl.write(DX: %f\n % ModelDesc[dx])
fl.write(DY: %f\n % ModelDesc[dy])
fl.write(DZ: %f\n % ModelDesc[dz])
fl.write(Extents 0: %f\n % ModelDesc[Extents][0])
fl.write(Extents 1: %f\n % ModelDesc[Extents][1])
fl.write(Extents 2: %f\n % ModelDesc[Extents][2])
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fl.write(Item List. \n)
for item in ModelDesc[ItemList]:
fl.write(item + \n )
fl.write(ZCrest: %f\n % ModelDesc[Zcrest])
fl.write(Bench Toes \n)
for toe in ModelDesc[BenchToes]:
fl.write(%f\n % toe )
RInfo = ModelDesc[RotateInfo]
fl.write(Rotation Origin: %f, %f, %f\n %
(RInfo[Origin][0],RInfo[Origin][1],RInfo[Origin][2]))
fl.write(Rotations: %f, %f, %f\n %
(RInfo[Rotations][0],RInfo[Rotations][1],RInfo[Rotations][2]))
fl.write(Azim: %f\n % RInfo[Azimuth])
fl.write(Dip: %f\n % RInfo[Dip])
fl.write(Plunge: %f\n % RInfo[Plunge])
fl.write(Reflect: %f\n % RInfo[Reflect])
fl.write(Rotation Type: %s\n % RInfo[Type])
fl.write(Rotation Matrix\n)
fl.write(%f, %f, %f\n
%(RInfo[RotationMatrix][0],RInfo[RotationMatrix][1],RInfo[RotationMatrix][2]))
fl.write(%f, %f, %f\n
%(RInfo[RotationMatrix][3],RInfo[RotationMatrix][4],RInfo[RotationMatrix][5]))
fl.write(%f, %f, %f\n
%(RInfo[RotationMatrix][6],RInfo[RotationMatrix][7],RInfo[RotationMatrix][8]))
fl.close()
main()