River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No.

858 • June 12-25, 2014 2 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 3 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
Charles “Big C” Edward High Remembered and Celebrated (1950-2014)
A
fter nearly six decades on the
planet, I find that the friendships
of our youth are the most endur-
ing. The timeless quality that defines
so many friendships that found their
genesis in Bettendorf includes not just the
persons, but often the whole family. This
truth is best personified in Chuck High –
“Big C” – who passed on April 6 at the age
of 63, leaving the world a whole lot duller.
So let the memories flow, and make
room because there are a ton of them,
all mostly wonderful and full of love,
laughter, fierce loyalty, and that forever-
ness that will keep Chuck alive and
vibrant in our hearts and minds going
forward.
First and foremost, Chuck loved his
family and close friends; was devoted
to his beautiful Labradors and English
Setters, with which he participated in field
trials; cared for his Tennessee Walking
Horses; had an unquenchable joy for duck
and pheasant hunting and fishing; and
had a talent for wood-carving stunning
likenesses of wildlife figurines for pleasure
and sale.
While living in
California for more
than a decade,
Chuck spent time as
an equipment and
sound technician in
the music industry,
working with the
Doobie Brothers
and most notably
partnering with the
wildly successful Santa Cruz band Snail.
He also opened two successful restaurants
– one with his brother-in-law Paul
Starnick in Glenwood Springs, Colorado,
and the other with his best friend Dave
“Halvey” Halverson in Bettendorf called
the Wing Dam.
Chuck’s whole family moved to
Arizona in the 1970s. He gained a brother
in his sister Pam’s husband Paul, with
whom he shared the deepest of bonds
until his passing. Chuck eventually
moved in with Pam and Paul and his
youngest sister Susie, with whom he
was also extremely close, after a skiing
accident left him disabled from a broken
neck. This did not prevent him from
enjoying his cherished outdoors, catching
trophy fish, or winning the Arizona State
Duck Calling Championship. His two
older sisters, Cheryl and Linda, also lived
in Arizona prior to their passing – Linda
in 2003 and Cheryl this past Christmas
Day. For a family as close-knit as the
Highs, these terrible losses continue to
reverberate through them to so many of
us who hold them dear.
Big C’s popularity cannot be overstated,
nor can his penchant for establishing
everlasting friendships be exaggerated. He
and Halvey have been magnets for humor
and camaraderie their entire lives. Couple
that with redefining “hardcore” with all-
new meaning by the time their class came
of age, and the result was that the bar was
permanently raised. The rest of us had no
choice but to step up if we wanted in on
the ride. And was it ever worth it!
It is therefore accurate to describe
our high-school group as the coolest.
Chuck and company, better know as
The Brewery Boys, made fun effortless,
evidenced by their prevailing legacy of
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
spectacular good times as they strove to
out-party their supreme rival, The Studs
(you know who you are).
Our group was especially awesome
because the wide age range of players
included so many siblings – many of
whom could be classified as cling-ons to
be sure, but all were welcome if you could
keep up, and that was a big if. Thanks to
Chuck letting his little sisters Pam and
Susie and a pile of their friends tag along,
we were included in all manner of antics
that would later define us with humor at
our very cores.
It is important to note that Chuck was
the only boy in a house full of type-A
girls: Linda, Cheryl, Pam, Susie, and
his mother Kay. He and Big C Sr., were
larger than life, regularly mixing affection
with hilarity to survive among so many
formidable females who doted on them
and loved them dearly. Theirs was a
robust family life, where the cling-ons
were never turned away for any reason.
We were all part of it, with Chuckie as the
quintessential big brother. Such are the
Continued On Page 17
Charles Edward High,
1950-2014
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 4 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
T
here were lots of losers during the state
legislative session that ended last month.
But there were a few winners, so let’s
take a look at them.
First up: Republican gubernatorial nominee
Bruce Rauner.
Never before has a political
party nominated a gubernatorial
candidate who had more
impact on a legislative session
than Rauner did this year. The
gazillionaire’s unlimited supply
of money and his constant
threats to “shake up Springfield”
clearly put legislators of both
parties on edge all spring – even
before he won the primary.
The Democrats surely
know in their guts that much of what Rauner
says about Springfield ain’t false. The long-
entrenched powers stifle innovation and
prevent actual compromise. Why wasn’t
a scaled-back income-tax hike ever once
debated? Because the top dogs didn’t want to
talk about it. End of story.
House Speaker Michael Madigan
introduced numerous pieces of legislation
designed with Rauner in mind, including
a tax surcharge on millionaires – which
ended up as a nonbinding question on the
November ballot.
Rauner railed repeatedly against extending
the 2011 income-tax hike, and Democrats
had to back off. Instead, they opted to punt
the ball until after the election. If Rauner
had lost the primary to a weaker Republican,
the tax-hike extension would’ve had a better
chance of passage. Of course, if Rauner goes
on to defeat Governor Pat Quinn, the massive
fiscal hole the General Assembly has created
will be his problem – which ultimately makes
him a loser as well.
Rauner became almost a shadow governor
this spring; his hand was seen everywhere.
Cook County pension reform failed, many
say, because Rauner pushed against it. The
$1.1-billion end-of-session road-construction
and -repair bill was reportedly only agreed to
by Republicans after Rauner okayed it, hoping
to please the GOP-leaning road-builders.
Senate President John Cullerton was
another winner.
The Senate president’s electoral prowess
meant once again that he could do pretty
much anything he wanted. His 40 Democratic
votes out of 59 total Senate seats gave him
enough cushion to sit back and watch while
House Speaker Michael Madigan struggled all
year to deal with his smaller super-majority.
Cullerton stood his ground on the budget
when the income-tax-hike extension fell
Legislative Session Produced
a Few Winners
by Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
ILLINOIS POLITICS
Rauner became
almost a shadow
governor this
spring. His
hand was seen
everywhere.
apart and made sure his members’ top
interests were taken care of, particularly
with a small Medicaid expansion. He
pushed back when Madigan tried to muscle
through a major change in the way the
Abraham Lincoln Presidential
Library & Museum was
administered. He stood firm
when pushed by Madigan to
insert a requirement into the
reauthorization of the court-
stricken state eavesdropping
law to require police to wear
body cameras. He muscled
through an innovative bill
with his former chief of staff
– Senator Andy Manar – to
fundamentally alter the way
education is funded in Illinois.
And out of all the Democrats under the
dome, he appeared to be the least rattled
by Rauner’s primary win. Cullerton may
not have always made the best decisions
(particularly when it came to ultimately
killing the eavesdropping bill), but he appears
to be coming into his own as a far more
confident leader.
Legislative Republicans did pretty well, too.
The weekend after the session ended,
Kendall County Young Republican Chair
Brian Russell was busily scurrying to get
himself onto the November ballot. He needed
to collect 1,000 valid petition signatures in just
three days to be appointed as the challenger
to Senator Linda Holmes (D-Aurora). Russell
said he hadn’t heard it, but word was that Team
Rauner had pledged six figures to back his
candidacy.
Holmes’ district is pretty solidly
Democratic, but this does show you why
legislative Republicans have strutted around
with renewed confidence since the March
primary. They finally have a candidate at the
top of the ticket who will not only give the
Democrats a run for their money, but who will
ensure that their own candidates have enough
cash to compete. Holmes wasn’t even on the
Republicans’ radar. They simply didn’t have the
resources to challenge her.
But if Rauner wins this November,
Republican legislators will have to do
something completely different – vote for some
pretty distasteful things to support their GOP
governor or risk his considerable ire. For more
than a decade, the Republicans often sat back
and hit their red buttons when it came time to
pass important bills. But they’ll finally have to
help govern if Rauner is in the mansion.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.
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F O R   Y O U R   E N J OY M E N T , A L WAY S   S M O K E   F R E E !
JUNE LINEUP:
• June 14-The Tailfns
• June 21-Double D & The Sensations
• June 28-Gray Wolf Band
In the event of rain, the concert will
move to the Edje Nightclub.
Get your summer
concert T-shirt!
Earn 100 base points, from 7am-
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OneT-shirt per person. Whilesupplies last.
What could be better
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patio jammin’ to some of the
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$5 Grill Baskets!
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Hamburger
Hot Dog
ALL GRILL BASKETS INCLUDE
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of condiments.
SIDES: Chips, Coleslaw, Potato Salad
FREE Live Entertainment Every Saturday, 6pm-10pm
For all the details, go to jumerscasinohotel.com
or visit the IMAGE Players Club.
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Points must beearnedonSunday,
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Father’s Day
sunday, June 15 – 9am-3pm
MADE-TO-Order
Brunch BUFFET
SAVE
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Don’t make him grill his own dinner, just bring him in to enjoy this Made-to-Order
bufet. He can enjoy the regular brunch menu items and Dad favorites like
Prime Rib and Crab Legs with a Bloody Mary or Bud Light Draft. (price includes one drink).
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 5 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Just Shoot
“A government which will turn its tanks upon
its people, for any reason, is a government
with a taste of blood and a thirst for power
and must either be smartly rebuked, or blindly
obeyed in deadly fear.” – John Salter
H
ow many children, old people, and
law-abiding citizens have to be
injured, terrorized, or killed before
we call a halt to the growing rash of police
violence that is wracking the country? How
many family pets have to be gunned down
in cold blood by marauding SWAT teams
before we declare such tactics off-limits?
And how many communities have to be
transformed into military outposts – com-
plete with heavily armed police, military
tanks, and “safety” checkpoints – before we
draw that line in the sand that says “not in
our town”?
The latest incident happened last month
in Atlanta, where a SWAT team attempting
to execute a no-knock drug warrant in the
middle of the night launched a flash-bang
grenade into the targeted home, only to have
it land in a crib where a 19-month-old baby
lay sleeping. The grenade exploded, burning
his face, lacerating his chest, and leaving him
paralyzed. At the hospital, he was put in a
medically induced coma.
If this were the first instance of police
overkill – if it were even the fifth – there
might be hope of reforming our system of
law enforcement. But what happened to
this baby, whose life will never be the same,
has become par for the course in a society
that glorifies violence, turns a blind eye to
government wrongdoing, and sanctions any
act by law enforcement – no matter how
misguided or wrong. As I detail in my book
A Government of Wolves: The Emerging
American Police State, this state-sponsored
violence is a necessary ingredient in any
totalitarian regime to ensure a compliant,
cowed, and fearful populace.
Thus, each time we as a rational,
reasoning, free-minded people fail to be
outraged by government wrongdoing,
we become accomplices in bringing
about our own downfall – whether that
wrongdoing involves SWAT-team raids
that go awry, the senseless shootings of
unarmed citizens, the stockpiling of military
weapons and ammunition by government
agencies (including small-town police), the
unapologetic misuse of our taxpayer dollars
for graft and pork, the incarceration of our
fellow citizens in forced labor prisons, etc.
There’s certainly no shortage of things
to be outraged about, starting with this
dangerous mindset that has come to
dominate law enforcement and the courts
that protecting the lives and safety of police
officers (of all stripes) is more important
than the lives and safety of the citizenry. This
belief applies even if it means that greater
numbers of innocent civilians will get hurt
or killed (police kill roughly five times more
often than they are killed), that police might
become laws unto themselves, and that
the Constitution will be sidestepped – or
disregarded – at every turn.
For example, where was the outrage in
2010 when a Minnesota SWAT team raided
the wrong house in the middle of the night,
handcuffed three young children, held
the mother on the floor at gunpoint, shot
the family dog, and then – according to a
complaint from the family – “forced the
handcuffed children to sit next to the carcass
of their dead pet and bloody pet for more
than an hour” while officers searched the
home?
Or what about the SWAT team that in
2011 drove an armored Lenco Bearcat into
Roger Serrato’s yard, surrounded his home
with paramilitary troops wearing face masks,
threw a fire-starting flash-bang grenade into
the house, and then, when Serrato appeared
at a window – unarmed and wearing only
his shorts – held him at bay with rifles?
Serrato died of asphyxiation from being
trapped in the flame-filled house, and the
county was ordered to pay $2.6 million to
Serrato’s family. It turns out the father of four
had done nothing wrong; the SWAT team
had misidentified him as someone involved
in a shooting. Even so, the police admitted
no wrongdoing.
And then there was the police officer who,
in 2011, tripped and “accidentally” shot and
killed Eurie Stamps, who had been forced
to the floor of his home at gunpoint while a
SWAT team attempted to execute a search
warrant against his stepson.
Equally outrageous was the four-
hour SWAT team raid in May 2014 on a
California high school, where students
were locked down in classrooms, forced to
urinate in overturned desks, and generally
terrorized by heavily armed, masked
gunmen searching for possible weapons
that were never found.
The problem with all of these incidents,
as one reporter rightly concluded, is
“not that life has gotten that much more
dangerous; it’s that authorities have chosen
to respond to even innocent situations as if
they were in a war zone.”
This battlefield mindset has so corrupted
our law-enforcement agencies that the
most routine tasks, such as serving a search
warrant – intended to uncover evidence of
a suspected crime – have sometimes become
death warrants for the alleged “suspect,” his
family members, and his pets once a trained-
to-kill SWAT team is involved.
Unfortunately, SWAT teams are no
longer reserved exclusively for deadly
situations. Owing to the militarization of the
nation’s police forces, SWAT teams are now
increasingly being deployed for relatively
routine police matters, with some SWAT
teams being sent out as often as five times a
day. For example, police in both Baltimore
and Dallas have used SWAT teams to bust
poker games. A Connecticut SWAT team
was sent into a bar that was believed to be
serving alcohol to underage individuals. In
Arizona, a SWAT team was used to break
up an alleged cockfighting ring. An Atlanta
SWAT team raided a music studio out of a
concern that it might have been involved in
music piracy.
Yet the tension inherent in most
encounters between civilians and police
these days can’t be blamed exclusively on law
enforcement’s growing reliance on SWAT
teams. It goes far deeper, to a transformation
in the way police view themselves and their
line of duty. Specifically, what we’re dealing
with today is a skewed shoot-to-kill mindset
in which police, trained to view themselves
as warriors or soldiers in a war – whether
against drugs, or terror, or crime – must
“get” the bad guys (i.e., anyone who is a
potential target) before the bad guys get
them. The result is a spike in the number of
incidents in which police shoot first and ask
questions later.
Who could forget what happened to
by John W. Whitehead
johnw@rutherford.org
13-year-old Andy Lopez last year? The
teenager was shot seven times and killed
after two sheriff ’s deputies, a mere 20 feet
away, saw him carrying a toy BB gun in
public.
Then there was the time in 2012 that
two Cleveland police officers mistook the
sounds of a backfiring car for gunfire and
immediately began pursuing the car and its
two occupants. Within 20 minutes, more
than 60 police cars, some unmarked, and
115 officers had joined the pursuit, which
ended in a middle-school parking lot with
more than 140 bullets fired by police in less
than 30 seconds. The “suspects” – dead from
countless bullet wounds – were unarmed.
Miriam Carey’s family still can’t get
past the shock of her death in 2013. Police
in Washington, DC, shot and killed the
34-year-old woman after she collided with
a barrier near the White House, then fled
when pursued by a phalanx of cop cars and
gun-wielding police. Carey’s one-year-old
daughter was in the backseat. Seventeen
gunshots later, Carey was dead and her
toddler motherless.
Just as troubling as this “shoot first, ask
questions later” mindset is what investigative
journalist Katie Rucke uncovered about how
police are being trained to use force without
hesitation and report their shootings to
legally justify a shot. Rucke reports the
findings of one concerned citizen, “Jack,”
who went undercover to attend 24 hours of
law-enforcement training classes organized
by the private, for-profit organization
Calibre Press.
“Jack says it was troubling to witness
hundreds of SWAT-team officers and
supervisors who seemed unfazed by
being instructed to not hesitate when it
comes to using excessive, and even deadly,
force,” writes Rucke. “‘From my personal
experience, these trainers consistently
promote more aggression and criticize
hesitation to use force,’ Jack said. ‘They argue
that the risk of making a mistake is worth
it to absolutely minimize risk to the officer.
And they teach officers how to use the law to
minimize legal repercussions in almost any
scenario. All this is, of course, done behind
the scenes, with no oversight from police
administrators, much less the public.’”
Rucke continues: “According to the
learning materials, ... there isn’t time for
logic and analysis, encouraging officers to
fire multiple rounds at subjects because ‘two
shots rarely stops ’em,’ and [the curriculum]
outlines seven reasons why ‘excessive use of
force’ is a myth. Other lessons Jack learned
Continued On Page 17
Turning Search Warrants into Death Warrants and SWAT Teams into Death Squads
COVER STORY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 6 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
reason I’m in a band is to tour,”
McCann said. “My favorite
part of being in a band – more
than playing music – is meeting
people. ... I can write a song in my
girlfriend’s apartment, and the
next minute I could be in America
because of it. I could write a song
that could fly me across the world.
That blows my mind. ...
“I like what it does to people. ... I
can make you laugh or cry or [feel]
whatever I feel.”
A breakthrough in his
songwriting, McCann said, came
after seeing Ida Maria perform.
“She just felt everything she was
singing,” he explained. “Instead of
basing it on what she was listening
to, she was basing it on what she felt. ...
The kick drum would blow her across the
room. I’d never seen that before.”
In his own writing, he said, he stopped
listening and started feeling. A chorus
worked, he said, “because it felt like ... it
pinned you to the wall.”
And although Catfish & the Bottlemen
have played 1,000-seat venues in the
UK, the Communion tour – the band’s
first foray into the United States – is a
welcome proving ground, McCann said:
“We played to like 40 people yesterday
in Washington, DC. That’s kind of like
seven years ago. That’s the band we were.
It’s like starting again for us, but with a bit
more knowledge now. ... It’s a lot harder,
but very exciting.”
Catfish & The Bottlemen will perform
a Daytrotter/Communion show on
Thursday, June 19, at Codfish Hollow
Barn (5013 288th Avenue, Maquoketa,
Iowa). The 21-and-older concert starts
at 7 p.m. and also includes Outsides,
Hailey Whitters, and Amasa Hines.
Tickets are $9.50 in advance and $15 the
day of the show. For more information,
visit CodfishHollowBarnstormers.com or
CommunionMusic.com.
For more information on Catfish & the
Bottlemen, visit CatfishAndTheBottlemen.com.
Catfish & the Bottlemen Perform a Communion Barnstormer, June 19 at Codfish Hollow Barn
Thinking Inside the Box
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
V
an McCann, singer and
guitarist for the United
Kingdom’s Catfish &
the Bottlemen, has a strange
relationship with the song
“Homesick.”
“I thought it was the worst
one of the batch we did ... when
we first started recording for
Communion,” he said, referring
to the label/tour founded by
Mumford & Sons’ Ben Lovett.
“Since then, it’s become
my favorite.”
What changed, McCann said,
was that other people liked it.
And therein lies a great deal
of the charm of Catfish & the
Bottlemen, a band described by
the UK’s The Guardian as “deeply old-
fashioned – and unfashionable.”
McCann doesn’t disagree with that
assessment – whether it means an
indifference toward appearance or, in a
larger sense, a band more in love with
the idea of playing for as many people
as possible than selling lots of records
or making artistic statements. When
the quartet performs a Communion/
Daytrotter show at Maquoketa’s Codfish
Hollow Barn on June 19, expect no-frills
rock-and-roll with one goal: to connect
with the audience.
“We’re not doing anything outside
the box,” McCann said in a phone
interview last week. “We’re not trying
to do anything special. We’re just trying
to write good songs in an old-fashioned
way, the way Oasis did and the Strokes
did and the Arctic Monkeys did. It’s not
anything that hasn’t been done before,
but we’re just trying to do it better than
everyone else. If everyone else is thinking
outside the box, we’re going to stay right
in the middle of it.”
That might sound like pandering, but
there’s little about the band that feels
calculated or crass. The group has been
together for more than six years, but
McCann said he considers last year its
official beginning: “We don’t really class it
as being in a band until ‘Homesick’ came
out. That was like the start. Everything
else was just getting ready. ... We needed
to write good songs instead of playing
bad ones and grow our hair just long
enough to be classed as rock stars.”
The new EP Kathleen & the Other
Three – a teaser for a full-length due
in the fall – is indeed full of rock-star
potential, four tracks of unpretentious,
catchy, radio- and arena-ready garage
rock. Praise for the song “Rango” from
the music blog Scientists of Sound
pretty much applies to the whole: “With
bright, forwardly driven guitars forming
the backdrop to Van McCann’s glazed
vocals, ‘Rango’ becomes a delightful mix
of clearly thought-out indie rock. Add
in subtle tempo shifts and piercingly
beautiful guitars, and you’re left with a
uniquely resplendent offering.”
The songs were self-evidently written
with a large audience in mind, and
McCann compared them to lasagna –
meant for mass, eager consumption. And
he said he has no interest in writing or
performing difficult music. “If you’re
going to do that, why don’t you stay in
your bedroom and do it?” he said. “When
I’m writing songs, I think 60,000 people
are going to sing them in an arena. I write
songs for the people.”
But shooting for a large target is less
about the trappings of fame than the
power of music to forge bonds. “The
MUSIC
Vol. 21 · No. 858
June 12-25, 2014
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 7 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 8 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
R
ecently at the
Quad City
International
Airport art gallery, two
travelers were bluntly
musing about twisting
sculptures cantilevered
off the display wall.
“Normally, this would
be considered a pile of
crap,” one said.
I was taken aback
and then chuckled
at the comment. The
sculptures of Matt
Moyer, at first glance,
do resemble aged
industrial plumbing.
But closer inspection
reveals something more.
The airport visitors
discussed the subtleties
of these sculptures,
discovering how the
surface colorations
simulate wear but are
a bit too unblemished
to be in a state of
disintegration. The
mechanical arabesques
tease our eyes and
raise questions about
reactions to old objects.
Moyer’s pieces are the
attention-grabbers in
the three-person Quad
City Arts show running
through June. In
addition to the work of
Moyer (from Columbia,
Missouri) are mixed-
media assemblages
by Wayne Bertola (of Chicago) and
photography by Marvin Thompson (of
Clinton, Iowa). While their work is very
different, all three artists explore the
effects of time.
At a distance or in a less-well-lit
setting, it would be easy to dismiss
Moyer’s works as merely old equipment.
But each of his sculptures blends
assembled real parts with one of
his meticulously formed ceramic
components to produce the illusion of an
operating machine.
The stoneware contraptions certainly
look like they once functioned. For
example, Vent with Float is made up of
steel pipe, an air filter, rubber gaskets,
and a copper tank front, along with a
stoneware “float” that mimics a corroded
Moyer’s combination of industrial parts
with industrial-looking hand-crafted
ceramics calls to mind the notorious
1917 Fountain, a real urinal that was
signed and thus declared as art by Marcel
Duchamp. Moyer has a respectful but
wry take on mechanization, and he
writes in one text panel of “the expressive
human qualities of efficiency, agency,
and ingenuity that are captured in
the mechanical systems that populate
our daily lives.” Duchamp’s urinal was
brand-new, however; Moyer has added
considerations of longevity to those of
craft tradition.
The artist’s accomplished replication
of deterioration was drawn from his
background. In a recent e-mail, he wrote:
“Both my father and grandfather retired
from the Plumbers &
Pipefitters Local 25 in
Rock Island. ... I also
worked for Local 25 out
of undergraduate school
at Illinois State University.
It was during that time
that I really began to
refine and define my
industry-themed artwork
that was directly inspired
by my time working in
the union at John Deere
manufacturing facilities,
foundries, and the Rock
Island Arsenal.” Even
though a considerable
amount of manufacturing
closed in the Quad
Cities in the early 1980s,
the region is still home
to some fabricating
companies. Industrial
equipment might evoke
potent memories for
many people who made
or make their living in
those factories.
In his text, Moyer refers
to “progress, change,
time, and decay” – themes
evident in the displayed
works. Yet he adds that
these sculptures refer to
delivery systems for clean
air and water. That aspect
was not obvious to me,
and I appreciated taking
the extra mental step; the
works are reminders that
mechanical maintenance
is a key environmental
issue.
The assemblages of Wayne Bertola
gather photographs, book illustrations,
trinkets, and various bits and pieces of
life, encased in weathered wood boxes.
His exhibition text speaks of “symbols
of the enigma of eternity haunted by
mortality” and “memory beyond the
limitations of linear time.” Like the
pioneer of assemblage boxes, Joseph
Cornell (1903-1972), Bertola juxtaposes
remnants of life’s bric-à-brac in a
gentle, mysterious manner. Each box
is assembled and layered with care for
compositional balance.
In the upper tier of the box titled 550,
a metal circle is suspended in front of
an image of an eye as if it were a lens
to encourage closer observation of
metal casing. Color surface treatments
are skillfully balanced with the kind of
sensitivity that finds iridescent beauty
in an oily puddle. Cerulean turquoise
and cadmium red sing out from the drab
earth tones, suggestive of oxidized wear.
Moyer’s ceramic forms follow in the
great tradition of trompe l’oeil technical
artistry; they fool the eye with hyper-
accuracy as they whimsically imitate the
appearance of metal.
In all of his pieces, it’s fun to decipher
how he blended his found components
with his ceramic creations. In Filtration
with Purge Bulb & Harrison Loop,
the red “pipe” that arcs through the
air to connect the thingamajig to the
thingamabob is actually a swimming-
pool noodle.
ART
Timeless Treatments
Three Artists at the Quad City Airport Gallery Through June
Photos byMeghan McLaughlin
Clockwise from top right: Pump, works, and Purge Bulb & Harrison Loop by Matt Moyer
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
nests that might have been encountered
investigating a deserted abode. I recalled
that my curious brother was stung so
many times for that youthful trespass ... .
I had not thought about that in years. He
developed a deep respect for nature ... .
Photographer Marvin Thompson
shares the pleasure of fleeting “little
discoveries” – in this case ice formations
– displayed in two groups of six. Abstract
beauty is found in flowing groundwater
halted in a frozen state and in veins of
crackled ice. With the use of different
by Sherry C. Maurer
sherry_maurer@yahoo.com
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
the minutiae. The lower
tier includes a printed
illustration of a man in
old-fashioned attire, behind
a fragment – the head – of
a ceramic harlequin-figure
knickknack suspended by
heavy old wire. A tag across
the middle reads “550.”
The assemblage’s elements
are typical of those Bertola
uses in this show: the
outmoded (illustration),
the commonplace (the
ceramic head), and the
ephemeral (what might be
seen through a lens). Most
of the artist’s work in the
exhibition has a low-key
overall tonality, which can be
a bit monotonous. The box
550 stands out, successfully,
because of the contrast of the
surprisingly shiny broken
harlequin head against the
other muted elements.
Bertola erases imagery as
well as providing it. In Law
of Reflection, we see a hand
held up, palm toward us, but
the rest of the figure is erased
to obscurity within a silvery,
mirror-like background. The
foreground is outfitted with
jumbled plain wire, a wire
trellis, and a brooch. These
elements throw shadows on
the background, but some
of the shadows seemed to
be drawn in. This ambiguity
of erased imagery and
uncertain shadows forces the
question of what is and isn’t
real. Handles are mounted
on the sides of the box, and
I wanted to pick it up and
turn it to better examine the shadows
and background, especially because the
gallery lighting casts a strong shadow
across the upper third of the assemblage.
While so much patient assemblage
of disparate materials and images is
impressive, it takes more than patience
to discern any meaning in them beyond
a general sense of nostalgia. When
presented with so many reminders of the
passage of time, you might want answers
about life, the universe, and everything
– but you’ll have to provide your own
meanings. One of Bertola’s untitled
works includes segments of empty wasp
Continued On Page 17
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Works by Wayne Bertola
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
T
he
title The
Melville
Boys implies
that the two
men in this
four-character
play are at
the crux of its
plot. For me,
though, the
highlight of
the Richmond
Hill Barn The-
atre’s production of Norm Foster’s script
was watching Diane McKune provide the
performance’s heart and soul. As Mary,
the character whose home neighbors the
family cabin that the Melville brothers are
using for the weekend, McKune brings a
centered warmth to the proceedings, and
is responsible for the play’s biggest laughs
and most heartfelt moments.
Given the actor’s penchant for
overacting – which suited her as Lina
Lamont in Countryside Community
Theatre’s Singin’ in the Rain two years ago,
but which, for me, sometimes breaks the
theatrical illusion – it’s clear either that
McKune’s talents are improving, or that
Melville director Eugenia Giebel inspired
one of McKune’s best performances to
date. Either way, the actor is a delight to
watch, not only for her subtle, nuanced
line deliveries, but for her employment
of non-verbal communication when
reacting to the other characters’
comments. During these moments,
McKune can be seen in the background
disapprovingly rolling her eyes, scowling,
or eying another character. Yet despite
the over-dramatic nature of these facial
expressions, McKune employs them with
sincerity. She’s constantly in the moment
here, with thoughts registering in her
eyes and expressions every minute she’s
on stage.
The performer is at her best when
Nathan Johnson’s Lee – one of the
titular boys – tells her that he’s dying.
McKune’s tear-filled reaction approaches
being over-the-top, but thankfully
never reaches it, effectively eliciting
laughter as her Mary scolds Lee for
slipping the phrase “I’m dying” into
their conversation without warning.
She’s comical without being clownish
in her crying. And moments later, as
the tensions settles, McKune’s tears –
accompanied by her almost whispered
vocal deliveries – led to what was, for
me, the tenderest moment in Friday’s
THEATRE By Thom White
O Brother, Why Art Thou?
The Melville Boys, at the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre through June 15
production.
Up to this
point in the
plot, The
Melville Boys’
conflicts have
to do with
whether Lee
and Mary
will hook up,
given that
each of them
is already
married,
and with Lee’s younger brother (Victor
Angelo’s happy-go-lucky brother
Owen) inviting Mary and her sister (Jo
Vasquez’s free-spirited, sexually energized
Loretta) to visit after spotting them in
a boat. The four end up attending a
local potluck supper and dance – with
Owen and Loretta clearly on a date and
Mary and Lee accompanying each other
for their siblings’ sake – and while it’s
clear that Mary’s marital status isn’t so
cut-and-dried, it’s equally obvious that
Mary is cautiously interested in Lee.
This is where Johnson’s portrayal is
strongest, as Lee has a true chemistry
with Mary, but also no interest in getting
to know her beyond sharing a casual
friendship. Yet despite my distaste for
infidelity off- and on-stage, I still hoped
for happiness for McKune’s Mary and
Johnson’s Lee because of their quite-
touching characterizations, each with its
undertones of brokenness.
Unfortunately, though, Johnson’s
most emotional scene is, in my opinion,
Foster’s weakest; with Owen finally
talking about his brother’s impending
death, the playwright wraps up his
amusing comedy with a heavy hand.
Johnson and Angelo offer commendable
performances and chemistry, but the
scene includes too much exposition
– especially as the final scene of the
play – and drags on with unnecessary
dialogue. While this confrontation and
emotional connection between the boys
is inevitable, it doesn’t match the tone of
the rest of Foster’s work. Nor does the
scene’s writing do justice to Richmond
Hill’s otherwise well-paced, charming
take on The Melville Boys.
The Melville Boys runs at the Richmond
Hill Barn Theatre (600 Robinson Drive,
Geneseo) through June 15, and more
information and tickets are available
by calling (309)944-2244 or visiting
RHPlayers.com.
Nathan Johnson and Victor Angelo
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
it is, my interest in the film waned as
soon as Cruise’s endless time/space
loop stopped looping, and the movie
turned into every routine summertime
blockbuster that it had, to that point,
been mercilessly satirizing. But there’s
no way I can dismiss the considerable
pleasures of its first 90 minutes, with
Cruise’s character ve-e-ery gradually
figuring out how he and Emily Blunt’s
warrior are to defeat the alien armada
(ritual suicide plays a big part of it),
and Cruise himself looser and flakier
and funnier than he’s been on-screen
in nearly two decades. Whether
unsuccessfully trying to blackmail
Brendan Gleeson’s unflappable
general or attempting to match wits
with Bill Paxton’s grinning-sumbitch
sergeant – or merely trudging along
the beach in body armor that’s clearly
heavier than he is – Cruise is a master
comedian here, and so lacking in his
traditional vanity that he appears
perfectly content to let Blunt emerge
as the film’s true ass-kicking hero. Edge
of Tomorrow is for anyone who ever
wanted to watch Jerry Maguire battle
invaders from outer space, or anyone
who ever wanted to watch Tom Cruise
die on-screen 20 times in a row. I can’t
be the only one.
For reviews of Maleficent, A Million
Ways to Die in the West, and other
current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.
com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
The first words heard in the romantic
tearjerker The Fault in Our Stars come
from Shailene Woodley’s cancer-stricken
teen Hazel, who tells us, in voice-over
narration, that Hollywood movies are
never honest in their depiction of sad
stories, and promises that when it comes
to the sad story she’s about to relate,
“This is the truth.” And in retrospect, the
film lost me with those four little words,
because almost nothing that happened
over the next two-plus hours felt even
close to true.
I know, I know: I’m a monster. Could
anyone other than a monster, after all,
fail to be touched by this adaptation of
John Green’s madly popular YA novel,
which finds Hazel and fellow “cancer kid”
Gus (Ansel Elgort) falling in love despite
the continual threat of death? Wasn’t I
moved when the sardonic, clear-headed
Hazel tried, in vain, to deny her feelings
for the devoted, persistently cheerful
Gus because she didn’t want to hurt him?
Didn’t I weep like a baby when the pair
found themselves in the Amsterdam attic
where Anne Frank and her family hid,
and began making out while their fellow
tourists, listening to Anne’s voice on a
phonograph, nodded approvingly and
applauded the teens’ PDA?
Uh, no. Nor was I taken with the
“truthful” meet-cute in which Hazel and
Gus literally bump into one another,
nor the “truthful” sit-comedy involving
the kids’ Jesus-freak counselor and Gus’
ever-present unlit cigarette and horrible
driving skills, nor Hazel’s penchant for
“truthful” dialogue such
as “I’m a grenade, and one
day, I’m gonna explode
and obliterate everything
in my wake.” To be sure,
it’s nearly impossible to
begrudge the affection
that so many teen and
tween girls feel for the
Fault in Our Stars movie.
Listening to them laugh
and cry and swoon at the
screening I attended (and
yes, when Gus finally
voiced his love for Hazel, I
heard audible swooning),
it was obvious that for the film’s target
demographic, director Josh Boone and
screenwriters Scott Neustadter and
Michael H. Weber had done their job
and then some. But let’s be clear: This is
not the truth. This is a romantic fantasy
about two perfect kids with perfect
parents who deliver perfectly elocuted
(i.e., perfectly false) sentiments until
cancer inevitably ends their perfect love.
That the film is sincere doesn’t mean it’s
not also a crock.
Whatever. Let’s just chalk it up to the
movie being profoundly Not for Me. I
was moved by a couple of moments with
Laura Dern as Hazel’s mom, and while, at
this point, I’m thinking I may never get
fully on board with Shailene Woodley –
her much-admired “naturalism” always
strikes me as completely practiced – she
enacts her saintly character about as well
as anyone could. Willem Dafoe does
fine with a senseless role as a grizzled,
alcoholic author. And although I found
Elgort, who resembles a beefier Michael
Cera, nearly insufferable with his one-
smile-for-all-occasions blandness, at
least his Gus had the good sense, on the
plane ride to Amsterdam, to be watching
Aliens, a movie I consider 10 times
more engaging, honest, and legitimately
emotional than The Fault in Our Stars.
And that’s the truth.
EDGE OF TOMORROW
A sci-fi thriller with the soul of a
screwball comedy, director Doug Liman’s
Edge of Tomorrow casts Tom Cruise as a
cowardly military flack who finds himself
fighting a beachfront insurrection by
tentacled marauders only to be killed,
to wake up, and to find himself fighting
them over and over again. In short,
it’s like Starship Troopers meets Saving
Private Ryan meets Groundhog Day,
and just about as much weird-ass fun
as that description suggests. Visually
dazzling and brilliantly edited though
Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren
The Kids Aren’t All Right
Ansel Elgort and Shailene Woodley in The Fault in Our
Stars
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 12 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
What’s Happenin’
Music
The Sena Ehrhardt Band
Rascals Live
Friday, June 13, 7:30 p.m.
T
his year, Father’s Day
lands on Sunday, June
15. And two days prior, when
Minnesota-based singer/songwriter
Sena Ehrhardt performs her concert at
Rascals Live, she’ll actually share the
stage with her own dad Ed Ehrhardt,
who’s the guitarist for his daughter’s
blues ensemble the Sena Ehrhardt
Band. In other words, this Father’s Day,
Sena will be able to give her pop the
one gift all parents most want from
their children: a paycheck.
With her dad a professional blues
musician and her mom a music fan
with particular fondness for The Judds,
Sena grew up in a tune-filled household
in the Minneapolis area, and received a
2009 University of Minnesota master’s
degree in exactly the field you’d expect:
health-care administration. (Okay,
maybe not exactly the field you’d expect
... .) But within a month of graduating,
Sena found herself performing in her
father’s band Plan B, which quickly led
to her wanting to front a blues-fueled
group of her own, with her dad serving
as guitarist and co-songwriter.
Put simply: Health-care
administration’s loss turned into
blues music’s gain. By the fall of 2010,
the nascent blues artist had formed
the Sena Ehrhardt Band
alongside Ed Ehrhardt,
bassist Steve Hansen, and
drummer Tim Hasler, and
after playing numerous
local and Midwestern
engagements, the group’s CD
debut Leave the Light on was
released in August of 2011.
The album went on to earn
Sena and her musicians a Blues Music
Award nomination for “Best New
Artist Debut,” and since the release of
the group’s 2013 follow-up All in, the
accolades have continues to amass.
Living Blues magazine raves, “Sena
Ehrhardt’s voice cannot get any
more powerful, range-defying, and
throwback cool,” adding that the artist
possesses “one of the most dynamic
young voices any genre has seen in a
long time.” Elmore magazine writes,
“Ehrhardt enchants with a hard-knock
heart full of blues and unrepentant
female soul,” citing especially her
“brassy, wrapped-around-her-finger
inflections that will have the listener
hanging on every word.” And Blues
Blast magazine states that Sena “is real
knockout, and her father Ed Ehrhardt
is a fantastic guitar player.” A paycheck
and awesome reviews. Not I’m feeling
even crappier for getting my dad that
tie.
For more information on the Sena
Ehrhardt Band’s Moline concert – a
Friday the 13th event that no one could
possibly fear – call (309)797-9457 or
visit RascalsLive.com.
Music
The Willie Pickens Trio
The Redstone Room
Sunday, June 15, 6 p.m.
I
n a Chicago Tribute interview in December 2013, jazz
pianist Willie Pickens said, “I feel sometimes that you
grow in spurts. Sometimes you kind of level off, and you
feel you’re not moving anywhere. Other times, you’re kind
of growing by leaps and bounds, and maybe this is one of
those times.”
What I didn’t mention about that interview is that
Pickens gave it when he was 82 years old. Growing by
leaps and bounds? Did no one ever tell Pickens that we’re
supposed to shrink as we age?
Apparently not. And thank goodness, because as Pickens’
audiences at Davenport’s Redstone Room will discover on
June 15, the octogenarian is showing absolutely no signs of
musical-talent shrinkage. Appearing as the latest guests in
Polyrhythms’ monthly Third Sunday Jazz series, the Willie
Pickens Trio – featuring Larry Gray on bass and Robert Shy
on drums – is sure to wow area jazz fans with astonishing
musicianship, while Pickens himself reveals the still-
growing gifts first made apparent on Eddie Harris’ seminal
1961 record Exodus.
A lifelong entertainer who received his 1958 bachelor’s
degree in music education from the University of Wisconsin
at Milwaukee, Pickens has spent the past half-century-plus
showing packed houses and festival crowds just how jazz is
meant to be played. Over the span of his remarkable career,
he’s shared stages with the likes of Sammy Davis Jr., Quincy
Jones, and Roberta Flack; he’s toured extensively throughout
Japan, Europe, Canada, and the United States; he’s headlined
Music
Boots & Brews
District of Rock Island
Saturday, June 14, 7 p.m.
H
ere’s a no-fail, country-rock recipe for a fantastic Saturday night – specifi-
cally, the night of Saturday, June 14 – in the District of Rock Island.
First, you invite the members of the Dani Lynn Howe Band. Winners of
numerous “Best Quad Cities Band” citations in the Quad-City Times and a certain
bi-weekly news source you’re reading right now, this group fronted by Iowa native
Dani Lynn Howe has been a vibrant and busy fixture on the area music scene for
years, headlining major festivals and opening for the likes of Tracy Lawrence,
Trace Adkins, Martina McBride, Brad Paisley, and Keith Urban.
Then you add a set with another female chanteuse and Iowa native: singer/
songwriter Logan Tudeen. Even though her self-titled debut album is less than a
year old, Tudeen has already amassed a sizable fan base and sensational notices
for her inspired country-rock stylings, with Music Row magazine praising her
“penetrating voice” and “moody, bluesy tone,” and Music News Nashville stating
that her popular single “Circles” showcases “the power of Tudeen’s vocal ability and
her impressive vocal range.”
And finally, you add a featured set with country duo Brother Trouble, the 2008
champions of Kenny Chesney’s “Next Big Star Competition” whose talents won
them $25,000 and three nights performing as openers on Chesney’s Poets & Pirates
tour. With their first single, the county hit “Summer’s Little Angel,” released in
2011, and their album debut Live from Nashville released in 2012, brothers Jason
and Mark Sutton have gone on to enjoy great success as touring artists, and will be
hitting the District following springtime stops in Tennessee, South Carolina, and
Ohio.
Put ’em all together, along with outdoor vendors serving all manner of tasty
treats, and you’ve got yourself the inaugural Boots & Brews concert, a new
summertime mini-festival that (weather be damned) is sure to be both very hot
and very cool. But as always, be careful about just how much you imbibe at this
particular event. Remember: It’s Boots & Brews. You don’t want to be the one who
boots after the brews.
For more information on this summer happening co-sponsored by the Daiquiri
Factory, 2nd Ave., and RIBCO, call (309)788-6311 or visit RIDistrict.com.
Riverside Festival Stage Lower City Park, Iowa City
319-338-7672 riversidetheatre.org

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 13 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
MUSIC
Thursday, June 12 – RME
10-Year Anniversary Outdoor
Concert. Celebratory event featuring
performances by the MarchFourth
Marching Band and the Winter Blues
All-Stars. River Music Experience (131
West Second Street, Davenport). 5
p.m. Free admission. For information,
call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Friday, June 13 – Here Come
the Mummies. Tightly-wrapped
rockers in an outdoor concert, with
an opening set by Naughty Naughty.
The District of Rock Island. $20. 8 p.m.
For information, call (309)788-6311 or
visit RIDistrict.com.
Saturday, June 14 – The David
Mayfield Parade and Lissie. Roots-
rock and Americana musicians in
concert. The Redstone Room (129
Main Street, Davenport). 8:30 p.m.
$15. For tickets and information,
call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Sunday, June 15 – An Evening
with Jackie Greene. Singer/
songwriter and multi-instrumentalist
in concert, with an opening set by
Cereus Bright. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third
Avenue, Rock Island). 7:30 p.m. $15.
For information, call (309)200-0978 or
What Else
Is Happenin’
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 14
Apparently not. And thank goodness, because as Pickens’
audiences at Davenport’s Redstone Room will discover on
June 15, the octogenarian is showing absolutely no signs of
musical-talent shrinkage. Appearing as the latest guests in
Polyrhythms’ monthly Third Sunday Jazz series, the Willie
Pickens Trio – featuring Larry Gray on bass and Robert Shy
on drums – is sure to wow area jazz fans with astonishing
musicianship, while Pickens himself reveals the still-
growing gifts first made apparent on Eddie Harris’ seminal
1961 record Exodus.
A lifelong entertainer who received his 1958 bachelor’s
degree in music education from the University of Wisconsin
at Milwaukee, Pickens has spent the past half-century-plus
showing packed houses and festival crowds just how jazz is
meant to be played. Over the span of his remarkable career,
he’s shared stages with the likes of Sammy Davis Jr., Quincy
Jones, and Roberta Flack; he’s toured extensively throughout
Japan, Europe, Canada, and the United States; he’s headlined
the Chicago Jazz Festival numerous times and served as the
featured pianist for the legendary Joe Segal’s Jazz Cruises.
But the Hyde Park, Illinois, resident has proven just as
dedicated in his role as educator, teaching at Northern
Illinois University and mentoring in Ravinia’s Jazz Scholar
Program even after his 80th birthday.
With the Chicago Reader raving, “Pickens’ most
exuberant solos all but take flight from the keyboard’s
runway,” and the Tribune praising the pianist’s “great
splashes of color and dissonance in the right hand and his
barrelhouse octaves in the left,” no jazz fan will want to
miss the Willie Pickens Band’s 6 p.m. concert – or, for that
matter, Pickens’ 3 p.m. jazz workshop. Finally! A summer-
school experience that no one can bitch about!
For more information on the Willie Pickens Trio’s area
engagement, call (309)373-0790 or visit Polyrhythms.org or
RiverMusicExperience.org.
“penetrating voice” and “moody, bluesy tone,” and Music News Nashville stating
that her popular single “Circles” showcases “the power of Tudeen’s vocal ability and
her impressive vocal range.”
And finally, you add a featured set with country duo Brother Trouble, the 2008
champions of Kenny Chesney’s “Next Big Star Competition” whose talents won
them $25,000 and three nights performing as openers on Chesney’s Poets & Pirates
tour. With their first single, the county hit “Summer’s Little Angel,” released in
2011, and their album debut Live from Nashville released in 2012, brothers Jason
and Mark Sutton have gone on to enjoy great success as touring artists, and will be
hitting the District following springtime stops in Tennessee, South Carolina, and
Ohio.
Put ’em all together, along with outdoor vendors serving all manner of tasty
treats, and you’ve got yourself the inaugural Boots & Brews concert, a new
summertime mini-festival that (weather be damned) is sure to be both very hot
and very cool. But as always, be careful about just how much you imbibe at this
particular event. Remember: It’s Boots & Brews. You don’t want to be the one who
boots after the brews.
For more information on this summer happening co-sponsored by the Daiquiri
Factory, 2nd Ave., and RIBCO, call (309)788-6311 or visit RIDistrict.com.
Theatre
Die Fledermaus
Lincoln Park
Saturday, June 14, through Sunday, June
22, 8 p.m.
“G
reetings, Jeff!”
“Hi, Mike. I see you’re
getting geared up for our
area’s summer-theatre season.”
“I am indeed!”
“So you want to explain this costume?”
“You like it? I’m wearing it to support
Genesius Guild’s season-opener: the
comic operatta Die Fledermaus, running
June 14 through 22 in Rock Island’s
Lincoln Park!”
“Walk me through it, Mike.”
“It’s a hilarious, musically and lyrically
beautiful tale of mistaken identity and
romantic entanglements by composer
Johann Strauss II and librettists Karl
Haffner and Richard Genée, and it’s
been a beloved operatic staple since its
premiere in Vienna back in 1874.”
“Yes, I’m aware of that.”
“It concerns a prison sentence and
adulterous lovers and drunken guards
and a madcap night at the prince’s ball,
and this particular production is being
helmed by Augustana College’s John
Pfautz, who also directed delightful
Lincoln Park presentations of Gilbert’s &
Sullivan’s The Mikado and Pateince!”
“Sounds like a lot of fun.”
“And the cast is sensational! Among
the more than two dozen performers in
Genesius Guild’s
show are familiar
talents such as
Jonathan Schrader,
Kai Swanson,
and Angela
Hand, and Augie
instructors such
as Michele Crouch, Tim Bloser, and
Ann Boaden, and University of Iowa
doctorate recipients Steven Jepson and
James Thompson ... . And there’s even
a Die Fledermaus role being played by
Genesius Guild founder Don Wooten!”
“That’s an impressive lineup.”
“Plus, there’ll be four student dancers
from Ballet Quad Cities’ summer
program performing choreography
by artistic director Courtney Lyon,
and Ballet Quad Cities’ Jake Lyon
choreographing the chorus numbers, and
the wonderful Ellen Dixon designing the
costumes ... !”
“Which bring us, again, to your
costume, Mike.”
“Well, in German, ‘die fledermaus’
means ’the bat.’ So in honor of Genesius
Guild’s Die Fledermaus ... I’m Batman!”
“And the rubber nipples?”
“Eh ... they were all out of Christopher
Nolan Batman outfits, so I got stuck with
the Joel Schumacher version.”
“That sucks.”
“Tell me about it.”
Admission to Die Fledermaus’ Saturday
and Sunday performances is free, though
donations are encouraged, and more
information is available by visiting
Genesius.org.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 14 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
visit RozzTox.com.
Tuesday, June 17 – Aaron Neville.
Concert with the Grammy-winning,
chart-topping R&B musician. Englert
Theatre (221 East Washington Street,
Iowa City). 8 p.m. $37.50-65. For tickets
and information, call (319)688-1653 or
visit Englert.org.
Thursday, June 19 – Henhouse
Prowlers. Bluegrass musicians in
concert, with an opening set by Dick
Prall. The Redstone Room (129 Main
Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $8. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-1333 or
visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Thursday, June 19 – Communion
Daytrotter June Club Night.
Independent musicians Catfish & the
Bottlemen, Amasa Hines, Outsides,
and Hailey Whitters in concert. Codfish
Hollow Barn (3437 288th Avenue,
Maquoketa). 8 p.m. $9.50-15. For tickets
and information, call (563)321-0172 or
visit CodfishHollowBarnstormers.com.
Friday, June 20 – Mark Chesnutt.
Concert with the chart-topping
country singer. Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center (2021 State Street,
Bettendorf ). 8 p.m. $30. For information,
call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.
IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Friday, June 20 – Benjamin Cartel
& the Melismatics. Indie, pop, and
rock musicians in concert. River Music
Experience (131 West Second Street,
Davenport). 9 p.m. $7. For tickets and
information, call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Saturday, June 21 – Laura’s Legacy
Concert with Lissie. The singer/
songwriter and area native headlines
the third-annual fundraiser for the AZSL
division of the Muscular Dystrophy
Association of Iowa & Western Illinois,
with additional sets by Daphne Willis,
Ellis Kell & Friends, and David Zollo & the
Body Electric. Schwiebert Riverfront Park
(between 17th and 20th Streets, Rock
Island). 2-9 p.m. $10, ages 12 and under
free. For information, visit Lissie.com.
Saturday, June 21 – Rock the District
with Chevelle. All-ages outdoor concert
presented by the Daiquiri Factory and
Rock Island Brewing Company, with an
opening set by Three Years Hollow. The
District of Rock Island. 7 p.m. $30-35. For
information, call (309)788-6311 or visit
RIDistrict.com.
THEATRE
Friday, June 13, through Sunday,
June 22 – Les Misérables. Quad City
Music Guild’s production of the Tony-
winning Broadway smash, directed by
Bob Williams. Prospect Park Auditorium
(1584 34th Avenue, Moline). 7:30 p.m.
$11-16. For tickets and information, call
(309)762-6610 or visit QCMusicGuild.
com.
Thursday, June 19, through
Saturday, July 12 – StinkyKids: The
Musical. Andrea Moore directs the
family musical based on the children’s-
book series. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse
(1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 10 a.m.
and/or 1 p.m. performances on Tuesdays,
Thursdays, and Saturdays. $8.50. For
tickets and information, call (309)786-
7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Thursday, June 19, through Sunday,
June 29 – Annie Get Your Gun. Irving
Berlin’s musical-comedy classic set in the
wild, wild West. Clinton Area Showboat
Theatre (311 Riverview Drive, Clinton).
Thursdays through Saturdays 7:30 p.m.,
Sundays and Wednesdays 2 p.m. For
tickets and information, call (563)242-
6760 or visit ClintonShowboat.org.
Thursday, June 19, through
Saturday, June 28 – An Inspector Calls.
J.B. Priestley’s Tony Award-winning
ghost story, directed by Chuck Smith.
Timber Lake Playhouse (8215 Black Oak
Road, Mt. Carroll). Tuesdays through
Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays and
Wednesdays 2 p.m. $17-23. For tickets
and information, call (815)244-2035 or
visit TimberLakePlayhouse.org.
Friday, June 20, through Sunday,
July 13 – The Complete Works of
William Shakespeare (abridged)
[revised]. A parody of the Bard’s entire
literary output, directed by Ron Clark.
Riverside Theatre Festival Stage (Lower
City Park, Iowa City). Tuesdays through
Sundays at 6, 7, or 8 p.m. $18-40. For
tickets and information, call (319)338-
7672 or visit RiversideTheatre.org.
Friday, June 20, through Sunday,
June 22 – The Mystery of Edwin
Drood. City Circle Acting Company of
Coralville’s production of the musical
based on an unfinished Charles Dickens
novel, directed by Patrick Du Laney.
Coralville Center for the Performing
Arts (1301 Fifth Street, Coralville). Friday
and Saturday 7:30 p.m., Saturday and
Sunday 2 p.m. $12-27. For tickets and
information, call (319)248-9370 or visit
CoralvilleArts.org.
Sunday, June 22 – Respect: A
Musical Journey of Women. The
University of Iowa’s Iowa Summer Rep
touring production of the female-
vocalist revue, directed by Eric Forsythe.
Ohnward Fine Arts Center (1215 East
Platt Street, Maquoketa). 2 p.m. $10
suggested donation. For tickets and
information, call (563)652-9815 or visit
OhnwardFineArtsCenter.com.
COMEDY
Thursday, June 19 – Baby Boomer
Comedy Show. Theatre event with clean
humor on topics including family, kids,
work, do-it-yourself projects, dieting,
and aging. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse
(1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m.
$20-25. For tickets and information,
call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit
Circa21.com.
MOVIES
Friday, June 20 – Charlie Chaplin
Celebration. Event featuring a
screening of Kid Auto Races at Venice
accompanied by the Josh Duffee
Orchestra, the feature The Kid, a Charlie
Chaplin costume contest, and more.
Bettendorf Public Library (2950 Learning
Campus, Bettendorf ). 4:30 p.m. Free. For
information, call (563)344-4175 or visit
BettendorfLibrary.com.
VISUAL ARTS
Saturday, June 14, through Sunday,
September 14 – From Pencil to Printed
Page: Arthur Geisert’s Thunderstorm.
Exhibit on the creation of Geisert’s
picture book, featuring more than 180
sketches, plates, print states, and hand-
colored illustrations accompanied by
an assemblage of artist’s tools. Figge
Art Museum (225 West Second Street,
Davenport). Tuesdays through Saturdays
10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m.-9 p.m.,
Sundays noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7
museum admission. For information, call
(563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org.
EVENTS
Thursday, June 12, through
Saturday, June 14 – Miss Iowa 2014.
Annual competition resulting in the
crowning of Miss Iowa and Miss Iowa’s
Outstanding Teen. Adler Theatre (136
East Third Street, Davenport). Thursday
and Friday $37, Saturday $47, three-day
pass $110. For tickets, call (800)745-3000
or visit MissIowa.com.
Friday, June 13 – BeeRME for
Music. Sixth-annual fundraising event
with beer samples, hors d’oeuvres, live
music by OSG, and more. River Music
Experience (131 West Second Street,
Davenport). 9 p.m. $7. For tickets and
information, call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Sunday, June 15 – Ride the River. The
30th-annual bi-state tour of the Quad
Cities along riverfront bike trails, hosted
by River Action. Meet at the Freight
House (421 West River Drive, Davenport).
7 a.m. $5-15 registration. For information,
call (563)322-7433 or visit RiverAction.
org.
Tuesday, June 17, through Saturday,
June 21 – Rock Island County Fair.
Annual outdoor fair featuring live music,
exhibitions, ride, games, children’s
activities, auto and truck shows, and
more. Rock Island County Fairgrounds
(Archer Drive and Avenue of the Cities,
East Moline). Free admission. For
information, call (309)796-1620 or visit
RockIslandFair.org.
Thursday, June 19 – The Garden
Party 2014. Annual fundraising event
featuring live music, a silent auction,
raffle items, hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar,
and more. Quad City Botanical Center
(2525 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). 6
p.m. $65. For tickets and information, call
(309)794-0991 or visit QCGardens.com.
Saturday, June 21 – Garden Get-
Down. Third-annual fundraising
featuring live music, local artists,
homemade goods, children’s activities,
and more, with proceeds helping to
build a recycled-glass greenhouse.
Tremont Garden Project (1926 Tremont
Avenue, Davenport). 4-10 p.m. Donations
encouraged. For information, call
(563)508-2755.
Saturday, June 21, and Sunday, June
22 – Mr. BBQ Barbecue Challenge.
Fourth-annual event featuring 30 teams
competing for cash and trophies plus a
craft-brew and wine tasting, in a benefit
for the Children’s Therapy Center of the
Quad Cities. LeClaire Park (River Drive
and Ripley Street, Davenport). Noon-5
p.m. For information, call (309)799-7469
or visit IOPRO.net.
Sunday, June 22 – Blossoms at
Butterworth. Traditional garden party
featuring antique cars, lawn games of the
1800s, live music, tours, refreshments,
and more. Butterworth Center (1105
Eighth Street, Moline). Noon-5 p.m. Free
admission. For information, call (309)743-
2701 or visit ButterworthCenter.com.
Tuesday, June 23 – Jim Wand:
Beyond Imagination. Audience-
participation performance with the
master hypnotist. Central Performing Arts
Center (519 East 11th Street, DeWitt). 8
p.m. $10. For information and tickets, call
(563)249-8541 or visit Midwestix.com.
Continued From Page 13
What Else Is Happenin’
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 15 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
T
ight
harmo-
nies,
effervescent
smiles, and
pastel-col-
ored dresses
are the high-
lights of the
Clinton Area
Showboat
Theatre’s The
Taffetas, a
jukebox mu-
sical featuring
songs from
the 1950s. Yet
it’s barely a
musical. The
production plays out as the titular girls’
group makes its national television debut
on the Spotlight on Music show – with the
Showboat crowd serving as the “live stu-
dio audience” for a televised concert – and
as there isn’t much dialogue, or much plot,
The Taffetas is really more of a revue.
Director and choreographer Brian
Cowing, however, keeps things bubbly as
the 90-minute performance (including
intermission) moves from song to song
in a score that features “Sh-Boom,” “Mr.
Sandman,” “Mockin’ Bird Hill,” and two
clever medleys that race through tunes
about travel and boys. His choreography
also fits the 1950s style, but with motions
that seem fresh and are sometimes
humorous. Such is particularly the case
with the song “The Three Bells,” in
which three of the girls – singing backup
to the fourth – hold their skirts out
perpendicularly from their sides and then
tilt to the left, then the right, as they sing
each subsequent “bum,” mimicking the
sounds of a bell chiming.
Jenna Haimes, Heather Baisley, Carly
Ann Berg, and Sarah Randall sound
great together as sisters Kaye, Peggy,
Cheryl, and Donna. As they sing, they
employ bright smiles and bouncy steps
to keep that perceived air of goody-
goodness believed to be an intrinsic
part of 1950s life. Yet this, beyond the
show’s lack of plot, is my major complaint
about the production, because the
actors consequently don’t do much to
differentiate their characters. It hardly
matters that they have names, because
beyond the various period hairstyles and
pastel colors that each girl wears, it’s so
difficult to tell them apart. (Costume
designer Jenna Damberger’s short-sleeve,
boat-neckline, circle-skirt dresses worn
over crinolines, though, are gorgeous.)
Randall, who also sports cat-eye glasses,
does have a few moments of distinction
in which her Donna displays slightly off,
going-out-on-her-awkward-own fits of
individuality and must be reeled back in
by her sisters. But other than that, the only
time the actors distinguish themselves
is in the second-act Q&A; on Friday,
Randall played up Donna’s spaz-iness,
while Baisley showed a sluttier side to
Peggy, offering a “Call me” gesture to an
audience member who asked a randy
question. But it was unfortunate that these
characteristics weren’t more prominent
from the start of the performance and
played throughout. As it is, the on-stage
pianist (George Spelvin’s crotchety Perry,
who plays on a keyboard that set designer
Steven P. House ingeniously built to look
like a baby grand) has a handful of lines as
he accompanies the quartet, and exudes
more personality than the show’s stars.
It could be argued that the absence of
plot also means the lack of a contrived
conflict that would almost certainly make
the show worse, and so not having one
was perhaps a smart choice made by
Rick Lewis, who wrote and arranged the
piece. As a musical, The Taffetas does have
its shortcomings, and this production
does not rise above them. However,
as a performance of 1950s tunes, the
Showboat’s staging shines, leaving this fan
of rich harmonies and buoyant melodies
smiling at the end of the evening’s
entertainment.
The Taffetas runs at the Clinton Area
Showboat Theatre (311 Riverview Drive,
Clinton) through June 15, and more
information and tickets are available
by calling (563)242-6760 or visiting
ClintonShowboat.org.
Do-Wop-ers with Cheese
The Taffetas, at the Clinton Area Showboat Theatre through June 15
By Thom White THEATRE
George Spelvin, Sarah Randall, Carly Ann Berg, Heather Baisley,
and Jenna Haimes
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 16
PHOTOGRAPHY
(Editor’s note: The
River Cities’ Reader
each month will
feature an image
or images from
the Quad Cities
Photography Club.)
M
ost of us
became
tired of
the cold weather
this past winter,
but Paul Riewerts
decided to make
the most of the
conditions. He and
a cousin headed
north – where it
was even colder
than in our area
– and got some
spectacular images.
One was entered
in the Quad Cities
Photography Club
competition recent-
ly and received one
of the high scores
for the evening.
Paul traveled to
Bayfiewld, Wisconsin, early in March to
visit and take photos of the Lake Superior
ice caves. Paul said: “The trail over the
frozen lake has not been opened for the
last five years, so we took advantage of
the extra-cold winter this year. It was 15
below zero when we left the parking lot
that day, and we spent six hours walking
and taking photographs of the many
unusual ice formations.” This is an image
he got looking out from the cave opening.
Paul used a Nikon D700 with a
14-millimeter lens. He shot at f/11 for
1/160 of a second with ISO 400. He
edited it with Capture NX 2 software.
Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club
The Quad Cities Photography Club
welcomes visitors and new members.
The club sponsors numerous activities
encompassing many types and aspects of
photography. It holds digital and print
competitions most months. At its meetings,
members discuss the images, help each
other to improve, and socialize. The club
also holds special learning workshops
and small groups that meet on specific
photography topics, and occasionally offers
interesting shooting opportunities. The
club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Thursday
of the month September through June at
the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street
in Moline.
For more information on the club, visit
QCPhotoClub.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 17 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
officer involved with administrative pay,
dragging out the investigation until the
public forgets about the incident, and then
eventually declaring the shooting incident
justified based on the officer’s fear for his
safety – thus allowing him to go back to
work as usual.
And if on the off chance that a shooting
incident goes before the courts, the judiciary
defers to police authority in almost all
instances. Just last month, for example, the
U.S. Supreme Court declared that police
officers who in 2004 used deadly force
to terminate a car chase were immune
from a lawsuit. The officers were accused
of needlessly resorting to deadly force by
shooting multiple times at a man and his
passenger in a stopped car, killing both
individuals.
Meanwhile, the epidemic of police
violence continues to escalate while fear
of the police increases and the police state,
with all its surveillance gear and military
weaponry, expands around us.
Constitutional attorney and author John W.
Whitehead is founder and president of the
Rutherford Institute (Rutherford.org) and
editor of GadflyOnline.com. His latest book,
A Government of Wolves: The Emerging
American Police State, is available online at
Amazon.com.
Just Shoot
by John W. Whitehead
johnw@rutherford.org
COVER STORY
lighting, sometimes the ice appears as
a white positive form, and sometimes
it reverses as gray or black on a white
background. There are views taken from
the side, and others focused directly
down on the etched, frozen layers. Edges
echo in ripples and change course in
new directions. These images may be
documents of one day’s puddle or pond
surface, but they also register as timeless
– a testimony to the strength of natural
forces, whether conventional or cosmic.
The presentation of Ice 7-12 is visually
stronger than its counterpart Ice 1–6,
with greater drama and a more dynamic
play of tonal contrast. There is potential
in these images, but as presented they’re
a bit wan for several reasons. Their
surface tone doesn’t match the powerful
from the ‘Anatomy of Force Incidents’
training in January include a need to over-
analyze one’s environment for deadly threats
by using one’s imagination to create ‘targets
of the day’ who could be ‘reasonably’ shot; to
view racial profiling as a legitimate policing
technique, even if the person is a child,
pregnant woman, or elderly person; and
to use the law to one’s advantage to avoid
culpability.”
What we’re dealing with is what author
Kristian Williams describes as the dual
myths of heroism and danger: “The
overblown image of police heroism, and
the ‘obsession’ with officer safety, do not
only serve to justify police violence after the
fact; by providing such justification, they
legitimize violence, and thus make it more
likely.”
If ever there were a time to de-militarize
and de-weaponize police forces, it’s now,
starting at the local level, with local
governments and citizens reining in local
police. The same goes for scaling back on
the mindset adopted by cops that they are
the law and should be revered, feared, and
obeyed.
Police have been insulated from
accusations of wrongdoing for too long and
allowed to operate in an environment in
which whatever a cop says goes. The current
practice is to let the police deal with these
transgressions internally by suspending the
Continued From Page 9 ART
Timeless Treatments
by Sherry C. Maurer
sherry_maurer@yahoo.com
Continued From Page 5
Untitled work by Marvin Thompson
impact of original black-and-white
photographs, lacking the gorgeous sheen
and depth of classic silver prints. They’re
also everyday-sized digital prints, and a
larger scale would envelop the viewer’s
full range of vision. Framing with wider
mats would create a more sumptuous
effect, buffering the images from their
surroundings.
The gallery is located next to the seating
area before airport security, and this
exhibition merits viewing as part of your
travels or as a destination in itself.
Sherry C. Maurer holds an MFA in
painting, an MA in art history, and a BFA
with a printmaking concentration. She was
the director of the Augustana College Art
Museum from 1983 to 2013.
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
Charles “Big C” Edward High Remembered
and Celebrated (1950-2014)
bonds that were formed all those years
ago, made utterly unbreakable over time.
Growing up in this environment taught
each of us about the importance of family
and lifelong friendships to all things
worthy. Many in our group are still best
friends today, and most are in regular
touch with one another. While this might
sound like a common enough thing, it
was most extraordinary since we were
jam-packed full of originals, chief among
us Chuck. And because you are never
not an original, no greater gift exists than
growing old with such characters still so
close.
Anyone who knew Chuck can tell
you the enormous impact he had on
their lives. Chuck exported his talent for
creating profound friendships everywhere
he went. Just before he passed, the
great friends he made while working
in the music industry in California
organized a massive benefit in his honor
that speaks volumes for the love and
enduring friendships Chuck engendered.
Musicians old and new gathered to
perform, encourage donations, and
generally celebrate an exceptional fellow
from Iowa, who had their love, respect,
and devotion still. A film company
documented the event for posterity,
and it is chock-full of testimonials and
interviews about Chuck, and includes all
the performances in tribute to him.
For those of you who knew Big C
and wish to celebrate his life, please join
us Saturday, June 21, from 6 to 9 p.m.
at Fumbles Sports Bar in downtown
Bettendorf. It used to be the Wing Dam,
where many of us enjoyed a misspent
youth when Chuck and Halvey owned
the place together. (Ross Burgers are on
the menu because they were Chuck’s
all-time favorite.) Together we will let the
memories flow, and create new ones in
his honor.
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
Continued From Page 3
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 18 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
a tongue scraper. This, in turn, should get you
longing to kiss her – a far more enjoyable act
once you’re no longer dating a woman who
maybe looks like Xena the warrior princess
but tastes like Xena’s horse after it’s licked the
break-room refrigerator.
Out of Leftover Field
My buddy was hit on by a girl he plays
softball with, but he politely told her he is
married, and they’ve since become friends.
Recently, he set me up with her. She’s
actually very cute and nice, but I can tell
that she still likes my friend. I feel like a
consolation prize. Is that just in my head?
Should I let this girl go even though I like
her?
– Runner-Up
People often give their romantic partners
food-related nicknames. Maybe yours can be
“my little half-eaten muffin that somebody
handed the homeless guy.”
This woman knows in her rational mind
that there’s a big wife-shaped roadblock
between her and your friend. The problem
is that when she initially turned getting
him into a goal, she switched on the human
motivational system, which is highly efficient
in maintaining a craving but lacks an off
switch for easily discontinuing 1. As for
where this leaves you – well, in game-show
terms, your friend’s the trip to Bermuda, and
you’re the set of steak knives.
When somebody you want still wants
somebody else, the temptation is to chase
after them and then tie them to a chair and
pontificate on your greatness. That’s the most
counterproductive thing you could do. This
isn’t to say you have to give up on this girl.
Just forgo hot pursuit for lukewarm pursuit.
Instead of going whole hog, go one-eighth or
one-sixteenth hog. In practical terms, make
yourself occasionally available but generally
somewhat scarce. She should have the sense
that you’re also dating other women, and
ideally, you are doing that. A month from
now, if she’s still looking at your buddy the
way a dog looks at a piece of bacon teetering
on a counter ledge, it’s probably time to
move on. When your future wife tells the
grandkids, “I’ll always remember when I
first saw your granddad ... ”, the rest of that
shouldn’t be, “... because I’ve still got the hots
for the guy who fixed us up.”
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
All Is Not Flossed
I’ve gone out several times with a girl
I really like, but her breath bothers me
enough that I don’t want to kiss her until it
improves. (It smells like pepper and socks.)
She doesn’t smoke, eat stinky foods, or have
an odd diet (beyond not eating red meat),
so I’m not sure where this is coming from. I
think her feelings might be hurt if I were to
say something. What’s the best approach?
– Holding My Breath
When you read a book about the horrible
chemical weapons used in World War I, you
shouldn’t think, “Hey, that reminds me of
kissing my girlfriend.”
People will tell you that you can just give
the girl a hinty-poo in the form of gum or
a mint. And sure, Altoids can eliminate
persistently bad breath – if the person who
has it gets killed in an avalanche of them. But
terrible breath that isn’t caused by something
a person ate or eats regularly could point
to dental problems – issues even “curiously
strong mints” can’t fix, not even when
combined with a really strong mouthwash,
such as Lysol Basin, Tub, & Tile Cleaner.
There’s a common misconception – held
even by many doctors and dentists – that
serious bad breath originates in the stomach,
notes the health-care research-vetting group
the Cochrane Collaboration. In fact, only
9 percent of the cases at an “oral malodor”
clinic were caused by things such as gastric
imbalances, diet, and sinus infections. But 86
percent of the cases originated orally – most
of them caused by gross microscopic critters
relaxing and playing poker on a person’s
tongue.
Studies find that these microbe meet-ups
can be shut down with tongue scraping, at
least for a while, but you can’t just present this
girl with a Tiffany’s box with a silver tongue
scraper. (“Thinking of you … .”) Sure, you
may lose her if you say something, but if you
don’t, you’ll almost definitely have to ditch
her or have your sinuses filled with cement.
To break the news, start positive: “I find
you totally hot and an amazing person, but
I have to tell you: There’s a sort of ongoing
issue with your breath, and I’ve read that this
can point to dental issues or a need for tongue
scraping.” Assuming she isn’t so mortified
that she dumps you, this news is likely to send
her to the dentist and/or to the drugstore for
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 19 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
stopped to let them pass, allowing an opponent
who was already ahead of him to gain an even
bigger advantage. Yet he ultimately won the race,
rowing with such vigor after the duck incident
that he finished well ahead of his challenger. I
foresee a comparable sequence in your life, Leo.
Being thoughtful and expressing compassion may
seem to slow you down, but in the end that won’t
hinder you from achieving your goal – and may
even help.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22): In
one of her “Twenty-One Love Poems,”
Adrienne Rich talks about her old self
in the third person. “The woman who cherished /
her suffering is dead. I am her descendant. / I love
the scar tissue she handed on to me, / but I want
to go from here with you / fighting the temptation
to make a career of pain.” With your approval,
Virgo, I’d like to make that passage one of your
keynotes in the coming months. According to
my analysis of the astrological omens, you will
have an excellent opportunity to declare your
independence from an affliction you’ve been
addicted to. Are you willing to say goodbye to one
of your signature forms of suffering?

LIBRA (September 23-October 22):
“You should be interviewing roses
not people,” says a character in Anne Carson’s
book The Autobiography of Red. That’s sound
poetic advice for you in the coming days, Libra.
More than you can imagine, you will benefit
from being receptive to and learning from non-
human sources: roses, cats, dogs, spiders, horses,
songbirds, butterflies, trees, rivers, the wind, the
moon, and any other intelligences that make
themselves available to you. I’m not saying you
should ignore the revelations offered by people.
But your emphasis should be on gathering in
wisdom from life forces that don’t communicate
with words.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): William Shockley was a Nobel
Prize-winning physicist who co-
invented the transistor. He also helped launch
the revolution in information technology, and
has been called “the man who brought silicon to
Silicon Valley.” Time magazine named him one of
the hundred most influential people of the 20th
Century. On the other hand, Shockley became
a controversial advocate of eugenics, which
damaged his reputation, led many to consider
him a racist, and played a role in his estrangement
from his friends and family. I suspect that you
will have to deal with at least one Shockley-type
phenomenon in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Will
you overlook the bad stuff to take advantage of
the good? Should you?

SAGITTARIUS (November
22-December 21): Novelist Herman
Melville wrote that to create art,
“unlike things must meet and mate.” Like what?
“Sad patience” and “joyous energies,” for example;
both of them are necessary, he said. “Instinct
and study” are crucial ingredients, as well as
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
ARIES (March 21-April 19): In its
quest for nectar, a hummingbird sips
from a thousand flowers every day.
As it flaps its wings 70 times a second, zipping
from meal to meal, it can fly sideways, backward,
or forward. If it so desires, it can also hover or
glide upside-down. It remembers every flower
it visits, and knows how long it will take before
each flower will produce a new batch of nectar.
To some Spanish speakers, hummingbirds are
known as joyas voladoras, or “flying jewels.” Now
take everything I’ve just said, Aries, and use it as a
metaphor for who you can be in the coming week.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1947,
the impossibly wealthy Duke of Windsor
went shopping in Paris to buy a gift for
his wife, the Duchess. She already had everything
she wanted, so he decided to get creative. He
commissioned the luxury-goods manufacturer
Hermes to build her a high-fashion black-leather
wheelbarrow. I am not urging you to acquire
something like that for yourself, Taurus. But I do
like it as a symbol for what you need in your life
right now: a blend of elegance and usefulness, of
playful beauty and practical value, of artistry and
hard work.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your
brain absorbs about 11 million pieces
of information every second, but is
consciously aware of less than .001 percent of
all that richness. Or at least that’s usually the
case. Having analyzed your astrological omens, I
suspect that you might soon jack that figure up as
high as .01 percent – a 10-fold increase! Do you
think you can handle that much raw input? Are
you amenable to being so acutely perceptive? How
will you respond if the world is 10 times more
vivid than usual? I’m pretty confident. I suspect
you won’t become a bug-eyed maniac freaking
out on the intensity, but rather will be a soulful,
wonder-filled explorer in love with the intensity.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have
a strong, intricate understanding of
where you have come from. The old
days and old ways continue to feed you with their
mysterious poignancy. You don’t love every one
of your past experiences, but you love ruminating
about them and feeling the way they changed you.
Until the day you die many years from now, your
history will keep evolving, providing an endless
stream of new teachings. And yet at this particular
moment in your destiny, Cancerian, I think your
most important task is to focus on where you are
going to. That’s why I urge you to temporarily
forget everything you think you know about your
past and instead concentrate on getting excited
about the future.

LEO (July 23-August 22): In 1928,
Bobby Pearce won a gold medal in
rowing at the Summer Olympics
in Amsterdam. An unforeseen event almost
sabotaged his victory. As he rowed his boat along
the Sloten Canal, a family of ducks swam leisurely
from shore to shore directly across his path. He
humility and pride, audacity and reverence, and
“a flame to melt” and a “wind to freeze.” Based
on my interpretation of the astrological omens,
Sagittarius, I believe you will soon need to meld
opposites like these as you shape that supreme
work of art – your life.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January
19): Haggis is a Scottish pudding.
According to the gourmet food
encyclopedia Larousse Gastronomique, it has
“an excellent nutty texture and delicious savory
flavor.” And yet, to be honest, its ingredients don’t
sound promising. To make it, you gather the
lungs, liver, small intestine, and heart of a sheep,
put all of that stuff inside the stomach of the
sheep along with oatmeal, onions, salt, and suet,
and then simmer the whole mess for three hours.
I’m guessing that your work in the coming week
may have a certain metaphorical resemblance to
making haggis, Capricorn. The process could a bit
icky, but the result should be pretty tasty.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February
18): Almost 100 years ago, world-
famous comedian Charlie Chaplin
decided to take part in a Charlie Chaplin
lookalike contest in San Francisco. He did his
best to imitate himself, but it wasn’t good enough.
He didn’t come close to winning. But I think
you would have a different fate if you entered a
comparable competition in the coming weeks.
There’s no question in my mind that you would be
crowned as the person who most resembles you.
Maybe more than ever before, you are completely
yourself. You look like your true self, you feel
like your true self, and you are acting like your
true self. Congratulations! It’s hard work to be so
authentic.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): “The
art of medicine consists in amusing the
patient while nature cures the disease,”
said French philosopher Francois-Marie Voltaire.
That principle will be useful for you to invoke
in the coming weeks. You definitely need to be
cured, although the “disease” you are suffering
from is primarily psycho-spiritual rather than
strictly physical. Your task will be to flood
yourself with fun adventures, engaging stories,
and playtime diversions so that nature can heal
you without the interference of your worries and
kibitzing.


Homework: Imagine your future self has sent
a message to you back through time. What
is it? Write: uaregod@comcast.net and visit
FreeWillAstrology.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 20 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
May 29 Answers: Right
BRIEF ENCOUNTERS · June 12, 2014
ACROSS
1. Caprice
5. Zippy
10. City in Israel
15. Gaff or boom
19. Parrot in Disney’s “Aladdin”
20. Nest
21. John Jacob _
22. Lacquered tinware
23. Anthology entry: 2 wds.
25. Classic cookie
27. Consumed
28. Mouthful
30. Grew wider
31. Particular
32. Ossuary contents
33. Camp bed
34. Pushed around
37. Mardi _
38. Featured performers
43. _ Pendragon
44. Gasping for air: Hyph.
47. Thorn apple fruit
48. Pi’s follower
49. Rose
50. Lab compounds
51. Contend
52. Bond servant
54. Stentorian
55. Fields’ yield
56. Like pulp fiction
57. Main road
59. “Common Sense”author
60. French philosopher
61. Stole
62. Formal duds for men
63. Metalworker
64. Agametes
66. Too sentimental
67. Prime-time fare
70. Sticky
71. Pursuit
72. Cover or chorus
73. Simple fastener
74. Blue flag
75. Neck and neck
76. Feliform animal
77. Kind of evidence
78. “The _ & Stimpy Show”
79. Cheat, in a way
81. Fold
83. Royal murder
85. Vigoda and Fortas
86. Mecca denizens
87. _ -relief
88. Gamins
90. Flittermice
91. Old Jewish ascetics
95. Charter
96. Party boss
100. Ephemeral: Hyph.
102. Cook type: Hyph.
104. _ me tangere
105. Old magistrate
106. Lead-and-tin alloy
107. Nautical term
108. Cocoyam
109. Porches
110. Tempo
111. Decreasingly
DOWN
1. Bit of smoke
2. Sunk fence
3. Mr. Youskevitch
4. Hole for a tenon
5. Savored (with “in”)
6. Desert shrub
7. Ferrum
8. _ Galahad
9. Input device
10. Rush
11. Sackcloth and _
12. Japanese statesman
13. Wade across
14. Stories
15. Low clouds
16. Metrist
17. Winglike parts
18. Foxx of TV
24. Spud
26. Kind of donor
29. Part of MIT: Abbr.
32. One’s children
34. Fluid-filled sac
35. Alternate
36. Deficiency
37. Monstrous thing
38. Marsh bird
39. Bookmaker’s offering
40. Understaffed
41. Piglike mammal
42. Rutabaga
44. Brown ermine
45. With considerable caution
46. Pictures
49. Errors
51. Tony or Jamie Lee
53. “_ Bueller’s Day Off”
55. Wouk’s warship
56. Secular
58. Orchestra member
59. Interstellar distance
60. Refine
62. Bread, altered
63. Binge
64. Bake, said of eggs
65. Tomato paste
66. Task
67. Hits the high notes
68. Porch
69. Gaiters
71. Earthy lump
72. Factors in heredity
75. Well-defined
76. Chin-wags
79. Not enough
80. Brilliantined stuff
81. Party locale
82. Purificatory
84. Spanish carrier
86. Like some butter
88. Sea snail
89. Helpers
90. Carried
91. Medieval menial
92. Like a racehorse
93. Auctioneer’s cry
94. Faction
96. Small opening
97. Not working
98. Letters
99. Barite and stibnite
101. London’s Old _
103. With-it: Var.
May 29 Crossword Answers
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 21 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Zach Harris Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
2014/06/14 (Sat)
1st Impression -Rascals, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Amy Andrews -Ca’ d’Zan, 411 South Rd.
Cambridge, IL
AsBigAsAMouse - My God the Heat -
Drama Major -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
B. John Burns -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House,
730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Boots & Brews: Brother Trouble - Dani
Lynn Howe Band - Logan Tudeen
-The District of Rock Island, 16 1/2 St.
Rock Island, IL
Caught in the Act -Generations Bar & Grill,
4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL
Chris Ryan Blues Band -Circle Tap, 1345
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Chuck T. Murphy -Kavanaugh’s Hilltop
Tap, 1228 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Cody Road -Mi ssi ppi Brew, Ri ver Dr
Muscatine, IA
Dawn -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 700
N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Fresh Hops - Soul Phlegm -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Gray Wolf Band -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
Harris Collection -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Joe and Vicki Price (4pm) -Wide River
Winery - Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek
Rd. Clinton, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
2014/06/12 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Archie Powell & the Exports - The Damn
Choir -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
Bass Physics - Soulshake -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Longshots Bar & Grill,
3312 W. Rock Falls Rd Cedar Falls, IL
Danika Holmes (6:30pm) -Bettendorf
Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus
Bettendorf, IA
Dar Williams - Lucy Wainwright Roche
-Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Downtown Rockin’ Daddies -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Joe and Vicki Price -Herbert Hoover
National Historic Site, off I-80 at exit
254 West Branch, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s - Moline, 3805
41st Ave. Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Ellis Kell (noon) -RME
Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
RiverCity 6 Orchestra (6:30pm) -Vander
Veer Botanical Park, 215 W Central Park
Davenport, IA
River Music Experience’s 10-Year An-
niversary Concert w/ MarchFourth
Marching Band - The Winter Blues
Junk Percussion & Drum Circle w/ Living
Lands & Waters and Terry Hanson
(10:30am) -RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Lee Blackmon (2pm) -Creekside Vine-
yards Winery & Inn, 7505 120th Ave.
Coal Valley, IL
Live @ Five: The Diplomats of Solid
Sound (5pm) -RME Courtyard, 131 W.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ QC Rock Academy Rock
101 Bands (noon) - Songwriter’s
All-Original Open Mic (3pm) -RME
Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Lynn Allen -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
North of 40 -Gunchie’s, 2905 Telegraph
Rd Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk,
226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
RiverCity 6 Orchestra (11:30am) -Gen-
eseo City Park Bandshell, Geneseo, IL
RiverCity 6 Orchestra (7pm) -Rhythm
City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Daven-
port, IA
Rob Dahms (6pm) -Rustic Ridge Golf
Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa
St. Eldridge, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Steve McFate & Friends -Tim’s Corner Tap,
4018 14th Ave. Rock Island, IL
The David Mayfield Parade - Lissie
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show
-Missippi Brew, River Dr Muscatine, IA
Here Come the Mummies - Naughty
Naughty -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Keep Off the Grass -On the Rock Grille &
Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Lindgren & Lewis (5pm) -Wide River
Winery - LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd.
LeClaire, IA
Live @ Five: The Candymakers (5pm)
-RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Lyle Beaver Trio Dance -Walcott Coli-
seum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
All-Stars (5pm) -RME (River Music Ex-
perience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
The Effie Afton - Crystal City - PermaS-
mile -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
The Janice Ian Experience -The Mill, 120
E Burlington Iowa City, IA
2014/06/13 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
BeeRME for Music: OSG -RME (River
Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
BrianFest: Tallgrass - David Zollo - Uni-
phonics - Jesse White Band - Emmett
Sheehan -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
CASI New Horizons Band -Bill Bowe
Memori al Bandshel l, Mi ddl e Park
Bettendorf, IA
Caught in the Act -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Chris Ryan Blues Band -Bleyart’s Tap,
2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA
Chuck T. Murphy -Crust Stone Oven Pizza,
2561 53rd Ave. Bettendorf, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -It’s on the River, 201
N. Main St. Port Byron, IL
Crosseyed Cats -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th
St. Davenport, IA
Damn Juhl - Mister Whiskers - Arbiter
- Arnie -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
Molly Conrad - Matt Van - Lewis Knud-
sen -Bier Stube Moline Blackhawk
Room, 417 15th St. Moline, IL
North of 40 -Sideways Bar & Grill, 635 15th
Ave. East Moline, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Recliners (6:30pm) -Sheraton Iowa City
Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
RiverCity 6 Orchestra -Rhythm Ci ty
Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
Sena Ehrhardt Band - Ric Burris & the
Sinners -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St.
Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The
Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
The Premium $ellouts -River House, 1510
River Dr. Moline, IL
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
Dear Rabbit @ Rozz-Tox – June 25
30
14 SATURDAY
00
13 FRIDAY
Continued On Page 22
00
12 THURSDAY
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 22 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2014/06/19 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Whiskey Barrel Saloon,
305 W 2nd St. Rock Falls, IL
Communion Daytrotter June Club
Night: Catfish & The Bottlemen -
Amasa Hines - Outsides - Hailey
Whitters -Codfish Hollow Barn, 3437
288th Ave. Maquoketa, IA
David Lindley -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Dirty Water Band -Barrel House Moline,
1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Hap Hazard -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E
11th St Davenport, IA
Henhouse Prowlers - Dick Prall -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Judy Collins - Rachael Sage -Englert
Theatre, 221 East Washi ngton St.
Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s - Moline, 3805
41st Ave. Moline, IL
Las Guitarras De Mexico -Herbert Hoover
National Historic Site, off I-80 at exit
254 West Branch, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
RiverCity 6 Orchestra (6:30pm) -Ke-
wanee Veterans Park Gazebo, E 2nd
St Kewanee,
River Town (6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public
Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bet-
tendorf, IA
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
The Harpoonist & The Axe Murderer
-RME (River Music Experience), 131 W.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
The Knockoffs -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Youth-Kelele Kids’ Ukulele Club (1pm)
-RME (River Music Experience), 131 W.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
2014/06/15 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6pm) -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
An Evening with Jackie Greene - Cereus
Bright -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Charlie Hayes and “Detroit”Larry Davi-
son (6pm) -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Parkside Grill & Lounge,
2307 5th Ave Moline, IL
Dave & the Gin Mill Gypsies -Gabe’s, 330
E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Ellis Paul Family Show (2pm) -CSPS/
Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar
Rapids, IA
Ellis Paul w/ Rebecca Loebe (7pm)
-CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE
Cedar Rapids, IA
Jim Ryan (3pm) -Len Brown’s North Shore
Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Von Stomper - Def Kitty Blinddog
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Yellow Bellied Sapsuckers w/ Nikki
Grossman & Joe Hart (7pm) - Open
Mic Night (9pm) -Uptown Bill’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
2014/06/20 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Almost Heroes - Velcro Moxie - Flannel
Season - All Dogs Invited -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Avon Dale -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Benjamin Cartel & the Melismatics -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Bettendorf Park Band -Bill Bowe Me-
morial Bandshell, Middle Park Bet-
tendorf, IA
Caught in the Act -Hollar’s Bar and Grill,
4050 27th St Moline, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Cody Road -Rock Island County Fair-
grounds, Archer Drive & Avenue of the
Cities East Moline, IL
Corporate Rock -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Cosmic -Ri ver House, 1510 Ri ver Dr.
Moline, IL
Dale Thomas Band Dance -Wal cott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Dave Chastain Trio -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Quad City Kix Band -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Red Rose -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
2014/06/18 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Bike Night w/ The Marvels (6pm) -Purga-
tory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Bix Youth Jazz Band -The Quarter Wel-
come Center, bottom of 7th Street,
along the riverfront East Moline, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Lyndon Pub, 704 1st
St. W Lyndon, IL
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza
Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Third Sunday Jazz Presents The Willie
Pickens Trio (6pm) -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
2014/06/16 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Fairhaven - As You Were - Rude Punch
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Magnolias - Dana T -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2014/06/17 (Tue)
Aaron Neville -Englert Theatre, 221 East
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake O’s Grille,
2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
No Tide - Legions of Romulus - Conquer-
ing Rome - Accident Prone Metal
- Outsiders -Bier Stube Moline Black-
hawk Room, 417 15th St. Moline, IL
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Hero’s Pub, 3811 N.
Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Dana T - Curt Oren -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
honeyhoney - Crystal City -The Mill, 120
E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
King Khan & the Shrines - Red Mass - The
Sueves -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Orion Walsh (6pm) -Uptown Bill’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriaco’s Trattoria,
1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Benjamin Cartel @ River Music Experience – June 20
19 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 21
00
20 FRIDAY
18 WEDNESDAY
16 MONDAY
17 TUESDAY
15 SUNDAY
wqpt.org
Come out & meet Buddy!
from PBS Kids®
Dinosaur Train
Watch Buddy on
Dinosaur Train
Weekdays | 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, June 17
10:00–11:30 a.m.
Scott Co. Public Library
Eldridge
Wednesday, June 18
10:00–11:30 a.m.
Moline Public Library
Moline
Thursday, June 19
10:00–11:30 a.m.
Geneseo Public Library
Geneseo
Presented by
Sponsored by
See Buddy at these locations
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 23 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Threefifty -Englert Theatre, 221 East
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Unseen Patrol -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
2014/06/25 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Almost Perfect -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
Bike Night w/ The Marvels (6pm) -Purga-
tory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Hero’s Pub, 3811 N.
Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Dear Rabbit -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriaco’s Trattoria,
1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Time & Luck -River’s Edge Gallery, 216 W
3rd St Muscatine, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Knockoffs -Jimbo’s Knucklehead
Saloon, 902 16th Ave. East Moline, IL
The Ripplers (5pm) -Wide River Winery
- LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
2014/06/21 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Acoustic Guillotine - The Atlantis Dia-
logue - The Effie Afton -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Chase Garrett (2pm) -Creekside Vine-
yards Winery & Inn, 7505 120th Ave.
Coal Valley, IL
Chris Avey Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Chuck T. Murphy -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Cody Road -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th
St Moline, IL
Cross Creek Karaoke -Rumors & Excuses
Pub, 230 Main St. Columbus Junc-
tion, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show
-The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Dav-
enport, IA
Gary Mortenson - Guy Drol l i nger
-Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S.
Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Jonathan Richman -CSPS/Legion Arts,
1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Laura’s Legacy: Daphne Willis (3pm)
- Ellis Kell & Friends (4pm) - David
Zollo & the Body Electric (5:30pm)
Greg & Rich (2pm) -Len Brown’s North
Shore Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Onewayness - Aru - Dog Hairs -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady Street
Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel,
111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
2014/06/23 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Before Swag Tour: Ft. Ras Kass - The
Other Elements - Shakes - Felix
Thunder -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2014/06/24 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake O’s Grille,
2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Johnny Pemberton & Josh Fadem -
Kristy Hartsgrove - Spencer Loucks
-The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Shade of Blue -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Smooth Groove -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Steve McFate -Generations Bar & Grill,
4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL
The Funnies -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn,
700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
The Knockoffs -Hall of Fame Pizza &
Wings - DeWitt, 902 6th Ave. DeWitt, IA
2014/06/22 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6pm) -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Farewell, My Love - I Cry Wolfe - Dopple-
ganger - Live to Conquer - OHANA
(5pm) - Travel Guide (9pm) -Gabe’s,
330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
- Lissie (7pm) -Schwiebert Riverfront
Park, between 17th & 20th Streets
Rock Island, IL
Lynn Allen -River House, 1510 River Dr.
Moline, IL
Mark Avey Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
North of 40 -Wildwood Smokehouse &
Saloon, 4919 B Walleye Dr Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk,
226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Orenda (6:30pm) -Sheraton Iowa City
Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Pieces of Candy (4pm) -Wide River Win-
ery - Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek
Rd. Clinton, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Powell -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St
Moline, IL
Project X -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St
Bettendorf, IA
Rock the District w/ Chevelle - Three
Years Hollow -The District of Rock
Island, 16 1/2 St. Rock Island, IL
Dirty Water Band -Barrel House 211, 211
E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show
-Onion Grove Bar, 602 Lombard St.
Clarence, IA
Funktastic 5 -Rascals, 1418 15th St.
Moline, IL
Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St.
Davenport, IA
Just Let It Go -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th
St Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Keep Off the Grass -It’s on the River, 201
N. Main St. Port Byron, IL
Live @ 5: The Tangents (5pm) -RME
Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Daven-
port, IA
Louis Logic - Psalm One - Ion (9pm)
- Derek Thorn Band - Animosity -
B-Tho - Gadema - DJ XXL (10pm)
- -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Mark Chesnutt -Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 2021 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Meet the Press -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
North of 40 -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
QC Slim Band -Rock Island Boat Club,
1706 Mill St Rock Island, IL
River City Radio Hour (5:30pm) -Mo-
line Commercial Club, 513b 16th St
Moline, IL
Shade of Blue (6:30pm) -Sheraton Iowa
City Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St. Iowa
City, IA
25 WEDNESDAY
23 MONDAY
24 TUESDAY
30
21 SATURDAY
22 SUNDAY
Chevelle @ The District of Rock Island – June 21
EXHIBITIONS NOW OPEN
Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804
www.figgeartmuseum.org
Sponsored by
Mary Bero, Stuffed Head; Self-Portrait, 2006, cotton, silk, courtesy of
the Collection of Marcia Docter, photography: courtesy of the artist
Innovators & Legends:
Generations in Textiles and Fiber
Through September 7, 2014
Organized by the Muskegon
Museum of Art, Innovators &
Legends features more than 70
works by artists from across the
country and abroad whose work
with fabric, thread and yarn has
revolutionized the genre of fiber art.
Local Threads
Through September 7, 2014
A companion exhibition, Local Threads,
will feature artists in the Quad Cities
region who use fiber and textiles to
create vibrant, imaginative artworks.
Schafer Interiors
Wynne Schafer
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 858 • June 12-25, 2014 24 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
From Memorial Day to Labor Day, the Channel Cat is one of the Quad Cities’ favorite attractions.
Tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for kids for all day, unlimited use. Buy your tickets on board or at
Centre Station, 1200 River Drive, Moline.
Hop on at any of four landings: John Deere Commons (Moline, behind the iWireless Center),
Celebration Belle Landing (Moline, next to the Celebration Belle), Isle of Capri (Bettendorf )
or Village of East Davenport (Davenport, Lindsey Park Marina).
For maps and schedules see the informational
buoys or visit www.gogreenmetro.com

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