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HISTORV
one of her frequent, majestic public
appearances.
THE HOUSE OF TUDOR
Queen
Elizabeth l, a woman in power
ln 1558, after vain hopes that qhe was to have a child, Mary
died. Amid great rejoicing
t
E lizabeth, Anne Boleyn's
daughter, became queen. She was twenty-five years of age,
with red-gold hair, a pleasing f igure, and beautiful eyes. She
had been taught by Roger Ascham, one of the best teachers
of the time, who believed that learning should be shared by
men and women alike. As a result flizabeth could write Latin
and C reek well. She cou ld also speak French, ltalian and
Spanish, ride, sing, dance and
play chess.
2
Above all, Elizabeth knew the art of pleasing
t
her subjects.
So that more of her people might see her, the
Queen
often
moved around the country, staying at the houses of the rich.
Once the Earl of Hertford enlarged his house
?nd
had a lake
dug
o
in the grounds
5
when he knew she was coming. At the
banquet 1
,000
glass and silver dishes were served by 200
se rva nts.
652
1. Amid great
[ri'$cisig]
=
Tra
dio
2. to play
chess
[es]
=
giocare
a scacchi
3. to please
ben accetto a
4. to dig (dug dug)
tdiel
[d^e]
=
Scavare
5. grounds
[graundz]
=
giardini
rejoicing
grande gau-
Queen Elizabeth /n
The
Queen
kept a magnif icent court. She surrounded hersetf
with gifted
6
men such as William Byrd, the musician, and Ed-
mund Spenser, whose long poem, The Faerie
Queen,
was writ-
ten in her honour.
Elizabeth and the religious situation
With the accession of Elizabeth to the throne, the Pope's
authority was again abolished in England. The
Queen
established a moderate form of Protestant worship, hoping to
end religious conf Iict. Those who f ollowed the accepted
religion were known as Anglicans. The extremist Protestants,
called Puritans, followed more intolerant doctrines: many of
them were of a rebellious nature and became more and more
troublesome.
7
Elizabeth and Mary,
Queen
of Scots
Mary Stuart,
Queen
of Scots, was an aspirant to the English
throne and an upholder
8
of the Roman Catholic faith. The
Protestants in Scotland were led by
John
Knox, who shared
e
many of Calvin's ideas and hated Mary. After a rebellion of
her own peopte, Mary fled
10
over the border to seek
11
the
protection of her cousin,
Queen
Elizabeth of England.
Elizabeth had always been
jealous
of her cousin. To send her
back to Scotland would mean her death, so Elizabeth prefer-
red to keep her in prison.
On at least four occasions Mary
was involved in attem pts to k il I Elizabeth and seize the
throne. Finally, after the discovery of a plot led by Anthony
Babington, who had been one of Mary's pages, Elizabeth signed
her cousin's death warrant.
t2
The execution took place at
Fotheringhay Castle in 1587.
7.
6. gifted
l'giftid]
=
dotato
troublesome
['trrrblsem]
importuno
B. upholder
[np'haulde*] =
sostenitore (-trice)
9. to share
Uee*l =
(con)-
dividere
10. to f lee (fled fled)
'[fli:]
lfledl =
fuggire
1 1. to seek (sought
sought)
[si:kl [sc:t] =
cer-
care
12. death warrant
['ucrant]
=
ordine di esecuzione
The execution of Mary,
Queen of Scots, in
1 587.
A
vgg
,"*d
Elizabeth and the war with Spain
Af ter the death of Mary,
Queen
of Scots, Philip of Spain
decided to attempt the conquest of England in order to
restore the country to the rule of the Pope and the Roman
Catholic faith. A great fleet called the "lnvincible Armada"
sailed f rom Spain: the intention was to collect the army of
the Duke of Parma in the Nethertands
13
and take it across
the Channel to conquer England.
When the Spanish f leet was sighted,
t4
the
Queen
reviewed
her troops at Tilbu ry and made one of her most f amous
speeches. With it she ended any dou bts about whether a
woman was fit to rule:
I am come amongst you being resolved in the midst of the
heat of battle
t5
to live or die amongst you all, to.lay down
16
for my Cod, and for my kingdom, and for my people my
honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the
body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and
stomach of a king, and a King of England too.
The English triumph
The English Admiral Lord Howard, with Sir Francis Drake as
his vice-admiral, found the Spanish ships at anchor in Calais
harbour. The heavy Spanish galleons were an easy prey for
the swifter English ships. Fire-ships
tt
were sent by the English
among the Spanish galleons, so that the
eatleons
made for
18
the open sea in d isorder: helped by f avou rable winds, the
English ships destroyed many of the Spanish
ealleons
and
compelled the others to sail into the North Sea, around the
northern tip of the British lsles and back home. On the way
many gatleons were wrecked
te
by storms: less than half the
Armada returned to Spain. England was safe.
654
The lnvincible Armada
in the Channel.
1 3. Netherlands ['neelendz]
=
Paesi Bassi
1 4. to sight
[sait]
vistare
15. heat of battle
=
im-
peto della battaglia
16. to lay down (laid laid)
17 . f ire-ship
18. to make for
VETSO
19. to wreck
[rek]
nauf rag ar e, distruggere
fUIONV fI,IRTTRS RND CONNfNRC
COMMERCIAL LETTERS
A vast amount of commerce is carried out by cor-
respondence, and the most important commercial language
today is English. Any ltalian f irm that does business abroad
must have someone who can write correct E nglish. Bad
E ngl ish means bad bus iness.
Some
people talk about "commercial English" as if it were a
separate language, and, of -course,
it is true that commerce
must have its own specialized vocabulary. But it is always
wrong to use specialized vocabulary when the same thing can
be said
just
as clearty
1
in normal English. Look at the follow-
ing sentence: "We beg to acknoryledge receipt of your
esteemed favour of the 16th inst.".
z
You probably have to
read that sentence twice before
you can understand what it
means. lt is bad commercial English. A good commercial let-
ter says the same thing in normal English: "We have received
your letter of
June
16th" or "Thank you for your letter of
J
une 16th" .
A commercial letter should be courteous, of course; but we
must remember that businessmen have no time to waste and
they are not interested in f lowery language or elaborate com-
The royal monogram on
the
pillar box dafes
back to the reign of
Queen Victoria.
1.
just
as clearly
=
per
I'appunto altrettanto chia-
ramente
2. "We beg to acknow-
ledge..."
=
"Ci pregiamo
accusare ricevuta del[a
pregiata vostra del 16 cor-
rente"
655
pliments. We show the greatest courtesy when we give cor-
rect information as qu ickly and clearly as possible.
Forms of address and salutation cannot be translated directly
f rom ltalian into English. When we write the address we use
no adjectives of courtesy such as "Egregio", "Centile", or
"Chiarissimo"; we simply write the person's title and name:
Mr
James
Smith, Mrs
Julia
Henson, Professor Henry Martin,
etc. lf the letter is addressed to a company
(Spett.
Ditta), we
use the term "Messrs": Messrs Ceorge Wolfe & Co., Messrs
Ronald Elliott & Sons. If the company is impersonal, we simp-
ly write the name: The Midland Cas Company, Nigerian
Railways.
For the opening salutation the only adjective used, on all oc-
casions, formal and informal, is "Dear". This is followed by
the title and name: Dear Mr Smith, Dear Mrs Henson, etc. lf
we do not know the person's name, we write "Dear Sir" or
"Dear Madam", as the case may be. lf we are writing to a
company and not to one person, we use the expression "Dear
S i rs".
The closing sentence is "Yours faithf ully" or "Yours truly". lf
we already know the person to whom we are writing, we can
use the less formal sentence "Yours sincerely".
SOME COMMERCIAL LETTERS
Albert
Jackson
& Co. Ltd,
Fruit lmporters,
4 Holbrook Road,
London E. C. 3.
Ref: KM-KD
12th
J
une, 1986
Messrs Ciovanni Esposito & Figli,
Via Lampedusa
'l
B,
Agrigento
(ltaly)
Dear S irs,
We received you r sh ipment of oranges on
J
u ne Bth, cn-
siderably later than we expected. Unfortunately, the oranges
arrived in poor condition
3
and sixteen crates were complete-
ly unsaleable. We think that the damage is probably due to a
delay in transport or defective packing.
We therefore enclose a note specifying the damage and the
loss incurred, which we have to ask you to make good.
a
At
the same time we would like to make it ctear
s
that, since we
have always received full satisfaction from you in the past,
this unfortunate occurrence will have no effect on future
orders, provided
6
that full compensation is paid.
You rs f aithf u lly,
Kenneth Mumby
Managing Director
3. in poor condition
=
in
cattive condizioni
4. to make good
=
risar-
cire
5. to make it clear
=
sot-
tol i near e (pe r ch iarezza)
6. provided
[pre'vaidid] =
purch, a condizione che
6s6
Ciovanni EsPosito & Figli,
via Lampedusa 18,
Agrigento
lBth
June,
1986
Messrs Albert
Jackson
& Co. Ltd.,
4 Holbrook Road,
London. E.C.3.
(Creat
Britain)
Dear Mr Mumby,
Thank your for you letter of the 12th of
June.
We are extremely sorry that our shipment of oranges reached
you in poor condition. Although inconveniences of this kind
are atmost inevitable in the frult trade,
7
we have to say that
in our experience they have been very rare.
We were indeed surprised to learn that the shipment did not
arrive until
June
Bth, hd we have no doubt that the damage
was due to this delay in transport. We are making enquiries to
find out where the delay occurred, in order to avoid similar
damage in the future. As for
8
packing, we can assure
you
that we always take particular care to protect our produie.
We have already arranged to pay compensation through the
Westminster Bank. Please accept our most sincere apologies.
You rs tru ly,
Ciovanni Esposito
Cartwright Bros Ltd.,
45 Clare Road,
Northampton
sth April, 1986
Messrs Annibale Bianchi & Co.,
Piazza Fontan a 11
,
Siena
(ltaly)
Dear S irs,
We have received your enquiry of March 28th and are glad
to be able to inform you that we still have stocks of the bicy-
cte tamps
e
which you mention. lt must be added, however,
that this type of lamp is no longer in production and we ex-
pect that our stocks will be exhausted in the next few months.
We advise you, therefore, to
place your order without delay.
Unfortunatety we cannot quote prices
l0
lower than those
given in the catalogue which we sent you last year. We hope
to have the pleasure of receiving
your order in the near
future.
You rs f aithf u lly,
Malcolm Henryson
Sales Manager
7. fruit trade
=
commer-
cio frutticolo
8. As for
=
ln quanto a,
per quanto riguarda
9. bicycle lamp
=
fanale
da bicicletta
10. to quote prices
=
aP-
plicare (indicare) prezzi
657
Annibale Bianchi & Co.,
Piazza Fontan a 11
,
S iena
1 5th April, 1 986
Messrs Cartwright Bros Ltd.,
45 Clare Road,
Northampton
(Creat
Britain)
Dear Mr Henryson,
Thank you for your letter of April 5th, which reached us
yesterday. We are glad that you are in a position
11
to supply
the bicycle lamps in which we are interested, though the
prices given in your catalgere are rather high. Since the order
which we wish to place
tz
is a large one, we really think that
you might offer us a discount. We also understand that there
are a number of firms in Cermany and Holland who still
manufacture a similar kind of bicycle lamp.
Although in the past we have given preference to your pro-
ducts, we have to inform you that unless
13
you offer a con-
siderable discount we shall be compelled to place our order
elsewhere.
Looking forward to hearing from you as soon as possible, we
remain,
You rs f aithf u lly,
E n rico Cars in i
lmport Manager
1 1. to be in a position
essere in grado
12. to place an order
collocare un ordine
1 3. unless
[nn'les] =
meno che
Uocabulary
receipt
[ri'si:t]
courtesy
['ke:tisi]
salutation
[slju'teiJan]
enquiry
[in'kuaiari]
shipment
['Jipment]
crate
[kreit]
delay
[di'lei]
packing
['pkirll
occurrence
[a'knrons]
compensation
[kcmpen'sei.,fen]
doubt
ldautJ
apology
[a'pcla$i]
stock
[stckJ
to carry out
to beg
[bee]
to acknowledge
[ek'ncligJ
ricevuta
cortesia
formula di aper-
tura (di lettera)
richesta di
informazioni
partita,
spedi-
zione
gabbia (da im-
ballaggio)
ritardo
imballaggio
fatto, avvenimen-
to
compenso, risar-
cimento
dubbio
SCUSA
giacenza, scorta
svolgere, effet-
tuare
pregiarsi
accusare
(ricevuta)
to esteem
[is'ti:m]
to address
[e'dres]
to incur
[in'ka:*]
to reach
[ri:c]
to find out
to arrange
[e'reing]
to exhaust
[ig'zc:
st]
to advise
Ied'vaiz]
to supply
Isa'plai]
to manufacture
[mnju'fke*]
courteous
['ke:tjas]
flowery
['flauari]
unsaleable
['nn'seilab[
stimare
indirizzare
incorrere
pervenire
a, rag-
g iu nge re
scoprire, ap-
purare
disporre, prov-
vedere
esau rire
cons ig liare
forn ire
produrre, fab-
bricare
cortese
f iorito
invend ibile
658
Today we are going to visit the Tower of London, the most
f orbidd ing
1
bu ild ing in London
William the Conqueror started the bu ild ing of the Tower,
eleven years after the Battle of Hastings, and for years it was
the bastion of the whole feudal system. Built on the angle of
a Roman Watl, the Tower has one of the grimmest'histories
of any building in the world. lts White Tower is one of the
oldest of the many towers; here, beneath the stairs, the bones
of the two little Princes murdered in the Bloody Tower were
discovered during the reign of King Charles the Second.
Many, many people were cruelly executed within these
walls. On Tower Creen there is a simple square of granite
which marks the spot where many private executions were
held, including those of Anne Boleyn, Lady
Jane
Crey and Sir
Thomas More,
just
to mention some of the most illustrious
victim s.
The Wakef ield Tower houses the Crown
Jewels,
an incredible,
breathtaking
t
collection of
jewels,
crowns, sceptres, gold
swords and other extraordin ary objects, including St Ceorge's
gold spurs.4
ine Aimoury is the oldest museum in London; armed men
have stood on guard
s
here for nine hundred years, at first in
full battle armour, now in shining scarlet coats.Try not to
miss the other Armoury in the White Tower. Here you will see
some interesting things, among which two daggers
6
belong-
ing to Colonel Blood who tried to steal the Crown
Jewels
in
1671
,
a sword that once belonged to Napoleon Bonaparte,
and a grotesque helmet given to Henry the Eighth by Emperor
Maximilan the First.
ln the Crypt of the Chapel of St
John
there are some grim
reminders
7
of the cruel past of the Tower: terrible in-
struments of tortu_re, together with a block and execution
axe
8
dating back
e
to about 1660
The Tower of London is a place of horror and cruelty, but it
belongs to the history of England. To miss it is to miss a large
part of English history.
When you come out of the Tower, stay there for a few
minutes and keep your eyes
to
on Tower Bridge. You may be
lucky enough to see something spectacu lar, Tower Bridge
opening to let a big ship pass through. lt's a unique sight!
I1 ROUND
LONDON
The ower of London
and Tower Bridge.
1. forbidding
[fa'bidi4]
=
truce, minaccioso
2. grim
[grim]
torvo
3. breathtaking
['breO'
teiki4l
=
sorprendente
4. spur
[spa:*] =
sperone
5. on guard
[ea:d] =
di
guardia
6. dagger
['dge*l -
pu-
gnale, stiletto
7. reminder
lri'mainda*] =
ricordo
8. a block and execution
axe
[ks] =
un ceppo ed
ascia per esecuzioni
9. to date back
=
risalire
10. to keep one's eyes
(on)
-
tenere gli occhi (su)
659
W. H. AUDEN
DYLAN THOMAS
The following two lyrics are by two
great English poets of our time: W.H. Auden and Dylan
Thomas. Both of them, though their vision of lile is different, excel among other poets
owing to the
extreme richness of images, and the vigour and freshness of their verse.
Epilogue
"O where are you goin g?" said reader
1
to rider,
2
"That valley is fatal when furnaces burn,
Yonder's
3
the midden
a
whose odours will madden,
5
That gap
6
is the grave
7
where the tall retu tn".
"O do
you imagine", said fearer
I
to farer
e
"That dusk
i'iiil
;"1;;
tt
"n'rour
path to the pass,
Your ditigent looking
tz
discover the lacking
13
Your footsteps
t4
fell from granite to grass?"
"O what was that bird", said horror to hearer,
ls
"Did you see that shape in the twisted
16
trees?
Behind you swiftty
t7
the figure comes softty,
18
The spot
t'
on your skin is a shocking
20
disease".
"Out of this house" said rider to reader
"Yours never will" said farer to fearer
"They're looking for you" said hearer to horror
As he left them there, as he left them there.
W. H. Auden
And death shall have no dominion
And death shall have no dominion.
Dead men naked
2t
they shall be one
With the man in the wind and the west moon;
When their bones are picked
2'.clean
and the ctean bones gone,
They shall have stars at elbow
23
and foot'
Tholgh they-'e ;;i
t-tn"v
rnutl be ,un"'
1 . reader
['ri:da*J =
lettore (-trice)
2. rider
['raida*J =
cavallerizzo (-a)
3. Yonder
['jcnda*] -
Laggi
4. midden
['midnJ =
mucchio di letame
5. to madden
['mdn] =
fare impazzire
6. gap
[ePl =
squarcio, gola
7. glave
[greivJ =
tomba, fossa
L fearer
ffiara*l
9. farer
['feera*f -
viaggiatore
(poetico)
10. dusk
ldrsk]
=
oscurit, crepuscolo
1 1, to delay
-
indugiare, sostare
12. looking
=
guardare
660
13. lacking
=
mancante
14. footstep
=
passo, orma
15. hearer
['hiare*J =
auditore
16. twisted
['tuistid]
=
contorto
17. swiftly
=
rapidamente
18. softly
-
morbidamente
19. spot
lspct] =
macchia
20. shocking
lTckin] =
orripilante
21 . naked
['neikid] =
nudo
22. picked
[pikt] =
spolpato
23. elbow
['elbau] =
gomito
24. to go mad
=
tmpazzire
Though they sink
25
through the earth they shall rise again;
Though lovers be lost, love shall not;
And death shall have no dominion
And death shall have no dominion
Under the windings
26
of the sea
They lying long shall not die windily;
27
Twisting on racks
28
when sinews
2e
give way,
30
Strapped
31
to a wheet, yet they shall not break;
Faith in their hands shatl snap
32
in two,
And the unicorn evit
33
runs them through;
34
Split
35
all ends they shatl not crack;
36
And death shall have no dominion
And death shall have no dominion.
No more may gults
37
cry at their ears
Or waves break loud on the seashores;
Where blew a f lower may a f lower no more
Lift
38
its head to the btows
3e
of the rain;
Though they be mad and as dead as nails
o0
Heads of the characters hammer
41
through daisies;
Break in the sun till the sun breaks down
,
o'
And death shall have no dominion.
Dylan Thomas
25. to sink (sank sunk)
-
affondare
26. winding
['uaindir3J
=
serpeggiamento, tortuosit
27. windily
l'uindilil =
vanamente
28. rack
[rk] =
ruota (di tqrtura)
29, sinew
['sinju:J
30. to give way
=
cedere
31. to strap
[strp] =
legare (con cinghie)
32. to snap
[snp]
=
spezzarsi
33. evil
['i:vl] =
male
34. to run through
=
traPssare
35. to split (split split)
-
fendere, spaccare
36. to crack
[krk] -
incrinarsi
37. gull
[Snl] =
gabbiano
38. to lift
=
sollevare
39. blow
[blauJ =
colpo
40. as dead as nails
=
morto del tutto
41 . to hammer
['hma] =
martellare
42. lo break down
=
crollare
An illustration y William
Blake.
661
BRANI DI TRADUZIONE DALL'ITALIANO
1
lack
Ho sentito che c' un piccolo ristorante sulla collina dove fanno pagare poco e
cucinano molto bene. Potremmo andarci stasera, che cosa ne pensi?
Lizzie lo avrei una traduzione da fare per una ditta, ma la far fare a qualcuno. Aspet-
ta, telefono a Mary e le chiedo se pu farlo... Pronto? Mary in casa?
I
Che pec-
cato! Telefongr di nuovo pi tardi. Crazie.
Jack,
ti far sapere fra un'ora se
posso venire o no, va bene? Sai chi vorrei invitare a venire con noi? David, lavora
sempre tanto, poveretto!
2
Jack
Buona idea! Cercheremo di fargli capire che non si deve lavorare come schiavi, e
che stupido fare tanto danaro, se questo ti rende infelice, non credi?
Lizzie Bisogna che impari a farsi apprezzare anche come commensale. Credi che verr?
lack
lo sp.-ero di si.
3
C' qualcun altro che potremmo invitare? Che ne dici di Pam?
una ragazza cosi simpatica, e fa sempre ridere tutti! Ora le telefono...
Lizzie Mi precipito a casa, e poi ti dar un colpo di telefono fra un'ora, O.K.?
lack
D'accordo. E se vieni, non farmi aspettare come l'altro ieri.
Lizzie Addio, vecchio brontolone!
a
2
"Non
farmi ridere! Sai benissimo che non riuscirai mai a farmi credere una storia cosi
assurda. Secondo te David mi ha fatto telefonare dalla cameriera per farmi sapere che
era dovuto partire improvvisamente per Londra per
s
degli affari importanti, e'che non
sar di ritorno fino alla settimana ventura. Secondo le tue penetranti
6
supposizioni, egli
ha inventato questa storia per non venire alla mia festa sabato prossimo,
dove ci
dovrebbe essere anche Lucy che, sempre secondo te,
7
lo ama in sitenzio da mesi e lo fa
impazzire con lunghi sguardi teneri e con una costante espressione supplichevole. Vuoi
proprio farti prendere in giro inventando storie del generel Oh, dimenticavo di dirti che
la cameriera di David mi ha telefonato poco fa per dirmi che David sar di ritorno per
sabato sera, e potr venire alla mia festa. Forse sar proprio Lucy a non farsi viva
8
alla
festa, chi
(lo) sa?
3
Sono circa
quattro anni che studio l'inglese, e credo di poter
e
dire che sono abbastanza
soddisfatto del mio studio. Riesco a farmi capire quando lo parlo,
anche se
10
non lo
parlo fluentemente, ma, e questo molto pi importante, riesco a capire abbastanza
bene questa lingua. Farsi capire molto importante, ma non c' bisogno che io vi dica
che pi difficile capire un lnglese, che parlargli.
Questa
la ragione per cui
1l
il nostro
insegnante d'inglese non perde mai l'occasione di parlarci in inglese, e vuole che noi
diciamo "Pardon?"
quando non riusciamo a capirlo.
Studier l'inglese per un altro anno, e potr quindi migliorare la mia conoscenza della
lingua ancora un poco.
1. essere in casa
=
to be in
2. poveretto!
=
poor thing !
3.disi=so
4. vecchio brontolo!
=
old grumbler!
5. por
=
on
6. penetranti
=
clever
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7. secondo te
=
in your
opinion
8. farsi vivo
=
to turn up
9. credo di poter
=
I think I can
10. anche se
=
even if
1 1. la ragione per cui
=
the reason why
JOHS
A Scotsman on a visit to London asked the conductor of a bus in Oxford Street. "What's
the fare to Regent's Park?."
"Forty
pence", said the conductor.
The Scotsman didn't get
on the bus but instead ran along behind it when it left.-As it
slowed down at the next bus-stop, he asked, panting: "What's the fare to Regent's Park
now?"
"Fifty
pence", said the conductor. "You're running the wrong way".
It is not generally known that in addition to the pay-as-you-enter bus system, a pay-as-
you-leave system has been experimented. However, this was abandoned after a Scotsman
starved to death in a bus.
A Scotsman on a visit to London was taking a ride in a taxi. Suddenly the brakes of the
vehicle failed.
"l can't stop!" shouted the driver
"For Cod's sake, man", shouted the Scotsman, "Turn the meter off !"
A Scotsman got on the Riverside Drive bus carrying a very heavy suitcase. He handed the
conductor a nickel and reacted furiously when the conductor informed him that the fare
on that line was twenty cents.
After a very excited discussion, the conductor lost his temper completely. First he threw
the Scotsman off the bus, then he picked
up the heavy suitcase and flung it over the
parapet int the Hudson River.
The Scotsman shook his fist after the disappearing bus and shouted in a rage: "lt's not
enough that you tried to kill me in cold blood, but you've drowned my son
Jock,
too!"
An Aberdonian went to a first-class restaurant, dined well and, paying his bill, he pushed
a two.pence piece towards the efficient waitress. She looked at the miserable tip and
then said: "Even the champion miser of Aberdeen tips us f ive pence when he eats here".
"You've got a new champion", was the prompt
comment.
"Oh goody ! Another diamond bracelet
what's in my next
parcel,
Chivers?"
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