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uNtr 37

HI::';lJiff:I:"
Women interrupted their housework to
hear Edmond Dickinson speak. He was
a vacuum-cleaner salesman.
He started
giving lectures in salesman-
ship, and
people
came from far-away
places to hear him speak.
He
had
and
64
was
quite
extraordinary. Nobody
ever seen a business respected
loved in such a way.
took him aside and
want to hear him talk
Edmond's boss
said he did not
of
quitting.
Uocabulary
vacuum-cleaner aspirapolvere
['vkjuam'kli:na*]
salesman piazzista
['seilzman]
salesmanship arte del vendere
['seilzmanfip]
lecture
['leka*l
conferenza
to quit quit
andarsene
quit
[kuitJ
*
aside
[a'said]
da
parte
RN CXTRRORDINRRY SRTSfI,IRN
Anyone could see that Edmond Dickinson was a man with unusual
gifts. People
felt shy and tongue-tied
I
when he went among them. Women interrupted their
housework to hear him speak. People who heard him were impressed by his per-
sonality. When they heard him give his message, they believed in him and in what
he was saying. This helped Edmond a lot. He was a vacuum-cleaner salesman.
2
Edmond never seemed to notice the effect he.had on his customers. He was always
perfectly natural and apparently unaware of the confidence he crebted. Everyone
saw him as a man who spoke the truth.
3
Gradually, he became something of a myth. He started
giving lectures in salesman=
ship, and people came from far-away places to hear him speak. Those who watch-
ed him being followed by his audience were quickly pervaded
by a feeling of ex-
citement. He was quite
extraordinary. Nobody had ever seen a businessman
respected and loved in such a lvay.
The seminars at which he spoke were always kept short. Edmond was afraid, be-
ing a considerate man, that the people who came to hear him talk would forget
their other business. Besides, he secretly felt rather shy in front of so many
people.
*
To
quit possiede
anche le forme regolari (quitted). 1. tongue.tled
[,t^0-taid] =
senza parole, intimorito.
2. vacuum-cleaner salesman
-
piazzista di aspirapolveri. 3. to speak the trutF
ttruol
=
dir:e la verit.
665
He sometimes thought of giving it all up
I
and finding something else to do.The
only man who seemed unaffected " by Edmond's seminars was Albert Gradmore,
Edmond's boss. He saw Edmond feel dubious about his activity and did not like
it. He took him aside and said he did not want to hear him talk of
quitting.
After
all, he knew he could not afford to lose the best vacuum-cleaner salesman he had
ever known. And it was he who sold the tickets for the seminars.
So Edmond, who vaguely felt that he was made for better things, let slip
3
his op-
portunity
and remained a vacuum-cleaner salesman, nothing more.
Ouestions
l. What could anyone see?
2. What did people
do when he went among them?
3. What did women do to hear him speak?
4. What did people do when they heard him give his message?
5. What was Edmond Dickinson?
6. How did everyone see him?
7. $[hat ttid he start doing?
8. Why were the seminars at which he took part
always kept short?
9. What did he sometimes think of doing?
10. Who was the only man who seemed unaffected by Edmond,s seminars?
11. What did he say after taking Edmond aside?
12. What did he know, after all?
Uocabulary
gift
[gift]
tongue
[tnn]
conf idence
['kcnfidns]
seminar
['semina:
*]
dono, pregio
lingua
f iducia
seminario
unaware
['nne'uea*1
far-away
['fa:rouei]
shy
UaiI
dubious
['dju:bjas]
inconsapevole
remoto
timido
dubbioso
vedere
guardare
guardare
percepire
ascoltare
to hear
to notice
to feel
to smell
to taste
udire, sentire
notare
sentire (tatto')
sentire (olfotto)
assaggiare
GStrFqL N@Ttrs
VERBI DI PERCEZIONE
to see
to look
(at)
to watch
to perceive
to listen (to)
1. to glve it all up
=
piantare tutto.2. unallected
[',rna'fektid] -
poco impressionato. 3. to let sllp
=
lasciar sfuggire.
666
The Rolling Stones in action.
COI{VERSATION
Simon
Lizzie
Simon
Lizzie
Simon
Lizzie
Simon
Lizzie
Simon
Lizzie
Simon
Lizzie
Simon
Lizzie
What have you got in that paper bag,
t
Lizzie?
Don't tell anybody, Simon, but they are records, four L.P.'s of the Rolling
Stones.
Where did you get them?
I've never heard such a silly
question. I bought them, of course!
Four longplaying records cost a lot of money, and
you'd better tell me where
you found the dough,2 Lizzie.
I sold some old records, and I bought the new ones.
Which records did you sell, Lizzie?
Oh, some old stuff
3
I found in the trunk where Mother keeps Great-
grandmother's dresses. I think they belonged to Mother when she was a girl.
What! You sold Mother's old records! I've seldom seen Mother fly into a
rage,o but I'll bet she'll do it this time.
Oh, don't make so much fuss, Simon! I listened to them before selling them.
They were the worst stuff ever recorded.
I hope what you
say is true, but, if Mother kept them in that trunk, it meant
she was very fond of them.
Maybe she doesn't even know about them. I'm not going to tell her, anyway.
Neither am I. Now, what about listening to the Rolling Stones?
['ll get them out of the bag... here! Fantastic, aren't they?
l/ocabulary
maybe
['meibi:]
forse incidere
1. Paper ag un contenitore di carta fornitoda negozi o
grandi magazzini per il trasporto degli oggetti ac-
quistti. Z. dougtr
[deu] =
"grana" (danaro). forma s/ang.3. someold stull
=
dellavecchia roba.4. to
lly into a rage
[reig] =
andare su tutte le furie.
to record
[ri'kc:d]
667
POINTS OF VIEW
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
Dermot
Kenneth
I don't see why you keep going
to football matches.
It's the excitement of watching the game unfold before my eyes. I like smelling
the hot dogs
1
being cooked outside the grounds
2
and the smell of beer and
bodies inside. And there's nothing better than watching a football crowd ex-
plode with
joy
when a goal is scored.
The smell of hot dogs? Revolting! And the smell of beer and bodies?
Disgusting! And crowds always look very unpleasant to me.
Don't you get excited when you see the sea of football scarves rise up from the
crowd when the people
see a goal
scored?
No, I don't. I only watch football matches shown on television. Actually, I
prefer to listen to
games
broadcast on the radio so that I can get
on
3
with
other things at the same time.
You miss a lot. You lose all the atmosphere of a game.
Well, I will continue to listen to the radio or sit in front of the television in
comfort.
a
But I will see more of the
game than you
will.
Television cameras follow the real action much closer than you
can do. They
show the game in detail.
Well, I'm going to see the match. I will see
you later.
Later on
Uocabulary
How did the game go?
I saw nothing. All I watched was the backs
ing up and do\ryn.
V/e11, I didn't manage any better. I didn't
Why not?
There was a power cut!
6
of the people in front of me
jump-
see anything either.
5
to unfold spiegarsi
[zrn'feuld]
to explode esplodere
[iks'plaud]
to score
[skc:*]
segnare (goal)
to rise rose levarsi
risen
lraiz
reuz
'rizn]
to manage cavarsela
['mnig]
action
['kJen]
detail
['di:teil]
smell
[smel]
revolting
[ri'veultir:]
disgusting
[dis'gnstin]
close
[kleus]
azrone
dettaglio
odore
rivoltante
disgustoso
vicino
1. Hot dog un panino allungato farcito con salsiccia calda e condito con cipolle e senape.2. outside the
grounds
=
all'esterno dei campi (di calcio). 3. to get
on
=
andare avanti, continuare. 4. ln comlort
['krrmfat]
=
in tutta comodit. 5. Eithq preceduto
nella frase da not indica esclusione (neanch'io).
6. powel
cut
=
interruzione di corrente (elettrica).
668
ORL DRILLS
Fill in the blank spaces with verbs of perception:
AT THE CIRCUS
The circus is always an exciting event, as popular with adults as with children. Mr Bates had
bought tickets for a big circus that toured
I
the country and was then in London. The summer
holidays were coming io an end and they all wanted to go on an outing
2
to mark the end
3
of
Stefano's stay, so this was the ideal opportunity.
They arrived at the arena in good time, and took their seats while the orchestra was tuning up.
a
There was an atmosphere of expectation all around them, and everybody was waiting impatient-
ly for the performance to start.
At last they ..... the lights go out and they ..... the talking around them stop,,A moment later they
..... ten magnificent horses trot into the ring to a background of
gay music.
)
They were very well
trained and everybody enjoyed ..... them perlorm with perfect precision. A crack of the whip
6
was sufficient to control them.
When the horses had left the arena, there was a short pause, and then the audience ..... a lot of
clowns come runing ip, with painted faces and funny clothes. They split their sides with
laughter at their antics,
'
and tears of laughter ran down the cheeks of the children. The clowns
were also very good musicians, and the audience ..... them
play the clarinet, the trumpet and
the trombone, dancing atl the while. Then they ..... them being chased by an enormous elephant
which splashed water on them thrgugh his long trunk.
Next came the tight-rope walkers.

Everybody looked very anxious, because there was no net.
A gasp went up from the audience when they ..... one of the acrobats suddenly slip and almost
fall, but Mr Bates whispered that it was all part of the act. ln any case, they all breathed a sigh
of relief when the clever acrobats came down from their high rope.
Then two entertainers appeared, and the audience ..... to them cracking
jokes
e
and saying ab-
surd things. They spoke very fast and Stefano understood them only in part.
And so the attractions followed one upon the otlfer: riders, acrobats, tamers and performing
lions,
10
tigers, bears, seals and elephants. There was something for everybody, and the Bates
and Stefano enjoyed themselves immensely. The outing had been a real success.
Vocabulary
circus
['sa:kes]
adult
['dnltJ
cheek
lci:kJ
musician
[mju'zirfanJ
gasp
[ga:sp]
bear
[bea*]
seal
[si:l]
trumpet
['trnmpit]
trombone
[trcm'bun]
crrco
adulto
guancia
musico
ansito
orso
foca
tromba
trombone
to celebrate
['selibreit]
to trot
[trct]
to train
[treinJ
to perform
[pa'fc:m]
to splash
lsplJl
to slip
lslipl
to breathe
lbri:l
festeggiare
trottare
addestrate
esibirsi
spruzzare
scivolare
repirare
1. to iour
ltuetl -
viaggiare pet.2. lo
go
on an oullng
=
uscire di casa, effettuare un'uscila
(per
un'oc-
casione dl divertlmento, escutsione od altro).3. to mark the end
=
per
solennizzare la fine. 4. lo tuno uP
=
accordare gli strumenti. 5. to a background ol gay musle
=
con l'accompagnamento di musica gaia.
6. e crack ot-th whlp
=
uno schiocco di frusta. 7. antlca
['ntiks[
=
buffonate, stramberie. 8. tlghh
rope walkers
=
funamboli..9. to crack
lokes =
dire barzellette
(o spiritosit). 10. tamers and
perlormlng
Ilons
=
domatori e leoni ammaestrati.
669
GRRfUIfUIRR
VERBI DI PERCEZIONE
l. Guordare viene solitamente tradotto con to look, seguito da at
qualora
accompagnato
da un complemento oggetto.
To watch traduce guardare nel significato di seguire con lo sguardo, osservare (qualcosa
o
qualcuno in movimento o in azione), assistere ad uno spettacolo
(manifestazioni
sportive,
spettacoli e televisione). Con quest'ultimo significato pu tradurre anche il verbo vedere
italiano.
He watched me all the time Mi guard (osserv) tutto il tempo
\tatch what I'm doing Guarda (osserva) quello
che faccio
Are
you going to
play
or only watch? Giochi o guardi solo?
We watched the football match Guardammo I'incontro di calcio
Do you usually watch television? Guardate di solito la televisione?
We watched a good programme on televi- Vedemmo un buon programma
alla
sion televisione
2. To see, to hear e to snell sono solitamente preceduti da can (could), quando viene sot-
tolineata la capacit di esercitare sensazioni.
Can you
see as far as there? Tu vedi sin l?
Can't you
see that building over there? Non vedi quell'edificio
laggi?
Can you hear a noise? Senti un rumore?
I couldn't hear anything Io non sentivo niente
Can't
you
smell something burning? Non senti qualcosa
che brucia?
3. To smell, to feel e to taste posseggono tn doppio significato:
to smell odorare, annusare, sentire (con I'olfatto)
aver odore, odorare
(d), sentire (di)
to taste, assaggiare, provare, assaporare, sentire sapore
aver sapore, sapere (di),
sentire
(di)
to feel sentire
(al
tatto)
rkultare (al
tatto'), essere
The dog was smelling the lamp-post Il cane stava annusando il lampione
The dinner smelt good il pranzo aveva un buon profumo
Your breath smells of brandy Il tuo alito sa (sente)
di brandy
Will you
taste the soup, please? Vuoi assaggiare la zuppa, per favore?
The meat tasted good La carne sapeva di buono (aveva
un buon
sapore)
The soup tasted too much of garlic La zuppa sapeva
(sentiva)
troppo d'aglio
The doctor felt my pulse Il dottore mi sentl il polso
Feel the weight of this box! Senti il peso di
questa
scatola!
Your hands feel cold
Le tue mani sono fredde
This silk feels awfully soft
Questa
seta sofficissima al tatto
670
VERBI DI PERCEZIONE + INFINITO
Infinito passivo
I saw him being chased by a dog I heard your name called twice
Lo vidi inseguire da un cane Sentii chiamare il tuo nome due volte
Infinito attivo
forma
in ing infinito senza to
I saw him walking along the river I saw him get on a bus
Lo vidi passeggiare lungo il
ftume
Lo vidi salire su un autobus
I smelt something burning V/e saw her hit him
Sentii bruciare qualcosa
La vedemmo colpirlo
1.
Quando
tn verbo di percezione italiano seguito da infinito,la lingua inglese segue
rigidamente la seguente costruzione:
verbo di percezione + oggetto + equivalenti dell'infinito italiano
2. L'infinito retto dal verbo di percezione,
che pu esprimere tanto un'azione attiva che
passiva, condiziona la traduzione di tale infinito. Azione preliminare per la traduzione di
un verbo di percezione
+ inftnito quindi I'esame attento di tale inftnito.
3.
Quando
l'infinito esprime azione passiva,
verbo di percezione
+ oggetto
We heard him
(being)
scolded by his
mother
I saw the car
(being)
stopped by a
policeman
I saw her
(being)
slapped by a man
la costruzione la seguente:
(
+ being) + participio passato
Lo udimmo rimproverare da sua madre
Vidi fermare I'auto da un vigile
La vidi schiaffeggiare da un uomo
4.
Quando
I'infinito esprime azione attiva, esso pu venir tradotto o con I'infinito senza
to
(o voce verbale
fondamentale)
o con la forma in ing.
a) si usa I'infinito senza to quando l'infinito italiano esprime azione
generalmente
breve,
percepita
doll'inizio aila
fine
del suo compiersi.
I heard him shut the door
I saw her fall into the river
I heard the telephone ring
I salv them playing tennis
I heard them quarrelling
Can't
you smell something burning?
Lo sentii chiudere la porta
La vidi cadere nel fiume
Sentii suonare il telefono
Li vidi giocare (che giuocavano) a tennis
Li udii litigare (che litigavano)
Non senti bruciare qualcosa?
b) si usa la forma in ing quando I'infinito esprime azione generalmente prolungata,
percepita in uno
fase
o momento del suo svolgersi.
671
CRRL IND URITTN DRILLS
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Reword the following sentences as
suggesfed;
E
1. The man was arrested by the
police. I
saw him.
I saw the man arrested by the
police.
2. The children were scolded by their
mothers. I heard them.
3. The thief was caught by a policeman. I
saw him.
4. Their names were called on the
loudspeaker. I heard them.
5. Tom was being chased by a dog. I saw
him.
The boy was praised by the teacher. I
heard him.
The girl was asked into the Rolls Royce.
I saw her.
The gentleman was being helped by the
porter. I saw him.
The poor woman was hit by a car. I saw
her.
The Queen was applauded by the crowd.
I heard them
a
1. I saw James running after a bus.
I often see him run after a bus.
2. I saw Henry walking in the park alone.
3. I saw Jane cycling on the road.
4. I saw Peter fishing on the bridge.
5. I saw the girls going to the pictures.
6. I heard Bob singing aloud.
7. I heard the baby screaming horribly.
8. I heard the boys eating very noisily.
9. I heard Uncle swearing.
10. I heard Aunt shouting at the
girls.
E
1. I often see Mr Fox mow the lawn.
I saw Mr Fox mowing the lawn
yesterday.
2. I often hear Susan quarrel wlth John.
3. I often see the children swim in the
river.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
often hear Tom sing in the bathroom.
often see the baby play
on the floor.
often hear Uncle shout at Susan.
often see Bob read in the garden.
often hear the girls talk aloud.
often see Mrs Fox walk the dog.
often hear the boys play their
guitars.
tr
1. Mr Brown entered the pub at seven: I
saw him.
I saw Mr Brown enter the
pub
at seven.
2. He got on the bus at six: I saw him.
3. He got off the bus at half past six: I
saw him.
4. He left the
pub at half past seven: I saw
him.
5. He arrived home at eight: I saw him.
6. He called his wife: I heard him.
7. He whistled to his dog: I heard him.
8. He opened the refrigerator: I heard him.
9. He broke a glass: I heard him.
10. He swore heavily: I heard him.
form or the infinitive
blank spaces.'
him ...!. punctually (fo
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Use either the ing
(without to) in the
tr
1. I've never seen
arrive)
We saw them in the park hand in
hand (fo walk)
We watched the boys an exciting
game (to play)
f
've
often heard that girl (fo cry)
I saw the girls in the library (fo read)
We've heard Mrs Fox her neighbour
fl%t#*" cat that tree
G)
aimot
The little girl watched her mother a
cake (to make)
We heard the two of them (fo
quarre[)
We've never seen her tennis (fo
plav)
Reword the following sentences as
suggesfed;
E
1. Mary saw the burglars leave the house.
The burglars were seen to leave the
house by Mary.
2. Mr Fox saw them get into a car.
675
3.
4.
5.
Then he saw them set off at full speed.
Somebody saw them collide with a bus.
A policeman saw them get out of the
7. An old
gentleman
saw them get off the
bus.
Somebody saw them enter a park.
A child heard them talking quietly.
Nobody saw them leave the park.
wrecked car.
6. A lady saw them
get on a bus.
Reptace the infinitives;
a
TFM INTRUDER
8.
9.
10.
There was something strange about the man. I saw him (to open) the gate
of my garden
and
steal in.
t
At first I thought he wanted to
pick
an apple from the apple-tree in our-garden, but he
didn't turn his eyes to the fruit. I heard him (to whisper) something, while walking'slowly around
the garden. Then I saw him (to search) the bushes in my garden. There was nobody at home
and I started to be a little afraid, Suddenly I heard him (to whlsfle) and I thought he was catling
somebody, perhaps
an accomplice, to let him know there wasn't anybody in the
garden.
Now
the stranger was
just
under my window, looking into a bush. A moment later I saw something
black (to
iump)
out of the bush and then I watched the man (to run) after it. Then he took a black
poodle
in his arms, and I heard him (fo say) sweet words to the dog. Then I saw them (to
disap
pear)
into the road.
Translate the ltalian tragments in the following conversation:
E
Policeman
Mrs Randall
Policeman
Mrs Randall
Policeman
Miss Hill
Policeman
Mrs Randall
Miss Hill
Policeman
Mrs Randall
Policeman
Mrs Randall
Policeman
Mrs Randall,
you
found Miss Lindley unconscious. Can you
tell us what happened
exactly?
Of course, officer. (Non avevo vlsto Miss Lindley entrare od uscire) of her cottage
for a few days. (Di solito la sento cantare o
parlare)
to her two cats.
And this made
you suspicious?
Yes, a little. So I went to ask Miss Hill who lives next door (se avesse vlsfo Miss
Lindley lasciare) her cottage.
What have you
to say, Miss Hill?
(La vidi fare la spesa) in town last Wednesday, but (non I'avevo visfa) her since
then. So, when Mrs Randall came and told me she was worried, we went together
to Miss Lindley's house.
(Non la senti suonare) the bell, obviously.
(Ascoltammo) carefully, but (non riuscimmo a sentire) anything. We knew she
wasn't on holiday because she would have told us. And then there was her milk
on the doorstep.3
There were three bottles, so she had been there three days at least. And then we
opened the door.
How did
you
do that? Wasn't it locked?
Yes, it ws. But we have a spare key
a
of each other's houses in case we lock
ourselves out
5
or lose a key.
So then
you went in and (vedeste Miss Lindley sfessa) on the floor.
Yes. Then we phoned the
police station and called an ambulance.
Well, the fact that
you had a spare key
probaby saved her life. Miss Lindley is very
lucky to have such
good neighbours!
1. to steal ln
=
entrare furtivamente. To steal (stole stolen)
=
rubare.2. while walklng
=
mentre
passeggiava (camminava). 3. on the doorslep
=
sul
gradino della soglia di casa. 4. spare key
-
chiave
di scoita 5. to lock onesell out
=
chiudersi
(a chiave) fuori'
676
Translate into English:
g
1. Se chiudi
gli occhi non vedi (non puoi
vedere).
2. Mi guardava con una strana espressione.
3. John
guardava la televisione
quando
arrivammo.
4. Chi stavate ascoltando?
5. Lo sentii con le mie stesse orecchie.
6. Gli sentii il polso: aveva la febbre.
7. Smetti di annusare i f iori!
8. Questi fiori hanno un buon
profumo.
9. Hai assaggiato I'insalala?
10. Sa troppo di aglio, temo.
IU
1. Lo vidi rincorrere da un cane
piccolissimo.
2. Li vidi fermare dalla polizia.
3. Sentii rimproverare il ragazzo da sua
madre.
4. La sentii lodare da tutti.
5. Vidi estrarre
I
la torta dal forno.
6. Non avete sentito chiamare il mio nome?
7. Abbiamo visto dipingere quel quadro.
8. Vidi prendere in giro quella ragazza dai
suoi amici.
9. Vedemmo arrestare un ladro.
10. Non I'avevo mai visto trattare a quel
modo.
Itr
1. Li vidi tuffarsi insieme.
2. Li osservai (vidi) entrare in un
3. Non mi avevi sentito arrivare.
4. Lo sentii chiudere a chiave la
negozio.
porta.
Uocabulary
loudspeaker
['laud'spi:ka*]
burglar
['ba:gla*]
bush
[buJ]
accomplice
[e'kcmplis]
poodle
['pu:dl]
pulse
[pnlsl
salad
['slad]
garlic
['ga:lik]
lawn
[c:nl
altoparlante
ladro
cespuglio
complice
barboncino
polso
insalata
aglio
prato (rasato)
5. Vedemmo Mr Bates
prendere un taxi.
6. Lo vedemmo alzarsi ed uscire dalla
stanza.
7. Sentii la casa tremare.
8. Non avete sentito suonare il telefono?
9. Non I'avevo vista uscire.
10. Che cosa I'hai sentito chiedere?
@
1. Vidi uscire dalla
pub Mr Brown.
2. Lo osservai entrare in un negozio.
3. Lui non mi aveva visto arrivare.
4. Vedemmo Jane prendere un taxi.
5. La vedemmo fermare un signore e
chiedere
qualcosa.
6. Sentii John chiamare Susan.
7. Vidi Susan fermarsi.
8. Non ho mai visto ridere quell'uomo.
9. Non avevo mai sentito (lo) zio imprecare
a quel modo.
10.
Non sentii suonare il campanello.
IE
1. Non senti bruciare
qualcosa?
2. Vidi la nonna che lavorava a maglia.
3. Li notai che parlavano a bassa voce.
4. Potevamo sentire le signore che
chiacchieravano in salotto.
5. Andiamo a vedere le ragazze giuocare a
tennis.
6. La vidi che stava facendo una torta.
7. La vidi (osservai) fare una torta.
8. Non I'avevo mai vista ridere.
9. La vediamo sempre tornare a casa a
quell'ora.
10. Non I'abbiamo mai vista uscire di sera.
to scold
[skauld]
to praise
[preiz]
to swear swore
sworn
[suea*
suc:
*
suc:nl
to whistle
['uis[
to wreck
[rek]
to search
[se:]
to dive
[daiv]
to knit
[nit]
nmproverare
lodare
imprecare
f ischiare
fare a
pezzi
frugare (in)
tuffarsi
lavorare a
maglia
1. estrarre
=
to take out.
677

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