CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions

World History

Introduction - World History–Social Science

The following released test questions are taken from the World History–Social Science Standards Test. This test is one of the California Standards Tests administered as part of the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program under policies set by the State Board of Education. All questions on the California Standards Tests are evaluated by committees of content experts, including teachers and administrators, to ensure their appropriateness for measuring the California academic content and skills standards in World History–Social Science. In addition to content, all items are reviewed and approved to ensure their adherence to the principles of fairness and to ensure no bias exists with respect to characteristics such as gender, ethnicity, and language. This document contains released test questions from the California Standards Test forms in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007. First on the pages that follow are lists of the standards assessed on the World History–Social Science Test. Next are released test questions. Following the questions is a table that gives the correct answer for each question, the content and skills (where applicable) standard that each question is measuring, and the year each question last appeared on the test. The following table lists each reporting cluster, the number of items that appear on the exam, and the number of released test questions that appear in this document. NUMBER OF QUESTIONS ON EXAM 13 10 14 13 10 60 NUMBER OF RELEASED TEST QUESTIONS 16 15 17 15 12 75

REPORTING CLUSTER 1. Development of Modern Political Thought 2. Industrial Expansion and Imperialism 3. Causes and Effects of the First World War 4. Causes and Effects of the Second World War

5. International Developments in the Post–World War II Era TOTAL

In selecting test questions for release, three criteria are used: (1) the questions adequately cover a selection of the academic content standards assessed on the World History–Social Science Test; (2) the questions demonstrate a range of difficulty; and (3) the questions present a variety of ways standards can be assessed. These released test questions do not reflect all of the ways the standards may be assessed. Released test questions will not appear on future tests. For more information about the California Standards Tests, visit the California Department of Education’s Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/resources.asp.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History

Released Test Questions

REPORTING CLUSTER 1: Development of Modern Political Thought
The following two California content standards (indicated by bold type) are included in Reporting Cluster 1 and are represented in this booklet by 16 test questions. These questions represent only some ways in which these standards may be assessed on the California World History–Social Science Standards Test. CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS IN THIS REPORTING CLUSTER

Development of Modern Political Thought WH10.1 Students relate the moral and ethical principles in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, in Judaism, and in Christianity to the development of Western political thought. Analyze the similarities and differences in Judeo-Christian and Greco-Roman views of law, reason and faith, and duties of the individual. Trace the development of the Western political ideas of the rule of law and illegitimacy of tyranny, using selections from Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Politics. Consider the influence of the U.S. Constitution on political systems in the contemporary world. Students compare and contrast the Glorious Revolution of England, the American Revolution, and the French Revolution and their enduring effects worldwide on the political expectations for self-government and individual liberty.

WH10.1.1. WH10.1.2. WH10.1.3. WH10.2

WH10.2.1. Compare the major ideas of philosophers and their effect on the democratic revolutions in England, the United States, France, and Latin America (e.g., John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Simón Bolívar, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison). WH10.2.2. List the principles of the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights (1689), the American Declaration of Independence (1776), the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen (1789), and the U.S. Bill of Rights (1791). WH10.2.3. WH10.2.4. Understand the unique character of the American Revolution, its spread to other parts of the world, and its continuing significance to other nations. Explain how the ideology of the French Revolution led France to develop from constitutional monarchy to democratic despotism to the Napoleonic empire.

WH10.2.5. Discuss how nationalism spread across Europe with Napoleon but was repressed for a generation under the Congress of Vienna and Concert of Europe until the Revolutions of 1848.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
REPORTING CLUSTER 2: Industrial Expansion and Imperialism

World History

The following two California content standards (indicated by bold type) are included in Reporting Cluster 2 and are represented in this booklet by 15 test questions. These questions represent only some ways in which these standards may be assessed on the California World History–Social Science Standards Test. CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS IN THIS REPORTING CLUSTER
Industrial Expansion and Imperialism WH10.3 WH10.3.1. Students analyze the effects of the Industrial Revolution in England, France, Germany, Japan and the United States. Analyze why England was the first country to industrialize.

WH10.3.2. Examine how scientific and technological changes and new forms of energy brought about massive social, economic, and cultural change (e.g., the inventions and discoveries of James Watt, Eli Whitney, Henry Bessemer, Louis Pasteur, Thomas Edison). WH10.3.3. Describe the growth of population, rural to urban migration, and growth of cities associated with the Industrial Revolution.

WH10.3.4. Trace the evolution of work and labor, including the demise of the slave trade and the effects of immigration, mining and manufacturing, division of labor, and the union movement. WH10.3.5. WH10.3.6. Understand the connections among natural resources, entrepreneurship, labor, and capital in an industrial economy. Analyze the emergence of capitalism as a dominant economic pattern and the responses to it, including Utopianism, Social Democracy, Socialism, and Communism.

WH10.3.7. Describe the emergence of Romanticism in art and literature (e.g., the poetry of William Blake and William Wordsworth), social criticism (e.g., the novels of Charles Dickens), and the move away from Classicism in Europe. WH10.4 Students analyze patterns of global change in the era of New Imperialism in at least two of the following regions or countries: Africa, Southeast Asia, China, India, Latin America and the Philippines.

WH10.4.1. Describe the rise of industrial economies and their link to imperialism and colonialism (e.g., the role played by national security and strategic advantage; moral issues raised by the search for national hegemony, Social Darwinism, and the missionary impulse; material issues such as land, resources, and technology). WH10.4.2. WH10.4.3. Discuss the locations of the colonial rule of such nations as England, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Portugal, and the United States. Explain imperialism from the perspective of the colonizers and the colonized and the varied immediate and long-term responses by the people under colonial rule.

WH10.4.4. Describe the independence struggles of the colonized regions of the world, including the roles of leaders, such as Sun Yat-sen in China, and the role of ideology and religion.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History

Released Test Questions

REPORTING CLUSTER 3: Causes and Effects of the First World War
The following two California content standards (indicated by bold type) are included in Reporting Cluster 3 and are represented in this booklet by 17 test questions. These questions represent only some ways in which these standards may be assessed on the California World History–Social Science Standards Test. CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS IN THIS REPORTING CLUSTER
Causes and Effects of the First World War WH10.5 Students analyze the causes and course of the First World War. WH10.5.1. Analyze the arguments for entering into war presented by leaders from all sides of the Great War and the role of political and economic rivalries, ethnic and ideological conflicts, domestic discontent and disorder, and propaganda and nationalism in mobilizing civilian population in support of “total war.” WH10.5.2. Examine the principal theaters of battle, major turning points, and the importance of geographic factors in military decisions and outcomes (e.g., topography, waterways, distance, climate). WH10.5.3. WH10.5.4. WH10.5.5. WH10.6 Explain how the Russian Revolution and the entry of the United States affected the course and outcome of the war. Understand the nature of the war and its human costs (military and civilian) on all sides of the conflict, including how colonial peoples contributed to the war effort. Discuss human rights violations and genocide, including the Ottoman government’s actions against Armenian citizens. Students analyze the effects of the First World War.

WH10.6.1. Analyze the aims and negotiating roles of world leaders, the terms and influence of the Treaty of Versailles and Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points, and the causes and effects of United States’s rejection of the League of Nations on world politics. WH10.6.2. Describe the effects of the war and resulting peace treaties on population movement, the international economy, and shifts in the geographic and political borders of Europe and the Middle East. WH10.6.3. WH10.6.4. Understand the widespread disillusionment with prewar institutions, authorities, and values that resulted in a void that was later filled by totalitarians. Discuss the influence of World War I on literature, art, and intellectual life in the West (e.g., Pablo Picasso, the “lost generation” of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway).

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions

World History

REPORTING CLUSTER 4: Causes and Effects of the Second World War
The following two California content standards (indicated by bold type) are included in Reporting Cluster 4 and are represented in this booklet by 15 test questions. These questions represent only some ways in which these standards may be assessed on the California World History–Social Science Standards Test. CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS IN THIS REPORTING CLUSTER
Causes and Effects of the Second World War WH10.7 WH10.7.1. Students analyze the rise of totalitarian governments after the First World War. Understand the causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution, including Lenin’s use of totalitarian means to seize and maintain control (e.g., the Gulag).

WH10.7.2. Trace Stalin’s rise to power in the Soviet Union and the connection between economic policies, political policies, the absence of a free press, and systematic violations of human rights (e.g., the Terror Famine in Ukraine). WH10.7.3. Analyze the rise, aggression, and human costs of totalitarian regimes (Fascist and Communist) in Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union, noting their common and dissimilar traits. WH10.8 WH10.8.1. WH10.8.2. Students analyze the causes and consequences of World War II. Compare the German, Italian, and Japanese drives for empire in the 1930s, including the 1937 Rape of Nanking and other atrocities in China and the Stalin-Hitler Pact of 1939. Understand the role of appeasement, nonintervention (isolationism), and the domestic distractions in Europe and the United States prior to the outbreak of World War II.

WH10.8.3. Identify and locate the Allied and Axis powers on a map and discuss the major turning points of the war, the principal theaters of conflict, key strategic decisions, and the resulting war conferences and political resolutions, with emphasis on the importance of geographic factors. WH10.8.4. Describe the political, diplomatic, and military leaders during the war (e.g., Winston Churchill, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Emperor Hirohito, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Joseph Stalin, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower). WH10.8.5. Analyze the Nazi policy of pursuing racial purity, especially against the European Jews; its transformation into the Final Solution and the Holocaust resulted in the murder of six million Jewish civilians. WH10.8.6. Discuss the human costs of the war, with particular attention to the civilian and military losses in Russia, Germany, Britain, United States, China and Japan.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History

Released Test Questions

REPORTING CLUSTER 5: International Developments in the Post-World War II Era
The following three California content standards (indicated by bold type) are included in Reporting Cluster 5 and are represented in this booklet by 12 test questions. These questions represent only some ways in which these standards may be assessed on the California World History–Social Science Standards Test. CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS IN THIS REPORTING CLUSTER
International Developments in the Post-World War II Era WH10.9 Students analyze the international developments in the post-World War II world. WH10.9.1. Compare the economic and military power shifts caused by the war, including the Yalta Pact, the development of nuclear weapons, Soviet control over Eastern European nations, and the economic recoveries of Germany and Japan. WH10.9.2. Analyze the causes of the Cold War, with the free world on one side and Soviet client states on the other, including competition for influence in such places as Egypt, the Congo, Vietnam, and Chile. WH10.9.3. Understand the importance of the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan, which established the pattern for America’s postwar policy of supplying economic and military aid to prevent the spread of Communism and the resulting economic and political competition in arenas such as Southeast Asia (i.e., the Korean War, Vietnam War), Cuba, and Africa. WH10.9.4. Analyze the Chinese Civil War, the rise of Mao Tse-tung, and the subsequent political and economic upheavals in China (e.g., the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square uprising). WH10.9.5. Describe the uprisings in Poland (1952), Hungary (1956), and Czechoslovakia (1968) and those countries’ resurgence in the 1970s and 1980s as people in Soviet satellites sought freedom from Soviet control. WH10.9.6. Understand how the forces of nationalism developed in the Middle East, how the Holocaust affected world opinion regarding the need for a Jewish state, and the significance and effects of the location and establishment of Israel on world affairs. WH10.9.7. Analyze the reasons for the collapse of the Soviet Union, including the weakness of the command economy, burdens of military commitments, and growing resistance to Soviet rule by dissidents in satellite states and the non-Russian Soviet republics. WH10.9.8. WH10.10 Discuss the establishment and work of the United Nations and the purposes and functions of the Warsaw Pact, SEATO, and NATO, and the Organization of American States. Students analyze instances of nation-building in the contemporary world in two of the following regions or countries: the Middle East, Africa, Mexico and other parts of Latin America, and China.

WH10.10.1. Understand the challenges in the regions, including the geopolitical, cultural, military, and economic significance and the international relationships in which they are involved. WH10.10.2. Describe the recent history of the regions, including the political divisions and systems, key leaders, religious issues, natural features, resources, and population patterns. WH10.10.3. Discuss the important trends in the region today and whether they appear to serve the cause of individual freedom and democracy. WH10.11 Students analyze the integration of countries into the world economy and the information, technological, and communications revolutions (e.g., television, satellites, computers).

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions

World History

CALIFORNIA ANALYSIS SKILLS STANDARDS FOR WORLD HISTORY
History and Social Science Analysis Skills (World History) Chronological and Spatial Thinking CS1. CS2. Students compare the present with the past, evaluating the consequences of past events and decisions and determining the lessons that were learned. Students analyze how change happens at different rates at different times; understand that some aspects can change while others remain the same; and understand that change is complicated and affects not only technology and politics but also values and beliefs. Students use a variety of maps and documents to interpret human movement, including major patterns of domestic and international migration, changing environmental preferences and settlement patterns, the frictions that develop between population groups, and the diffusion of ideas, technological innovations, and goods. Students relate current events to the physical and human characteristics of places and regions. Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations. Students identify bias and prejudice in historical interpretations. Students evaluate major debates among historians concerning alternative interpretations of the past, including an analysis of authors’ use of evidence and the distinctions between sound generalizations and misleading oversimplifications. Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations. Students show the connections, causal and otherwise, between particular historical events and larger social, economic, and political trends and developments. Students recognize the complexity of historical causes and effects, including the limitations of determining cause and effect. Students interpret past events and issues within the context in which an event unfolded rather than solely in terms of present day norms and values. Students understand the meaning, implication, and impact of historical events while recognizing that events could have taken other directions. Students analyze human modifications of a landscape, and examine the resulting environmental policy issues. Students conduct cost/benefit analyses and apply basic economic indicators to analyze the aggregate economic behavior of the U.S. economy.

CS3.

CS4.

Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View HR1. HR2. HR3.

HR4.

Historical Interpretation HI1. HI2. HI3. HI4. HI5. HI6.

At least twenty-five percent of the content questions must include an element of the skills standards.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
1 �
Jewish and Christian beliefs differ from the Greco-Roman tradition in matters concerning the importance of A B C D the role of law.
individual morality.
belief in one God.
the family unit.

CSD00101

Released Test Questions
3 �

He who trusts any man with supreme power gives it to a wild beast, for such his appetite sometimes makes him: passion influences those in power, even the best of men, but law is reason without desire. . . . —Aristotle Which feature of modern Western democratic government reflects Aristotle’s views as given above? A the direct election of members of the legislature B the power of the courts to review the law C the granting of emergency powers to the chief executive
CSD00293

2 �

Who believed that in an ideal society the government should be controlled by a class of “philosopher kings”? A B C D Muhammad
Plato
Lao-tzu
Thomas Aquinas

D the requirement that government actions must adhere to the law
CSD00311

4 �

Which of the following is a concept from classical Athens that is central to Western political thought today? A Individuals should fight against nature and society to achieve greatness. B Individual achievement, dignity, and worth are of great importance. C Individual recognition impedes societal progress. D Individuals play an insignificant role in shaping ideas, society, and the state.
CSD00366

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
5 �

From the Constitution of Japan We, the Japanese people, acting through our duly elected representatives in the National Diet, determined that we shall secure for ourselves and our posterity the fruits of peaceful cooperation with all nations and the blessings of liberty throughout this land. . . . Which of these is a source for the ideas outlined in the Japanese Constitution? A B C D Charter of the United Nations legal writings of Thomas Hobbes writings on constitutions by Voltaire United States Constitution
CSD00151

World History
8 �
Both the United States Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man emphasized the idea that governments must A B C D guarantee economic prosperity.
protect the rights of people.
support established religious beliefs.
operate on a system of checks and balances.

CSD00120

9 �

Use the following information to answer the question below. Natural Rights Philosophy

Emphasizes individual rights to life, liberty and property.
What document best exemplifies the natural rights philosophy described above? A B C D The Communist Manifesto Plato’s Republic Luther’s Ninety-five Theses The Declaration of Independence
CSH10067

6 �

When a country’s constitution requires the branches of government to remain independent of each other, it is adhering to the constitutional principle of A B C D popular sovereignty.
separation of powers.
federalism.
direct democracy.

CSV21742

10 �

How did the Magna Carta (1215) contribute to the development of the English government? A B C D It created a two-house parliament.
It extended voting rights.
It provided for a bill of rights.
It limited the power of the monarch.

CSV21399

7 �

The English philosopher John Locke argued that life, liberty, and property are A natural rights that should be protected by government. B political rights to be granted as determined by law. C economic rights earned in a capitalistic system. D social rights guaranteed by the ruling class.
CSD00456

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
11 �
Unlike the French Revolution, the American Revolution produced A B C D women’s suffrage.
short-term military rule.
strategic alliances.
a lasting constitution.

CSD00212

Released Test Questions
15 �

Which of these first demonstrated that popular protest would play a role in the French Revolution? A B C D the reign of the Committee of Public Safety the trial of Louis XIV the fall of the Bastille the Civil Constitution of the Clergy
CSD00231


12

Which leader was inspired by the ideas of the American Revolution and the Enlightenment to lead the liberation of much of South America from Spain? A B C D Simón Bolívar
Padre Miguel Hidalgo
José Martí
Antonio López de Santa Anna

CSF10352

16 �

Between 1815 and 1848, the Congress of Vienna and the Concert of Europe suppressed nationalism by A B C D ensuring a balance of power between nations.
promoting democratic institutions.
sharing colonies among the great powers.
establishing international economic ties.

CSD10026

13 �

The principles of the American Revolution and the French Revolution are similar in many ways. Which of the following best summarizes their similarities? A B C D Both favored representative governments. Both limited voting rights to an economic elite. Both retained certain hereditary rights for aristocrats. Both supported equal rights for women.
CSD10031

17 �

The agricultural changes which took place in England during the 1600s contributed to
England’s later industrial development by
A B C D strengthening the importance of the family farm. breaking large estates into smaller farms. encouraging city dwellers to return to farming. producing more food with fewer workers.
CSD00130

14 �

When members of the Third Estate took the Tennis Court Oath (1789) at the start of the French Revolution, they were attempting to A B C D establish a military government.
draft a new national constitution.
restore the king to power.
persuade Napoleon to take power.

CSV21666

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
18 � 20 �
Population (in thousands) 300
250
200
150
100
50
0

World History
Population of Birmingham, England (1801–1851)

Louis Pasteur’s research into germ theory in the nineteenth century is significant because it A B C D created safety standards for machine workers. led to techniques that increase crop production. identified the importance of vitamins to nutrition. proved that cleanliness helps to prevent infections.
CSV23431

19 �

Use the information to complete the statement.

The streets were hot and dusty on the summer day. Stokers emerged from low underground doorways into factory yards, and sat on steps, and posts, and palings, wiping their swarthy visages, and contemplating coals. The whole town seemed to be frying in oil. There was a stifling smell of hot oil everywhere. The steam-engines shone with it, the mills throughout their many stories oozed and trickled it. —Charles Dickens, Hard Times, 1854 The historical era most likely referred to in this quotation is the A B C D Industrial Revolution.
Great Awakening.
French Revolution.
Enlightenment.

CSF10080

1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 Census Year
Source: HM Records Office

What historical trend was most responsible for the change in Birmingham’s population shown above? A B C D immigration from the colonies industrial growth improvements in urban health care famine in rural areas
CSV22998

21 �

In the nineteenth century, labor unions developed mostly in response to A B C D increasing unemployment.
government ownership of businesses.
wages and working conditions.
racial and gender discrimination.

CSV21254

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
22 �
To increase production output during the Industrial Revolution, businesses primarily invested in A B C D workers’ wages.
machinery.
training.
marketing.

CSV21628

Released Test Questions
25 �

The social criticism of Charles Dickens’s novels Hard Times and David Copperfield was a response to conditions brought about by A B C D colonial conflicts.
industrialization.
unionization.
parliamentary reforms.

CSV20614

23 �

In the mid-1700s, how did trade contribute to the early growth of an industrial economy in Great Britain? A It allowed the British to educate their workforce. B It provided funds to pay high wages to the new labor class. C It enabled British merchants to hire skilled foreign laborers. D It gave British entrepreneurs the capital needed to open new factories.
CSV20411

26 �

At the end of the 1800s, colonies were generally seen as a A B C D place to banish criminals.
sign of a country’s relative power.
location to train military forces.
method for suppressing nationalism.

CSD00279

27 �

Economically, what enabled Japan to become a colonial power after 1894? A Agricultural advances increased the population and forced Japan to look for new land. B Japanese trade wars against the United States removed regional competition for colonies. C Industrialization allowed Japan to expend resources on military and colonial expansion. D The Japanese were forced to acquire colonies in Asia when European trade was banned.
CSE10010


24

What late-eighteenth-century European artistic movement arose as a reaction against Classicism’s emphasis on reason? A B C D impressionism
realism
romanticism
surrealism

CSV20613

28 �

In 1900, anti-foreign sentiment in China led to an uprising known as the A B C D Nian Rebellion.
Boxer Rebellion.
Taiping Rebellion.
Sepoy Rebellion.

CSV21616

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
29 � 32 �

World History
Why did Great Britain, France, and Russia form the Triple Entente in 1907? A to protect their colonies from invasion by other nations B to develop an economic alliance based on open markets C to suppress minority nationalists in their own countries
CSV20273

The collapse of the last Chinese Empire in 1912 was caused by the imperial government’s failure to A B C D control foreign influence.
educate the masses.
enter into alliances with other nations.
repel communist guerrillas.

30 �

Mohandas Gandhi used his philosophy of nonviolent noncooperation in an effort to A B C D form a Marxist government in India.
convince his fellow Indians to support the
Allies in World War II. persuade Pakistanis to separate from India. achieve India’s independence from Great Britain.
CSV20421

D to respond to the increased military power of Germany
CSF10184

33 �

According to some historians, Europe’s system of alliances prior to 1914 increased the likelihood that A democratic ideals would spread throughout the continent. B nations would be protected from economic exploitation. C colonization of undeveloped nations would cease. D small disputes would develop into large-scale wars.
CSV20362


31

By 1914, Ethiopia and Liberia were the only two African countries to A B C D establish democratic governments.
develop industrial economies.
retain their independence.
colonize other nations.

CSV22485

34 �

During World War I, U.S. propaganda posters often portrayed German soldiers as A B C D honorable opponents.
violators of human rights.
unbeatable enemies.
liberators of oppressed peoples.

CSV21410

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
35 �
One major reason for the tension between France and Germany before World War I was that A France had begun to surpass Germany in industrial output. B Germany wanted to join the Triple Entente with Great Britain. C Germany controlled French access to the North Sea. D France wanted to regain lands previously seized by Germany.
CSV21412

Released Test Questions
38 �

How did Russia’s participation in World War I affect its empire? A A string of decisive military victories gained land from the Central Powers. B Russia’s sale of supplies to its western allies strengthened its economy. C The czar adopted the reforms necessary to win the support of the Russian people. D Economic hardships brought on by the war resulted in the downfall of the czar.
CSF10285


36

Why did most of the combat on the Western Front in World War I take place in a relatively small area? A There is only a small amount of flat land in all of Europe. B The armies became immobile because of trench warfare. C Each side cut off the fuel supply of the other. D Germany’s military tactics were based on “static warfare.”
CSD00285

39 �

Which of the following most affected the course and outcome of World War I? A Allied withdrawal from the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli B British victories in the Sinai that secured the Suez Canal C American military and financial intervention in the war D the switch in allegiance of Italy from the Central Powers to the Allies
CSF10086

37 �

The Schlieffen Plan was designed by the German military to A address U.S. troop deployments in France. B strengthen the defense of Germany’s colonies in Africa. C neutralize Great Britain’s naval control of the North Sea. D avoid the problem of fighting Allied powers on two fronts.
CSD10094

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
40 � 43 �

World History
What aim did Italian leader Vittorio Orlando have during the creation of the Treaty of Versailles? A B C D to gain territory from Austria-Hungary to assume control of Austria’s industries to guarantee the partition of Germany to gain possession of Austria’s overseas colonies
CSF10008

One contribution of overseas colonies to the Allied effort during World War I was that they provided A large numbers of soldiers to reinforce the Allied armies. B protected sites for new Allied industrial factories. C most of the agricultural labor in the Allied nations. D places of refuge for displaced Allied civilian populations.
CSV20424

41 �

President Wilson said that his Fourteen Points would provide a framework for A B C D a lasting and just peace.
determining war reparations.
expanding colonial empires.
punishing aggressor nations.

CSD00137

42 �

A major goal of France and Great Britain at the Conference of Versailles following World War I was to A B C D create a politically unified Europe. keep Germany from rebuilding its military forces. restore pre-war imperial governments to power. help Germany rebuild its industrial economy.
CSD00319

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
44 �
Use the information to answer the question that follows.

Released Test Questions

Southwest Asia and Northeast Africa, 1922–1934

A C B

D

After World War I, the territories of the Ottoman Empire in Southwest Asia were partitioned. Into which area did nearly 400,000 Jewish people immigrate between 1919 and 1941? A B C D A B C D
CSF10288

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
45 �

World History

Europe Before World War I
N W S E

Europe After World War I
ED EN
North Sea

AY RW NO

FINLAND
ESTONIA

W

S

LATVIA DENMARK NETHERLANDS

Baltic Sea

LITHUANIA

U. K. GERMANY
BELGIUM LUXEMBOURG

GERMANY

SOVIET UNION

POLAND

CZ EC H OSLOV AKIA

FRANCE
SWITZERLAND

IA Y AUSTR HUNGAR
YUGOSLAVIA ITALY

ROMANIA

BULGARIA

SPAIN
ALBANIA

Mediterranean Sea

GREECE

New Nations

A comparison of the two maps indicates that one of the results of the war and the peace treaty was the A B C D partitioning of Germany into zones of occupation. dismemberment of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. shift of the balance of power from Western to Southern Europe. new dominant role for Russia in Eastern Europe.
CSD00176

46 �

One way fascist leaders in the 1920s and 1930s gained popular support was by A B C D promising to maintain peace with other countries. attracting foreign investment for industrial development. limiting military influence in the government. appealing to national pride.
CSV21292

47 �

The Nazis blamed most of Germany’s pre– World War II social and economic problems on Jews and the A B C D communists. military. industrialists. Catholics.
CSV20609

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
48 �
Authors Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald are identified with A B C D the lost generation.
romanticism.
the classical era.
naturalism.

CSV20429

Released Test Questions
51 �

Particular obstructive workers who refuse to submit to disciplinary measures will be subject, as non-workers, to discharge and confinement in concentration camps. —Vladimir Lenin, Decree of November 14th, 1919

49 �

How did the Cheka (secret police) help Lenin gain control of Russia? A B C D They infiltrated the Czar’s army.
They organized the redistribution of the land.
They used terror tactics against the enemies
of Bolshevism. They negotiated peace with Germany.
CSD00463

The excerpt above describes Lenin’s method for dealing with those who opposed A B C D Russian involvement in World War I.
the establishment of a communist government.
technological advances in industry.
the implementation of a market economy.

CSV21462

50 �

Lenin hoped that the Russian Revolution of 1917 would A inspire the Russians to continue the European war effort. B incite similar socialist rebellions throughout Europe. C persuade the combatants in Western Europe to sign an armistice. D counter U.S. military presence in Eastern Europe.
CSV21463

52 �

Stalin’s “Great Purge” from 1934 to 1939 A eliminated the army’s dominance in state decisions. B expanded Soviet agriculture at the expense of industry. C brought about the death of millions of people. D replaced agricultural workers with technology.
CSD00252

53 �

In the struggle to gain control of the Soviet Union in the 1920s, Stalin’s chief political rival was A B C D Kerensky.
Bukharin.
Romanov.
Trotsky.

CSF10181

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
54 � 58 �

World History
Use the following information to answer the question.

Both the Italian Fascists and the German Nazis gained power partly because they A had the support of an electoral majority of their nations’ peoples. B carefully followed accepted democratic political practices. C used terror tactics against political opponents. D represented the ideas of compromise and prudent government.
CSD00155

My good friends, for the second time in our history, a British Prime Minister has returned from Germany bringing peace with honor. I believe it is peace for our time . . . . Go home and get a nice quiet sleep. —Neville Chamberlain, April 30, 1938 (following his return from the Munich Conference) The statement reflects the British belief that which of the following policies would prevent another war? A B containment
isolation

55 �

Which of the following does not describe Hitler’s Germany, Mussolini’s Italy, and Stalin’s Russia? A B C They were all totalitarian governments.
Political opponents were killed in each state.
All three nations wanted to expand their
borders.

D Marxist principles governed all economic activity.
CSD00113

C reparation D appeasement
CSF10026

56 �

In 1939, France and Great Britain declared war on Germany as a direct result of the German A B C D annexation of Austria.
occupation of the Rhineland.
seizure of the Sudetenland.
invasion of Poland.

CSF10182

59 �

Following the United States’ entry into World War II, American and British leaders decided that their highest priority would be to A B C D recapture Pacific possessions lost to the Japanese. invade Europe and defeat Germany. send armies to the Russian Front to help the Soviet Union. strike directly at the Japanese home islands.
CSD00124

57 Which nation sought to establish the Greater
East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere between 1931 and 1945? A B C D Japan
India
China
Korea

CSV23212

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
60 �
Why did Hitler sign a non-aggression treaty with Stalin on the eve of World War II? A to prevent the League of Nations from acting to stop the war B to show that Hitler had changed his views on communism C to allow Germany to invade Poland without Soviet opposition D to insure that Germany had direct access to the Baltic Sea
CSD00197

Released Test Questions
63 �

Which of the following countries suffered high civilian and military casualties because it was invaded and partially occupied during World War II? A B C D Great Britain
the Soviet Union
the United States
Japan

CSV21313

61 �

64 �

One major purpose of the Yalta Conference in 1945 was to decide A B C D when to open the second front against Germany. where to launch the final invasion of Japan. how to restructure Europe after the war. which countries to include in the United Nations.
CSV20497

Which of these is the main reason that Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Romania became satellites of the Soviet Union? A These areas were given to the Soviet Union by a League of Nations mandate. B The people in each country voted in free elections to ally with the Soviets. C The Soviet army occupied these areas at the end of World War II. D Hitler surrendered control of these areas to the Soviet Union at the end of the war.
CSD00115


62

Early in World War II, Allied leaders decided that the enemy they had to defeat first was A B C D the Ottoman Empire.
the Soviet Union.
Imperial Japan.
Nazi Germany.

CSV22452

65 �

The economic recovery of Japan following World War II focused primarily on A rebuilding its military and weapons capabilities. B exporting raw materials in exchange for consumer goods. C developing an agricultural economy and marine resources. D developing industry and an export economy.
CSV23507

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
66 � 69 �

World History
Use the information below to complete the statement that follows.

Which of the following was a primary cause of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union? A B C D a competition for political influence over other countries direct, armed conflict between the two nations a deep reduction in military expenditures the founding of the United Nations
CSF10222

One way of life is based upon the will of the people, and is distinguished by . . . freedom from political oppression. The second way of life is based on the will of a minority forcibly imposed upon the will of the majority. It relies upon . . . the suppression of personal freedoms. This quote from a speech delivered in 1947 forms part of the rationale for the A B C D Monroe Doctrine.
New Frontier.
Truman Doctrine.
Good Neighbor Policy.

CSV20103

67 �

U.S. intervention in Vietnam came as a result of the Cold War policy of A B C D détente.
brinkmanship.
appeasement.
containment.

CSV21487

68 �

What was one major goal of the Soviet Union during the early years of the Cold War? A B C D to establish a competitive market economy to create a defensive buffer zone in Eastern Europe to expand individual liberties in the Baltic republics to attract foreign economic investments
CSV20038

70 �

When the United States sent military aid to African governments to help them resist communism, it was continuing a foreign policy first asserted in the A B C D Marshall Plan.
Potsdam Agreement.
Truman Doctrine.
Teheran Conference.

CSV21316

— 21 —

This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
71 �
Use the following information to answer the question.

Released Test Questions
73 �

NATO was created in order to A develop goodwill between Eastern and Western Europe. B encourage diplomatic solutions to regional problems in North Africa. C facilitate regional economic development in North America. D create a unified military defense between the U.S. and Western Europe.
CSD00193

Events of 1968
• began as a writers’ protest • hard-line Communist leader resigned and was replaced by one more open to democratic reform • new leader instituted reforms allowing greater freedom of speech and the press • Soviets reestablished control and restored hard-line Communists to power

74 �

The Warsaw Pact was developed in 1955 as a response to the A B C D formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. start of the Communist revolution in Cuba. U.S. development of the hydrogen bomb. UN intervention in Korea.
CSV22556

In what country did the events being described above take place? A B C D Czechoslovakia
Yugoslavia
Hungary
Poland

CSF10048

75 �

In India and Pakistan, feelings of nationalism are intertwined with religious conflict between A B C D Buddhists and Hindus.
Christians and Muslims.
Taoists and Buddhists.
Muslims and Hindus.

CSD00112

72 �

The Arab oil embargo against the United States in 1973 was initiated because of U.S. support for A B C D Egypt in the Suez Crisis.
Iraq in its conflict with Iran.
Israel in the Yom Kippur War.
Greece in its conflict with Turkey.

CSV20016

— 22 —
This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
Question Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Correct Answer C B D B D B A B D D D A A B C A D D A B C B D C B B C B A D C D D B D Standard WH10.1.1 WH10.1.2 WH10.1.2 WH10.1.2 WH10.1.3 WH10.1.3 WH10.2.1 WH10.2.2 WH10.2.2 WH10.2.2 WH10.2.3 WH10.2.3 WH10.2.3 WH10.2.4 WH10.2.4 WH10.2.5 WH10.3.1 WH10.3.2 WH10.3.3 WH10.3.3 WH10.3.4 WH10.3.5 WH10.3.5 WH10.3.7 WH10.3.7 WH10.4.1 WH10.4.1 WH10.4.3 WH10.4.4 WH10.4.4 WH10.4.4 WH10.5.1 WH10.5.1 WH10.5.1 WH10.5.1 HI 2 HI 2 HI 3 HI 1 HR 4 HI 1 HI 1 HI 1 Skills

World History
Year of Release 2007 2003 2003 2005 2003 2006 2005 2003 2006 2007 2004 2004 2005 2005 2004 2007 2003 2006 2004 2007 2006 2006 2007 2004 2007 2003 2005 2004 2004 2005 2006 2004 2006 2007 2007

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

World History
Question Number 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 Correct Answer B D D C A A B A C B D A A C B B C D C D D A D B C C D B C D A D B C C Standard WH10.5.2 WH10.5.2 WH10.5.3 WH10.5.3 WH10.5.4 WH10.6.1 WH10.6.1 WH10.6.1 WH10.6.2 WH10.6.2 WH10.6.3 WH10.6.3 WH10.6.4 WH10.7.1 WH10.7.1 WH10.7.1 WH10.7.2 WH10.7.2 WH10.7.3 WH10.7.3 WH10.8.1 WH10.8.1 WH10.8.2 WH10.8.3 WH10.8.3 WH10.8.3 WH10.8.3 WH10.8.6 WH10.9.1 WH10.9.1 WH10.9.2 WH10.9.2 WH10.9.2 WH10.9.3 WH10.9.3 HI 2 HI 4 HI 3 HI 2 HI 3 HI 2 Skills HI 2

Released Test Questions
Year of Release 2003 2005 2004 2005 2006 2003 2003 2005 2005 2007 2006 2007 2004 2003 2006 2007 2003 2007 2004 2005 2004 2006 2005 2003 2003 2005 2007 2006 2004 2006 2005 2006 2007 2004 2006

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

CA L I F O R N I A S TA N DA R D S T E S T

Released Test Questions
Question Number 71 72 73 74 75 Correct Answer A C D A D Standard WH10.9.5 WH10.9.6 WH10.9.8 WH10.9.8 WH10.10.2 HI 3 Skills

World History
Year of Release 2005 2004 2003 2007 2003

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.