Project: Engineers sliding T bevel plan Page 1 of 7

Engineer's sliding T bevel plan

The sliding T bevel differs from the try square in having a movable blade. This blade may
be set at any desired angle from 0 to 180 degrees. It consists of a stock with a slotted
blade that can be set and locked at any angle.

The sliding bevel is used for laying out angles other than 90 degrees and for testing
constructed angles.

The measurements are given in millimeters, while the measurements given in inches are
in brackets (1 inch = 25, 4 mm).





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Engineer's sliding T bevel plan - Parts list


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Engineer's sliding T bevel plan - Assembly 2D drawings


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Project: Mortise gauge plan - Locking screw version Page 1 of 15




Mortise gauge plan - Locking screw version

This design consist of a single stem which has a groove cut out of one side. A small wooden slider, carrying a spur,
fits into the groove, and can be locked in any position along the lenght of the stem. The groove is filled in at one end
by a small block of wood. The second spur is hammered through the block.









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Project: Mortise gauge plan - Locking screw version Page 2 of 15
Parts list



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Assembly drawing









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1. Stem




















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2. Fence










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3. Shoe























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4. Threaded inserts - Standard part



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5. Wing Screw M6x20mm - Standard part












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6. End Block
























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7. Wooden Slider




















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8. Nail D2x18mm - Standard part (D maximum 2mm)



Assemblage instructions

1. Mark the centre of the top of the fence, and drill a D8mm pilot hole right through. Use a screwdriver to screw the threaded
inserts and the wing screw M6x20mm into the pilot hole.





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2. Drill a holes (on the Wooden slider and the End block), slightly smaller than the diameter of the nails. Drilling the holes first
prevents the wood from splitting. Hammer the nails into the holes. Sharpen the ends with a file.





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3. Fit and glue End block into the groove at the end of the stem. Fit the two subassemblies of the stem together and if necessary
trim the ends with a chisel or sharp knife so that the distance between the spurs is 6mm.





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4. Fit the Shoe into the groove.




5. Assemble the gauge




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Project: Mortise gauge plan - wedge version Page 1 of 11


Mortise gauge plan - wedge version


Mortise gauges are made with two spurs (nails) which mark two lines parallel to the edge of a workpiece, showing
the position of a tenon or mortise or a similar joint. This avoids having to score two lines separately, and makes for greater
accuracy. The spurs must be able to move independently, and be locked in any position by the fence. The spurs are made
from nails cut down and hammered into the ends of each half of the stem.








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Project: Mortise gauge plan - wedge version Page 2 of 11
Parts List












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Assembly drawing








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1. Main Stem























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2. Fence








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3. Wedge



















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4. Nail D2x28mm (D maximum 2mm) - Standard part













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5. Stem




























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6. Nail D2x18mm (D maximum 2mm) - Standard part






Assemblage instructions


1. Drill a holes (on the main stem and the stem), slightly smaller than the diameter of the nails. Drilling the holes first
prevents the wood from splitting. Hammer the nails into the holes. Sharpen the ends with a file.





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2. Fit the two parts of the stem together and if necessary trim the ends with a chisel or sharp knife so that the distance
between the spurs is 6mm.




3. Assemble the gauge.





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Project: Try square Page 1 of 7


Try square


Try squares made of wood are very practical pieces of equipment, and are quick and easy to make. They can be
made to any size up to a metre in length. Use the dimension given here only as a guide. When making this tool it is
most important that the straight edge and the stock are glued up perfectly square, otherwise all the woork done with it
will be inaccurate.





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Parts list





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Assembly drawing



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1. Stock









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2. Straight Edge
















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3. Dowel









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Assemblage instructions

Glue the straight edge into the stock and, before the glue dries, make sure the straight edge and stock are square. Leave the
assembly to dry. When the glue is dry drill a D8mm hole in the centre of the joint. Drive in a D8mm dowel. Smooth up the ends of
the dowel.










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Project: Cutting gauge Page 1 of 13


Cutting gauge

Cutting gauges are very similar to marking gauges, but instead of a metal spur, the stem carries a small knife blade
held in position by a wedge. In the drawing the fence is fixed to the stem, using a M6 wing screw as a locking screw.
The cutting gauge is used for scoring deep lines parallel to the edge, especially across the grain when marking long
shoulders of joints. It can also be used for cutting the sides of small grooves, or for splitting thin wood into strips.






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Parts List





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Assembly Drawing









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1. Stem
















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2. Fence




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3. Shoe
















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4. Threaded Inserts - Standard Part



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5. Wing Screw M6x25mm - Standard Part












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6. Knife Blade




















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7. Wedge









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Assemblage instructions

1. Mark the centre of the top of the fence, and drill a D8mm pilot hole right through. Use a screwdriver to screw the threaded
inserts and the wing screw M6x25mm into the pilot hole.





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Project: Cutting gauge Page 12 of 13
2. Assemble the marking gauge by sliding the stem through the fence. If it does not fit check that the sides of the mortise are
straight, or plane the stem down very carefully. Don't forget to put Shoe into the groove.






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3. Fit the blade and the wedge into the mortise.





Using the cutting gauge

Set the distance from the blade to the fence, and tighten the wing screw. To tighten the blade tap the top of the wedge with a
small hammer or a piece of wood. To loosen the blade tap the end of the stem, and remove the blade with your fingers.
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Project: Wooden Mallet Page 1 of 6




Wooden Mallet



The wooden mallet is one of the easiest tools to make, and is essential for all joinery and furniture making.
Choose the hardest and heaviest timber available for the head. If it is a problem to find a piece the right thickness,
glue two ot three pieces together. The handle can be made from any suitable hardwood. The dimensions given are
for a medium-sized mallet.







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Parts List


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Assembly Drawing















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1. Handle











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2. Head


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Assemblage instructions

Push the bottom of the handle through the top of the head and tap it down on a piece of wood.





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Project: Sliding bevel square Page 1 of 6


Sliding bevel square

A sliding bevel square, which is an essential tool for marking out dovetails and other joints with angles, can be made on
the same lines as the try square . Again the dimension given are only for guidance.




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Parts list





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Assembly drawing






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1. Stock





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2. Straight Edge






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Standard parts

Assemblage instructions

1. Mark a central point 20mm from the end of the stock and drill a D6mm hole. Fit the straight edge into the socket.

2. Pass the screw through this hole and the two washers and tighten the wing nut.


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Project: Panel Gauge Page 1 of 8




Panel Gauge

This is a large wooden gauge with a wide fence and a stem anything up to a metre long. Instead of the workpiece
being marked with a metal spur, the stem carries a pencil, located in a hole at the one end. The fence and the stem are
locked together by a wedge.
This type of gauge is used for marking out wide panels of timber or plywood. The lower edge of the fence is
rabated on one side, which helps to keep it firmly in contact with the edge of the board to be marked.


















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Parts list















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Assembly drawing











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1. Stem
































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2. Fence


















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3. Wedge


















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4. Pencil




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Assemblage instructions

Assemble the gauge by first inserting the wedge and then the stem into the mortise.








Using the Panel gauge

Set the distance between the pencil and the fence with a ruler. Tighten the fence by hitting the back of the wedge with a piece of
wood or a small hammer. Loosen the fence by hitting the front of the wedge.
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Project: Marking gauge Page 1 of 8


Marking gauge


Marking gauges consist of two main parts, a fence and a stem. The stem carries a pointed metal spur at the end. The fence
can be fixed to any position along the stem by a wedge. Marking gauge is an essential tool for basic carpentry and joinery. It is
used to score a single line parallel to the face side or face edge, when planning a piece of timber to size, and for marking out
rabates and simple joints. The spur is simply a nail with its head cut off and hammered into the end of the stem.









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Parts List



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Assembly Drawing










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Project: Marking gauge Page 4 of 8
1. Stem

























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2. Fence














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3. Wedge

















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4. Spur




Assemblage instructions
1. Drill a hole with a bit slightly smaller than the diameter of the nail you will use as the spur. Cut the head off a nail and drive
it right through the stem.




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2. Assemble the marking gauge by fitting the wedge into its groove and sliding the stem through the fence. If it does not fit check
that the sides of the mortise are straight, or plane the stem down very carefully.








Using the Marking gauge

To use the gauge first set the distance from the spur to the fence. Tighten the fence to the stem by tapping the back of the
wedge with a piece of wood. Check the setting and make final adjustments by tapping either end of the stemon the bench top.
To loosen the fence tap the front of the wedge.

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Project: Bevel Square Page 1 of 7
Bevel Square
A bevel square, which is an essential tool for marking out dovetails and other joints with angles, greater or
smaller than 90 degrees, can be made on the same lines as the try square. Again the dimension given are only for
guidance.














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Project: Bevel Square Page 2 of 7
Parts List




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Assembly Drawing






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1. Stock












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2. Staright Edge

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Standard Parts




Assemblage instructions

1. Fit the straight edge into the socket so there are no overlaps. Mark a central point 20mm from the end of the stock and
drill a D6mm hole right through both pieces of wood.


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2. Pass the screw through this hole and the two washers and tighten the wing nut.






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