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We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,

Nations, and Gods releases later this year. Were celebrating with a series of free weekly RPG content we call Full
Metal Fridays! Youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal Fridays. Each
month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can drop right into games. For
the first month of Full Metal Fridays we are diving into a subject near and dear to our hearts: the sea.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 1, Week1:

Raiders on the High Seas


By Matt Goetz Art by Brian Snoddy
Known for their ferocity and fighting prowess, the Satyxis
are the source of many grisly stories told in ports along
the Broken Coast. Those in the service of the Cryxian
Black Fleet take great joy in preying on the navies of the
Iron Kingdoms. Guided by ancient traditions of plunder
and bloodshed, these blighted fiends are as deadly as
they are merciless.

Whether a ship-borne raider or a wielder of enigmatic blood


magic, a Satyxis is a terrifying sight to any who makes his
living on the sea. While very few who encounter the Satyxis
escape with their lives, the stories of those rare survivors
describe the immense ferocity, bravery, and wickedness of
these fell women of the waves.

Women of the Sea

Satyxis
Satyxis are fearsome women from the island of Satyx,
a legendary place hidden somewhere among the fogshrouded Scharde Islands. Theirs is an ancient race,
known for its cruelty and skill in combat. Once they were
human, but for over a thousand years they have been
known as the foremost living servants of Lord Toruk.
They are easily distinguished by the twisted horns
growing from their skulls, a physical manifestation of
the dragon blight that transformed their race.
Some mainlanders think the Satyxis form is connected to
Toruk, but this blight originates from a different dragon,
now deceased. In 1650BR, over six centuries before the
founding of Cryx, the Dragonfather battled the white
dragon Shazkz in the skies over Satyx. Though Shazkz
tried to defend himself, Toruk savaged the lesser dragon
and consumed his essence. Blighted blood rained down
on the island. The lands were corrupted and changed,
the sands poisoned, and the men of Satyx withered into
malformed husks. The women of the island, though,
changed in different ways. They became something
inhuman, growing their characteristic horns and having
their already heightened cruelty twisted and refined
into something truly terrifying. When Toruk came to
claim the island as part of his domain, the Satyxis queen
was quick to join the fate of her people to the great
dragon, offering him warriors and worship. From that
day forward, many skilled Satyxis raiders have sailed
among Cryxian pirate fleets as sea reavers. Their society
is inextricably bound up in blood rituals and cycles of
predation upon those living on the mainland, making
them feared and despised by the majority of nonCryxians. Satyxis are killed on sight in most mainland
towns and cities and are treated warily even in those few
pirate dens where they are sometimes seen.

Satyxis
STARTING
VALUE

HERO
LIMIT

VET
LIMIT

EPIC
LIMIT

PHY

SPD

STR

AGL

PRW

POI

INT

ARC

PER

Archetypes: Gifted, Mighty, Skilled


Languages: Satyxis start the game with three languages:
Satyxi, Scharde, and one other they have picked up in their
travels. Satyxi is generally used only for communication
between Satyxis and in rituals and is not widely spoken.
Height: 5569 inches (not including horns)
Weight: 100160 pounds
Additional Characteristics:
Satyxis with the Gifted archetype cannot have the
Arcane Mechanik or Arcanist careers.
A Satyxis must be female.
Horns: In addition to her normal attacks, a Satyxis
can make one unarmed melee attack with her horns
during each of her turns. This attack uses the Unarmed
Combat skill and is POW 3. On a critical hit, the target
is knocked down. If a Satyxis uses her horns to make a
knockout strike that damages her target, add +2 to the
target number to avoid the knockout.

Copyright 2001-2013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cygnar, Cryx, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution,
Trollbloods, Trollblood, Circle Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion,
Skorne, warjack, warcaster, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks
of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. Were celebrating with a series of free weekly RPG content we
call Full Metal Fridays! Youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal
Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can drop
right into games. For the first month of Full Metal Fridays we are diving into a subject near and dear to our
hearts: the sea.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 1, Week 2:

Blood and Plunder


By Jason Soles
Though known for their cruelty and vicious blood magic,
along the shores of the Broken Coast Satyxis are most
infamous for the lightning raids they conduct on the fleets
of the Iron Kingdoms. The following career allows you to
play as one of the fierce raiders of a Satyxis crew.

Raider

Among the bloodthirsty Satyxis serving the Cryxian Black


Fleet, none are more feared than the cruel raiders. Vicious
reavers born to ride the waves, they strike relentlessly
wherever their masters and the fates bid them. These
merciless raiders are well versed in the use of wicked chain
whips crafted to flay flesh from bone and inflict pain across
the mystical tethers that bind steamjacks to their warcasters.
The mainlands defenders have learned to dread the terrible
sound of Satyxis war horns, for soon raiders emerge from
fog-shrouded darkness to rip apart any who stand against

them before stealing away with their plunder and captives


bound for the slave pits of Blackwater.
Satyxis raiders are no mere pirates. Behind their savagery
are ancient rituals and rites drawn from the very foundation
of their race. The raiders, like all Satyxis, are accustomed
not only to slaughter but also to the arcane. They regularly
look to the visions and portents of the witches among their
number to guide them toward their next prey.
Playing a Raider: Satyxis Raiders are skilled melee
fighters specializing in the use of their lacerator whips.
They are also quite capable of using their natural horns
to lethal effect, and their unarmed capabilities should not
be underestimated. The Raider career pairs well with the
Pirate career, granting the character access to a number
of useful abilities such as Waylay, which increases the
effectiveness of a Satyxis horns in her attempts to knock
out a victim. It is also worth keeping in mind that a Raiders

Blood and Plunder

Raider

Prerequisites: Satyxis

Starting Abilities,
Connections, and
SKILLS

Special: A character starting with the Raider career must choose Cutthroat,
Duelist, Gun Mage, Military Officer, Pirate, Pistoleer, Ranger, Sorcerer, or
Warcaster for her other career.
Abilities: Specialization (Lacerator)
Connections: Connections (Black Fleet)
Military Skills: Hand Weapon1 and Unarmed Combat1
Occupational Skills: Intimidation1, Jumping1, Sailing1, Swimming1

Starting Assets

Lacerator, Leather Armor

Raider Abilities

Ambush, Battle Plan: Call to Action, Boarding Action (New), Disease Resistance, Gang,
Precision Strike, Ram (New), Roll with It, Specialization (Lacerator), Sprint (New)

Raider Connections

Connections (Black Fleet)

Raider
Military Skills

Hand Weapon4, Pistol3, Thrown Weapon3, Unarmed Combat4

Raider Occupational Skills

Command2, General Skills4, Navigation3, Rope Use4, Sailing3

life is a constant struggle, and only the most ruthless and


bloodthirsty rise to command. Additionally, Satyxis have a
powerful affinity for the arcane. A player wishing to play a
leader among the Satyxis should consider taking Military
Officer, Sorcerer, or Warcaster as her second career.
As the character gains experience she will grow more
deadly in the use of her favored weaponry and defensive
capabilities. At the Veteran level, a Raider has the potential
to inflict truly thunderous blows with her horns with the
Ram ability.
Note, however, that the Satyxis are feared and truly hated by
the mainlanders they have preyed upon for centuries. This
animosity runs deep, and virtually anywhere outside the
Scharde Islands Satyxis will be attacked on sight. As a result,
while Satyxis characters can make excellent antagonists,
they are extremely difficult player characters to work into
games set outside the confines of the Nightmare Empire.

New Abilities
Boarding Action
Prerequisite: Jumping 1
A character with Boarding Action can use the Jumping
skill to make a long jump as a quick action instead of a full
action after making a full advance.

Sprint
Prerequisite: AGL 6
At the end of this characters turn, if she destroyed one or
more enemy models with melee attacks that turn she can
make a full advance.

New Melee Weapon


Lacerator
Cost: These weapons are never available for sale.
Skill: Hand Weapon
Attack Modifier: 3
POW: 4
Description: Lacerators are the wicked whips of chain
favored by the cruel Satyxis raiders. The secrets of the
lacerators creation are known only to the blood witches
among them.
Special Rules: Lacerators are magical reach weapons.
Attacks from lacerators ignore ARM bonuses from bucklers
and shields.
On a critical hit, the character hit is knocked down.
When a lacerator damages a bonded steamjack, the
steamjacks controller suffers 1 damage point.

Ram
Prerequisite: Unarmed Combat 3
When this character hits an enemy with her horns, the
enemy is knocked down and can be pushed 1 directly away
from this character. If the enemy is pushed, this character
can immediately advance directly toward him, up to the
distance that enemy was pushed.

Copyright 2001-2013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cygnar, Cryx, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution,
Trollbloods, Trollblood, Circle Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion,
Skorne, warjack, warcaster, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks
of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more
on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters
can drop right into games. For the first month of Full Metal Fridays we are diving into a subject near and dear to our
hearts: the sea.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 1, Week 3:

Riding the Storm


By Matt Goetz
Beyond fending off vicious pirates, trading blows in
drunken brawls, and struggling to scrape together
enough crowns to buy a hot meal, the sailors of western
Immoren face danger from an altogether uncaring
source: the very waters of the Meredius on which they
ply their trade. Rough storms, powerful tides, and
more can destroy a vessel, leaving its hapless crew to
struggle against the waves or die a watery death.

Reminder
The rules for Swimming (p.194) and effects of deep
water (p.222) are found in the Iron Kingdoms Full Metal
Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Core Rules book.

The following hazards are designed to increase the


danger of your maritime encounters and include rules
for situations like explosions below deck and severe
weather conditions.

riding the storm

Fire Down Below

Rough Seas

Special Rules: If you decide a shot has hit a volatile


location below decks, place a 3, 4, or 5 AOE on deck
and roll for deviation. If the AOE deviates off the deck
of the ship, the shot did not trigger a chain reaction.
Otherwise, all characters in the AOE take a POW8 hit
that deals fire damage. The affected area of the AOE
becomes rough terrain.

Special Rules: Rough seas can be added to any maritime


encounter. While engaged in rough seas, characters that
move more than 30 feet (5) must make an AGL + Sailing
roll against a target number of 14. If the roll succeeds,
nothing happens. If the roll fails, however, the character
is pushed d3 in a random direction and knocked down.

Description: While combat rages on the deck of a ship,


gunnery crews beneath keep firing, hoping to wreak
enough damage to force the enemy vessel to break away
from the attack or cause a defending crew to surrender.
These shots tear through a ships hull and can hit volatile
stores of blasting powder or the pressurized boilers that
power a ships paddle wheels. When this happens, violent
secondary explosions erupt up through the deck, throwing
great blasts of fire, steam, and shrapnel into the air.

Massive Waves

Description: One of the great dangers of sailing far


from the relative safety of the Broken Coast are the
massive waves. These walls of water are twice as tall
as normal waves, and some grow even higher. Massive
waves easily wash over the deck of a ship and sweep
away anything not securely strapped to the deckguns,
cargo, and crewmen alike are washed overboard by the
force of such waves.
Special Rules: Massive waves are easy to spot at a
distance. A character automatically discovers a wave
when it is within his PER in turns away. When the wave
hits the ship, anything not securely tied down is pushed
1d6 in the direction the wave is moving (for instance, if
a massive wave washes over the starboard side of a ship,
objects are pushed toward the port side). Characters
hit by the massive wave must pass a STR + Sailing roll
against a target number of 15 to avoid being pushed. If
a character is holding rigging, ropes, or other secured
objects, he gets a +2 bonus to this roll. Medium- and
large-based characters also gain this bonus. A pushed
object or character falls overboard if it has less than 1 of
ground under its base after being pushed.

Description: The Meredius is both unforgiving and


unpredictable. The pull of Caens three moons cause
tides of terrifying power, turning the deck of a ship
into tilting, shifting terrain of unreliable footing. This
combined with a constant spray of ocean water wetting
the deck means that simply moving about becomes a
challenge and close-in fighting becomes a nightmare.
A heaving ship can cause a crewman to veer wildly off
course if he doesnt make careful, measured movements.

Storm Winds

Description: Winds of terrible force are a common


feature of the storms of the Meredius. At its peak, a
gales force can rip the masts from a ship, particularly
if the crew is unable to bring the sails in before they are
caught by the storm. Blasts of wind make sight difficult
and cause shots to veer wildly off course.
Special Rules: Storm winds can be added to any
maritime encounter. While storm winds are in effect, all
characters gain +2DEF against ranged attacks.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, warjack, warcaster, warbeast, and all associated logos are
trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for personal, non-commercial use only.

Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings, Nations, and Gods releases this summer. To
celebrate the books release, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG content every Friday! From
now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal Fridays.
Each month will have a theme uniting its releases and conclude with an event using the months content that Game
Masters can feature in their games. For the first month of Full Metal Fridays we are diving into a subject near and
dear to our hearts, the sea.
Check back every Full Metal Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 1, Week 4:

SAILOR TAKE WARNING


Heavy sheets of rain lash against the crew on deck, who
are working at a desperate pace to pull down the sails
before gale-force winds rip the cloth to tatters. The ship
pitches underfoot as waves toss the small vessel about
like a childs toy, and large swells break over the gunwale,
swamping the deck with ankle-deep seawater. A crewman
shouts a warning and points off the starboard side just as a
sleek, black-hulled ship plows over the crest of the nearest
wave. The dark ship strikes with an earsplitting sound,
burying its prow into your boat. Horned warrior women
leap onto the deck, shrieking as they cut down the crew.

For the Game Master

The Satyxis of the blackship Hellkite are notorious for


rapid strikes. The ship is outfitted with a corroded iron
naval ram and barbed boarding planks, allowing the
crew to forgo the need to come alongside and grapple an
enemy ship. Hellkite simply rams into prey at top speed,
imbedding its prow into the target, and drops its planks
to allow a bloodthirsty tide of trained Satyxis to rush
onto the pinned ships deck. This happens so quickly
the captain of the boarded vessel begins to comprehend
the situation only when he is face-to-face with Meara
Brinebight, captain of the Hellkite.

sailor take warning

Hero-Level Combat Encounter


Encounter Points: 57
Adversaries: Satyxis Raiders (8), Black Ogrun Boarders
(2), Captain Meara Brinebight
Additional Factors: Rough Seas, Rogue Waves, Allied
Crew
Description: This encounter takes place on the seas
anywhere along the Broken Coast. The player characters
might be onboard a ship as extra security to guard
valuable cargo, traveling as passengers, or (if they are
part of a naval adventuring company) simply going
about their day-to-day business. Regardless of their
reasons for being aboard, the outcome is the same: using
the cover of a heavy storm, the Hellkite rams the ship
and secures boarding planks its crew uses to swarm
onto deck. In the confusion of those first few moments,
Captain Brinebight shoots down the captain of the
player characters ship if he is an NPC, leaving the player
characters to direct any defensive efforts.

DEF

ARM

Lacerator

POW P+S

10

This weapon has Reach.


Attacks from lacerators ignore ARM bonuses from bucklers and shields.
On a critical hit, the character hit is knocked down.
When a lacerator damages a bonded steamjack, the steamjacks controller
suffers 1 damage point.

Horns

POW P+S

On a critical hit, the character hit is knocked down.

Hand Cannon

RN
G AOE POW

12

12

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)
Climbing 5, Command 6, Intimidation 8, Jump 8, Rope Use 6, Sailing 8,
Swimming 8
Battle Plan: Captains Orders This character can spend 1 feat point to use
Battle Plan: Captains Orders. Using a battle plan is a quick action. For one
round, friendly Hellkite raiders that follow the characters orders roll an extra
die for attack rolls and discard the lowest result.
Feat Points This character starts each encounter with 1 feat point. She is
allocated 1 feat point at the start of each of her turns. She can only have up
to 1 feat point at a time.
Gang When making a melee attack targeting an enemy in melee range
of another friendly character, this character gains +1 to melee attack and
melee damage rolls. When making a melee attack targeting an enemy in
melee range of another friendly character with this ability, these bonuses are
increased to +2.
Ram When this character hits an enemy with her horns, the enemy is
knocked down and can be pushed 1 directly away from this character. If the
enemy is pushed, this character can immediately advance directly toward the
pushed enemy up to the distance that the character was moved.
Specialization [Lacerator] This character ignores penalties while
fighting with a lacerator (included above).

Command Range
Base Size
Encounter Points

6
Small
9

AGILITY

PHYS

IQ

Special Rules/Tactics: This encounter takes place on


the deck of a small single-mast ship and uses the Rough
Seas and Massive Waves rules available in last weeks
Full Metal Fridays release. The deck is represented by
an 18 wide by 36 long area. Water barrels and rigging
points on deck create cover and grant opportunities to
gain elevation.

RAT

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak

ECT

Sailor Take Warning

MAT

LL

Hellkites crew are a cruel and bloodthirsty lot. Wielding


pistols, cutlasses, harpoon guns, and lacerators, they
take pleasure in carving a path through a ships
defenders, covering the deck with foam made of blood
mixed with seawater.

STR

TE

Meara takes great pleasure in striking ships struggling


in one of her ships storms. While the ships of other
nations pull down their sails to avoid snapping their
masts in the powerful winds, Meara flies a blue-black
spinnaker to harness the storm wind generated by
the blackship, trusting in the strength of her ship and
the skill of her crew to endure the peril of the storm.
Attacking from within this cloak of storms the Hellkite is
protected, shielded from the sight of enemy gun crews
by heaving waves, sheets of rain, and gale-force winds.

SPD

Like all blackships, Hellkite commands its own weather.


Because it can summon up storms to swirl around the
ship, it is never without enough wind to fill the sails.
The only warning an enemy crew has that the Hellkite
is about to attack is a sudden foul turn in the weather,
marked by dark storm clouds and rough white-flecked
waves.

sailor take warning

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


cutlass

POW P+S

13

harpoon gun

RN
G AOE POW

10

12

If this weapon damages a target with an equal or smaller base, immediately


after the attack is resolved the damaged character can be pushed any
distance directly toward the character armed with the harpoon.

Abilities:
Huge Stature An ogrun can wield a weapon in one hand that usually
requires two hands to wield but suffers 2 on attack rolls with that weapon.
Reel In After pushing a model with the harpoon gun, black ogrun can
make one normal melee attack against the model pushed. After resolving
this melee attack, the black ogrun can make additional melee attacks during
its combat action.
Terror Black Ogrun cause Terror [12].

Vitality
9
Base Size
Medium
Encounter Points
8
Use a mix of five human thugs and human thieves, with
a Sailing skill of 1 (Core Rules, pp.344345), to represent
the crew of the player characters ship. They will fight to
defend themselves but will not act otherwise until given
direction. A character can attempt a Command skill roll
against a target number of 12 to direct the crews defensive
efforts. If he fails, nothing happens. If he succeeds, the
friendly crew will attack targets the chosen by the rolling
characters controller.
The encounter begins when the Hellkites crew jumps
onto the deck of the ship. Place all of the adversaries on
one of the long sides of the PCs ship within 1 of the
starboard edge. The friendly crew is placed randomly
across the deck. When combat starts, the Hellkites Ogrun
fire an opening salvo with their harpoon guns, followed
by the Satyxis closing with the nearest targets to engage
them with lacerators.
Once two or more of her crew are killed, Captain
Brinebight identifies the PCs as the most significant
threat on deck, instructs her crew to attack them directly,
and moves to engage the closest PC in melee. If over half
of her crew dies in the combat, Captain Brinebight uses
Captains Orders and orders a withdrawal back to her
ship. If she is allowed to reach the starboard edge, she
returns to the Hellkite and orders a full broadside into
the PCs vessel, causing Fire Down Below.

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


Lacerator

POW P+S

10

This weapon has Reach.


Attacks from lacerators ignore ARM bonuses from bucklers and shields.
On a critical hit, the character hit is knocked down.
When a lacerator damages a bonded steamjack, the steamjacks controller
suffers 1 damage point.

Horns

POW P+S

On a critical hit, the character hit is knocked down.

Abilities
Skills (stat already included)
Climbing 6, Intimidation 7, Rope Use 6, Sailing 6, Swimming 7
Gang When making a melee attack targeting an enemy in melee range
of another friendly character, this character gains +1 to melee attack and
melee damage rolls. When making a melee attack targeting an enemy in
melee range of another friendly character with this ability, these bonuses are
increased to +2.

Vitality
6
Base Size
Small
Encounter Points 4

Room to Maneuver
The deck size of the PCs ship can vary depending on
the size of your player group and the amount of gaming
space you have available. The beam (or width) of the
ship is intended to give the characters a bit of breathing
room to move around, and the overall length is meant
to give the area a generally ship-like shape while
still fitting into a reasonable area on the table. If you
have the space to increase the length of the ship, by all
means do so. Many steamships are four to six times as
long as they are wide.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, warjack, warcaster,
warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc.
Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for personal, noncommercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. Were celebrating with a series of free weekly RPG content we call Full
Metal Fridays! Youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal Fridays. Each
month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can drop right into games.
This time around, we take a closer look at something that has played a critical role in shaping the Iron Kingdoms,
the art of alchemy.
Check back every Full Metal Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 2, Week 1:

The Art of Synthesis


By Matt Goetz Art by Brian Snoddy
The world of alchemy is one of constant change and
experimentation. Although most research is conducted
within the stable conditions of the laboratory,
occasionally an alchemist must work on the fly, tailoring
compounds to suit the needs of the situation. A great
deal of advancement in this discipline is the product of
field alchemy, spontaneous experimentation that yields
immediate results.

THE ART OF SYNTHESIS

Field Alchemy
Alkalic Fluid
Description: A quick concoction meant to counteract the
adverse effects of alchemical acids, alkalic fluid has saved
the lives and possessions of many clumsy alchemists.
Special Rules: The moment the ingredients are combined,
select a friendly character in base contact with the alchemist
suffering the Corrosion continuous effect. The continuous
effect immediately expires.
Brewing Requirements: Alchemy
Ingredients: 1 unit alchemical waste (liquid), 1 unit mineral
crystals
Total Material Cost: 4gc
Alchemical Formula: Creating alkalic fluid can be done
without an alchemy lab and requires a character to mix
mineral crystals into a vial of alchemical waste. A character
must spend a quick action to combine the ingredients and
then makes an INT + Alchemy roll against a target number
of 12. If the roll succeeds, the character creates one unit of
alkalic fluid. If the roll fails, the ingredients are lost.

Blackbond
Description: Blackbond is a thick, tarlike substance prized
for its adhesive properties.
Special Rules: The moment the ingredients are combined,
they create a few ounces of this thick, gummy substance.
An object coated with blackbond sticks wherever it
makes contact and remains stuck for d3 hours. Sand, soot,
and similar substances coating a target surface prevent
blackbond from adheringit sticks to the grime rather than
the intended surface. To remove a stuck object, a character
must make a STR roll against a target number of10.
Brewing Requirements: Alchemy
Ingredients: 1 unit alchemical stone, 1 unit organic oil
Total Material Cost: 2gc
Alchemical Formula: Creating blackbond can be done
without an alchemy lab and requires a character to
combine a vial of organic oil with powdered alchemical
stone. A character must spend a quick action to combine
the ingredients and then makes an INT + Alchemy roll
against a target number of 12. If the roll succeeds, the
character creates one unit of blackbond. If the roll fails, the
ingredients are lost.

Firestifle
Description: Firestifle generates an expanding cloud of
foam that quickly smothers flames. Alchemists often keep
the ingredients for this compound on hand so that they
can use it to prevent accidental fires from spreading out of
control within their labs.
Special Rules: The moment the ingredients are combined,
place a 3 AOE in base contact with the alchemist. Fire
continuous effects on characters in the AOE immediately
expire and open flames in the AOE are extinguished.
Brewing Requirements: Alchemy
Ingredients: 1 unit alchemical waste (liquid), 1 unit mineral
crystals
Total Material Cost: 4gc
Alchemical Formula: Creating firestifle can be done
without an alchemy lab and requires a character to drop
mineral crystals into a vial of alchemical waste. A character
must spend a quick action to combine the ingredients and
then makes an INT + Alchemy roll against a target number
of 12. If the roll succeeds, place the firestifle AOE in base
contact with the alchemist. If the roll fails, the ingredients
are lost.

Glasseater
Description: Glasseater is thick blue-green grease that
dissolves glass into an acrid vapor immediately upon
contact.
Special Rules: The moment the ingredients are combined,
any glass surface the compound is spread over dissolves
into a pale vapor. One unit of glasseater can dissolve three
square feet of glass up to a quarter-inch thick.
Brewing Requirements: Alchemy
Ingredients: 1 unit arcane minerals,1 unit mineral acid.
Total Material Cost: 9gc
Alchemical Formula: Creating glasseater can be done
without an alchemy lab and requires a character to combine
powdered arcane minerals with a vial of mineral acid on a
surface. A character must spend a quick action to combine
the ingredients and then makes an INT + Alchemy roll
against a target number of 12. If the roll succeeds, the
character creates one unit of glasseater. If the roll fails, the
ingredients are lost.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. Were celebrating with a series of free weekly RPG content we call Full
Metal Fridays! Youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal Fridays. Each
month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can drop right into games.
This time around, we take a closer look at something that has played a critical role in shaping the Iron Kingdoms,
the art of alchemy.
Check back every Full Metal Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 2, Week 2:

Clever Concoctions
By Matt Goetz
New formulas are constantly being tested and
refined in alchemists workshops throughout western
Immoren. Some are tailor-made to the specifications
of a single client, while others are the result of an
alchemist identifying and attempting to address a
common problem. Once a stable alchemical compound
has been carefully documented, it is a simple matter for
others to reproduce it.

Alchemical Items
Laughing Gas
Cost: 21gc
Description: Those wishing to incapacitate a large
number of individuals without doing them any
physical harm can employ this gaseous compound.
When inhaled, the vapor causes its victim to laugh

uncontrollably. The gas causes a deep, hysterical laugh


akin to those most often heard from the cells of a
lunatic asylum. Individuals under the effects of the gas
find most actions extremely difficult while they are
wracked with fits of cackling.
Special Rules: Vials of laughing gas can be used as
improvised thrown weapons, but due the inaccuracy of
thrown glassware and the low cost of reliable grenade
housings (see Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Core
Rules, p.297), laughing gas bombs are the preferred
delivery method for the substance.
Laughing gas is a gas effect that causes no damage.
When a character is exposed to laughing gas, he must
make a PHY roll against a target number of 12. If the
roll succeeds, nothing happens. If the roll fails, the
character is affected by the gas and begins laughing
uncontrollably. The character suffers 1 on his attack

Clever Concoctions
and skill rolls. During each of his Maintenance Phases,
the character must make an additional PHY roll. If
he passes three of these PHY rolls, the gas has run its
course and its effects end.

Alchemical
Equipment

Brewing Requirements: Alchemy

Injection Pistol

Ingredients: 1 unit alchemical stone, 1 unit arcane


extract, 1 unit organic oil

Cost: 125gc

Total Material Cost: 7gc

Ammo: 1 (injector)
Effective Range: 4 (24 feet)

Alchemical Formula: Brewing laughing gas requires


an alchemy lab and two hours of labor spent
combining, cooking, and stabilizing the ingredients.
At the end of this time, the alchemist makes an INT +
Alchemy skill roll against a target number of 14. If the
roll succeeds, the character creates one dose of laughing
gas. If the roll fails, he creates one unit of alchemical
waste (liquid).

Umbroculant Drops
Cost: 27gc
Description: This dark, syrupy liquid is dropped
directly into the eyes, coating the corneas with a
glassy black sheen. Those under the effects of the
substance have a temporarily increased ability to see
in low-light conditions.
Special Rules: Administering a dose of this substance
requires an eyedropper. A living character exposed to
umbroculant drops treats light conditions as one step
brighter than normal. For a character under its effects,
complete darkness is treated as dim light and dim light
is treated as bright light. A dose of umbroculant drops
lasts for one hour.
Brewing Requirements: Alchemy
Ingredients: 1 unit mutagenic extract, 1 unit organic oil
Total Material Cost: 9gc

Extreme Range:
Skill: Pistol
Attack Modifier: 2
POW: 8
AOE:
Description: This complicated brass pistol uses a small
vial of true air, the alchemical compound used in
concussion grenades, to propel an injection dart into a
target at range. The injection pistol provides a means of
long-range delivery for an alchemists creations but is
difficult to use and has a very short range.
Special Rules: This weapon deals no damage. A damage
roll in excess of a targets ARM indicates that the injector
had sufficient force to puncture armor and deliver the
compound contained within it. The target is immediately
subject to the effect of the alchemical compound.
An injector can be loaded with any injectable alchemical
compound. To be injectable, an alchemical compound
must be described as a liquid or contain organic oil,
organic acid, or organic toxin in its ingredients.
If a target is hit by an unloaded injector, nothing
happens.
It costs 5gc for a dart and propellant for a single shot.
The alchemical compound must be acquired separately.

Alchemical Formula: Brewing umbroculant drops


requires an alchemy lab and one hour of labor spent
combining, cooking, and stabilizing the ingredients.
At the end of this time, the alchemist makes an INT
+ Alchemy skill roll against a target number of 14. If
the roll succeeds, the character creates one dose of
umbroculant. If the roll fails, he creates one unit of
alchemical waste (liquid).

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. Were celebrating with a series of free weekly RPG content we call Full
Metal Fridays! Youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal Fridays. Each
month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can drop right into games.
This time around, we take a closer look at something that has played a critical role in shaping the Iron Kingdoms,
the art of alchemy.
Check back every Full Metal Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 2, Week 3:

Unsafe Working Conditions


By Matt Goetz
The interior of an alchemists workshop can be
disconcertingif not outright terrifyingto those
unfamiliar with the art. Exotic ingredients cover
every available surface, bubbling vats of nauseatingly
colors occasionally flare with brilliantly colored flame,
and great clouds of choking chemicals swirl around
the rafters and floorboards, sometimes combining in
unpredictable or even catastrophic ways.
Fighting in an alchemists workshop is doubly dangerous.
Alongside the normal risks present in any battle, such as
being shot, stabbed, and concussed, combat in the lab
can end with any number of unintended consequences.
Stray rounds can impart the necessary shock to detonate
a volatile compound, and a careless sweep of the sword
might mix dozens of different solutions together. True
alchemy requires great care and complex calculation;
the accidental combination of acids, poisons, and less-

identifiable distillates presents a danger to everyone in


the room.
The following list of potential hazards can be added
to any encounter that takes place in an alchemists
workshop. These rules can also be applied in
marketplaces, warehouses, the lair of Thamarite cultists,
and anywhere else alchemical compounds can be bought
or are regularly used or stored.

Alchemist
Workshop Hazards
Crucible
Description: Fundamentally, crucibles are vessels
that can withstand extreme temperatures. In practice,
though, they are much more. A crucible stands at the

Unsafe Working Conditions


heart of an alchemists lab, stoked by a hot fire beneath
it. Inside the crucible, ingredients are broken down and
recombined, touched with arcane energies that convert
them from simple parts into a useful whole.
To outsiders who hold the crucible in slightly less esteem,
the crucible can still serve a useful function. It is, after
all, still a giant vat of boiling chemicals.
Special Rules: A crucible is represented by a small-,
medium-, or large-based model. A character engaged
with an enemy within 1 of the crucible can attempt
to push his opponent into it. Doing so requires the
character first grapple his target (Iron Kingdoms Full Metal
Fantasy Core Rules, p.210). After successfully grappling
his target, a character can use a full action to attempt
to force his target into the crucible. The characters then
make contested STR + Unarmed Combat rolls. If the
attacker wins, the character being grappled is pushed
1 toward the crucible. If he contacts the crucible, the
character suffers a POW14 corrosion damage roll and
the Fire continuous effect. If the grappled character wins
or draws, he is not forced into the crucible, although he
remains grappled.

Dangerous Miss
Description: Attacks in the workshop must be
carefully aimed to guard against causing unintended
chemical reactions. The larger and more elaborate an
alchemists workshop, the more likely an errant shot
or careless close combat attack will have unintended
consequences. Bullets might pass through dozens of
bottles before hitting a wall, and broad strikes can clear
entire workbenches of their contents.
Special Rules: If an attack roll misses while fighting in
a lab, roll a d6. On a roll of 3 or higher, nothing happens;
either the attack miraculously avoided striking any
supplies, or it simply hit those that are nonreactive when
combined. On a roll of 1 or 2, a critical combination has
occurred. Roll deviation for one 3 AOE centered over
the character who missed the attack. The AOE is a cloud
effect that stays in play for one round. Characters who
enter or end their turns in the AOE suffer a POW8
corrosion damage roll.

50gc. It costs 10gc for the housing and sufficient oil for
an extra reservoir.
Special Rules: Using a tar candle as a weapon requires
an extra quick action to spin the pressure valve fully
open. A tar candle has the following profile:
Ammo:
Effective Range: 18 feet (3)
Extreme Range:
Skill: Thrown
Attack Modifier: 2
POW: 10
AOE:
Special Rules: This weapon deals fire damage. On a
critical hit, targets suffer the Fire continuous effect.

Toxic Cloud
Description: Caustic or poisonous clouds often fill the
workplace of an alchemist, the noxious byproducts of
their craft. Most alchemists wear gas masks to protect
themselves against these gases. Those who dont take
such precautions have short-lived careers marked by
consumptive lung diseases and early death.
Special Rules: A toxic cloud can be represented by a 3,
4, or 5 AOE centered over an alchemists workbench
or some other sufficiently extraordinary piece of
equipment. The AOE is a cloud and gas effect that
remains in play unless acted on by an outside force, such
as a Wind Blast spell or a strong cross-breeze blowing
through a broken window. A character must succeed on
a Willpower roll against a target number of 12 to enter
the AOE. A character who enters or ends his activation
in the cloud suffers d3 damage points.

Tar Candle
Cost: 5gc
Description: A common implement in the workshops
of upper-echelon alchemists, a tar candle is a long metal
housing attached to a compressed reservoir of refined oil,
most commonly whale oil. Refined oil is viscous and a
deep black color, giving the tar candle its name. A valve
controls the expulsion of oil up the housing to a pilot
wick, and while open the reservoir provides enough
hot flame for hours of work. The tar candle is useful for
speeding up the process of alchemical distillation, but
one used irresponsibly can throw out gouts of intensely
hot, if short-lived, fire. A new, fully fueled tar candle costs

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. Were celebrating with a series of free weekly RPG content we call Full
Metal Fridays! Youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more on Full Metal Fridays. Each
month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can drop right into games.
This time around, we take a closer look at something that has played a critical role in shaping the Iron Kingdoms,
the art of alchemy.
Check back every Full Metal Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 2, Week 4:

Alchemical Imbalance
By Matt Goetz Art by Damon Westenhofer and Thorsten Denk
The musty, crumbling building is filled with stacked crates
of glassware and complex apparatuses of twisted copper and
steel. Deep within the labyrinth of disorganized ingredients
and equipment, a foul stink of ammonia and sulfur creates
choking fumes that thicken the air. Floating amid the swirling
fog is a translucent figure dressed in the attire of an alchemist,
flasks and vials orbiting its outstretched hands like the moons
of Caen. Suddenly it notices you amid the clutter, glassy eyes
snapping down to pin you in place. Behind you the door to this
placethe only doorslams shut with a sound of finality, and
the specter begins to drift closer.

For the Game


Master
In life, Victor di Cavour was an accomplished alchemist of
Corvis. He produced alchemical reagents and restoratives

to provide for the needs of his community, using the


coins he earned to fund his passion: the study of ancient
alchemies, particularly from pages purported to contain
information copied from the Crucibilus Synthetatus. Di
Cavour hoped to find a key to a means of alchemically
extending natural life within the scrawled pages.
Tragically, di Cavours work was cut short. He was
betrayed and murdered by his apprentice for his
notebooks, which contained a significant number of
proprietary alchemical preparations. In the aftermath of
his violent death, di Cavours spirit lingered on in his
laboratory, each passing year fracturing his memories
and twisting his once-gentle personality into something
more clinical and cruel. With his great work unfinished,
the specter of di Cavour is caught in a perpetual cycle of
attempting to complete his impossible masterpiece.

Alchemical Imbalance
The specter of di Cavour retains some of the alchemists
living memories, but they are fragmented and tainted
with a bitter desire for revenge. He does not have a specific
target for his revenge; memories of the person responsible
for his murder are among those he lost in death. Instead di
Cavour lashes out against anyone he feels presents a threat
to him or his work. Several refugees new to Corvis have
already fallen victim to his wrath, and he has controlled
others with his deathly powers to function as assistants and
harvesters of supplies. Though it has taken several months,
di Cavours former home has once again been stocked with
all the materials he needs to practice the art of alchemy.
The Order of the Golden Crucible has heard some rather
disturbing rumors regarding di Cavours recent resurgence.
Unwilling to dedicate resources to the investigation the
organization has extended the opportunity to mercenaries
and investigators in the region. Dealing with di Cavour
is one way for unaffiliated alchemists seeking the orders
attention to make their name known and those simply
seeking gold know that the pockets of the order run deep.

Encounter
The Specter of Alchemy
Hero-Level Encounter
Encounter Points: 23
Adversary: Victor di Cavour
Additional Factors: Alchemical hazards
Description: This encounter involves the characters
entering the former home of Victor di Cavour, either
at the behest of the Order of the Golden Crucible or
to investigate rumors of unnatural activity they have
heard on the streets of Corvis. The encounter begins
the moment all the PCs enter di Cavours home. The
specter psychokinetically closes and seals the doors
behind the characters before beginning the attack.
The main floor of di Cavours home is made up of four
smaller rooms and one large laboratory. Each room is
filled with alchemical equipment. Shelves covered in
bottled solutions create a maze of cover, and dozens of
alchemical devices litter the building. Each room of di
Cavours home is, in effect, a fully stocked alchemical
workshop. Each contains several crucibles, stockpiles of
supplies, and compounds in the process of refinement.
Special Rules/Tactics: This encounter uses the
rules for alchemical hazards presented last week.
Full Metal Fridays 2.3
Player characters and di Cavour alike can use the
ingredients found in the five rooms to create any field
alchemy compound they desire. Di Cavour also has several

Alchemical Imbalance
shelves of charred books and notes related to his research
that give clues to his obsessive yet impossible undertaking.
Di Cavour fights by using his psychokinetic abilities
for field alchemy or to hurl alchemical items such as
vitriolic fire, acid, and rust agent. There are d3 prepared
alchemical items in each of the rooms. Di Cavour distrusts
other alchemists due to the nature of his murder, and he
focuses attacks on them first. During the encounter he
shouts at the characters to leave him to his work, warning
them that they will not steal the formulae from him.

Victor di Cavour
Victor di Cavour is the specter of a Llaelese alchemist and
currently haunts his former Corvis home.

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)

Di Cavour phases from room to room within the laboratory


to avoid anyone engaging him or to gather a fresh supply
of items he can use to attack. If he exhausts his supply of
alchemical items, di Cavour uses Dark Influence to make
player characters attack each other as often as possible.

Dark Influence During his turn, di Cavour can use a quick action to control
a living character in his command range. Di Cavour can attempt to control a
character only once per turn. If the target is in di Cavours command range,
di Cavour makes a contested Willpower roll against him. If the target wins,
nothing happens. If di Cavour wins, he takes control of the character. Di
Cavour immediately causes the affected character to make a full advance
followed by a quick action or a melee or ranged attack.

Because di Cavour is a specter, he presents the player


characters with a much greater challenge if they have
no means of dealing with his incorporeality. If they
do not already have Ashes of Urcaen prepared, they
have a chance to discover a dose of the item within
the workshoplikely a dust-covered bottle of the
compound refined before di Cavour found himself in
his present state. A character can spend a full action to
search for a bottle of Ashes of Urcaen. The character
makes a Detection skill roll against a target number of
15. If the character is an Alchemist, he gains +2 to his
roll. If he succeeds, he discovers the Ashes of Urcaen.
If he fails, he does not discover anything in that room.
The characters can attempt to search each room once.

Feat Point Di Cavour starts each encounter with 1 feat point. He is


allocated 1 feat point at the start of each of his turns. Di Cavour can have only
up to 1 feat point at a time.
Incorporeal Di Cavour can move through rough terrain, solid objects, and
other characters. Blessed weapons affect him normally. Spells and other
magical weapons can damage di Cavour but roll one fewer die on damage
rolls. No other weapons can harm him.
Obsession Di Cavour is obsessed with the manufacture of alchemical
substances, in particular the impossible task of replicating recipes from the
Crucibilus Synthetatus. Convincing him of the impossibility of this endeavor
is a key to laying his spirit to rest.
Phase Di Cavour can spend a quick action to immediately be placed
anywhere within thirty feet (5) of his current location.
Psychokinesis Di Cavour can manipulate small objects by manifesting
psychokinetic energy. He can pick up unattended objects within his command
range weighing five pounds or less and move them up to 8 as a quick action.
He cannot use complex objects (such as the trigger on a gun), but he can break
glass, rattle doors, and hurl small objects with surprising force by spending
an attack action and making a ranged attack roll. On a hit, di Cavour inflicts
damage equal to his STR plus the POW of the object hurled if a weapon in the
thrown weapon category, or simply STR + POW2 for a mundane object.
Terror Di Cavour causes Terror [16].
Undead Di Cavour is an undead creature and never flees.

Command Range
6
Base Size Small
Encounter Points
9

AGILITY

PHYS

ECT

IQ

TE

LL

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For the third month of Full Metal Fridays were taking a look at the intrepid
scholars and other adventurers delving into the remains of history.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 3, Week1:

Equipping Yourself for


an Expedition
By William Oz Schoonover
Over the 800 years of their occupation of western Immoren,
the Orgoth built many structures, from massive fortress
cities to extensive catacombs. Few of these survived
the Scourge, but isolated Orgoth tombs and vaults can
still be found scattered across the Iron Kingdoms. In
addition, even older places of interest exist. Sites from the
Thousands Cities era and those originating from Morrdh
or other ancient civilizations attract explorers looking for
knowledge, wealth, and power.
These vaults contain secrets that have lain undisturbed for
hundreds of years. Some of these secrets are very valuable,
but all of them are dangerous. Expeditions to search out
these sites are launched by a variety of groups, including
universities, arcane organizations, and somewhat shadier
elements of society.

Expeditions into ancient ruins require a mix of scholarly


knowledge and combat skills and should never be
undertaken lightly. Besides the possibility of conflict,
explorers might also face myriad other challenges unique
to the environment.

Gear
The first step to preparing to investigate an ancient location
is making sure the group is properly equipped. Most often,
a company investigating these sites includes scholars, their
assistants, and bodyguards. While the groups guards
carry conventional gear, scholars typically employ more
specialized equipment.

Equipping Yourself for an Expedition

Adventuring Scholars Tools


Cost: 15gc
Description: This small satchel contains the tools of the
trade for the adventuring scholar. Inside are brushes and
picks for archeological digs, a set of small magnifying
glasses, paper and charcoal for taking rubbings, measuring
devices, and other items to make the scholars job easier.
Special Rules: A character with a set of adventuring
scholars tools gains +2 to Lore and Research skill rolls
when attempting to learn something from an artifact or
location he is inspecting.

All-Weather Notebook
Cost: 20gc
Description: This is a leather-bound journal in a leather
slipcase. Both the leather and the paper have been
alchemically treated to resist the destructive effects of
inclement weather. The pages cannot be written on with
regular ink, and the notebook is sold with a supply of allweather ink. Replacement bottles of this special ink can be
bought separately for 5gc each.

Bottled Light
Bottled light (Core Rules, p. 294) can be very useful when
exploring any underground structure, as it does not ignite
pockets of dangerous gases like a torch or lantern would.

Durkin Bar
Cost: 15 gc
Skill: Great Weapon
Attack Modifier: 2
POW: 5
Description: Designed centuries ago by the prominent
Rhulic mining clan from whom it takes its name, the Durkin
bar has found its way into the equipment of many explorers
and thieves. Cast as a single piece of steel incorporating
elements of a pick, adze, and pry bar, this versatile tool can
be used as a lever, digging tool, or improvised weapon.
The most common length of Durkin bar sold in the Iron
Kingdoms is thirty-six inches, but they are available in
multiple lengths, including the massive seven-foot heavy
Durkin bar designed for use by ogrun.
Special Rules: A character must have at least STR5 to use
this weapon and can only use this weapon two-handed.
A character using a Durkin bar to attempt to pry open a
door or lever a heavy weight gains a +2 bonus to his STR
roll. The Game Master sets the target number for the STR
roll based on the physical qualities of the object. Opening
a rusted metal door or lifting an overturned wagon might
require a successful STR roll against a target number of 12,
while opening a heavy hinged stone door or lifting a large
stone might have a target number of 18 or more.
The Durkin bar can also be used as an entrenching spade.

Hand Pick
Cost: 5 gc
Skill: Hand Weapon
Attack Modifier: 1
POW: 2
Description: Nearly all expedition companies bring
excavation tools such as pickaxes and shovels in case of
buried ruins. In addition to these large tools, many scholars
like to have a hand pick on their belts. These tools are
basically hammers with an elongated spike on one side of
the head. Many a scholar has found himself fighting for his
life with a hand pick after using it to break into a chamber
filled with aggressive creatures.
Special Rules: A character can spend 1 feat point to gain
an additional damage die against knocked down and prone
targets.

Preservation of Corben Pendant


Cost: 21 gc
Description: The Preservation of Corben pendant was
originally created for mining but quickly found its way
into the standard tools of many other organizations that do
extensive underground exploration. The main body of the
pendant is made from a solidified alchemical compound
that is normally black. When this compound comes into
contact with methane, carbon monoxide, or an airborne
poison, an immediate reaction causes it to turn white and
begin glowing faintly. The brightness of the glow indicates
the level of poison in the air.
The outer layer of the pendant slowly dissolves while it is
exposed to harmful gas, but once the pendant is removed
from contact with the poison it stops glowing.
Special Rules: The pendant glows very faintly when
exposed to trace amounts of poisonous gas. As the level of
poison grows, so does the glow of the pendant. If the glow
becomes candle bright, the poison has reached dangerous
levels and the character is in immediate danger of death.
A pendant can glow at candle brightness for a total of eight
hours before being completely consumed.
Brewing Requirements: Alchemy
Ingredients: 2 units of alchemists stone, 1 unit of arcane
extract
Total Material Cost: 7 gc
Alchemical Formula: Brewing the Preservation of Corben
compound and casting it into a pendant requires an alchemy
lab and six hours. After three hours spent combining,
cooking, and stabilizing the ingredients, the alchemist
makes an INT + Alchemy roll against a target number of 14.
If the roll succeeds, the character has successfully created a
dose of Preservation of Corben and can pour the compound
into a mold. After three additional hours the material
solidifies. If the roll fails, the character creates one unit of
alchemical waste (liquid).

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador, Protectorate
of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood, warcaster, warjack, warbeast,
and all associated logos are trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For the third month of Full Metal Fridays were taking a look at the intrepid
scholars and other adventurers who delve into the remains of history.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 3, Week 2:

Preparing for an Expedition


By William Oz Schoonover Art by Nstor Ossandn
An adventuring company venturing into
the wilds of western Immoren in search
of ancient treasures must make the proper
preparations beforehand in order to have the
best hope of success. First, the group needs
to ensure it is appropriately equipped and
knows everything it can about its destination.
Most of the necessary equipment should be
purchased before the expedition begins, and
the group should thoroughly research the
destination in preparation for the venture.
Although the company may well have the
opportunity to gather information at the
destination or along the way, it is unwise to
rely on such luck.

Equipping Yourself for an Expedition

General
Equipment
and Travel

An exceptional few are from the Orgoth themselves, while others


are from the ancient civilizations of western Immoren or scholars
who lived during the Occupation. Works written in the 400 years
since the Rebellion are more common, though even those are
closely guarded.

Many items required for surviving in the wilderness, such as


bedrolls, compasses and dry rations, are detailed in Iron Kingdoms
Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Core Rules (p.249). To purchase
a piece of gear designed to withstand extreme environmental
conditions, such as a winterized bedroll, double the price of the
item given there. This section lists a few other helpful items a
party might want before striking out on an expedition.

ITEMS
Canoe, three-person
Map, local terrain
Pulley hoist

Sack, waterproof, sixteen-gallon capacity

20 gc
3 gc
5 gc
2 gc

Tent, six-person

30 gc

Wagon, heavy

85 gc

Tent, personal
Wagon, small

15 gc

50 gc

An adventuring company must also take adequate provisions


for the feeding and care of all the expedition members,
including any animals. Foraging for food is possible in some
areas, but it is time consuming and should not be relied on
as the only source of food. Transporting all the supplies for a
large expedition will likely require multiple wagons as well as
draft animals to haul them.
The group may travel some portion of the distance to a site
by rail or steamship, but it is likely that there are no available
consumer travel solutions for the final leg of a journey.
It is logistically easiest to hire additional expedition members, buy
provisions for the expedition, and make arrangements for transport
as close to the site as possible. Unfortunately this is not always
possible, and the company must allow for the extra transportation
costs of transporting supplies by train or river barge.

Research
AND Special
Collections
If an expedition is searching for a site from the ancient kingdom
of Morrdh or the burial chambers of a king from the Thousand
Cities Era, there are few sources of information. Intact Orgoth
sites are even rarer, as the invaders sought to destroy any relics
of their own civilization their enemies could use against them.
Written records, whether documents or inscriptions carved in
stone, were a main target for destruction, whether those covered
aspects of Immorens past or the Orgoths own activities in
western Immoren.
Fortunately for modern scholars in the Iron Kingdoms, the
Orgoth were not completely successful, and some ancient
documents survive that an explorer can look to for information.

Gaining access to a document detailing Immorens ancient


past is seldom a simple task. The scarcity of original texts
from the time of the Occupation or before makes such items
invaluable, and the owners of such documents are always
worried about theft. Even copies are rare and highly prized.
Documents of an occult nature, especially those of Morrdh
or Orgoth origin, present even further complications. Many
people living in western Immoren still harbor a superstitious
fear that the possession of such a relic can draw the attention of
the dark gods worshiped by its former owners. Others suspect
anyone who exhibits undue interest in such baleful artifacts
of harboring dark secrets. This sentiment makes many private
collectors hesitant to allow word to spread about the contents
of their collections.

Universities

The most readily accessible collections of historical documents


are held at large universities, although this access is not universal.
Characters with a connection to the university or who have a
wealthy patron they can call upon for influence can gain access to
a collection without complex negotiations or bribes. Explorers and
Aristocrats find this easier than most. Arcanists and Priests with
the University Education ability may have spent time at a place of
higher learning or at least understand the intricacies of dealing
with such systems.
All other characters need to find alternate ways of accessing
the information, be it through bribery, coercion, or breaking
and entering.
A character who gains admittance to a university collection
still has to deal with heavy restrictions while accessing the
texts. Typically they are only allowed to review the material in
a reading room staffed by university personnel. This access is
limited to a certain amount of material at a time and only for a
limited amount of time per visit.

Arcane Organizations

The arcane organizations of western Immoren, such as the


Fraternal Order of Wizardry, keep libraries that can offer
more insight than those available to the universities. Access to
these collections is extremely restricted. Characters without a
connection to the organization are almost never granted access
except in the most extreme circumstances.
An order member in good standing can access its library
but is still treated as an outsider by its staff. These libraries
are managed much like the universities described above,
with closely monitored reading rooms and limited access.
One added restriction for an arcane organizations collection
is the consideration of rank; different ranks have different
privileges. New initiates are not granted access to a collection
in the same way a high-ranking member is, and members
from distant chapter houses may be viewed with a degree
of suspicion and distrust. The information contained in the
requested documents can affect who has access, as can the
rarity of the document within the particular collection and the

Equipping Yourself for an Expedition


organization as a whole. Lastly, there is always the question
of internal politics. If the curator of a collection has a problem
with a characters goal, background, associates, or patrons,
access may be denied with no appeals.

Private Collectors

Private collectors offer a Game Master a broad spectrum of


options. One private collector may have only a single record of
potential interest, while another might be an aristocrat with an
extensive collection of relics from the Rebellion. Access to these
collections can vary widely. The owner of a diary might not
even admit its existence, but the aristocrat with an extensive
library may be commissioning the party to explore a location
he has heavily researched in hopes of adding to his collection.

The first issue a party may find is that no one who has ever been to
the site has returned alive to speak of it. This is slightly better than
absolutely no information simply because the locals are aware of
which part of the region is dangerous, allowing the expedition to
narrow the scope of its search.
If members of a community have knowledge of a site, there are a
few ways to handle the situation. If the site is related to something
from a dark time in Immorens history, such as the time of the
kingdom of Morrdh, there could be a superstitious fear among
the locals that speaking of the site could somehow invoke the evil
residing there. It is also possible the party will arouse the anger of
a population with their intentions to disturb a place regarded with
such fear.

A party can choose to rely solely on their own abilities and previous
research to find the goal of their expedition, but they may find it
useful to seek out local assistance. This generally takes one of three
forms: local legends, eyewitness accounts, and local guides.

Another issue with gathering information from a local community


is that not every story told in a local pub is true, and many are highly
embellished. With this the Game Master can give the players plenty
of chances to make rolls using Lore and Deception. He should also
keep in mind that in some cases such deception is benign, while
other times the liar could be trying to lure the party into an ambush
or impede their search in other ways.

Local Legends

Local Guides

Local Conditions

Time, and events such as the Scourge, has destroyed many of


the obvious indications of where locations like tombs or ancient
castles can be found. Often in such cases important clues to the
past have been preserved in local legends, stories, and regional
songs. The oral traditions of a region can vary greatly from one
culture to another, however. In some areas embellishment to
make a story better may be the norm, while in others passing
down accurate information is highly regarded.
There are broadly two kinds of stories: those covering the
known and those speculating on the unknown.

Known Facts

Many legends and stories are based on known facts: things like
historical rulers, regional battles, or other details or events that
were witnessed by large numbers of people. The significant
facts of many of these stories are verifiable through written
accounts and other research, but smaller details may not be as
widely known. For example, the story of a battle that resulted in
an army being completely routed could be learned in a number
of ways. The specifics that the losing general fled east into a
forest and was never heard from again might only be known by
a few witnesses who passed the story down to their children.

Unknown Speculation

These kinds of stories cover unlimited amounts of topics, from


strange sounds echoing through the mountains at night to
the sighting of strange creatures in the sewers of a major city.
Many of these stories are not documented and rely entirely on
the regions storytellers for their propagation. These stories can
often contain the most important clues that lead an expedition
to its goal.

There are many options available when the Game Master is


determining what kind of guide is available in an area. Two
parts of this are the capability of the party and the hesitancy
of a previous visitor to revisit a site. This decision, like many
others, should be weighed against its value to the story and the
capability of the party.
If the party is made up primarily of characters who are at home in
the wilderness, they may not need a guide to lead them to a site,
but they will be helped by a well-drawn map provided by someone
who has been there. If the party is full of university professors and
students who have naively blundered into the wilderness, they
need a guide who will stay with them all the way to the destination
to ensure they dont fall victim to the hazards of the wilderness.
Then there is the personality of an available guide. A guide who is
terrified of returning to the site in question may be willing only to
draw a map and give ominous warnings. Another guide may be
willing to return to the general area but will take the party only as
far as the entrance of the site, refusing to set foot beyond that point.
The quality of a guide is also something the Game Master can
vary. Some guides are just local miners willing to take the party
as far as a base camp. These guides rarely ask for much payment,
unless they are experiencing a prolonged dry spell in their mining
efforts. Other guides are professional hunters or retired military
scouts that will be a major NPC addition to the party and expect
to be paid a significant amount of money for their talents and time.
There is always the danger a guide is actually a bandit. He could
be leading the party into a trap set by the rest of his band. This is
another place where the skills of the characters come into play, as
they begin to piece together inconsistencies and errors in a wouldbe bandits story.

Eyewitness Accounts

In addition to the folklore of an area, it is also probable people


currently living in the region have firsthand information about the
exact location of the ancient site the party seeks. There are, however,
several problems with this method of information gathering that
give the Game Master tools to work with.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For the third month of Full Metal Fridays were taking a look at the intrepid
scholars and other adventurers who delve into the remains of history.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 3, Week 3:

Architects of Death
By William Oz Schoonover
The creativity of the Orgoth knew no bounds when building
ways to inflict pain and death. This installment focuses on
traps they built to protect their structures. Orgoth traps
were well made, but few have remained fully functional in
the hundreds of years since their construction. Sometimes
this means the trap has become harmless, while others have
become more dangerous due to their unpredictability. The
results of deteriorated traps going off can vary widely. Some
might do absolutely nothing, while others could cause entire
chambers to collapse. Many modern trap makers have studied
the remains of Orgoth designs for ways to improve their own
creations. The following traps are just a small sample of the
many defenses that can be found built into structures.
When playing a game involving traps the Game Master will
likely want to make some rolls for the characters in secret.
Detection rolls are a good example of this, since telling a
player to roll to detect a trigger will warn him of its existence.
Another good use for secret rolls is when a character attempts

to disarm a trap. If the roll fails by only 1 point, it is likely that


the character will think he has adequately disarmed a trap that
is still dangerous.

Triggering Traps
The Game Master should make a note of the location of each
element of a trap but not indicate this on the tabletop before
it is triggered. A trap might be detected and avoided. When a
character gets close to a triggering mechanism he can make
a Detection skill roll to spot it. The target number for this
roll is listed in the description of the trap below. If the roll
succeeds, the character spots the trap before he has a chance
to set it off. If the roll fails, he does not notice the trap. The
Game Master determines when a character has a chance to
trigger a trap. Sometimes the triggering character will be
able to make a roll to evade the trap or else suffer its effects.
Some traps can affect a number of characters, while others
affect only the triggering character.

Equipping Yourself for an Expedition


Tomb traps are usually triggered by a pressure plate disguised
as a floor tile, however this plate can be incorporated into
other surfaces. Objects of great value may also have triggering
mechanisms attached directly to them that will set off a trap if
the item is moved.

Traps
Anatomy of a Trap
The following elements define a trap in the game.
Trap Name
Description: Describes the trap.
Special Rules: Lists any special rules that apply to the
trap.
Detection: Explains how a character discovers the trap.
Disarming: Gives rules for how to prevent the trap from
going off.

Flood Trap
Description: Flood traps are especially dangerous because
most of their mechanisms are completely hidden within the
walls of a structure. The only warning of their existence is the
presence of expertly concealed triggering plates in the floor of
a room and a channel cap in the walls or ceiling of the room.
An intruder stepping onto a pressure sensitive section of
the floor triggers the trap. This causes a barrier between the
chamber and a nearby reservoir, such as a lake or river, to
open. Water is released into a channel connected to the room.
A portion of the wall or ceiling of the room is an opening to
this channel and is disguised with a cap designed to collapse
when hit by the water. The collapse of this cap creates a large
hole for water to enter through.
There is commonly a metal grate at some point in the channel
to prevent a victim from using the channel as an escape route.
In many traps this grate has rusted and can be removed with a
STR roll against a target number of 14.
The trap can be designed to dispatch its victims in one of two
ways. Flood traps are commonly paired with sealing traps
(see below) to contain the victims in an area where they will
quickly succumb to the rising waters and drown. The traps can
also be designed to wash intruders over the edge of a chasm
or into a narrow passage where they will be battered to death
against the walls.
Special Rules: When a character triggers this trap, the area he
is in quickly fills with water. Any character within 3 of the
cap can make a Detection roll against a target number of 10 to
hear the water rushing toward him. After one minute, center

a 3 AOE over the portion of the room containing the channel


cap. Characters within the AOE must make a PHY roll against
a target number of 14 or be knocked down.
The water spreads 6 feet (1) from the opening every minute in
a direction determined by the Game Master. Characters in the
flow of water must make a PHY roll against a target number
of 12 or be knocked down. Standing characters in the flow of
water are pushed d3 in the direction of the waters flow, while
knocked down characters are pushed d6.
The water flowing from the opening is between 2 and 3 feet
deep. If the water is flowing into an enclosed area it rises 1 foot
every minute.
If a character is submerged in an area completely filled with
water he has a number of rounds equal to his PHY before he is
overcome and drowns.
Detection: For a character to spot a flood trap he must be
within 6 feet (1) of the trigger and make a Detection skill roll
against a target number of 15. If the roll succeeds he spots the
traps trigger. If the roll fails the trigger goes unnoticed.
Flood traps can also provide clues to the presence of an
underground structure. During dry years, the water levels of
rivers and lakes can drop far enough to partially expose the
door between the traps channel and the water source.
Disarming: There are two ways to disarm a flood trap. The first
is to find its trigger plate in the floor and secure the mechanism
so it cannot go off. Safely disarming the trigger plate requires
a character to spend a full action and make a Mechanikal
Engineering skill roll against a target number of 14. If the
character fails this roll by 3 or more, the trap triggers.
The second option to disarm the trap is to find the disguised
channel cap. This requires a character to be within 6 feet (1) of
the cap and make a Detection roll against a target number of
14. If the roll succeeds, the character discovers the channel cap.
If the roll fails, he does not find the opening. A discovered cap
can be pried open using the proper tools with a Mechanikal
Engineering skill roll against a target number of 12. Once
the cap is removed, a small-based character can crawl up the
channel to the door mechanism. The channels of flood traps
are commonly rigged with trigger plates to set off the trap. The
reservoir door of a flood trap is also built with anti-tampering
mechanisms that will trigger the trap if it is mishandled. To
secure the door a character must spend a full action and make a
Mechanikal Engineering skill roll against a target number of 14
to lock the door in place. If the roll succeeds, the door is locked.
If the roll fails, the trap triggers.

Sealing Trap
Description: Sealing traps are designed to lower large stone
slabs or an iron portcullis into a passage to prevent an intruders
escape. Stone sealing traps are commonly paired with gas or
water traps to quickly dispatch a victim; others simply trap a
victim in an inescapable area where he will slowly suffocate.
Stone sealing traps are designed to line up seamlessly with
the ceiling of a chamber while armed and resemble common
walls once sealed. Once triggered, one of these traps might go
undiscovered, leaving a sealed chamber undisturbed if the
witnesses of the traps triggering died within it.

Equipping Yourself for an Expedition


Special Rules: The triggering plate for this trap is typically 6
feet (1) or more from the slab. When a character triggers this
trap any character within 1 of the falling slab he must make an
AGL roll against a target number of 10 to avoid being hit by it.
If the roll succeeds, he is not hit by the slab. If the roll fails, he
is hit and knocked down, and he suffers a POW16 damage roll.
A character within 2 of the slab can make an AGL roll against
a target number of 14 to put something he is carrying in
his hand between the slab and the floor. The Game Master
determines whether the object has any chance to prevent
the slabs closure; most things will be crushed utterly by the
heavy stone slab or iron gate slamming into place to seal a
doorway or other corridor.
Once the trap has been triggered it is very difficult to pry open.
The average sealing trap slab weighs 600 pounds, with many
weighing more. Lifting one of these slabs will be a challenge
for most adventurers (see Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy
Roleplaying Game: Core Rules, p. 199).
Detection: For a character to spot a sealing trap he must make
a Detection skill roll against a target number of 15. If the roll
succeeds he spots the traps trigger. If the roll fails the trigger
goes unnoticed.
Disarming: There are two ways to disarm a sealing trap.
The first is to find its trigger plate in the floor and secure the
mechanism so it cannot go off. Safely disarming the trigger
plate requires a character to spend one full action and make a
Mechanikal Engineering roll against a target number of 14. If
the character fails this roll by 3 or more, the trap is triggered.
The other option for disarming the trap is to brace something
capable of bearing the weight of the slab or gate against it so
it cannot fall into place. To accomplish this a character must
have something of sufficient size and strength to do the job.
He must then spend one full action and make a Mechanikal
Engineering roll against a target number of 12. Many
experienced tomb robbers and explorers bring a supply of steel
bars for this purpose. If a character fails this roll the Game
Master determines the results. Perhaps the weight is too great
for the brace, which will only slow the door, or perhaps the
falling door will easily knock the brace away.

Orgoth Pit Trap


Description: The Orgoth took great pride in their cruelty, and
nowhere can this be seen more clearly when exploring one
of their ancient sites than in their wicked modification of the
simple pit trap. Rarely deep enough to kill an intruder from
falling, these instead rely on wicked, barbed spikes lining the
trap to dispatch a victim. Many an unwary adventurer has fallen
into an Orgoth pit trap to die a slow death impaled on spikes.
Some of these Orgoth pit traps are hidden, covered with a stone
slab. This slab is designed to fall open when weight is placed
upon it, dumping a hapless intruder into the pit. The pits are
generally only ten feet deep, relying more on the spikes for
damage than the fall itself.
Special Rules: When a character triggers a hidden pit trap
center a 3 AOE over him. He must pass an AGL roll against

a target number of 14 to avoid falling in the pit. All characters


within the AOE must pass an AGL roll against a target number
of 12 to avoid falling in the pit.
A character has a chance of falling into a previously opened
trap only if he is pushed or fails an attempt to jump over it.
Characters that fall into an Orgoth pit trap suffer a POW 12
damage roll with an additional die of damage. For pits deeper
than 10 feet, add an additional die following the falling rules
(Core Rules, p. 205)
Once in the pit, the AOE remains in play. Characters in the pit
gain cover and do not block line of sight. If a character takes
damage from a fall into the pit he has been impaled on the
spikes. A character impaled on the spikes remains knocked
down and suffers d3 damage points during each of his
Maintenance Phases. The character cannot regain vitality even
if he is freed from the spikes unless treated by a character with
the Medicine skill. Treating the wound takes a full action but
does not require a skill roll.
A character wishing to free himself from the spikes must
spend one full action and succeed at a Willpower roll against a
target number of 16.
Characters in the pit cannot leave the AOE unless they succeed
in a Climbing skill roll against a target number of 14 (see Core
Rules, p. 175).
Detection: An open pit is very obvious, and characters do not
have to make a roll to see it.
For a character to spot a hidden pit trap before it is triggered he
must succeed in a Detection skill roll against a target number
of 14. The target number to spot a trap that has recently been
triggered is 10.
Disarming: The easiest way bypass a pit trap is to leap over
it. If this is not possible due to its width or an overhanging
obstruction, it may be possible to bridge it with something.
Although filling a pit in with other materials is usually the
safest option, it is very time consuming and not practical in the
depths of an Orgoth ruin.
An open pit is generally 18 to 24 feet wide and can be jumped
normally.
Hidden pits are constructed with locking mechanisms to allow
their builders to safely pass over them. In some structures, like
tombs, these mechanisms were disabled upon completion of
the construction. A character can find this mechanism with a
Mechanikal Engineering roll against a target number of 12. If
the mechanism is still functional, the character can activate it
with a quick action without a skill roll. To activate a disabled
mechanism, a character must spend one full action and make
a Mechanikal Engineering roll against a target number of14.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For the third month of Full Metal Fridays were taking a look at the intrepid
scholars and other adventurers who delve into the remains of history.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 3, Week 4:

The Lost Chamber


By William Oz Schoonover

Hero-Level Combat Encounter


Description: This series of encounters follows a group
of characters as they search for a previously unexplored
section of an Orgoth tomb.

When the characters arrive for the meeting at Bartlesbys


home, they are ushered into a large library. The room
contains thousands of books, but more notable are the
glass cases evenly spaced around the room. Each of
these cases holds various old artifacts, some definitely
Orgoth in origin.

Scene 1:
The Collector

Bartlesby sits behind a large stone desk absentmindedly


playing with a black dagger embellished with strange
runes. As the characters take the seats offered to them, he
places the dagger on top of a pile of unopened envelopes.

Adversaries: Dread (14)

The characters have been contacted by a man named


Matthias Bartlesby. He has a reputation for being a
wealthy eccentric and for financing expeditions to
various areas of western Immoren.

Bartlesby presents the characters with a non-disclosure/


non-compete agreement and explains that he would
like them to undertake an expedition on his behalf into
the nearby mountains. Until the characters sign the

the lost chamber


agreement, he will say only that he is hoping to expand
his collection and is worried that any more information
could be sold to his rivals.
After the party members have each signed their names,
their potential employer giggles with glee and walks to
a nearby bookshelf. He produces a key on a chain that
he wears under his shirt. He inserts the key into a gap
between two books and unlocks a mechanism. A section
of the adjacent bookshelf slides into the floor to reveal a
safe. Shielding the dial with his body, Bartlesby inputs
the combination. He then opens the safe and withdraws
a silk-wrapped object from inside.
He returns to his desk and motions the characters to
gather around it. He reverently unwraps the object to
reveal a weathered book. He then explains that this is
the diary of a prominent member of the local resistance
from the final years of the Orgoth Occupation. It
recounts the authors rescue from an Orgoth torturer
named Riksasivus. Bartlesby opens the book and reads
a passage:
I was chained to a wall awaiting my fate when I heard the sound
of fighting coming from down the hallway. Moments later my
friends rushed into the room. When they had unchained me we
ran away from the fighting, going deeper into the catacombs,
where we came to the intersection of two tunnels. We heard
the sound of wind coming down the middle of the three tunnels
we faced and followed it to a natural cave, which led to our
freedom. I can never repay my comrades from saving me from
Riksasivus and the tortures I would have endured without
their actions.
After reading the passage, Bartlesby goes to the wall
and takes down a large hand-drawn map in a frame. He
places the map on the desk, explaining that it is from
the expedition that discovered and explored an Orgoth
tomb fifty years ago. He is sure the diary is referring to
the same tomb and uses the map to point out the path he
believes the diary refers to. The described intersection is
not along the path. Bartlesby is convinced the tomb has
a hidden door to an untouched section that may hold
valuable artifacts. To his knowledge no other expedition
has been made to the area, since nothing of importance
was found by those who discovered the tomb.
The man offers the characters a large sum of money to
journey to the area and bring him any relics that they find.
The characters can stay in the library for as long as they
need to research. The following table indicates what a
character learns with a research skill roll.

TARGET NUMBER

Information Discovered

12

Orgoth torturers wore iron masks,


many of which were imbued with
dark magic.

14

Often, Orgoth masks were cursed


to harm anyone wearing them
except the owner.

16

Riksasivus was a noted Orgoth


torturer who worked in the area
where the tomb was found.

18

Riksasivus was known to turn


some of his victims into powerful
undead creations.

Scene 2: A Trip to
the Mountains
The characters can find and investigate the tomb without
major setbacks. They are likely to encounter creatures
that have made the abandoned chambers their homes,
like burrow-mawgs and dregg. Crypt spiders (NQ issue
#43), razorbats, or devil rats (NQ issue #45) are also good
monsters for these encounters.
When the characters reach the intersection described in
the diary they find it just as drawn on the map. Where
the diary indicates a fourth tunnel opening there is
only a wall carved with the leering faces commonly
found in Orgoth reliefs. A character with Lore (Orgoth)
or Mechanikal Engineering can make a roll against a
target number of 14 to examine the wall. If successful
the character discovers that the wall is actually a sealing
trap. He will also know that these traps involve enormous
stones that can barely be budged once triggered. This side
of the trap is seamless, but there may be enough of a gap
on the other side to lift the stone with the proper tools.
The sealing trap indicates that there is in fact more to this
tomb than the last expedition found. Orgoth black stone is
nearly indestructible, and using enough explosives to clear
the trap will bring down all the surrounding tunnels.

Duskenvale

The small mountain village of Duskenvale is home to


hunters, trappers, and independent miners. It has a
small tavern and a blacksmiths shop. The village is a
few hours by horse from the general area of the tomb.
The characters can stop in this village tavern on their
initial trip to the tomb, or they can return here to rest
after their first investigations come up fruitless.
The characters can ask the villagers about the tomb,
but most locals will not speak of it. The best chance
of gathering information is to wait until the hunters,
trappers, and miners return to town after sundown to
gather in the tavern. The characters will need to tread
carefully when making inquiries of these folk, since few
of them will be very personable.

the lost chamber


If the characters are patient enough or generous
enough with drinks, they will overhear a conversation
mentioning the Rotten Maw.
A hunter named Alberd is comparing stories with a few
others about the conditions of a nearby valley. Sometime
in the last few decades a large sinkhole the locals have
nicknamed the Rotten Maw opened in the valley.
A terrible smell emanated from the hole, and animals
became scarce in the valley. One of the hunters tells a
secondhand story of a man who attempted to investigate
the hole shortly after it was found. The man climbed
down into the hole but became sick and had to be pulled
back out by his partners. Another hunter in the group
says he has recently been to the valley and the smell
seems to have mostly gone away.
A character with the Navigation skill will be able to
make the connection between the location of the valley
and the Orgoth site to realize that the Rotten Maw is
likely above the tomb. A character with the Alchemy
skill will know that the description of what happened in
the valley when the hole appeared indicates there was
sulfur gas coming from it, which makes it likely that the
hole connects to a network of caves.
Alberd is leaving in the morning and offers to lead the
characters to the Rotten Maw valley for a fee of 20gc.
If the characters ask around the tavern to try and find
another guide they will be rejected; Alberd is the most
respected hunter in the region, and no one is willing to
get on his bad side. Alberd is trying to take advantage of
the characters, seeing them as incapable of negotiating
the wilderness without him. If there is a character in
the group with obvious wilderness experience, such
as a ranger or an explorer, or if a character with the
Negotiation skill makes a successful roll against a target
number of 13, Alberd will lower the price to 12gc.

Scene 3:
The Unmapped
Chambers
Alberd leads the characters up into the mountains using
foot trails that are otherwise impassable. The characters
can bring a pack animal along, but nothing larger can
make the journey.
When they arrive at the Rotten Maw the smell is still
noticeable. A Preservation of Corben pendant lowered
into the hole will faintly glow. The sides of the pit are
unstable, and a character can climb down only with the
use of a rope.
The glow from the pendant grows stronger as a character
makes his way down the hole, but it does not reach
candle brightness, which would indicate a lethal amount

of toxins in the air. Seventy-five feet down the hole, there


is a ledge wide enough to stand on. The ledge widens to
the north to form the floor of a chamber. A crack in the
north wall of this chamber opens into a room.

Room 1

The first room the characters enter is approximately


30 feet by 30 feet. It is empty except for four niches in
the corners, which each hold a mummified body. Each
body is contorted in a different way, seemingly locked
in a state of pain. A character trained in Mechanikal
Engineering that examines these niches can make a roll
against a target number of 20 to determine that the wall
at the back of each of these niches is false. There is no
visible opening mechanism for the false wall.
Along the west wall of the room is an indentation.
The characters recognize this as the sealing trap they
discovered earlier and find part of a leg sticking out from
under the stone. The skeletal leg is wearing a boot and
is covered in deteriorating cloth. With the proper tools
and strength (such as an ogrun with a lever) a character
can make a Mechanikal Engineering roll against a target
number of 12 to pry up the sealing stone enough to drag
the body out from under it. There is almost nothing of
value on the corpse since all of its possessions were
crushed with it, but the characters find a notebook. The
final dates in the notebook are from nearly 100 years
earlier. Parts of the book are written in code, but from
what the characters can read it is clear that the owner
was an explorer who discovered many interesting things
he didnt survive to tell the world about.
When the characters leave this room the niches will
open to reveal dread tomb guards (see below).

Game Master Notes


The number of dread that are released is determined by
the Game Master. For a group that is not very combat
oriented, one dread is enough of a challenge. For a much
more combat-focused party with some experience, using
all four is recommended.

Room 2

The second room is approximately 35 feet by 35 feet.


There is a door opposite from the one the characters
enter through. A little over halfway across the room is
an open spike pit that runs from one side wall to the
other and is 18 feet across.

the lost chamber

The Mask of Riksasivus is a dangerous Orgoth object.


If the players failed to discover that Orgoth masks are
sometimes cursed, a character with Lore (Orgoth) can
make a roll against a target number of 16 to remember
that touching the mask is probably dangerous.
If a character touches the mask, he is compelled to put
it on. To resist this compulsion a character must make a
successful Willpower roll against a target number of 16.
If the character succeeds he can either immediately drop
the mask or hold onto it. For every minute that he holds
the mask he must make another Willpower roll as above,
with a cumulative 1 to his Willpower. If the character
fails this roll he dons the mask.
A character who places the mask of Riksasivus on his
face immediately feels an evil presence trying to take
over his body. To try to remove the mask he must make
a Willpower roll against a target number of 18. If he
succeeds he can immediately take off the mask, at which
point he is holding it again and must roll to resist putting
it back on as above. For every minute that he wears the
mask he must succeed at a Willpower roll against a target
number of 20 with a cumulative 1 to his Willpower. If
the character fails the roll while wearing the mask he is
immediately possessed by the spirit of Riksasivus, and
becomes an NPC under the Game Masters control.
Once in possession of a new body Riksasivus attempts
to hide the change long enough to escape the tomb. If he
is discovered, he makes every effort to escape, killing
anyone who stands in his way.
The dread will not attack someone wearing the mask of
Riksasivus.

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


Hand blade

POW P+S

12

Blessed Weapon Attacks from this weapon ignore spell effects that add to
a targets DEF or ARM.
Beat Back When this character hits a target with a melee attack, he can
immediately push his target 1 directly away. After the target is pushed, this
character can advance up to 1.

ABILITIES
Dread gain boosted Willpower rolls.
Terror Dread cause Terror [16].
Spell Ward Dread cannot be targeted by spells.
Tough This character is incredibly hardy. When this character is disabled,
roll a d6. On a 5 or 6, the character heals 1 vitality point, is no longer
disabled, and is knocked down.
Undead A dread is not a living character and never flees.

Base Size

Small

AGILITY

IQ

The Orgoth were masters of necromancy and made


many undead creations. Dread are just one of the horrific
things they created.

A dread fights with no regard for its own safety and will
not break off an attack until its target is destroyed.

PHYS

Dread Tomb
Guard

Special Rules/Tactics: The dread will attempt to remain


unseen while following the characters. The characters
may attempt to detect it (or them) with a Detection roll
against a target number of 16. If the dread remains
undiscovered it will reveal itself as the characters move
into the room with the pit traps.

ECT

The Mask of Riksasivus

Dread retain much of the intelligence they had in life,


but it is twisted to create a cunning that makes them
dangerous opponents. Dread Tomb Guards attempt to
remain hidden and stalk an intruder until the best time
to attack. Often a Tomb Guard remains unseen until
a party has discovered a pit trap blocking their path,
revealing itself at the only exit and attempting to force
its victims into the pit.

LL

After the characters have crossed the spiked pit they


are able to enter the last room, which is the final resting
place of Riksasivus. There is a large stone sarcophagus in
the center of the room with an image of an Orgoth man
carved into the lid. Resting on the face of the carving is
an iron mask.

TE

Room 3

The Dread Tomb Guard is a specialized necromantic


creation. It does not rely on sheer strength to destroy
intruders but instead works with pit traps or other
hazards to defeat trespassers within its domain.

The dread that entered the previous room quietly makes


its way to the doorway and then attacks the characters,
attempting to drive them into the pit.

the lost chamber

Lore

A character can make a Lore (Orgoth) skill roll to


determine what he knows about this creature. The
higher the characters total, the more he learns. The
character learns all the information up to his total.
12: Dread are a specific type of undead and are
sometimes found in Orgoth ruins.
14: Dread were created by the Orgoth to guard important
sites. The presence and number of dread can indicate the
ruins importance to the Orgoth.
16: Dread were created with a long-lost dark ritual that
make the creatures resistant to damage and immune
to magic.

Wrap Up
The characters are free to do what they wish with the
mask once they have it, but they should be aware that
there are repercussions to any decision they make.
If the characters decide to destroy the mask, they will
make an enemy of Bartlesby. Destroying the mask is
also much more difficult than it may seem. The mask
resists melting and most other kinds of damage that
would destroy a mundane item made of iron. The
Mask of Riksasivus has ARM20 and 20 damage points.
Damage rolls made against the Mask of Riksasivus roll
an additional die and drop the highest result. The Mask
of Riksasivus cannot be targeted by magical attacks.

The Notebook

The notebooks code is based on Cygnaran. Deciphering


the code in the notebook requires a Cryptography skill
roll against a target number of 14. Once deciphered the
dead explorers notebook becomes a valuable source of
information. Most notable is his plan to return to his
base camp in a nearby cave and retrieve a case in order
to safely transport the mask. Additionally, the explorers
notebook contains references to several other Orgoth
sites he has explored across western Immoren. If the
characters desire, they can utilize the explorers notes as
a roadmap of potential sites to investigate.

Game Master Notes


What powers the mask possesses, beyond making dread
created by Riksasivus not attack its wearer, can be
determined by the Game Master. The mask could easily be
a major plot hook in an ongoing series of adventures.

If the characters decide to return the mask to Bartlesby


it is likely from his handling of other objects that he will
not treat it as dangerous and will likely fall victim to the
spirit of Riksasivus. It is also possible that gaining the
mask to use its power was his goal all along, and he may
have in his possession knowledge to allow him to use
the mask without losing his will.
Lastly, the party may decide that they can make more
money finding another buyer for the mask, which will
also make an enemy of Bartlesby. It is also likely that
knowledge of their possession of the mask will spread
once they begin looking for buyers, and they could draw
all manner of unwanted attention.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For this installment of Full Metal Fridays we take a closer look at the nefarious
gangs of the Iron Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 4, Week 1:

The Wrong Side


of the Law
By Simon Berman
Criminal exploits make exciting fodder for Iron Kingdoms
gaming as characters work to foil nefarious plots or enact
some of their own. However, running a gang or other
criminal outfit takes more work for a group of characters
than simply choosing to be members of an outlaw
adventuring company (see Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy
Roleplaying Game: Core Rules, p.152). In this weeks offering
for Full Metal Fridays we take a look at some of the most
common criminal pursuits in the Iron Kingdoms to inform
players and Game Masters alike about roleplaying in the
seedy underbelly of western Immoren.
Many criminals and gangs specialize in one or more areas of
crime, but it is a rare gangster indeed who turns his nose up
at a lucrative opportunity for larceny outside his preferred
arena. Career criminals are invariably well connected in

their local underground networks and might work in the


short term with specialists to conduct a tempting heist. The
most successful criminals treat crime like a businessand
that business rewards fast thinking and the ability to act on
a rare opportunity.

Confidence Tricks
Clever criminals regularly employ confidence tricks and
scams. Even at the simplest levels, confidence tricks usually
rely on trust. Street urchins might convince a stranger to
lend them an item of some small worth, such as a watch,
and then simply vanish into a crowd. If a young criminal
can master the art of appearing trustworthy, he can in time
begin to develop the ruthless social skills to engage in more
complex cons.

THE WRONG SIDE OF THE LAW


Professional con men almost always operate in groups to
orchestrate their complicated schemes. A gang attempting
to divest a Cygnaran noblewoman of her heirloom jewels
might make considerable efforts to impersonate an exiled
member of the Llaelese aristocracy and his household,
perhaps going so far as to forge false documents to verify
their crafted identities. One notorious incident in this
vein involved a group of confidence artists who not only
pretended to be exiled Llaelese refugees to gain the trust
of a noble family in Bainsmarket but also had some of their
number impersonate Khadoran assassins in pursuit of the
faux exiles. Alarmed to see their new friends under attack in
the street, the Cygnaran nobles invited the confidence men
into their home for safety. Several days after their guests
had moved on to their next target, the nobles discovered
that their finest jewels had been pilfered.
Since confidence games hinge on gaining the trust of the
victim, characters who are potentially sympathetic enjoy
the greatest success. Humans have the easiest time gaining
the confidence of most citizens of the Iron Kingdoms, more
so if they are (or can appear to be) of the same ethnic group
or social strata. Gobbers also make excellent swindlers,
given their diminutive size and apparent harmlessness.

Labor Rackets
Criminal gangs and other organizations naturally attract
violent individuals to their ranks and employ their talents
for various minor crimes.
Successful criminal organizations become well versed in the
arts of extortion and coercion, using the looming presences
of their most dangerous members to gain the assent of their
victims and rivals. Although these talents commonly come
into play between competing criminals, such skills do not
go unnoticed by more legitimate institutions. In some cities,
notably Steelwater Flats, companies have been known
to hire criminal thugs to intimidate and coerce business
rivals. Gangs are often eager for such jobs, which involve
the opportunity to infiltrate legitimate businesses. Once a
few gang members have secured places within a business,
they go out of their way to bring in more members, turning
the business into a lucrative source of income.
As organized labor has gained momentum across the
Iron Kingdoms, it has become increasingly common for
unscrupulous companies to hire thugs as strikebreakers,
or sometimes to temporarily replace unskilled laborers.
Of course, this sword cuts both ways, and unprincipled
local unions are not above hiring their own violent louts
to protect picket lines or combat city watchmen and
strikebreakers. The lines between gang warfare and labor
protests have grown increasingly unclear in some cities.

Moneylending
Gangs can earn a respectable profit through moneylending.
By loaning out money with steep interest rates, gangs can
parlay illicitly gained coin into massive returns. A borrower
is typically given a short period of time to repay the debt,
with compounded interest added weekly or even daily.
Borrowers who prove either unwilling or unable to pay
face threats of violence made against them, their property,
and their families by the enforcers of the gang. This kind of
exploitative lending provides a steady trickle of funds into
a gangs coffers.
Moneylending also includes opportunities for massive
scores. A gang might seek out a borrower with access to an
especially appealing business or facility, particularly those
without a head for numbers or those who find themselves
in desperate situations, and offer them a large loan. An
individual in dire straits can scarcely afford to decline,
even though the debt may be nearly impossible to repay.
Once a borrower is caught in an untenable position, the
gang offers to forgive part or all of the debt in exchange for
a favor, such as leaving the gates of a storehouse unlocked
or diverting shipments of valuable goods to waiting
members of the gang.

Murder for Hire


Professional killers are common among western Immorens
criminal class. Most murders are the result of crimes of
passion, perpetrated by an individual who feels he has been
wronged and committed in the heat of the moment. Hired
killers, on the other hand, possess a strong desire for gold
and approach their targets with impersonal regard. Such
killers are useful to gangs, as they usually do not have any
allegiance that would lead investigators back to the gang
and their use enables important gang members to protect
ironclad alibis. For this reason, most clever gangs prefer to
hire out-of-towners for these jobs.
From time to time an individual or organization (legitimate
or otherwise) has need of the services of a murderer, and
someone willing to undertake the risks stands to make
a tidy sum for the bloody work. The murderer-for-hire
is typically a feared and well-connected criminal who
typically also pursues less lethal criminal activities in the
alleys and streets of virtually every city.
Contacting a murderer-for-hire almost always requires
good street connections, since few killers take a job from
a stranger for fear of being set up by the authorities. Once
under contract, most killers require payment up front,
with the fee varying by the perceived difficulty of the task.
Few murderers accept jobs targeting military personnel or
members of the upper class due to the potentially high-risk
ramifications of success, let alone the penalties of failure.

THE WRONG SIDE OF THE LAW

Robbery
Whether a criminal robs his victim at gun- or knife-point,
picks his pockets, or burgles his home, robbery is by far the
most common crime of the Iron Kingdoms. A wide range
of specialized thieves practice their trade in the cities of
the Iron Kingdoms, from nimble-fingered pickpockets to
catfooted second-story men.
Manyperhaps mostyoung criminals begin their careers
as pickpockets on crowded city streets. Some work as
cutpurses, stealthily slashing the pockets and pouches
of their victims. Others operate in groups, with one thief
distracting the victim by pretending to accidentally jostle
him while a compatriot rifles his pockets. Some criminal
outfits spend the bulk of their time and derive the majority
of their income from pickpocketing operations. Gobbers
and children make particularly effective pickpockets due
to their small size, unassuming demeanor, and manual
dexterity, to say nothing of their ability to disappear into
narrow corners of the city should they draw the attention
of their victims. An older criminal might become the leader
of a gang of child robbers, fencing their stolen goods with
unscrupulous merchants.
Some pickpockets graduate to armed robbery, working in
small groups to rob their victims through force. Muggings
and holdups often involve dragging the victim into an alley
or other secluded location to rifle through his belongings
in privacy. Some gangs of robbers prefer to target wealthylooking individuals and others choose the easy pickings
of drunks stumbling out of dockside taverns, though
the wisest robbers pick their targets with care. Armed
robbery is a potentially dangerous line of crime, as any
victim might feel the need to fight for his life, and the Iron
Kingdoms are home to deadly combatants who might not
appear overly threatening to the untrained eye. Outside the
cities, highwaymen and brigands operating from secluded
wilderness hideouts are a constant threat to travelers on the
lonely roads.

Robbers who prefer to avoid direct confrontation may


instead pursue breaking and entering. These break-in artists
range from those who simply smash down a door or pry
open a window to gain access, to the agile urban climbers
known as second-story men who easily scale structures to
reach upper windows, which typically are less secure than
guarded lower entrances.
Whatever their preferred method of robbery, thieves
require the services of professional fences to move stolen
goods, especially easily recognizable items such as jewelry.
Fences profit from these transactions because they are able
to purchase goods for a fraction of their value and can use a
number of methods to disguise them for sale. A process like
covering the monogram engraved on a fine pocket watch is
fairly straightforward, while more complex techniques may
involve a wide range of different alchemical solutions. The
best fences have a network in place to move recognizable
items out of a city, duchy, or even nation if needed.

Smuggling
Smuggling can be a high-risk, high-profit enterprise for a
gang. When the Protectorate of Menoth required smuggled
cortexes for its warjacks, loyal Menites living abroad
provided the majority of the devices, but several gangs
amassed sizeable fortunes by stealing and delivering
military-grade cortexes to the nation.
Other smugglers work in the contested territories of Llael.
There is profit to be made on both legs of the journey to the
embattled territory, since gangs can sell military hardware
to the Llaelese Resistance and transport desperate refugees
out of military-controlled districts. The Black River is the
main channel for these smuggling operations, and larger
river gangs employ entire fleets of swift blockade-runners
to deliver their merchandise.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Convergence of Cyriss, Convergence,
Cryx, Cygnar, Khador, Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods,
Trollblood, warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for
personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For this installment of Full Metal Fridays we take a closer look at the nefarious
gangs of the Iron Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 4, Week 2:

Anatomy of a Gang
By Simon Berman
Whether youre a Game Master building a gang of NPCs for
your campaign or a group of players crafting characters as
members of an outlaw adventuring company (see Iron Kingdoms
Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Core Rules, p.152), youll
want to give some thought to what roles youll need to fill. Not
every gang is identical. Small-time bands of pickpockets and
thieves have a dramatically different roster than an organized
crime family with influence over an entire city.

Boss

As you begin to flesh out your characters or NPCs,


consider what kinds of crime your gang usually commits.
In last weeks Full Metal Fridays installment we explored
common criminal pursuits and rackets, some of which have
more specialized needs than others. Since most criminal
gangs dabble in a number of illicit pursuits, however,
you can expect to fill certain roles no matter your gangs
specialty. The roles described here are given titles for
convenience, but many gangs dispense with formal labels
altogether, and not every gang utilizes every role.

Bosses are called by different names depending on the


gangs nation and city of residence, its preferred criminal
pursuits, and the idiosyncrasies of its members. Bosses
are rarely elected but instead rise to the top through
cleverness or a proclivity for violence. Depending on the
gangs preferred criminal activities, the boss might be a
mastermind or simply the toughest, and often loudest,
member of the gang.

Every criminal outfit needs a boss, a leader the gang looks


to for the final word on all matters. The most effective
bosses delegate minor responsibilities, but the most
important decisions for the gang fall to the boss: matters
of life and death, or at the least, the difference between
freedom and incarceration.

It is the boss responsibility to ensure the success of the


gang in its endeavors. In its simplest form, this means he
must make sure his followers are successful criminals who

anatomy of a gang
stay free from the arm of the law. Gangs that engage in
complex crimes, like long-term confidence games or heists
from heavily protected facilities or individuals, should be
led by a boss with a gift for planning. A boss can expect
a share of all the gangs profits. When the gang makes a
score, the earnings are passed up the ladder of the gangs
hierarchy, with each member taking a cut along the way. A
boss in charge of a large gang can receive dozens of payouts
at a time as the gang performs jobs across a city.
Most bosses choose to delegate minor responsibilities to an
underboss or to a number of subordinates based on their
specialties or talents.
The boss sits at the center of the criminal network and
orchestrates its actions. Most bosses dont worry themselves
about the day-to-day management of the gang, but the big
decisions are his to make, and his word is final. Successful
bosses do not tolerate insolence, and crossing a gang boss
almost certainly results in a death sentence.

Underboss

The underboss is an important part of most gangs. It falls


to him to carry out the boss commands, settle disputes
between members of the organization, collect shares of loot
from underlings, and generally help oversee the routine
business of the gang. A single boss might have many
underbosses, each ruling a smaller cohort of gang members.
Over time, each of these smaller groups might specialize in
a particular avenue of crime, with each underboss acting as
the go-to man for a particular job.
Some underbosses are chosen out of simple cronyism,
but shrewd bosses choose a second-in-command who
complements their own strengths and weaknesses. Bosses
who rule through brute force often pick the gangs canniest
member for his foresight and silver tongue. Alternatively,
bosses who lead through cunning employ the most violent
and thuggish member of the gang to enforce their will.
Some underbosses long for the day when they will rule
the gang themselves, and accordingly, wise bosses keep
a watchful eye on their seconds. The maxim keep your
friends close and your enemies closer is even more
applicable in the criminal underworld than anywhere else
in the Iron Kingdoms.

Enforcer

Few gangs specialize in making a living from violence, but


almost every criminal organization keeps a few enforcers
around. These members usually spend most of their time
engaged in theft or robbery and serve as the gangs resident
heavies. The boss looks to these members to intimidate
rivals or punish other members of the gang for holding
out on loot or betraying the gang. Ogrun and trollkin
sometimes fill this role even in primarily human gangs.

Fixer

Rarely holding an official position within a gang, the fixer is


someone the gang can rely on for quick thinking and social
connections. Fixers maintain contacts across the criminal
underworld and sometimes beyond. For instance, larger
gangs employ fixers who can influence the political structure
of a city. These men and women are proficient at winning
over members of a citys power structure through activities

such as extravagant events where politicians can expect to


eat and drink the finest delicacies the gang can afford. Fixers
with proficiency in the legal systems of the Iron Kingdoms
are particularly prized, as they know how closely they can
skirt the line of legality without stepping over it.
When plans go awry, gang members turn to their resident
fixer. Whether its a matter of springing a compatriot from
the city jail, disposing of an inconvenient body, or finding a
specifically configured laborjack in a hurry, the fixer knows
how to resolve a dicey situation quickly.

Lookout

Lookouts are often new members of a gang who spend


much of their time keeping an eye on city watchmen or rival
gang members while their more experienced colleagues
commit crimes. Sometimes considered a punishment duty,
standing watch is still an important aspect of almost any
criminal undertaking.

Soldiers

A gangs rank-and-file members are called soldiers.


Discharged military men, desperate refugees, and members
of poor families are often drawn to the life of a gang soldier.
Membership in a gang can offer a measure of protection
and potential earnings that such individuals could hardly
attain otherwise.
The talents and abilities of soldiers can vary wildly from
member to member, but they are all expected to follow the
orders of their superiors without question. Large gangs
often structure soldiers into cells each led by a captain, a
trusted veteran of the gang. Gang captains are given a piece
of territory and tasked with protecting the gangs holdings
and generating profit from it. Eventually every gang must
fight to defend its territory, against either armed members
of the city watch or rival gangs seeking to expand their
borders. Soldiers make up a gangs primary force during
these conflicts.

Specialist

Specialists fall outside the normal structure of a gang, often


reporting only to a boss and his most trusted lieutenants.
These individuals, such as mechanikal engineers,
physicians, or arcanists, possess rare or prized skills and
are therefore invaluable to their gang. Bosses are careful
not to endanger their specialists and rarely send them
on jobs that do not require their unique talents. Though
they share similarities with fixers, specialists differ in
one important way: a fixer is expected to perform many
different tasks, whereas a specialist focuses all his abilities
in one particular field.
Some specialists do not swear allegiance to a single gang
but rather work as freelance operators who sell their skills
to all the different gangs of a city. For other roles this kind of
behavior would be met with violence, but skilled specialists
are afforded special consideration.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For this installment of Full Metal Fridays we take a closer look at the nefarious
gangs of the Iron Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 4, Week 3:

The Red Kings


By Simon Berman
The Khadoran invaders were not the only ones to profit
from the fall of Llael. The chaos of the invasion and
subsequent occupation was fruitful for many of Llaels less
ethical citizens, especially those who already operated in
the shadows of organized crime.
Established over a decade ago as a loose collection of
pickpockets and thieves, the Red Kings have survived
brutal gang wars, the invasion, and the occupation, all
without taking a side in the larger conflict. The Red Kings
might not be the most powerful gang in Merywyn, but they
have held their own against Llaelese rivals, resisted the
influx of Khadoran bratyas, and evaded the authorities for

years. They have done dirty work for employers on every


side of the Llaelese conflict and possess a reputation for
ruthless practicality.
The gangs membership varies between ten and fifteen
associates as individuals are arrested, killed, or flee the
reach of the law, but its core members have been through
thick and thin together for the past five years. The gang
operates out of the basement of a tenement in an industrial
neighborhood. The building is otherwise vacant and is in
such poor shape that the Khadoran 1st Army has designated
it unsuitable for the quartering of troops.

THE RED KINGS

Fynne di Vinianni

Di Vinianni grew up with the Red Kings and has led the
gang as their undisputed boss since 603AR, after stabbing
the previous leader to death in the aftermath of a botched
robbery resulting in the deaths of three gang members. A
large man in his early thirties, di Vinianni is given to few
words and harbors a dislike of rash decisions.
Under his direction, the Red Kings have weathered years
of turmoil and developed a reputation for patience and
pragmatism among the often-foolhardy criminal gangs of
Merywyn. Though di Vinianni prefers for the Red Kings
to focus on pickpocketing and extortion rackets, he is not
above engaging in the occasional armed robbery. In a fight
he relies on his trusted hand cannon and banded club.

Morna Petrork

Morna Petrork is the sole member of the Red Kings to


evince the Gift of Magic, which she wields as a powerful
fire sorceress. Like di Vinianni, Petrork has been a member
of the gang since her youth and has proven herself as both
a clear thinker and a powerful asset in a fight. Di Viniannis
trusted second-in-command, Petrork is treated with equal
measures of fear and respect by the other gang members.
Petrork is quick to angerperhaps a feature of her
Umbrean heritagebut she is also a quick thinker, traits
that make her an excellent complement to di Vinianni, with
his preference for ponderous thought and preparation. She
rarely takes part in the day-to-day muggings and purse
cuttings of the gangs rank-and-file members, since her
responsibilities for making sure her compatriots pay their
dues and stay in line take up the lions share of her time.

Luka Left Fist Istori

A veteran of the Khadoran Winter Guard who chose to stay


in Merywyn at the end of his service, Luka is a notorious
bruiser for the Red Kings. His presence alone intimidates
the gangs rivals, and he has garroted over a dozen men and
women in his few years as a member.
He first encountered the gang after murdering a former
member who attempted to rob him at gunpoint in a
dockside tavern during the first months of the Khadoran
occupation. He cut the mans throat and had calmly
returned to drinking his beer when di Vinianni and the
other Red Kings returned to the tavern. Confronted by the
gang, Istori asked, Need a new recruit? Maybe one whos
less stupid and better armed? di Vinianni recruited him
on the spot.

Garrote
Cost: 2gc
Skill: Unarmed
Attack Modifier: 0
POW:
Description: A garrote is a device designed to strangle
a victim from behind, regardless of the form it takes.
Purpose-built garrotes consist of a length of wire with a
handle on each end. The garrote is not a battlefield weapon
and can be used only from behind a target with the element
of surprise.
Special Rules: This weapon causes no damage. Instead, it is
used to choke the life out of a victim.
To use this weapon, the attacking character must succeed
in hitting his target with a back strike with the garrote.
If the attack hits, the attacker can begin strangling his
victim. The attacker and victim immediately each roll a
d6. The attacker adds his STR to his roll and the victim
adds his PHY. If the attackers total is higher, the victim
suffers 1PHY. If the victim wins, he breaks free. If the
totals are equal, nothing happens.
The attacker can take no other actions while strangling his
victim, but he can release the victim at any time. At the start
of each of the attackers subsequent turns, the two characters
roll again to determine the effect of the strangulation.
While being garroted, a victim cannot speak, yell, or use
his voice to make any sound. The victim can use his turns
to attempt to fight his attacker off as a full action (triggering
another strangulation roll that might result in further PHY
loss), fight through his terror with a successful Willpower
roll to take another action, or fight to get a mouthful of air
(no effect, but does not force another strangulation roll). If
the victim attempts to take any action other than fighting
his attacker off, he must make a Willpower roll against a
target number of14. If he succeeds, he can take any action
he is physically capable of but suffers a 3 penalty on skill
and attack rolls and cannot move away from his attacker. If
he fails, he must forfeit his turn.
If a victim is reduced to 0PHY, he is knocked out. If he
is strangled beyond 0PHY, he dies. A character recovers
PHY lost as a result of strangulation at a rate of 1 point per
hour of rest.

Since then the Khadoran has been the gangs most brutal
and competent enforcer. Luka employs the garrote when
dealing with high-profile enemies of the Red Kings, and the
lengths of braided red cord he uses for the task have become
a calling card of sorts, letting the lowlifes of Merywyn
know the consequence of crossing the gang.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. For this installment of Full Metal Fridays we take a closer look at the nefarious
gangs of the Iron Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 4, Week 4:

Dead End
By Simon Berman

Hero-Level Combat Encounter


Encounter Points: 40
Adversaries: The Red Kings (street gang) including
Fynne di Vinianni, Luka Left Fist Istori, Morna
Petrork, 4 Human Thieves, 3 Human Thugs
Description: This encounter takes place in a dead-end
alley in which the Red Kings have prepared an ambush.
The characters could be their intended targets if the PCs
are known to be in Merywyn and carrying valuable
goods or if they have been targeted by any faction of
the Llaelese conflict and a contract placed on their lives.
Alternatively, the characters accidentally stumble into
an ambush the Red Kings set for an unrelated target.
Special Rules/Tactics: The Red Kings lure the characters
into the alley with cries for help by one of their lookouts.

This member of the gang lies on the ground toward the


rear of the alley, and he claims to have been robbed and
attacked. If the characters investigate, Luka Left Fist
Istori leaps from a hiding place in the alleys trash and
attempt to garrote the last character to enter the alley.
If his attempt at garroting is interrupted or no longer
tenable, he uses a quick action to equip his great axe for
the duration of the combat.
Other gang members lay concealed among the alleys
rubbish, and two of them, including the sorceress Morna
Petrork, wait on the roofs of the alleys buildings. As her
first action, she casts Wall of Fire at the alleys entrance
to prevent the characters escape. The characters can
attempt to spot these well-hidden criminals with a
successful Detection roll against a target number of16.

dead end
The Red Kings attempt to surround the characters and
offer them a chance to hand over their valuables if they
are intent on robbery, but otherwise they initiate battle
via a surprise round. If the characters initiate combat,
use the normal initiative rules.

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak

The Red Kings do not fight to the death, and if more


than three of their members are incapacitated they
attempt to flee.

garrote

POW P+S

(See previous Full Metal Friday: The Red Kings.)

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

axe, great

ARM

POW P+S

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak

pistol

R
NG AOE POW

sword

POW P+S

13

110

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)

ABILITIES
Dodger When this character is missed by an enemy attack, she can
immediately advance up to 2 after the attack is resolved unless she was missed
while advancing. She cannot be targeted by free strikes during this movement.

Intimidation 6

Immunity: Fire The character is immune to fire damage.

Roll With It When the character would ordinarily be knocked down, he


goes prone instead. The character loses this ability while he is mounted.

spells COST RNG

AOE POW UP OFF

Starter
1 8
No *
The spellcaster starts a small fire within the range of the spell and in line of
sight. This spell can be used to target an enemy, in which case it requires an
attack roll. If the enemy is hit, he suffers the Fire continuous effect.

Blood Spiller The character gains +2 on damage rolls against living


characters.

vitality
Base Size
Encounter Points

15
Small
7

Howling Flames
2 SP 8

10 No Yes
Howling Flames causes fire damage. On a critical hit, the character hit suffers
the Fire continuous effect.
Immolation
2
8
12 No Yes
Immolation causes fire damage. On a critical hit, the character hit suffers the
Fire continuous effect.
Wall of Fire
2 CTRL WALL Yes No
Place the wall template anywhere completely in the spellcasters control
area where it does not touch a characters base, an obstruction, or an
obstacle. When a character enters or ends his turn in the wall area, he suffers
an unboostable POW 12 fire damage roll and the Fire continuous effect.
Characters within the wall template gain concealment.

arcane 5
vitality
7
Base Size
Small
Encounter Points
8

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


club, banded

POW P+S

Hand Cannon

R
NG AOE POW

12

12

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)
Climbing 7, Intimidation 6, Pickpocket 7, Lock Picking 6
Anatomical Precision When this character hits a living target with a
melee attack but the damage roll fails to exceed the targets ARM, the target
suffers d3 damage points instead of the damage rolled.
Backstab This character gains an additional die on his back strike damage rolls.
Blood Spiller The character gains +2 on damage rolls against living
characters.
Dodger When this character is missed by an enemy attack, he can
immediately advance up to 2 after the attack is resolved unless he was missed
while advancing. He cannot be targeted by free strikes during this movement.

vitality 12
Base Size
Small
Encounter Points
6

dead end

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


dagger

POW P+S

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)
Climbing 7, Pickpocket 7, Lock Picking 6, Escape Artist 8

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


sword

POW P+S

pistol

R
NG AOE POW

10

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)

Dodger When this character is missed by an enemy attack, he can


immediately advance up to 2 after the attack is resolved unless he was
missed while advancing. He cannot be targeted by free strikes during this
movement.

Intimidation 5

Get Away When the character is missed by an enemy attack at any time
other than while advancing, instead of advancing up to 2, the character can
immediately make a full advance.

Anatomical Precision When this character hits a living target with a


melee attack but the damage roll fails to exceed the targets ARM, the target
suffers d3 damage points instead of the damage rolled.

vitality 5
Base Size
Small
Encounter Points
1

vitality 7
Base Size
Small
Encounter Points
5

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, warjack, warcaster,
warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc.
Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for personal, noncommercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. This month, Full Metal Fridays will examine the role of dueling in the Iron
Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 5, Week 1:

History of Dueling and


Common Equipment
By William Oz Schoonover
Dueling plays different roles in the varied cultures of
Immoren and is a prominent part of some societies. In this
first week of our look at dueling well discuss the history of
duels as well as the weapons commonly used by duelists in
the human kingdoms of modern western Immoren.

History of
Dueling
Dueling traditions in the Iron Kingdoms have roots running
deep into the regions long history. Early tribal duels to
determine primacy of status eventually became a means to
address a wide range of disputes. Use of dueling expanded
over time to cover issues of law and honor. In the modern
era few legal disputes are resolved by dueling, but crossed

blades or drawn pistols are still used to resolve many issues


of honor and ego.
During the Warlord Era many conflicts were settled with
violence, and the only thing that set duels apart from other
skirmishes was the number of participants. The Molgur
in particular came to settle many disputes of leadership,
property, succession, and hunting rights with singular
combat. While most conflicts were resolved as quickly as
they arose, duels to settle matters of great importance took
place before the whole tribe. A special area was often set
aside in the center of each community. This is the origin
of the kuor dueling platform found in the center of most
trollkin villages.
With the rise of civilization, dueling became more
structured. During the Thousand Cities Era the people of

History of Dueling and Common Equipment


the ancient kingdom of Rynyr developed stringent rules for
dueling. The Orgoth did little to stamp out the practice of
dueling specifically, but any activity that had the potential
to threaten the stability of the populace was quickly
punished.

Melee Weapons

Dueling, like many other things in western Immoren,


flourished after the Corvis Treaties. The Rynnish traditions
in the nation of Llael led to an even more established
structure for dueling that was eventually recorded into a
set of rules called The Duello. This Llaelese dueling code
established rules for many aspects of arranging the duel and
the satisfaction of honor, and it became more common for
duelists to offer their services for hire, whether temporarily
or as a member of a nobles staff. Llael is also home to many
prestigious dueling schools and has significantly influenced
the dueling cultures of its neighboring nations.

Description: A traditional tool of defense developed in


the dueling schools of Llael, the weighted cloak is used
by combatants across the Iron Kingdoms. It resembles a
common cloak, but a series of weights have been sewn into
the bottom hem. A skilled duelist can use the cloak to tangle
an enemys weapon, making it harder for an opponent to
strike him.

New Equipment
The weapons and equipment associated with dueling have
developed over the centuries. When men first began dueling
any weapon would do, but in the modern era the rapier has
become the favored weapon of many duelists. The items
here represent the current state of dueling equipment.

Military Duels
In addition to the more codified system of civilian dueling,
there have been many instances of single combat between
two rival leaders deciding the outcome of a battle. While this
type of personal combat lacks most of the rules associated
with formal dueling, it is commonly allowed to take place
without interference from warriors of either side. One of
the earliest examples of this is the confrontation between
Horfar Grimmr and Priest-King Golivant. Twice during their
fateful battle beneath the Shield of Thrace they clashed. The
tide of battle separated them for a time, but as the Molgur
forces began to lose, Grimmr sought to end the battle by
killing Golivant. More recently, the most significant combat
of this nature, between Lord Commander Stryker and
Hierarch Voyle, resulted in the cessation of major hostilities
between Cygnar and the Protectorate and a change in the
leadership of a nation.
Ancient dueling traditions still persist among the wild
peoples of Immoren, such as the Tharn. One of the most
notable formal duels in all of recorded history saw a
confrontation between the traditions of tribal society and
a more modern duelist. At the end of the Siege of Midfast,
Markus Graza used his knowledge of tribal custom to
challenge the fourteen chiefs of the barbarian tribes
assailing the city and delay the full brunt of their forces
upon the people there. Over the course of seven days he
successively defeated each chief in single combat, only
succumbing to his wounds after finishing the final duel.
With his death he became an ascendant of Morrow, bringing
brought an end to the siege.

Cloak, Weighted
Cost: 10 gc

To use a weighted cloak, a character must spend a quick


action to take it up and wrap it around his off hand. A
character cannot make attacks with that hand while using
the cloak. Anyone in the front arc of a character using a
weighted cloak suffers 1 on melee attack rolls targeting
that character.

Dueling Buckler
Cost: 10 gc
Skill: Hand Weapon
Attack Modifier: 1
POW: 0
Description: The dueling buckler is a small shield gripped
in the off hand. Useful in deflecting strikes in a melee, the
dueling buckler can also be used as a weapon to deliver
jabbing blows with its flat face or rim.
Special Rules: A character armed with a dueling buckler
who does not attack with it during his turn can use a quick
action to gain +1ARM against melee attacks originating in
his front arc for one round. The dueling buckler cannot be
used while also carrying a shield.

Dueling Pistols
Cost: 100+ gc per pair
Effective Range: 60 feet (10)
Extreme Range: 300 feet
Ammo: 1 (light round)
Skill: Pistol
Attack Modifier: +1 (firing a custom bullet), 0 (firing a
standard light round)
POW: 10
Description: These typically exquisite firearms are sold as
a pair in an ornate box along with fine powder horns and a
custom gunsmiths kit for casting bullets for the pistols. The
design of these weapons has changed little for hundreds
of years, as they are intended as instruments for highly
ritualized aristocratic duels rather than as weapons of war.
Special Rules: Antiquated as they are, dueling pistols are
very difficult to load, taking a full action rather than a
standard quick action.
A dueling pistol firing a bullet manufactured with the
casting kit that comes with the weapon gains +1 to its attack
roll. A dueling pistol firing any other round does not gain
this bonus.

History of Dueling and Common Equipment

Tournament Foil
Cost: 10 gc
Skill: Hand Weapon
Attack Modifier: 0
POW: 0
Description: The tournament foil is specifically designed
to facilitate sporting duels without risk of major injury. It
is capable of causing pain and bruising but cannot cause
mortal injury. It is long and slender with unsharpened
edges. At the tip of the blade is a three-pronged point
designed to catch on an opponents clothing so touches can
easily be seen by a judge.
Special Rules: This weapon cannot reduce any aspect of a
characters life spiral to less than 1 vitality.

Armor
Plastron
Cost: 20 gc
SPD Modifier: 0
DEF Modifier: 0
ARM Modifier: +2
Description: This is a light quilted-leather vest worn by
duelists while practicing and during sporting competitions.
While it does offer some protection against practice
weapons, it does little to protect its wearer in true combat.
Special Rules: None.

When using the tournament foil in a non-lethal duel a


successful attack roll against an opponent counts as a touch.

Practice Equipment
The tournament foil and the plastron are recent inventions
that owe their existence to a recent growth in organized
exhibitions of dueling skill.
Many dueling schools still teach with swords with blunted
blades, but some have adopted the tournament foil as a
standard weapon.
Professional duelists find it hard to take a fight seriously
when these items are employed. Many exiled Llaelese nobles
sponsor sporting tournaments specifically for dueling that
offer large enough prize purses to make even the proudest
duelist lower himself to using non-lethal equipment.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Convergence of Cyriss, Convergence,
Cryx, Cygnar, Khador, Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods,
Trollblood, warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for
personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and more
on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game Masters can
drop right into games. This month, Full Metal Fridays will examine the role of dueling in the Iron Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 5, Week 2:

Incorporating Dueling
into a Game
By William Oz Schoonover
Although dueling has a place in the Iron Kingdoms, it does not
fit into every situation and should not be used to resolve every
disagreement that arises. For example, in high society the
entire process of a duel from the time of the initial challenge
to the resolution of the combat can take up to a week, making
a duel a poor choice for quickly resolving a conflict.
It is also important to remember a duel is a combat that
follows an established set of rules, not just any time two
characters have a fight.

When to Duel
As the Game Master, the first thing to consider when
deciding if a duel is an appropriate response to a situation
is the parties involved in the altercation. Among the
upper levels of society in the Iron Kingdoms dueling

is an appropriate recourse to an affront, but not every


conflict escalates to combat. If someone has given offense
unknowingly, the matter can be resolved simply by the offer
and acceptance of an apology. If the issue is not directly
related to a matter of honor, such as in the case of two
nobles with a business dispute, the participants are just as
likely to try and settle their disagreement with negotiation
as they are to resort to a duel. The only time a duel is sure to
be unavoidable is if the conflict involves the honor of one of
the parties, for instance if one is accused of being a coward.
Along with considering the culture of the parties in question,
also consider their stations in life. Although it is common for
duels to take place between gentlemen in Ord, for example,
organized duels are less common among the lower classes
of that kingdom, who prefer to answer slights on family
honor with an immediate unregulated brawl. When the

Incorporating Dueling into a Game


poor or criminal elements of the Iron Kingdoms resolve a
dispute with violence, there are rarely any rules involved.
It is also considered inappropriate to challenge a member of
a significantly lower class to a duel, and anyon can ignore a
challenge without damage to his reputation if the challenger
is from a significantly lower standing. A player can, of
course, choose to ignore these customs.

Setting Up a Duel
The Llaelese dueling code, The Duello, has been widely
adopted as the standard set of rules for dueling across the
Iron Kingdoms. It establishes protocols governing a number
of aspects of dueling, though some are taken more literally
than others. For instance, traditionally it was a rare member
of the Llaelese aristocracy who did not keep a professional
duelist among his retainers. Many refugee Llaelese nobles
now living in Ord and Cygnar have found it difficult to
continue paying the fees of these professional duelists,
which has contributed to a larger number of skilled killers
looking for employment.

The Duello
A challenge to duel must be issued publicly and chance
given for an apology to be proffered. If the challenged gives
no apology, the challenge is accepted. A challenge may be
ignored should it be of a trivial nature or from a trivial person.
Challenges are never delivered at night, for it is desirable
to proceed with grace and allow sufficient time for apology.
The challenged and the challenger must choose seconds of
equal station to their own.
The challenged chooses the ground; the challenger chooses
the distance; the seconds fix the time and terms of firing.
The challenged and the challenger decide upon the terms of
victory, which are assumed to be the drawing of first blood
unless otherwise specified.
Upon meeting at the ground, if the cause of the challenge is
such that no apology or explanation can or will be received,
the challenged takes his ground and calls on the challenger
to proceed.

Whatever the cause, the first part of a duel is the challenge.


After an incident worthy of a duel has occurred a public
challenge must be given, and then there must be sufficient
time allowed for the challenged individual to offer an
apology. If an apology is offered and accepted, the honor of
both parties is preserved without the need for confrontation.
On occasion, however, the injured party is eager to meet on
the dueling ground and will refuse all apologies made.

No apology can be received after the parties have taken


the ground until there has been an exchange of fire or an
engagement with blades.

After a challenge has been accepted, both duelists choose


their seconds. These seconds act as assistants, judges, and
replacements if necessary, particularly if the duelists are
of vastly disproportionate skill or physical ability. After
seconds are chosen they confer to decide the terms of the
duel. The challenged party chooses where the duel will
occur, and the challenger chooses at what distance the duel
will be fought. The seconds negotiate more specific details:
the weapons to be used, the time the duel will begin, and so
on. One of the most important aspects of the duel that must
be decided are the terms of victory. The most common is
first blood, but the duelists can also agree to fight until one
party submits or is killed.

Where seconds disagree and resolve to exchange shots


themselves, it must be at the same time as the principals.

When the appointed time arrives, the parties meet at the


chosen location. At this point there is still a chance that an
apology can resolve the conflict. Once the challenged party
takes his ground, however, no apology can prevent the
duel. Finally, the seconds inspect the weapons to be used. If
those are firearms, they are loaded in the presence of both
seconds before this inspection.
When both seconds are satisfied by the weapons, the parties
face off against each other. In a duel with melee weapons,
combat is usually initiated after both parties have made
it known that they are ready. When firearms are involved
the terms of the duel are arranged to include whether both
parties will fire at a signal such as the chiming of a nearby
clock tower, at the call of a judge, or when they choose.

The seconds load pistols or inspect blades in the presence


of each other.
Firing may be regulatedfirst by signal; second by word of
command; or third at pleasure, as is agreeable to the parties.
In all cases a misfire is equivalent to a shot.

Once the terms of victory are met or if both principals


can or will no longer continue, the seconds must attempt
reconciliation. If the challenged will not accept reconciliation
at this point, a second meeting must be arranged.

After the duel has started, the seconds act as judges to


determine not only who has won the duel but also when
the terms of honor have been met.

Deloping
It is a common practice in a duel that is only being fought to
save face for the participants to discharge their pistols at the
ground and have their seconds declare that honor has been
satisfied. This practice, known as deloping, permits duelists
to preserve not only their honor, but also their lives. Deloping
in a duel is a risky gambit, however: if the opponent does
not also deign to do so, a duelist has essentially given his
opponent a free shot at him.

Incorporating Dueling into a Game

The Quick-Draw Showdown

A pistol duel is fought with the participants facing off


against each other with pistols in hand and taking a shot
at the agreed time. With the reduction of pistol cost due
to advances in manufacturing over the last few centuries,
there has been a growing trend for a new style of conflict
resolution among gunmen that shares some similarities
with dueling but does not follow its rules.
The quick-draw showdown is popular among the lower
classes, in the wilder areas of western Immoren, and
among the growing number of adventurers who consider
themselves pistoleers. The object of the conflict is usually
the resolution of an argument, but it can also simply
be a test to see who is the more skilled combatant. For
this showdown, the two gunmen face off with holstered
weapons. The competition is a combination of intimidating
the other participant, drawing weapons as quickly as
possible, and making an accurate shot.
The characters first make a contested Intimidation roll.
The loser of this roll suffers a 2 penalty to his Initiative.
The characters then make initiative rolls and follow the
standard rules for combat.

Dueling among
Non-Humans
The descriptions of dueling offered above focus on how
dueling is handled in the human societies of Immoren,
but dueling is also a regular aspect of other cultures. The
approach to dueling and the specific customs surrounding
it vary widelymost non-human races do not choose
seconds for their duels, for examplebut on the whole
dueling is embraced as a sometimes necessary method for
settling otherwise irreconcilable disputes.

Ios

Ios has an uncomfortable relationship with duels, which


are technically illegal but still practiced among the
aristocracy in particular. Historically the government
has had limited success in interfering with the internal
disputes of its myriad noble houses and their well-armed
sons and daughters. Iosans approach these duels with
great seriousness and have long employed them as a means
to confront an accuser, settle a bitter rivalry, or resolve a
matter quickly and privately and therefore avoid public
scandal or dishonor to ones house. Despite the practice
being considered slightly disreputable, victors earn a
certain prestige.
Considerable ceremony accompanies these duels, which
must include uninvolved parties bearing witness on both
sides, these having a similar role as seconds in the human
kingdoms. Duels are always conducted in secrecy, at a preestablished place and time. The weapons and method of the
duel varies considerably and are determined ahead of time.
Arcane duels are possible if both parties are skilled in such

arts, but most are fought with melee weapons. The notion of a
duel with ranged weapons would never occur to most Iosans,
as it undermines the private and personal nature of the clash.
Most of these duels are fought to first blood, but sometimes
the participants agree to fight to the death. Accidental
deaths also occur, of course. In the case of a death, the
witnesses are tasked to bring word of the outcome to
necessary friends and family. So long as the duel was
conducted honorably there is an expectation that there will
be no retaliation or legal consequences brought against the
surviving party. Nonetheless, noble houses have sometimes
harbored longstanding enmity over such fatalities.
Iosans living outside of that nation rarely initiate duels,
but those born to certain families may be familiar with the
practice. Duels between Iosans in human lands happen
from time to time, kept as private and secret as those in
Ios. Otherwise an Iosans attitude toward the practice may
vary depending on the nation in which he lives. An Iosan
who has spent most of his life in Llael, for instance, may
be entirely comfortable with the Code Duello and even
become a professional duelist.

Rhul

The dwarves of Rhul have laws governing every aspect of


their society, and dueling is no exception. As a matter of
cultural tradition, any severe dispute can be resolved by
martial effort, either as a larger feud between entire clans
or as individual duels. These clashes are governed by rules
so detailed and exacting that they are a standard area of
specialization among legal experts in Rhul. In general,
other avenues of reconciliation be exhausted before a
duel is considered appropriate. A trade embargo against
a rival clan might be appropriate, for instance, but if the
other clan still refuses to submit, combat can then legally
be employed. These clashes can take the form of a limited
skirmish between clan warriors or can be decided by a duel
of champions. At both the larger and smaller scales there
are specific rules governing how these battles can begin, be
conducted, and be resolved. Every effort is made to prevent
larger duels from spilling over to uninvolved parties or
otherwise disrupting ordinary business.
Although the rules governing the circumstances and
structures of Rhulic duels and feuds are labyrinthine by nonRhulic standards, the most complex of these stipulations
are reserved for the larger clashes. Individual duels are
more straightforward; Rhulic clan lords and warriors are
generally conversant with the particulars and quickly come
to an agreement in most cases. The laws pertinent to these
contests focus on making them as fair as possible, such as
by stipulating parity of weaponry and skill and by allowing
for seconds and champions to fight by proxy. Witnesses are
required for the outcome of a duel to carry the weight of
law. On matters of importance, Rhulfolk prefer a priest be
employed as witness and judge, as such individuals are
fully versed in the legal and ritual procedures. If a duel
involves members of the same clan, the clan lord may be
invited to stand as judge instead of or in addition to a priest
of the Great Fathers.

Incorporating Dueling into a Game


The duelists for a particular fight are usually chosen so as
to take the best advantage of the agreement reached for that
duel; often the only stake the participants themselves have
in the fight is the honor of their clan. Because the Rhulfolk
place particular importance on clan loyalty, however, every
clan can choose from among a wealth of volunteers for such
duels. It is not uncommon for complex duels to be arranged
for involving multiple combatants, or several in a row.
These are still considered duels so long as the fighting is
one-on-one in each case.
When a dispute goes beyond small groups to involve two or
more entire clans, it is deemed a feud. Feuds can be employed
to determine the outcome of major contract disputes,
including the rights to significant construction projects or
other lucrative work. A clans fortunes can easily rise or fall
based on the outcome of a feud, and so entire well-armed
clan forces, including steamjacks, can be dispatched to wage
them. Although organized similarly to smaller duels, feuds
may require the witnessing presence of higher authorities
such as moot judges, who represent the Moot of the Hundred
Houses in Ghord. It is the priority of a moot judge to ensure
that feuds do not escalate or destroy protected property, such
as important buildings. All decisions of a moot judge are
final and binding, becoming law.
Clan lords can earn considerable acclaim and honor by
interceding to end a long-standing feud by personal
combat against their rival clan lord, although most such
matches can be decided by proxy champions. A duel of this
nature carries considerable risk, particularly for the clan
with military superiority. Some smaller clans are adroit at
leveraging challenges of honor to force an otherwise more
powerful adversary into a position where they would lose
respect and prestige by refusing a personal duel. Similarly,
a moot judge can force a one-on-one duel between clan
champions to quickly resolve a feud that has escalated and
begun to threaten the public peace.

Skorne

A large portion of the population of the Skorne Empire is


made up of members of the warrior caste, who live by the
hoksune code. One of the core philosophies of this code states
that a true warrior truly lives only while risking his life
in combat. Additionally warriors are taught to beware the
path of least resistance and to seek the harder path in order
to reap the benefits of the obstacles they must overcome. To
a skorne warrior, every injury and every minute of pain is a
lesson that allows them to forge their strength.
To understand the skorne outlook on dueling one must
understand the caste system. Very regimented, this system
offers many opportunities for an individual to find insult
in the actions or words of anyone who is a member of his
own or a lower caste. Honor is a vitally important concept
to the warriors of the skorne and is bound up in ones duty
to ones caste, house, and superiors as well as in personal
adherence to hoksune. Killing another over a perceived
insult or challenge to ones honor is perfectly acceptable and
proper behavior. Peers consider the death of a combatant as
an affirmation of his weakness and the end of the matter.

Along with the emphasis on mastery of weapons, which are


worn at all times, these aspects of skorne culture contribute
to an environment where dueling is a major part of life. A
challenge to fight may be offered and answered between
skorne warriors even without any perceived slight or
insult, purely to test the mettle and prowess of a peer or a
subordinate. As a matter of honor these fights are not to the
death, but they can still result in bloodshed and injury. The
need to answer insults or overt challenges of honor might
prompt an immediate duel, with the drawing of weapons
and a clash begun at once and with little ritual.
More important and severe challenges, such as aspersions
on house leaders or high-ranking officers, might result in
formal duels at a specific time and location, and these are
usually attended by any house members with an interest in
the outcome. Most significant houses have a fighting arena
set aside for this purpose as well as fighting instruction and
sparring between house leaders and officers. When a duel
is arranged, it is most common for the participants to wield
whichever weapon they are most familiar with. In cases
where a clearly superior combatant faces an inferior, the
more skilled warrior may gain the respect of his peers by
putting aside familiar weapons to employ those with which
he is less comfortable.
The most ritualized duels in skorne society occur yearly
during the Trials of the Aspirant Praetorians. During this
time young skorne who hope to join the ranks of a great
houses Praetorians participate in numerous sword duels to
prove themselves worthy of the honor of membership.
Vinter Raelthornes conquest of the skorne was greatly
aided by the significance they place on dueling. As he
traveled across the skorne empire toward Halaak, Vinter
subjugated house after house by defeating their lords and
champions in duels and absorbing their military strength
into his own force. His last act as supreme archdominar
has already become legend, whereby he single-handedly
defeated an entire room of tyrants and dominars, including
killing several with their own weapons.

Tharn

Among the savage Tharn, duels are less structured and far
more brutal. Power among these tribes is usually determined
by who is strongest and fiercest, a status that is hard won
through many bloody conflicts. When a tribes leader begins
to show age or weakness, for example, it is not long before he
begins facing challenges from its younger members.
A typical Tharn duel begins with the challenger calling to
the challenged, boasting of his own prowess while casting
doubt on the abilities of the challenged. The challenged can
continue this verbal exchange, but often the response is a
roar of rage as both parties channel the Devourer and then
violently clash. There is no special area set aside for these
conflicts, which can range through the village in a frenzied
path of destruction.

Incorporating Dueling into a Game


The fight usually ends once one of the combatants
demonstrates clear dominance over the other. A duel can
certainly be fought to the death, though, and the victor may
decide to kill his adversary to make an example of him,
particularly in duels for tribal leadership. Due to the brutal
nature of Tharn fighting, it is not uncommon for combatants
(and sometimes observers) to suffer grievous injuries in these
clashes. A Tharn can find his place in the tribe significantly
lowered if he is maimed, and the standing of any combatant
who begs for mercy is permanently damaged.

Trollkin

Dueling is an accepted way to deal with many disagreements


in trollkin society, and combatants gain and lose influence
and reputation based not only on victories and losses but
also on a complex assessment of the contest and their
performance in it. Whatever the purpose of the duel, it takes
place at the kriels kuar, a huge stone platform in the center
of the village that serves as both a gathering place for the
kriel and an arena to settle scores through confrontation.
Trollkin usually fight their duels with whatever weapon they
are most familiar with. The most common choices are axes
and hammers, but any weapon is considered acceptable, and
more than one trollkin has made a point of spurning weapons
altogether to fight bare-handed. Regardless of the weapon
chosen, combatants are expected to fight honorably, and the
numerous spectators intervene if cheating is suspected. In
most of these clashes, forcing an opponent off the platform
grants victory to the one remaining.

While melee duels are the most common and exciting for
spectators, trollkin leaders sometimes use other means to
best one another either atop the kuar or anywhere the kin
can gather in number to witness. Direct feats of strength
and stamina such as arm-wrestling or drinking may be
undertaken by two trollkin to take the measure of the other.
Shamans, elders, fell callers, and chroniclers may face one
another for a verbal duel, an intense debate involving
heated words along with tricks of oratory, seeking to not
only prove their position but also sway those listening.
Losing one of these duels can be just as severe to a trollkins
standing as a loss by weapons, as being shamed or proven
foolish can unseat a chieftain. There is also a variant of the
Tohmaak Mahkeiri ceremony whereby two trollkin stand
close and stare into one anothers eyes, trying to force the
other to back down by sheer force of will. This ceremony
has superstitious and mystical overtones among the
trollkin, who claim participants can peer into the soul of
the other and gauge their true worth. Long minutes or even
hours can pass in such a mental confrontation; if it becomes
clear to both that they are deadlocked, a physical duel will
commence to settle the matter.
It is common practice for the younger members of a
trollkin community to take part in many duels to establish
a reputation. It is also not unheard of for leaders in the
community to face off to resolve a conflict that cannot
be decided by other means. In his rise to power Hoarluk
Doomshaper challenged countless elders to duels, both
physical and mental, and was never defeated.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Convergence of Cyriss, Convergence,
Cryx, Cygnar, Khador, Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods,
Trollblood, warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies for
personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. This month, Full Metal Fridays will examine the role of dueling in the Iron
Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 5, Week 3:

Ways to Use Dueling


By William Oz Schoonover
This weeks Full Metal Friday offers ways for both Game
Masters and players to use dueling in a game. Plot hooks
give the Game Master a situational premise, providing
enough background and motivation to build adventures
on. The maneuvers are new gameplay options for Duelist
characters to use in a fight.

Plot Hooks for


Duelists
The invasion of Llael has forced many dueling masters,
professional duelists, and nobles with a love of dueling to
find new homesand in some cases new employment. This
provides many opportunities for dueling to be incorporated
into an ongoing campaign. The following are just a few of
the many ways dueling can be the focus of a game.

The Exiled Noble

The Llaelese aristocracy patronized many dueling schools,


employed a large number of professional duelists, and
contributed heavily to the popularity of dueling. Nobles
who have fled the turmoil in Llael have taken their
traditions, and in some cases their dueling retainers, with
them into exile. This has strengthened the dueling cultures
of both Ord and Cygnar.
Game Masters wishing to include dueling in their
campaigns can use these nobles in any number of ways.
Here is one example:
A noble seeking to make a name for himself in his newly
adopted home is sponsoring an exhibition of dueling skill
at his villa outside of Mercir. In addition to building his
own esteem in the community, he is using the event to seek
a skilled duelist to add to his staff.

ways to use Dueling


Entrance in the tournament is free, so any of the player
characters can participate. It is common knowledge that
many prominent duelists will be competing, which will
make winning quite a challenge. The tournament winner
will receive a monetary reward and be offered a permanent
position as a bodyguard to the noble, who fears an assassin
has been hired to kill him.
The catch is that one of the tournament competitors is in fact
an assassin hired to kill the noble. He hopes to be offered
the bodyguard position to make completing his contract a
simple task.

The Newly Established


School

A famous master duelist has recently opened a school in the


Ordic city of Midfast. The masters renown has made his
school an instant success.
The school is secretly a base for the Llaelese Resistance.
After hours the building is used for meetings and as a
location for organizing shipments of weapons and supplies
back to Llael. Capable fighters who enroll in the school are
recruited to guard the shipments in transit.
Khadoran intelligence agents are aware that aid shipments
are being smuggled into occupied Llael and are close to
tracing the shipments to Midfast. Having caught wind of
the Khadoran threat, the schools founder is readying his
students for battle and spreading word among the mercenary
community that he is looking for some capable adventurers.
If the party has any interest in making allies with the
Resistance, fighting to defend the shipments is certain
to make them friends in the right places. If the party is
unaffiliated or aligned with Khador in some way, they can
be brought in on the other side of the conflict to help put an
end to the shipments.

The Call of the Clan

The local branch of a Rhulic player characters clan has


had a dispute with another locally represented clan over
the shipment of goods. Tensions are high at home, and his
clan is not in the position to start a full-blown feud with its
rivals. In addition, the clan does not have a large number of
members in the area.
A senior member of the other clan comes forward with the
offer of a compromise: resolve the dispute through a duel,
and the issue will not be brought to the notice of the lords
of either clan. Although his own clan would likely win an
extended feud because of their numbers, such a situation
would incur unknown costs in damages as well as potential
injuries he would rather not risk. Additionally, his clan
has access to a formidable champion who has won many
duels, while the PC clan has no one of similar standing. The
clan representative keeps this information to himself and
focuses on the expediency of a duel whose winner will gain
a favorable position in the negotiations.

The dwarf player character will check in with his clans local
estate, as is Rhulic custom. His clans lack of manpower in
this area means that he is their best option for a champion
in the duel.

Dueling
Maneuvers
The following are a list of maneuvers taught in Llaelese
dueling schools. In order to use a maneuver, a character
must have the required prerequisites.
Most of these maneuvers can be used only while armed
with a light one-handed weapon, like the rapier. Attempting
them with heavier weapons is strenuous and slow, all too
often resulting in being run through by a better-equipped
swordsman. The Game Master has final say on whether or
not a weapon is appropriate for any the following maneuvers.

Deflecting Strike
Prerequisite: Duelist, light one-handed weapon, Hand
Weapon 3
Description: Although it is a strike, the purpose of this
maneuver is not to wound the opponent but to deflect his
weapon out of position, making a return strike much more
difficult.
Special Rules: The deflecting strike is a melee attack that
causes no damage. If the attack hits, for one round the target
character suffers a 2 penalty to his next melee attack roll.

Feint*
Prerequisite: Unarmed Combat 2
Description: A character with the proper degree of skill
can attempt to mislead his opponent with a false attack to
put him off balance and make it easier to hit that opponent
with follow-up attacks.
Special Rules: A character can spend 1 feat point to make
a feint attack while armed with a one-handed weapon
or great weapon. He makes an attack roll using PRW +
Unarmed Combat. If the attack hits, the target takes no
damage but suffers 2 DEF for one round.
A character with Unarmed Combat 3 or more can advance
1 after a successful feint attack roll.
* The Feint maneuver also appears in No Quarter Presents
Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Urban
Adventure.

ways to use Dueling

Hidden Guard

Turning Riposte

Prerequisite: Duelist, light one-handed weapon, Hand


Weapon 2

Prerequisite: Duelist, light one-handed weapon, Hand


Weapon 2

Attack Modifier: 0

Description: This footwork maneuver allows the duelist to


quickly change his position in response to an opponents
attack.

Description: This specialized overhand parry protects a


swordsmans backline and is a favorite of flashy duelists
seeking to outshine their opponents.
Special Rules: A character using this maneuver spends 1
feat point and uses a quick action. For one round enemies
cannot claim melee attack back strike bonuses against him.

Lashing Strike
Prerequisite: Duelist, light one-handed weapon, Hand
Weapon 2

Special Rules: When this character is missed by a melee


attack, he can change his facing before making his Riposte
attack. If he does, he suffers a 2 penalty to his Riposte
attack roll.
A character with AGL 6 or higher can advance up to 1
before making his Riposte attack. If he does, he suffers the
penalty described above.

Attack Modifier: 0
Description: A broad circular cut favored by those who
fight with curved swords, the lashing strike hits with
extreme force but is a slow maneuver compared to many of
the classical dueling moves.
Special Rules: A character using this maneuver can spend
1 feat point to increase the POW of a melee attack by +2.
For one round after using the lashing strike a character
is not considered to have a melee range, does not engage
other characters, and cannot make additional attacks or
free strikes.

Copyright 20012013 Privateer Press, inc. All Rights Reserved. Privateer


Press, Iron Kingdoms, Immoren, Full Metal Fantasy, Cryx, Cygnar, Khador,
Protectorate of Menoth, Protectorate, Retribution of Scyrah, Retribution, Circle
Orboros, Circle, Legion of Everblight, Legion, Skorne, Trollbloods, Trollblood,
warcaster, warjack, warbeast, and all associated logos are trademarks of
Privateer Press, Inc. Permission is hereby granted to make photocopies
for personal, non-commercial use only.

We at Privateer Press are very excited that Iron Kingdoms Full Metal Fantasy Roleplaying Game: Kings,
Nations, and Gods releases later this year. To celebrate, were counting down to launch day with free new RPG
content every Friday! From now until launch, youll be able to download new careers, equipment, monsters, and
more on Full Metal Fridays. Each month will showcase a different theme and will culminate in an event Game
Masters can drop right into games. This month, Full Metal Fridays will examine the role of dueling in the Iron
Kingdoms.
Check back every Friday for new Iron Kingdoms RPG content!

Installment 5, Week 4:

The Nobles Tournament


By William Oz Schoonover
Hero-Level Combat Encounter
Adversaries: Denys Manet, Mirek Orlov, Human Duelists
(as necessary)
Description: This series of encounters take place in and
around a sporting dueling tournament sponsored by an
exiled Llaelese noble.
The noble is sponsoring the tournament as a recruitment
tool, as he lost all his most capable retainers in the fall of
Llael. He is most eager to fill a bodyguard position since
he has recently learned that there may be a contract out on
his life. The event has drawn many duelists, one of whom
is an assassin.

Scene 1: Before
the Tournament
The characters have become aware of a dueling tournament
taking place in Kings Vine. The tournament is being
sponsored by a prominent exiled Llaelese earl named
Armand Feraud. The contests will use non-lethal weapons
provided by the host, and the winner will claim a significant
purse as a reward. Registration for the tournament is being
held in a nearby tavern and is open to all comers.

The Nobles Tournament

Gathering Information

When the characters arrive in town they can seek out


additional information about the event. The local taverns
offer many easily overheard conversations. Ferauds family
has maintained an estate near Kings Vine for at least one
hundred years. He arrived in the city days before the invasion
of Llael. This could mean that he has very high connections
who warned him to flee or that he is simply very lucky.
Feraud previously employed a few well-known retainers
who did not arrive with him and have not been seen since
the invasion. Rumors abound regarding what happened to
those individuals, with the consensus being that they must
be dead. Many of the townsfolk speculate Feraud is holding
the tournament to recruit staff and will offer the winner, and
possibly other skilled duelists, a position.
A character with the Streetwise skill can gather additional
information. Without making a roll, any character trained in
Streetwise hears rumors in the tavern that someone has put
out a contract on Ferauds life. On a roll of 12 the character
learns that there is at least one assassin attempting to kill
Feraud. On a roll of 14 the character learns that the assassin
has entered the dueling tournament.

The Reception

Registration for the tournament takes place over four hours


at a large tavern called the Drunken Jack. The wait to
register is never more than fifteen minutes.
In the evening, after registration has been closed for an
hour, there is a reception at Ferauds estate a short distance
outside of Kings Vine to honor the tournament participants.
Numerous nobles and other prominent members of the
community are also in attendance. The event offers the
duelists a chance to gauge their potential opponents and
allows the spectators a first look at the combatants. Many
of the wealthy spectators begin betting on the upcoming
competitions; a large amount of money will exchange hands
over the course of the tournament. If the player characters
did not discover all the information about the assassin
earlier, they overhear several of the partygoers gossiping
about it during the reception.
As the attendees mingle, two names are brought up more
than any others: Denys Manet and Mirek Orlov. These men
are the obvious favorites to win the tournament, and one
of the two is most likely the assassin sent after Feraud. The
player characters can mingle during the reception to gather
more information about the two duelists. The reception
attendees have six pieces of information about Manet and
Orlov, but not all of them are true.

Each detail comes from a different individual at the


reception, and the attendees response to the effort of
gathering the information varies depending on the approach
a player character uses. The Game Master should feel free to
add further bonuses or penalties to the roll as appropriate
(deciding, for instance, that the Riverboat Captain is much
more receptive to a character who introduces himself
by offering him a drink). The target number for learning
a detail is 16. Rolls can be made using Bribery, Etiquette,
Interrogation, Negotiation, or Seduction. For the purposes
of these checks, these skills suggest slightly different and
broader use of these social skills than their description in
the Core Rules. For example, Seduction can represent flattery
and a general attempt to charm, Negotiation can represent
a discussion with an implied exchange of future favors, and
Intimidation can represent simply being a bit more forceful
and firm in ones requests.
Each detail can be verified from other sources. Once a
detail is learned it can be included in a conversation with
another source to attempt to verify it. A character confirms
or denies information without requiring a roll.
The following describes the significant attendees at the
reception, the modifiers to skill rolls when interacting with
them, which detail they know, and which facts they can verify.

The Shipping Magnate


The shipping magnate is in his late 50s. He is a self-made
man and responds well to flattery.
Modifiers: +2 to rolls using Seduction, 2 to rolls using
Intimidation
Detail: He and Orlovs father were both riverboat captains
on the Black River twenty years ago. They knew each other
well, and Orlovs father was always honorable.
Confirmation: The shipping magnate knows that Orlov is
not a Khadoran, disproving the egotistical duelist. Orlovs
family has Umbrean roots, but he was born in Llael.

The Baron
The baron is a local Cygnaran noble in his late 60s. He does
not like to be badgered.
Modifiers: +2 to rolls using Etiquette, 2 to rolls using
Negotiation, No roll for Cygnaran characters with the
Aristocrat career
Detail: Orlovs family lost everything in the invasion of
Llael. Hes been seen in the company of river pirates and
other shady characters.
Confirmation: The baron confirms that Orlovs father was
a riverboat captain who started a small shipping company
based in Merywyn prior to the Khadoran invasion.

The Nobles Tournament

The Hapless Duelist


The hapless duelist is wearing fine clothes that show a bit
of wear and tear. He is afraid that others dont think he
belongs here.
Modifiers: +2 to rolls using Bribery, 2 to rolls using
Intimidation
Detail: Manet looks a lot like a man who lost a duel against
a Mercir nobles second four years ago. That man went by
the name Collins and suffered a wound to the chest that
ended the duel.
Confirmation: The hapless duelist was on the same boat
with Manet and fought alongside him against the bog trogs,
confirming the river boat captains statement.

The Courtesan
The courtesan is a woman in her mid 20s. She quickly grows
bored with flattery.
Modifiers: +2 to rolls using Interrogation, 2 to rolls using
Seduction, No roll for characters with the Highwayman
career
Detail: Manet is a master duelist who served the Llaelese
crown.
Confirmation: The courtesan confirms Manet has a scar on
his chest from a sword cut.

Scene 2:
The Tournament
The tournament begins on the morning following the
reception. It uses a single-elimination format, and all the
contests are fought in a single day.
Every player character taking part in the tournament faces
off with a human duelist (see below) during the first round
of the tournament. Manet and Orlov also fight human
duelists and win. If there are multiple player characters that
pass the first round they face each other during the second
round. If only one player character wins his first match he
faces another human duelist in the second round. Manet
and Orlov fight each other during the second round, and
Orlov is the victor. If a player character wins in the second
round he faces Orlov in the final round.

A Note on Time
The description of the length of the tournament given
assumes a limited field with only one or two player characters
participating. If an entire party enters the tournament it
will go longer than three rounds. For a larger tournament
the bouts are spread over two days. In the case of a longer
tournament, Manet and Orlov duel on the second day.

The Riverboat Captain


The captain is a gruff, finely dressed man. His clothing is
a few seasons past fashionable, but he takes offense to any
suggestions that he has come on hard times and is anything
but prosperous.
Modifiers: +2 to rolls using Etiquette, 2 to rolls using
Intimidation or Negotiation
Detail: Manet arrived in the city on the captains boat. He
helped fend off a bog trog raid as they passed through the
Marchfells.
Confirmation: The riverboat captain has seen Orlov fight
in disreputable fight clubs in other ports, confirming the
barons statement.

The Egotistical Duelist


The egotistical duelist is full of himself. He will posture
loudly but quickly backs down from a real confrontation.
Modifiers: +2 to rolls using Intimidation, 2 to rolls using
Seduction
Detail: Orlov is secretly a Khadoran. He speaks in a fake
Llaelese accent.
Confirmation: The egotistical duelist served the Llaelese
crown and has never met Manet.

Player characters not participating in the competition are


spectators. They can make side bets and take notes on
the fighting techniques of potential opponents for their
friends. A character who watches a bout can make an INT
roll against a target number of 12 to gain insight about
the way a character fights. If the roll succeeds he can pass
this information on to give a character facing the observed
duelist a free reroll during a bout.

Bouts
Each round of the tournament is a bout. Each bout is fought
until a participant has scored three touches. In order to
score a touch a character must hit his opponent with a melee
attack. All participants are armed with tournament foils.
The two combatants face off six feet apart and roll initiative.
They fight until a touch is scored. After each touch there is
a reset. The reset consists of both participants returning to
their starting positions and rolling again for initiative.
When a participant has scored three touches, the bout is
over and the winner is declared. Feraud has hired several
line judges to ensure the bouts are fought honorably and
without cheating. If a character is observed cheating,
such as using magic or being under the influence of
alchemical enhancement, he is immediately evicted from
the tournament.

The Nobles Tournament

Scene 3: The Attack


After the tournament has ended Earl Feraud invites a few
participants, including Orlov and the player characters,
to stay the night in his mansion. If the player characters
performed well it is recognition for their abilities.
Conversely, if they were unable to secure victory in their
bouts, the earl has seen their potential and wants to foster
it. The ceremony to award the winner will be held the next
morning, and Feraud wants to speak with his guests about
a private matter over breakfast.
As the other spectators and duelist leave the mansion
everyone who is staying overnight is shown to richly
appointed rooms. If the player characters check, Orlov is
not in his room.
Shortly after midnight there is a loud disturbance at the front
gate. One of the losing duelists is drunk and demanding to
see the earl, noisily complaining that his opponent was a
cheater and demanding the opportunity to redeem himself.
The estates staff attempts to calm the man down and send
him away without resorting to violence. The altercation is
loud enough to wake people sleeping in the house, and most
of the house staff is watching from a safe distance.
The drunk at the gate is a distraction. Manet (the assassin
hired to kill Feraud) and some of his henchmen scale the
back wall of the estate and make their way to the earls
quarters. A member of the house staff on his way to check
the earls fireplace sees the assassins and manages to cry
out before he is killed. The warning is enough for the earl
to lock himself in a small private sitting chamber attached
to his room before the assassins reach him and alerts the
player characters to the danger.
Orlov, who has trouble sleeping, is walking the grounds to
clear his mind. He hears the drunk at the gate and attempts
to help.
Manet and six human duelists are in the earls room. They
have taken a ceremonial axe from a display in the hallway
and are attempting to chop through the door of his hiding
place. The axe has a POW of 3. The door has ARM16 and
can take 10 damage before collapsing. The earl is defense 10,
and will die if he is hit with any attack.

I Think Weve Got


the Wrong Guy
If the player characters mistakenly identify Orlov as the
potential assassin, he profusely denies any accusation.
Having lived a hard life in the aftermath of the Khadoran
invasion of Llael, Orlov is not a trusting man and responds
violently to any attack or attempt to restrain him. He will not
seek to kill the player characters in a confrontation, however,
simply to prevent them from harming or imprisoning him.

Wrap-Up

There are two possible outcomes to the combat during the night.

The Earl is Rescued


If the players rescue the earl they have breakfast with him
and Orlov the following morning. Feraud explains that he
has job offers for everyone. He is involved in many things,
and he needs individuals with a certain skill set to assist
him. The first task he will give his new employees is tracking
down the party responsible for the attempt on his life.
Regardless of the outcome of the breakfast discussion, the
award ceremony takes place in mid-morning. The winner
of the tournament is given 100 gold crowns.

The Earl Dies


If the earl is killed, the assassins plant evidence pointing
the blame at Orlov and the player characters, who must
then evade the authorities and track down who is really
responsible in order to clear their names.

If the player characters enter the room, Manet instructs


his men to hold them off while the man with the axe
keeps trying to reachand killthe earl. Manet targets
whichever character performed the best during the
tournament. Manet is a skilled swordsman and can use
Hidden Guard, Lashing Strike, and Turning Riposte. He
will fight to keep the characters from stopping his man
from breaking through to the earl, even if it means breaking
away from his initial target.

The Nobles Tournament

Adversaries
SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak

SPD

STR

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)

POW P+S

(See previous Full Metal Friday: The Red Kings.)

Climbing 7, Etiquette 5, Gambling 5, Intimidation 5, Jumping 8,


Seduction 5, Streetwise 5
Feat Points Orlov starts each encounter with 1 feat point. He is allocated
1 feat point at the start of each of his turns. Orlov can have only 1 feat point
at a time.

pistol

RN
G AOE POW

10

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)
Climbing 6, Etiquette 5, Gambling 5, Intimidation 5, Jumping 8,
Seduction 5, Streetwise 5
Ambidexterous This character does not suffer the normal attack roll
penalty while using the Two-Weapon Fighting ability.
Feat Points Manet starts each encounter with 1 feat point. He is allocated 1
feat point at the start of each of his turns. Manet can have only 1 feat point at
a time.
Parry While armed with a hand weapon, the character cannot be targeted
by free strikes.

Parry While armed with a hand weapon, the character cannot be targeted
by free strikes.
Precision Strike When the character hits with a melee attack, he chooses
the branch of the targets life spiral or the column of the targets damage
grid that is hit, if applicable.
Riposte Once per round when this character is missed by an enemys
melee attack, immediately after the attack is resolved he can make one
normal attack against the attacking enemy. To make a ranged attack, the
characters ranged weapon must be loaded.

Base Size
Encounter Points

Quick Work When this character kills one or more enemies with a melee
attack during his combat action, immediately after that attack is resolved this
character can make one ranged attack.

PHYS

ECT

IQ

Riposte Once per round when this character is missed by an enemys


melee attack, immediately after the attack is resolved he can make one
normal attack against the attacking enemy.

Base Size
Encounter Points

TE

Two-Weapon Fighting While fighting with a one-handed weapon or


pistol in each hand, the character gains an additional attack for the second
weapon. He suffers 2 on attacks rolls with the second weapon while doing
so.

LL

To make a ranged attack, the characters ranged weapon must be loaded.

Small
10

AGILITY

To make a ranged attack, the characters ranged weapon must be loaded.

ARM

POW P+S

garrote

DEF

rapier

POW P+S

RAT

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak

rapier

MAT

Small
10

AGILITY

PHYS

ECT

IQ

TE

LL

The Nobles Tournament

SPD

STR

MAT

RAT

DEF

ARM

Willpower Initiative Detect Sneak


sword

POW P+S

ABILITIES
Skills (stat already included)
Climbing 6, Etiquette 5, Gambling 5, Intimidation 5, Jumping 8,
Seduction 5, Streetwise 5
Parry While armed with a hand weapon, the character cannot be targeted
by free strikes.
Riposte Once per round when this character is missed by an enemys
melee attack, immediately after the attack is resolved he can make one
normal attack against the attacking enemy. To make a ranged attack, the
characters ranged weapon must be loaded.
Variable MAT When this character is introduced, roll a die. On a 12 his
MAT is reduced by 1. On a 56 his MAT is increased by +1.

vitality 7
Base Size
Small
Encounter Points
4

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