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BFF-BFM 2801 Electronic Lab_sem2010-2011_Lab_04_Op Amp Applications AIDIL-FKP-SEM I-2009/ 2010


In the name of Allah, The Most Beneficent, The Most Merciful

Lab 04
Operational Amplifier Applications



Prepared By:
Aidil Shafiza Safiee
shafiza@ump.edu.my
Telephone Ext: 3367,
Hand phone: 013-7721657
Fakulti Kejuruteraan Pembuatan, UMP

Lab Instructor
Aidil Shafiza Safiee

Lab Location
MAKMAL MEKATRONIK FKP, UMP

Lab Objectives

By the end of this lab, students should be able using MULTISIM and NI ELVIS II to demonstrate the
use of Operational Amplifier for performing mathematical operations summation and
difference

Group Information

Student ID Student Names Section
1
2
3
4
5











20
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BFF-BFM 2801 Electronic Lab_sem2010-2011_Lab_04_Op Amp Applications AIDIL-FKP-SEM I-2009/ 2010
PART A : LINEAR OP-AMP APPLICATIONS : INVERTING SUMMING AND DIFFERENCE AMPLIFIERS
OBJECTIVES :
To demonstrate the use of Operational Amplifier for performing mathematical operations
summation and difference.
PARTS AND EQUIPMENT:
DC Power Supply (using NI ELVIS II)
Oscilloscope (using real instrument)
Function Generator (using NI ELVIS II)
LM 741 Op-amp
Resistors

BACKGROUND
Op-Amp circuits employing negative feedback can be used in various configurations. Since in
these applications there is a linear relation between input(s) and output, we usually refer to
these application circuits as linear applications. Negative feedback produces bounded input-
bounded output stability; i.e. a finite input voltage cannot produce an infinite output voltage.
Figure 1 shows the schematic symbol of an op amp. A is the voltage gain. The non-inverting
input is v1, and the inverting input is v2. The differential input is
v
in
= A(v
1
v
2
)
Notice that V1, V2 and Vout are node voltages. This means they are always measured with
respect to ground. The differential input Vin is the difference of two node voltages, V1 and V2.
When the first operational amplifiers were constructed, their primary function was to perform
mathematical operations in analog computers. These included summation, subtraction,
multiplication, division, integration and differentiation. The summation circuit is also used to mix
or combine analog signals together.
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BFF-BFM 2801 Electronic Lab_sem2010-2011_Lab_04_Op Amp Applications AIDIL-FKP-SEM I-2009/ 2010
a) Inverting Summing Amplifier
Figure 2 shows an example of how an operational amplifier is connected to perform voltage
summation. In this figure, an ac and a dc voltage are summed. In general,







b) Difference Amplifier
A difference amplifier has two inputs and the output voltage is proportional to the voltage
difference of the input voltages. In fact, the (open-loop) Op-Amp itself is a difference amplifier,
except that the gain is ideally infinity. Here we want a difference amplifier with finite gain. One
such circuit using a single Op-Amp is shown in Figure 3. It can be shown that the gain of the
difference amplifier can be calculated using the following:


This equation can be simplified by making R3 = RF = R1 = R2, yielding a simple differential
amplifier with unity gain:

V0 =V2 V1

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BFF-BFM 2801 Electronic Lab_sem2010-2011_Lab_04_Op Amp Applications AIDIL-FKP-SEM I-2009/ 2010


PREPARATION/PRE-LAB ASSIGNMENTS/SIMULATIONS
1. For the Inverting Summing Amplifier circuit of Figure 2,

i) Derive the output equation.
ii) Generate the output voltage waveform using Multisim if V1 is a sine wave or a square
wave of 1 Volt peak, and V2 is a DC voltage of 5 V. Print out the curve plot as a function
of amplitude against time.

2. For the Difference Amplifier circuit of Figure 3,

i) Derive the output equation.
ii) Generate the output voltage waveform using Multisim if V1 is a sine wave or a square-
wave of 1 Volt peak, and V2 is a DC voltage of 5 V. Print out the curve plot as a function
of amplitude against time.


PROCEDURES
Part 1 : Inverting Summing Amplifier
1. To demonstrate the use of an operational amplifier as a summing amplifier, connect the
circuit of Figure 2 on NI ELVIS II protoboard.
2. With VS adjusted to produce a 1 V peak sine wave at 1 kHz, observe the output voltage VO
(and VS to note the phase relationship) on an oscilloscope set to dc input coupling.
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BFF-BFM 2801 Electronic Lab_sem2010-2011_Lab_04_Op Amp Applications AIDIL-FKP-SEM I-2009/ 2010
3. Sketch the output voltage waveform. Be sure to note the dc level in the output.
4. Interchange the 5V dc power supply and the 1V peak signal generator. Repeat procedure
step 2.


Part 2 : Difference Amplifier
5. To investigate the use of an operational amplifier in a difference amplifier configuration,
connect the circuit of Figure 3.

6. With VS adjusted to produce a 1 V peak sine wave at 1 kHz, observe the output voltage VO
(and VS to note the phase relationship) on an oscilloscope set to dc input coupling.

7. Sketch the output voltage waveform. Be sure to note the dc level in the output.

8. Interchange the 5 V dc power supply and the 1 V peak signal generator. Repeat procedure
step 7.


All the result from above experiment must be write in proper report that contains the following:

i) Derivation of output equation for Summing and Difference amplifiers
ii) Printed curve plot from Multisim for summing and difference amplifiers
iii) Sketched output for Part 1 and Part 2 experiments (note that each part have 2 result)
iv) Conclude in your own word what do you understand from the result of Summing and
difference amplifiers experiment.

Thats all for our operational amplifiers experiments. Please note that there are a lot of other
applications for omp-amp besides what we learned in this lab. So please feel free to explore
others function in the future. Thank you.


REFERENCES
1. Camallil Omar and Abd Hamid Ahmad. (2008). Operational Amplifier Experiment,
Faculty of Electrical Engineering UTM. <http://www.fke.utm.my/lab/basic-e/resource/Op-
Amp.pdf>
2. Boylestad, R and Nashelsky. (2006). Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, 9
th
Edition,
Prentice Hall.
3. Floyd, Thomas L. (2005). Electronic Devices, 7
th
Edition, Prentice Hall.
4. Paynter, R.T. (2003). Introductory Electronic Devices and Circuits, 6
th
Edition, Prentice Hall.
5. Neaman, D.A. (2001). Electronic Circuit Analysis and Design, 2
nd
Edition, Mc Graw Hill.
6. Horenstein, M.N. (1996). Microelectronic Circuits and Devices, 2
nd
Edition, Prentice Hall.

7. Fleeman, S.R. (1990). Electronic Devices Discrete and Intergrated,Prentice Hall.