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Landmark Nomination

Aloha Terrace Apartments, 902 East Aloha Street
Seattle























BOLA Architecture + Planning

February 14, 2014



Landmark Nomination
Aloha Terrace Apartments, 902 East Aloha Street
Seattle

February 14, 2014

CONTENTS

Landmarks Nomination Form (1 page)

1. INTRODUCTION 1
Background
Research
Local and National Landmarks
Seattle’s Landmarks Designation Process

2. PROPERTY DATA 3

3. HISTORICAL CONTEXT 4
Historical Overview of Capitol Hill
The Emergence of Garden Apartments
Defense Housing and Post-War Housing
Garden Apartments in Seattle
Early History and Occupants of the Complex
The Original Architect, George Wellington Stoddard

4. ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION 11
Neighborhood Context and Site
The Buildings
Changes to the Complex

5. BIBLIOGRAPHY & SOURCES 13

6. PHOTOS & GRAPHICS 15




Cover: Contemporary views of the complex.


BOLA Architecture + Planning
159 Western Avenue West, Suite 486
Seattle, Washington 98119
206.447.4749


Name: Stoddard Terrace Apartments / Aloha Terrace Apartments
Year built: 1943-44

Street and number: 902 East Aloha Street

Assessor's file no.: 2663000055

Legal description: Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, all in Block 5 of Sarah B. Yesler’s First Addition, and
Lots 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, all in Block 1 of Furth’s Addition to the City of
Seattle

Plat /Block/Lot: Furth’s Addition, Block 1, Lots 11-15, Sarah B. Yesler’s 1st Addition, Block
5, Lots 1-4

Present owner: Aloha Terrace Associates
Owner's address: Michael Denning
1414 East Denny Way, Suite 1
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 322-6125 / mdenning@chardenn.com

Present use: Multi-family residential

Original owner: Unknown
Original use: Multi-family residential
Architect: George Wellington Stoddard

SEE ATTACHED for physical description, statement of significance, and photographs

Submitted by: Michael Denning
Address: 1414 East Denny Way, Suite 1
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone / Email: (206) 322-6125 / mdenning@chardenn.com

Date: February 14, 2014


Reviewed (historic preservation officer): Date:
Aloha Terrace Apartments
902 East Aloha Street, Seattle
Landmark Nomination

BOLA Architecture + Planning
February 14, 2014


1. INTRODUCTION

Background

This landmark nomination report addresses the Aloha Terrace Apartments, a nine-building complex of
WWII garden apartments located on Capitol Hill. It was prepared at the request of the long-time property
owner, to determine the landmarks status of the property.

This report includes data about the property, an architectural description, a discussion of the emergence of
garden court style apartments nationally and in the Northwest, and post-war housing trends. A sample of
garden court apartment buildings in the Seattle area is provided, along with information about the life and
career of original architect, George Wellington Stoddard, as well as historic and contemporary photos, maps,
and drawings.

Research

The research and report were developed in December 2013 and January 2014 by Associate Sonja Molchany
and Principal Susan Boyle, of BOLA. Sources included:

 City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) microfiche permit and drawing
records, and Seattle Municipal Archives (SMA) photographic collection

 Property information from King County Parcel Viewer and the historic tax assessor’s property
records from Puget Sound Regional Archives

 Historic photos from the collections of the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
and Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI)

 Historic Polk Directories, Kroll and Sanborn maps in the Seattle Room of Seattle’s Central Public
Library, and articles from the Seattle Times Historical Archives database available through the
library’s website

 City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods historic site inventory forms and earlier landmark
nominations of similar buildings or those in the immediate neighborhood

Research included examination of drawing and permit records, tax records, and historic maps and
photographs. Several site visits were made to view and document property’s exterior and interior elements, site
features, and the neighborhood context.

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Local and National Landmarks

Designated historic landmarks are those properties that have been recognized locally, regionally, or nationally
as important resources to the community, city, state, or nation. Official recognition may be provided by
listing in the State or National Registers of Historic Places or locally by the City’s designation of the property
as a historic landmark. The City of Seattle’s landmarks process is a multi-part proceeding of three sequential
steps involving the Landmarks Preservation Board:

1) submission of a nomination and its review and approval by the Board

2) a designation by the Board

3) negotiation of controls and incentives by the property owner and the Board staff

A final step in Seattle’s landmarks process is approval of the designation by an ordinance passed by the City
Council. All of these steps occur with public hearings to allow input from the property owner, applicant, the
public, and other interested parties. Seattle’s landmarks process is quasi-judicial, with the Board ruling rather
than serving as an advisory body to another commission, department, or agency.

Under this ordinance, more than 420 individual properties have become designated landmarks in the City of
Seattle. Hundreds of other properties are designated by their presence within one of the City’s eight special
review districts or historic districts, which include the Harvard-Belmont, Ballard Avenue, Pioneer Square,
Columbia City, Pike Place Market, and International, Fort Lawton, and Sand Point Naval Air Station
historic districts.

Seattle’s Landmarks Designation Process

The City of Seattle's Landmarks Preservation Ordinance (SMC 25.12.350) requires a property to be more
than 25 years old and “have significant character, interest or value, as part of the development, heritage or cultural
characteristics of the City, State or Nation.” The standard calling for significant character may be described as a
standard of integrity. Integrity is a term used to indicate that sufficient original building fabric is present to
convey a property’s historical and architectural significance.

Seattle’s ordinance also requires a property meet one or more of six designation criteria:

Criterion A. It is associated in a significant way with an historic event, which has had a significant effect on
the community, city, state, or nation.

Criterion B. It is associated in a significant way with the life of a person important in the history of the city,
state, or nation.

Criterion C. It is associated in a significant way with a significant aspect of the cultural, political or economic
heritage of the community, city, state or nation.

Criterion D. It embodies the distinctive visible characteristics of an architectural style, period or method of
construction.

Criterion E. It is an outstanding work of a designer or builder.

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Criterion F. It is an easily identifiable feature of its neighborhood or the city due to the prominence of its
spatial location; contrasts of siting, age or scale; and it contributes to the distinctive quality or
identity of its neighborhood or the city.

In Seattle, a landmark nomination may be prepared by the property owner, the City’s Historic Preservation
Office, or by any interested party or individual. The ordinance requires that if the nomination is adequate in
terms of its information, the Landmarks Board must consider it within a stipulated time frame. Designated
landmark properties in Seattle include individual buildings and structures, building assemblies, landscapes,
and objects. In contrast to the National Register or landmark designation in some other jurisdictions, Seattle’s
process does not require owner consent.

There is no local ordinance that requires an owner to nominate its property. Such a step may occur if an
owner proposes substantial development requiring a Master Use Permit (MUP). Since July 1995, DPD has
required a review of potentially eligible landmarks as a part of the MUP process for residential and
commercial projects of certain sizes and in specific zones in the city. Seattle’s landmarks process does not
include consideration of future changes to a property, the merits of a development proposal, or continuance
of any specific occupancy, as these are separate land use issues.


2. PROPERTY DATA

Historic Name: Stoddard Terrace Apartments
Current Name: Aloha Terrace Apartments

Original / Present Use: Multi-family residential

Current Address: 902 East Aloha Street
Seattle, Washington 98102

Site Location: North side of East Aloha Street, between Broadway and 10th Avenues East.

Date of Construction: 1943-44

Tax ID Number: 2663000055

Legal Description: Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, all in Block 5 of Sarah B. Yesler’s First Addition, and Lots
11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, all in Block 1 of Furth’s Addition to the City of Seattle

Original Designer: George Wellington Stoddard
Original Builder: Unknown

Site Area: 40,000 sf / .92 acres (King County Parcel Viewer)
Building Sizes: 9 buildings / total 21,600 net sf / avg. unit size 600 sf

Original Owner: Unknown
Present Owner: Aloha Terrace Associates

Owner’s Representative: Michael Denning
1414 East Denny Way, Suite 1
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 322-6125 / mdenning@chardenn.com
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3. HISTORICAL CONTEXT

Historical Overview of Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill rises more than 410’ in elevation above Elliott Bay and comprises part of a long ridge east of
Lake Union and downtown Seattle. To the south of Capitol Hill is First Hill and to the north is Portage Bay.
To the east and southeast are the neighborhoods of Madison Valley and the Central District, while the west
edge was defined in the 1960s by the construction of I-5.

Originally platted by Arthur Denny before 1861, Capitol Hill was the site of pioneer settlement in the 1870s
and 1880s, after its timber was cleared. In 1876 the City purchased 40 acres from J.M. Coleman for a park.
The land became City Park in 1885 and its name was changed to Volunteer Park in 1901. To the north of
the park were two early cemeteries—the Masonic Cemetery, later known as Lake View Cemetery, and the
Grand Army of the Republic Cemetery, established in 1895.

The primary developer of the area, known originally as Broadway Hill, was James Moore. Moore acquired
160 acres in 1900 and renamed the district, cultivating blocks directly south of Volunteer Park as an upscale
residential neighborhood. Capitol Hill quickly began to develop as a vibrant residential and commercial
community. In 1890, the Pontius/Lowell School opened on the corner of Mercer Street and Federal Avenue.
It was followed by construction of Seattle/Broadway High School at Broadway Avenue and Pine Street in
1902, Stevens Elementary at 18th Avenue East and East Galer Street in 1906, and other public schools. Early
civic construction included the Lincoln Reservoir (1900), Volunteer Park Tower (ca. 1901), and Volunteer
Park Conservatory (completed 1912).

In 1891, an electric trolley line was constructed along Broadway Avenue, linking Capitol Hill to First Hill
and Beacon Hill. The street was paved in 1903 and quickly became a favorite route for cyclists and motorists.
Between 1907 and 1909, trolley routes were extended along 15th, 19th, and 23rd Avenues, and the Bellevue-
Summit line was added in 1913. East-west lines included Pike Street, Madison Street, and the Yesler-Jackson
route. Neighborhood commerce has continued to follow the pattern established by early streetcar and cable
car routes, with neighborhood and destination retail stores, cafes, and other facilities arranged in a linear
fashion along these and nearby streets.

Residential construction had moved eastward to the top of the ridge by the turn of the century. Many
religious institutions followed this development. Examples include the former Capitol Hill United Methodist
Church (1906, presently occupied by the Catalysis Corporation) at 128 16th Avenue East; the First Church
of Christ Scientist (1914, recently converted to residential use) at 16th Avenue East and East Denny Way;
and St. Mark’s Cathedral (1931) at 1245 10th Avenue East, three blocks north of the subject property.

Modest houses were built near the ridge of Capitol Hill in the 1880s and 1890s, but few of them survive.
These unassuming dwellings were followed by mansions, as well as houses for working- and middle-class
families. The latter were rapidly constructed near the business and transportation strips of Broadway, 15th,
and 19th Avenues. Many of these residences were built in the Classic Box style, and others in Neoclassical,
Arts and Crafts, and Tudor Revival styles. Grander homes included those along “Millionaire’s Row” (14th
Avenue East) and large houses northwest of Volunteer Park on Federal Avenue East, as well as along the
somewhat serpentine streets north of Aloha Street in the Harvard-Belmont district west of Broadway.

Taller, mixed-use brick buildings and apartment houses were constructed on Capitol Hill as the city grew
denser. Few apartments remain from the early decades of the 20th century, and for the most part extant older
apartment buildings date from the 1920s and the early 1930s. These include a range of building types, from
large courtyard structures with spacious flats for middle class and professional families, such as those built by
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Fred Anhalt, to low-scale courtyard housing and three-story apartment houses with small walk-up units for
working-class occupants.

The Emergence of Garden Apartments

The Aloha Terrace Apartments are a modest example of a garden apartment complex, a type of American
middle-class, multi-family housing that emerged in the early 20th century. Beginning in the 1920s, American
planners Clarence Stein and Henry Wright introduced aspects of European design solutions for affordable
housing, drawing from the tenets of Ebenezer Howard’s late-19th-century Garden City Movement. Howard
aimed to combine “the best of the city and country” by incorporating open space into urban developments.
Aspects of the movement included curvilinear streets, individual gardens, economic self-sufficiency and
communal ownership of property. During the late 1800s and early 1900s in the United States, curvilinear
streets and large landscaped lots were, conversely, features of wealthier suburban developments designed by
Frederick Law Olmsted and others.

However, Stein and Wright’s introduction of Garden City forms during the 1930s was applied to lower- and
middle-class development. The two men also introduced the concept of the super block, which clustered
living units in duplexes and multi-family buildings on small cul de sacs around a central communal area. A
super block was much larger than a traditional city block, allowing for greater building setbacks and quiet
open space within the block. In Ranches, Rowhouses and Railroad Flats, Christine Hunter described this
period:

After World War I and continuing through the 1930s, a fashionable widely used term for the
homes in many new developments was garden apartment. The name was loosely applied to
almost any configuration of apartment buildings with planted outdoor space, and its broad
connotation was a combination of the best of city and suburban life. Most garden apartments
were six stories or less...and were associated with a more informal, middle class lifestyle… The
most ambitious developments are buildings set within a landscaped “campus” that included
recreational facilities such as playgrounds and tennis courts. (Hunter, pp. 246-47.)

To accommodate the growing importance of automobiles as a primary source of transportation without
weakening the Garden City concept, major vehicular thoroughfares were relegated to the periphery of a
garden apartment complex and intersecting streets were eliminated. Pedestrian and vehicle roads were
separate. In this way, open spaces and a quiet, residential atmosphere were maintained. Examples of this type
of low-rise garden apartment are cited later in this report.

Defense Housing and Post-War Housing

During the Depression years and World War II, American design began to focus on function and the use of
new technologies and building materials. In public projects, the federal government encouraged some Garden
City concepts through the combination of open space and simple, inexpensive building forms. The federal
Public Works Administration (PWA) funded low-income housing projects consisting of blocks of housing in
a park-like setting, with requirements for a certain amount of space, light, and air.

An influx of workers migrated to Seattle in the run-up to WWII, seeking defense-related employment with
the Boeing Company, local shipyards, and other industries. Existing housing was woefully inadequate to meet
the rising demand, and the need for public housing projects was clear. The Seattle Housing Authority (SHA)
was established in 1939 to provide low-income housing, and was subsequently authorized to construct
defense housing. Yesler Terrace, sited just east of the city’s center on First Hill, was SHA’s first low-income
housing development and the first one in Washington State. A “slum clearance” project, Yesler Terrace was
initially completed in 1942 with a second phase completed in 1943. This residential addition to Yesler
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Terrace initially was not designated for defense housing, but was turned over to that purpose to address
housing needs of wartime workers.

SHA subsequently gained funding for more defense-related housing projects. Its Sand Point development in
northeast Seattle was one of the first defense housing projects in the nation. Rainier Vista Homes, Holly Park,
and High Point Garden Community were built with funding provided by the Lanham Act, which allowed
their use as defense housing during the war and as permanent low-income housing after the war’s end
(Droker, n.p.). By 1943 SHA had built five housing projects in the city. Yesler Terrace was the only one near
downtown Seattle, with the others located in outlying neighborhoods. The garden apartment style was used
by SHA in these large-scale housing projects, each containing hundreds of units.

When America suffered a housing shortage following WWII, the Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
actively provided financing for additional housing. The government initiative of the Veterans
Administration/FHA mortgage insurance program made it possible for many middle-class families to afford
homeownership for the first time. Hunter describes the predominant national trends of the post-war era to be
the development of “freestanding” single-family homes for the middle class and the development of
increasingly dense tower developments in public housing for the poor.

[T]he small ranches and Cape Cod houses underwritten by the FHA were the descendants of
two longstanding American traditions, one social and the other visual. Widespread individual
ownership of land and homes had been seen by American social theorists since Thomas Jefferson
as important to creating a stable and democratic society…It was the idea of ownership combined
with a picturesque vision of the freestanding country house, popularized in the mid-1800s by
Andrew Jackson Downing, that inspired the new suburbs. (Hunter, pp. 256-59)

While garden court style apartments and other low-rise multi-family residential buildings were built in Seattle
in the 1940s and 1950s, the overwhelming trend in the area reflected the national one. Growing housing
demand was met through developments of suburban, single-family residences.

Between 1950 and 1960, the population of the outlying parts of the metropolitan area [of
Seattle] increased by 46 percent, while that inside the 1950 city limits grew by only 0.7 percent.
Before World War II, the central city of Seattle contained 60 percent of the population of the
region; in 1960, it had about half, and it retained that much only because of aggressive
annexations during the 1950s.

…Apparently the more attractive part of the metropolis, the suburbs gained a disproportionate
share of people who changed their place of residence between 1955 and 1960.

…Suburban expansion represented one kind of growth in the automobile age…Vitality on the
urban perimeter suggested that Seattle had begun to overcome its natural barriers…[A]
multiplying number of ferries, bridges, and roadways had begun to facilitate auto and truck
transportation between the urban hub and its outlying regions. Seattle foresaw expansion both
of its urban living area and of its role in regional markets. (Findlay, pp. 220-21.)

Seattle historian Dr. Lorraine McConaghy has described the boom in housing development on the east side of
Lake Washington that resulted from this expansion:

In 1940, the floating toll-bridge linking Seattle to Bellevue across Lake Washington finally
opened…In the twelve years following the opening of the bridge, the population of the Greater
Bellevue area doubled and then redoubled. After the war’s end, restrictions on building
materials were lifted, the Veterans’ Administration (V.A.) underwrote home loans for returning
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G.I.s and Seattle’s Cold War homefront soon faced a postwar housing shortage nearly as acute
as that of the wartime homefront. Throughout west Bellevue, many small developers catered to
eager buyers, platting a street or two in former strawberry fields.” (pp. 270-71.)

In the post-war housing boom, garden apartments were not the predominant construction type and low-rise
multi-family construction in general began a slow but steady decline in the U.S. by 1950, constituting only
about 25 percent of all American homes. Hunter notes that in this period, due to the need to incorporate cars
and parking, the more pristine horticultural aspect of this dwelling type declined. “In middle class apartment
complexes parking gradually took precedence over common outdoor recreation spaces. A few such
developments completed in the late 1930s and early 1940s continued to use the term gardens, but as the
amount of parking relative to the number of apartments grew, the actual gardens atrophied. By the 1940s,
they were often reduced to narrow planted strips around paved lots or low banks of garages.” (Hunter, p.
253.)

Garden Apartments in Seattle

The Aloha Terrace Apartments is a modest example of a garden apartment complex. Groups of low-rise
garden apartment buildings with characteristics very similar to the subject property are found in many
residential neighborhoods in the Seattle area, including Capitol Hill, Ballard, Magnolia, Wedgwood, West
Seattle, Mercer Island, and Shoreline. These properties share common characteristics that typically include a
large master planned site, internal streets and pathways, groupings of one-, two- and three-story buildings,
and landscaped courtyards. While most are of modest design and low cost construction, more opulent
examples may provide family-oriented leisure amenities such as playgrounds, outdoor furnishings, picnic
areas, barbecues, tennis courts, and pools.

Existing garden court apartments in Seattle and the area include the following properties (cited in
chronological order), which were surveyed for this report:

A local example of pre-World War II low-rise garden apartment complex is the 1939-40 Edgewater
Apartments, designed by John Graham, Sr. The Edgewater consists of 20 buildings located on a large
waterfront site at 2411 42nd Avenue East in the Madison Park neighborhood. It has interior access drives and
two-story multi-family buildings organized in a regular, uniformly spaced pattern around interior courtyards.
The architectural style is traditional Colonial Revival, with low-pitched gable roofs, “aged” red brick cladding,
double-hung windows, and white contrasting painted wood trim. Off-street parking is provided in enclosed
multi-car garages.

Yesler Terrace, a public housing project built by the Seattle Housing Authority, dates from 1941-43 and is
located on the southwestern edge of Seattle’s First Hill neighborhood. The design team for the vast site was
comprised of J. Lister Holmes; George W. Stoddard; William Bain, Sr.; John T. Jacobsen; and William
Aitken. When completed, Yesler Terrace included 97 residential buildings with 863 units, three community
buildings, and a steam plant for hot-water heating. The original structures were designed in the Modern style,
with residential buildings characterized by two-story rectangular massing, flat roofs, minimal trim
emphasizing horizontality, and individual backyards. Linear arrangement of the buildings, clad with cedar lap
or rustic V-groove siding, and wide roof overhangs in some locations further emphasized the horizontal lines.
Extensive changes have been made to this property over time, detailed in a 2010 landmark nomination report
(BOLA).

Lock Haven is located between 30th and 32nd Avenues NW, NW Market Street, and NW 56th Street in
Ballard. This project, built in 1948, was undertaken by the same developer as the subsequent Lock Vista and
may have been designed by the same architect—Thomas, Grainger & Thomas—although this has not been
verified. It is a large, super-block site with two primary groupings of large three-story multi-family buildings
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organized around interior garden courtyards, patios, circular, brick-walled planters, retaining walls and
terraces, and surface parking lots. The style is restrained Modern, with low-pitched hipped roofs, wide
overhangs, and roman brick cladding. The buildings have distinctive, continuous brick banding at each floor
level at the window head and sill lines. Windows are wood sash, in triplet combinations of a double hung
flanked by two fixed units. At the frontage along NW Market Street, an interesting feature is the presence of a
few small commercial/retail spaces at the ground floor in some of the buildings, though the street character is
predominantly residential. These buildings are larger apartment buildings in a garden setting, and do not have
individual dwelling entries on the exterior.

Wedgewood Estates (formerly Oneida Gardens), is located at 7543-49 39th Avenue NE and 3807-11 NE
77th Street, Seattle. The complex was built in 1948 and consists of a large, super block site with a curvilinear
interior drive. (The designer has not been identified.) One and two-story multi-family buildings are organized
in L- and H-shaped configurations around garden courtyards, interspersed with lawns and pedestrian
pathways. An outdoor swimming pool is centrally located on the grounds. Three larger multi-family buildings
appear to have been added to the original development. The original structures are Colonial Revival, one and
two-story buildings with low-pitched roofs. First level cladding is common brick, with cedar shingle siding on
the upper levels. Original windows appear to have been replaced with vinyl sash.

Lock Vista (formerly Ballard Apartments) is sited immediately south of Lock Haven, between 30th and 32nd
Avenues NW, NW 50th Street, and NW Market Street in Ballard, Seattle. Designed by Thomas, Grainger &
Thomas (Harlan Thomas), the complex was built in 1949. A trapezoidal-shaped super block encompasses
four large three-story multi-family buildings oriented to the north (toward Lock Haven), with a single large
surface parking lot to the south. The architecturally distinctive buildings are set back from the streets on all
sides, and organized around interior garden courtyards and pathways. A small swimming pool and patio are
located on the south side. The style is restrained Modern with low-pitched compound hipped roofs, wide
overhangs, and common red brick cladding laid in running bond with a decorative pattern of occasional off-
set protruding bricks. Fenestration is slightly varied and includes individual single- or double-hung metal sash
windows, double-hung windows flanked by fixed sidelights, and corner window assemblies with both double-
hung and fixed. Most windows have a brick header course at the sill line. Corner windows are linked by
painted board and batten panels between floors, creating a distinctive vertical feature, along with small
projecting bays on the south side that overlook the locks. An octagonal “look-out” tower feature appears on
the rooftops of the two larger L-shaped central buildings. This property consists of larger apartment buildings
in a garden setting, similar to Lock Haven.

Linden Garden Apartments are located just north of Seattle at 901-977 N. 177th Street in Shoreline.
Designed by architects Charles Taylor Miller and Frederick Theodore Ahlson, the complex was built in 1948-
1950. The full-block site contains two groupings of one and two-story buildings, with 50 multi-family units
clustered in a regular pattern around interior garden courtyards and pathways. A surface parking lot is in the
center between building groups. The style is simplified Colonial, with modest wood frame construction, low-
pitched gabled roofs, wide roof overhangs and individual covered porchlets, double-hung wood sash and
corner windows, and varied vertical and horizontal cedar siding.

The Laurel Crest (“Garden Court Apartments for Laurel Crest”) complex is located just west of Seattle’s
Laurelhurst neighborhood, on the west side of Sand Point Way NE at 40th Avenue NE & NE 50th Street.
This site was designed by architects Stuart and Durham and built in 1949-1950. The site is 3.4 acres, with 81
units in groups of nine, two-story multi-family buildings organized in a stagger pattern around a semi-circular
interior drive (Terrace Drive NE), with interior garden courtyards. Parking on the property is within surface
lots and open carports. The style of the buildings, which are of modest wood frame construction, is simplified
Colonial. The buildings are characterized by low-pitched gabled roofs, roof overhangs and individual covered
porchlets, masonry veneer cladding (common brick, roman, jumbo, and concrete block) at the first level, and
varied types of vertical and horizontal cedar siding on the upper level. A distinct detail is the intentionally
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unstruck, oozing mortar joints in some of the masonry. The design includes some early Modernist features
such as corner windows and flat, cantilevered porchlet roofs.

Northgate Apartments, located along NE Northgate Way between 1st and 3rd Avenues NE, date from 1951.
(The designer has not been identified.) The large super-block site has an L-shaped interior drive (NE 112th
Street and 2nd Avenue NE) and contains 34 two-story multi-family units in long “barracks style” buildings.
These rectangular structures are arranged in orderly groups around interior gardens, connecting pathways,
lawns, courtyards, and a pool area. The architectural style is simplified Colonial, with modest wood frame
construction and cedar shingle siding. Roofs are low-pitched gable, and units are entered through individual
covered porchlets. Some units have upper level balconies. Casement windows appear to be replacement
aluminum or vinyl sash.

Shorewood Heights Apartments are prominently located on a crest at the north end of Mercer Island,
between SE 36th Street and I-90. The complex, which is served by 88th and 90th Avenues SE and includes
West Shorewood Drive, was designed by Stuart and Durham and built in 1949. The setting boasts
spectacular panoramic views of Lake Sammamish to the north and the Cascades to the east. The site is
sprawling, with rolling hills, wooded with mature evergreens and deciduous trees, a looped drive and grounds
that include garden courtyards and grassy lawns. Multi-family buildings are spaciously spread apart along
curvilinear drives. Two larger multi-family buildings were added to the site in 2001. Site amenities include
carport parking, picnic areas, tennis courts, walks, and a viewpoint replete with a totem pole popular in the
period. The style of the original buildings on the property is Colonial Revival, with more defined architectural
detailing than the other garden court housing sites designed by Durham in the Seattle area. Buildings are two
stories with low-pitched gabled roofs, brick cladding on the first level and a variety of cedar siding types on
the upper levels, covered porchlets, and corner windows.

Early History and Occupants of the Complex

Records indicate that the subject property was designed in 1943 by architect George Wellington Stoddard
and completed in 1944 as the Stoddard Terrace Apartments. Stoddard was part of the design team for the
1941-43 Yesler Terrace housing project, and may have been influenced by this recent project. His role on that
team, which included J. Lister Holmes; William Bain, Sr.; John T. Jacobsen; and William Aitken, appears to
have been in site and building design.

Archival property record cards from 1943 note the fee owner as the Broadway-Aloha Improvement Company;
research has revealed no further information about this company or its officers. A newspaper article indicates
that the property was sold by Emil Bovela in 1966, to Mrs. Ruth Coffin. Mrs. Coffin was a licensed real estate
broker who owned and operated a number of rental properties in Seattle, including the Milwaukee Hotel in
Chinatown. Forty-eight years later, the subject property remains in the ownership of the same family; it is
currently managed by Mrs. Coffin’s grandson, Michael Denning.

A review of Polk city directories from 1943-44 and 1951 gives an indication of the tenants during those years.
More than half of the residents had no occupations listed, perhaps indicating that they were retirees. Of those
with jobs listed, they included a district manager for a fire equipment company, inspector at Remington Rand
office equipment supply, Northwest manager for a packaging materials company, assistant Alaska division
traffic manager for Pan Am Airways, clerk, Kenworth Motor Truck Company employee, pharmacist, artist,
and Todd Shipyards employee (1943-44 directory); and salesman for the Ryerson Steel Company, UW
physicist, insurance salesman, assistant buyer for the Bon Marché, department manager at the University
Bookstore, two examiners for the General Insurance Company, an importer, City engineering inspector,
postal carrier, air filter sales and serviceman, auto parts company owner, and engineer (1954 directory).
Although by 1954 the property was no longer known as the Stoddard Terrace Apartments, it did have
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Stoddard’s daughter Virginia Stoddard cited as a resident and listed as an associate at her father’s architectural
firm.

The Original Architect, George Wellington Stoddard

Original drawings on file at Seattle’s DPD indicate that George Wellington Stoddard (1895–1967) was the
designer of the apartment complex in 1943. Stoddard was born in Detroit and received an architectural
engineering degree from the University of Illinois in 1917. After serving in WWI, he came to Seattle in 1920.
Here Stoddard joined his father, Lewis M. Stoddard, in an architectural firm, which was renamed Stoddard &
Son. After his father died in 1929, he established George Wellington Stoddard & Associates. The firm
became George W. Stoddard-Huggard & Associates in 1955, with Francis E. Huggard as a partner. After
Stoddard’s retirement in 1960, the firm continued as Stoddard & Huggard for approximately ten years.

A search of historical Seattle Times articles indicates that Stoddard designed numerous single-family residences
through the 1930s, including multiple houses within planned neighborhoods, as well as commercial and
industrial buildings. Projects cited in the Seattle Times included:

 Apartment building, 420 13th Avenue North (1930)
 Two-story, two-store commercial building, NW corner of 3rd Avenue & Vine Street (1931)
 Bowles Residence, West Lander Street (1931)
 Williams & Co. factory, Elliott Avenue West & West Lee Street (1931-32)
 Dyer Residence, 3800 Cascadia Avenue [South] (1932)
 Slipper Residence, Haller Lake (1932)
 Moran Junior College Gymnasium, Bainbridge Island (1932)
 Beacon Service Station, intersection of Aurora Avenue & Denny Way (1933)
 Residences for the Puget Mill Company suburban properties—Broadmoor, Sheridan Beach,
Cedar Park and Alderwood Manor (1933-37)
 Blue Ridge residences (at least nine designs) (1935)
 Madison Park development—east of 42nd Avenue East, between East Lee and Garfield Streets
(1935-36)
 View Ridge residence (1935)
 Harbor Island Fire Station (1941-42)
 Victory Square, a temporary war-era plaza on University Street between 4th & 5th Avenues
(1942)
 Doctors Hospital, between University & Seneca Streets, 9th & Terry Avenues (1944)

The firm of George W. Stoddard-Huggard & Associates was known for design of schools, colleges, clinic
buildings, hospitals, and banks. Work also included commercial buildings and apartments. Notable projects
included Overlake High School (1946) in Bellevue, Memorial Stadium (1947, present-day Seattle Center
grounds), Green Lake Aqua Theater (1950), the south stands of the UW Stadium (1950, demolished), the
National Bank of Commerce (1956) at 5th & Olive in downtown Seattle, and the Chapel (1958) at Veterans
Hospital on American Lake near Tacoma.

Stoddard was engaged in civic and professional activities as well as his practice. He served on the State
Hospital Advisory Council Executive Committee in 1948-49, the Seattle Civic Arts Committee, the King
County Educational Advisory Committee in 1950-51, and the King County Juvenile Advisory Committee in
1952. He was a member of the Washington State Chapter of the AIA, joining in 1922 and serving as
president in 1946-47. Stoddard was also a member of the Rainier Club, the Seattle Chamber of Commerce,
and the Municipal League, and was a longtime board member of the Seattle Symphony. He died in 1967 at
the age of 71.

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4. ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION

Neighborhood Context and Site

The subject property is located on Capitol Hill, approximately two blocks southwest of Volunteer Park and
one block north of the north end of the commercial district along Broadway Avenue East. It is situated a
block east of the Harvard Belmont Landmark District. The immediate neighborhood consists of both single-
family residential and low-scale multi-family buildings. The Aloha Terrace Apartments are sited on the
southern portion of a long block, where the property is bounded on the south by East Aloha Street, on the
east by 10th Avenue East, and on the west by Broadway Avenue East. To the north are adjacent single-family
dwellings.

The 200’ by 200’ site consists of 40,000 square feet, incorporating open landscaped areas and courtyards,
narrow paved walkways, surface parking, and nine two-story buildings. A driveway (approximately 12’ wide)
runs east-west across the property at the north end of the site, accessible from both 10th and Broadway
Avenues East, to serve the small surface parking lots. The site is relatively level, although it is graded and
raised approximately 4’ above the sidewalk grade, reached by concrete steps on the south, east, and west sides.

The nine buildings, which comprise 36 units, are arranged in three groups of three: one U-shaped group
opens east to Broadway, another U-shaped group opens west to 10th, and a linear arrangement is on the
south, along East Aloha Street. Each building is addressed individually and contains four units. Resident
parking is provided in the north/central portion of the property, behind the buildings. The east and west “U”
arrangements each embrace a concrete patio area, a lawn, and plantings, while additional planted areas and
paved footpaths are also scattered among buildings. Plantings include dense, low-growing evergreen shrubs
along the south and west edges of the property, some mature trees and larger evergreen shrubs, and more
ornamental plants such as azaleas.

The Buildings

The Aloha Terrace Apartments consist of nine modestly-constructed, two-story buildings, designed in a
simplified Colonial Revival style. They are characterized by simple rectangular massing, low-pitched gabled
roofs with slightly overhanging eaves, centrally-located front and rear entries with individual covered
porchlets, wood windows with horizontally-divided lights, and siding that is differentiated between the first
and second stories. Each building measures 49’-6” by 26’-6” and contains four units—two on the first floor
and two on the second, with a reported size of 1300 square feet per floor (per archival property record card).

The buildings are wood-frame construction on poured concrete foundations; the center building in each
group of three has a full basement. Records note 2x4 stud wall construction, with 2x10 joists at 16” on center.
Each building was designed identically, with the exception that a basement is present in only one building per
group. Exterior finishes were cited on original drawings as vertical cedar siding at the first story and cedar
shingles at the second story, but 1945 tax record photos indicate painted horizontal cedar siding at the first
story and painted cedar shingles at the second story. A simple wood belly band, also serving as window header
trim, emphasized the cladding distinction between the first and second stories.

Wood windows were set in horizontal groups of five on the primary façade, flanking the central entry at the
first story, and grouped the same way at the second story. A single, central window was located at the second
floor, directly above the main door. Each end wall fenestration varied; some buildings had four single
windows at each end, while the more closely-spaced buildings had none. Fenestration on the rear façades
consisted of single windows and smaller, shorter bathroom windows. The typical windows were wood, with
four horizontally-stacked divided lights. Some of these windows were fixed and some were single- or double-
hung sash. Each front entry porch was sheltered with a flat roof supported by thin posts and reached by three
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concrete steps flanked by integral concrete planting boxes. Front doors were wood paneled, with a glazed
upper portion that included divided lights. Back doors were a simpler wood three-paneled type with a glazed
upper panel, protected by a small, slightly-sloped roof supported with quarter-circle brackets. In the buildings
with a basement, the basement was accessed on the rear side of the building, with steps down to a basement
door located directly below the back door.

On the interior, each building was arranged around a central circulation space that served all four units. There
were front and back stairs, and each unit had both a front and back door. The 36 one-bedroom apartments
were virtually identical, each approximately 600 square feet, comprised of a living room (approximately 20’ by
11’) across the front of the unit and a bedroom, bath, and kitchen across the back. The front door provided
entry directly into the living room, with no vestibule. Ample storage was provided by built-in cabinets and
closets between the bathroom and bedroom, as well as off the living room. Kitchens were small, typically 5’-
8” by 11’-7”. Original interior finishes were noted on the archival property record card as painted plaster walls
and ceilings, oak flooring, linoleum in kitchen and bathrooms, and fir trim. Each basement contained a
shared laundry room, drying room, and lockers for storage, as well as a boiler room. Steam heat was provided
to each unit by an oil-fired boiler in the shared basement. Ceiling height was noted on the property record
card as 7’ at the basement and 8’ at the first and second floors.

Changes to the Complex

The buildings generally appear to be in fair to good condition, with some alterations made over time. The
group of three buildings facing south onto East Aloha Street were re-clad with aluminum siding in the 1960s,
also resulting in removal of some of the wood trim. Aluminum storm windows were also installed on these
three buildings. Replacement wood shingles have been installed on other buildings as necessary due to
weathering and wear. Original, divided-light entry door glazing has been replaced with single-light safety
glass. Railings on the rear porches are inconsistent and have been changed over time, presently including
wrought iron types as well as pressure-treated lumber.

While original drawings indicated a coal room adjacent to each boiler room, tax record indicate that the
complex was originally constructed with oil heat. This has since been converted to gas boilers serving the
original steam heat system.

On the interior, kitchens and bathrooms have been updated over time and as necessary. Second-floor units are
carpeted, while first-floor units retain original oak flooring.


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5. BIBLIOGRAPHY & SOURCES

Berner, Richard C. Seattle 1921-1940: From Boom to Bust. Seattle: Charles Press, 1992.

_____. Seattle Transformed: World War II to Cold War. Seattle: Charles Press, 1999.

BOLA Architecture + Planning.
“Anhalt Apartment Building, 1600 East John Street Street, Seattle Landmark Nomination.” July 2012.
“Laurelon Terrace, Seattle Landmark Nomination.” June 2008.
“Yesler Terrace, Seattle Landmark Nomination.” September 16, 2010.

Caldbick, John. “Seattle Neighborhoods: Capitol Hill, Part 2 – Thumbnail History.” HistoryLink.org Essay
9841, June 3, 2011. http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=9841

City of Seattle:
Department of Neighborhoods, Historic Preservation Program. Historical Site Inventory database.
Department of Planning and Development. Microfilm Library, permit records and drawings.
Municipal Archives. Digital Photograph Collection.

DocomomoWEWA. “Stoddard, George W.” in Architect Biographies online. http://www.docomomo-
wewa.org/architects_detail.php?id=62

Dorpat, Paul. “Seattle Neighborhoods: Capitol Hill, Part 1 – Thumbnail History.” HistoryLink.org Essay
3188, May 7, 2001. http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=3188

Droker, Howard. “Interview with Jesse Epstein.” March 13, 1973. (Howard Droker Papers, University of
Washington Libraries Special Collections.)

Findlay, John M. Magic Lands: Western Cityscapes and American Culture After 1940. Berkeley: University of
California Press, 1992.

Hoole, John. “Southeast Seattle, Neighborhoods Community History Project—Public Housing in Southeast
Seattle: 1940 – Present.” Prepared for City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic
Preservation Program, 2011.

Hunter, Christine. Ranches, Rowhouses and Railroad Flats. American Homes: How They Shape our Landscapes
and Neighborhoods. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1999.

The Johnson Partnership. “Arbor Heights Elementary School.” Seattle Landmark Nomination Report, July
2013. (re: George Wellington Stoddard)

King County.
Parcel Viewer website. http://gismaps.kingcounty.gov/parcelviewer2/
Tax Assessor's Records for parcel 2663000055. (Available at Puget Sound Regional Archives, Bellevue
Community College)

McConaghy, Lorraine. “No Ordinary Place: Three Postwar Suburbs and Their Critics.” Doctoral
dissertation, University of Washington, 1993.

Museum of History and Industry. Digital photography collection. http://www.seattlehistory.org/

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Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl, ed. Shaping Seattle Architecture: A Historical Guide to the Architects (2nd ed.) Seattle:
University of Washington Press, 1998.

R. L. Polk and Company. Polk's Directory to the City of Seattle. Seattle: various.

Seattle Public Library:
Architect Scrapbooks (Robert Durham).
Northwest Index.

Seattle Times:
“3 Apartments for City Will Cost $145,000.” May 5, 1930, p. 3.
“Plans Prepared for Building at Third and Vine.” March 22, 1931, p. 28.
“Big Factory Project Now Near Finish.” December 13, 1931, p. 22.
“Large Residence Project Awarded.” February 14, 1932, p. 19.
“Modern Plant on Elliott Ave is of Novel Construction.” May 20, 1932, p. 12.
“New $25,000 Establishment.” May 20, 1932, p. 12.
“Beauty Found in Homes.” August 21, 1932, p. 27.
“Recent Transactions.” October 2, 1932, p. 25.
“Beacon Service Station Opens at Aurora Avenue.” May 16, 1932, p. 10.
“Scott is Made Puget Mill Co. Sales Manager.” October 15, 1933, p. 22.
“Suburban Dwelling.” March 18, 1934, p. 28.
“Talbot Predicts Upturn in 1934 on Waterfront.” March 25, 1934, p. 11.
“Under Construction.” June 2, 1935, p. 16.
“Tracts Offered Near Madison Park.” July 7, 1935, p. 22.
“Honor Received by G.W. Stoddard, Local Architect.” July 7, 1935, p. 22.
“Home for New Development.” August 25, 1935, p. 22.
“Sunshine Home at Broadmoor.” March 22, 1936, p. 26.
“Institute Hears Architect Head.” April 19, 1938, p. 24.
“Pre-Built Home Plans Outlined.” October 9, 1938, p. 25.
“Harbor Island Fire House to be Most Modern in U.S.” November 25, 1941, p. 13.
“Architect’s Sketch of New Fire Station.” November 25, 1941, p. 13.
“Victory Square Opens Saturday.” April 28, 1942, p. 26.
“New School at Bellevue is Dedicated.” December 19, 1942, p. 3.
“Stadium Seats to be Discussed.” December 23, 1943, p. 11.
“Cornerstone of Doctors Hospital Laid.” October 16, 1944, p. 7.
“Insurance Firm Moving to Mercer Island.” December 16, 1956, p. 38.
“Apartment Sales Top $1 Million.” January 30, 1966, p. 80.

University of Washington Libraries.
Manuscripts and Special Collections Digital Photo Collections. http://content.lib.washington.edu/cgi-
bin/advsearch.exe
Pacific Coast Architecture Database (PCAD). https://digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/architects/

Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation. “George W. Stoddard,” in Architect
Biographies online. http://www.dahp.wa.gov/learn-and-research/architect-biographies/george-w

Wright, Gwendolyn. Building the Dream: A Social History of Housing in America. New York: Pantheon Books,
1981.

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6. PHOTOS & GRAPHICS

Index to Figures Page

Fig. 1 Current aerial view 16
Fig. 2 Site plan 17

Fig. 3 Historic photo, view at 12th & Aloha, 1916 18
Fig. 4 Historic photo, looking south on Broadway, near the subject site, 1932 18

Figs. 5-8 Historic photos of low-income or war worker housing projects 19-20

Figs. 9-14 Current context views 21-22

Figs. 15-20 Tax record photos, 1945 and 1962 23-25

Current Photographs (2014)
Figs. 21-23 East Aloha Street group 26
Figs. 24-26 Broadway Avenue East group 27
Figs. 27-29 10th Avenue East group 28
Fig. 30 Looking SW into complex from 10th Avenue East 29
Fig. 31 Typical rear façade 29
Figs. 32-34 Views of the site 30
Figs. 35-37 Front and back doors and porches 31
Figs. 38-40 Current conditions photos 32
Figs. 41-45 Interior views 33-34

Other George Wellington Stoddard Buildings
Figs. 46-49 Williams & Co. factory, Blue Ridge residences, Renton Hospital, and Green Lake
Aqua Theater 35-36

Other Garden Court Apartments
Figs. 50-57 Views of other extant garden court apartments 37-40

Architectural Drawings
Figs. 58-63 Original drawings by George Wellington Stoddard. 41-46

Archival Tax Records
Figs. 64-72 Property record cards, 1943-62 47-55

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Note: Historic images in this report have been selected from cited sources and repositories. Many of these are
copyrighted and are used with strict permission for this document only. Copyright holders may not permit
reproduction or reuse for any other purpose.

Unless otherwise noted, contemporary photos are by BOLA and date from January 2014.



Fig. 1 Current aerial view of the property, marked in red, and surrounding area. North is up. (Google Maps,
January 2014)


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Fig. 2 Site plan.
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Fig. 3 View at 12th Avenue North (now East) and East Aloha, approximately two blocks
east of the subject property, in 1916. (Seattle Municipal Archives, item no. 1176)



Fig. 4 Looking south on Broadway, about 30’ north of East Aloha Street, 1932. The
corner of the subject site is visible at left, but the photo predates construction of the
apartment complex. (Seattle Municipal Archives, item no. 49996)
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Fig. 5 View of the Yesler Terrace housing complex on Seattle’s First Hill, 1941. (MOHAI,
image no. PI23737)



Fig. 6 View of a building in the Sand Point housing project, Seattle, 1941. (MOHAI, image
no. PI23714)
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Fig. 7 View of the High Point housing project in West Seattle, 1942. (MOHAI, image no.
PI23696)



Fig. 8 View of the Rainier Vista housing project under construction in Seattle’s Rainier
Valley, 1943. (UW Libraries Special Collections, order no. SEA0434)
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Three context views:

Fig. 9, left: Looking southeast along
10th Avenue East from a second-
floor unit in the subject complex.

Fig. 10, middle left: Looking south
along Broadway Avenue East, from
in front of the subject property.

Fig. 11, bottom left: Looking east
along East Aloha Street, toward 10th
Avenue East and beyond. The
southeast corner building of the
complex is visible at the left edge of
the photo.


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Three context views:

Fig. 12, left: Looking east/northeast
along East Aloha Street, showing the
linear group that faces south.

Fig. 13, middle left: Looking
north/northeast along Broadway
Avenue East, from the corner of East
Aloha. The two end buildings in the
Broadway group are partly visible at
the center-right of the photo.

Fig. 14, bottom left: Looking
northwest from the corner of 10th
Avenue East and East Aloha Street.
The corner building of the complex
is visible here; it is the eastern
building in the linear group along
East Aloha Street.


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Figs. 15-20 Tax record photos from 1945 and 1962 show four of the nine buildings in the complex.
(Puget Sound Regional Archives)



A 1945 tax record photo, view looking west at the east façade of the central building in the 10th
Avenue East group.



A 1945 tax record photo, view looking southwest at the north and east façades of the southern
building in the 10th Avenue East group.
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These 1945 (top) and 1962 (above) tax record photos show the middle building in the East Aloha
Street group. The top photo shows the original cedar siding and shingles, while the lower photo shows
the building after aluminum siding was installed.

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These 1945 (top) and 1962 (above) tax record photos show the east building in the East Aloha Street
group. The top photo shows the original cedar siding and shingles, while the lower photo shows the
building after aluminum siding was installed.

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Figs. 21-23 Shown from
west to east, the three
buildings in the East Aloha
Street group, which is a
linear arrangement facing
south. These buildings
were clad with aluminum
siding ca. 1962 and also
have aluminum storm
windows over the original
wood windows.





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Figs. 24-26 The three
buildings in the U-shaped
group that faces west onto
Broadway Avenue East.
The buildings are arranged
around a flat lawn and
concrete patio, and are
reached by concrete
pathways.




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Figs. 27-29 The three
buildings in the U-shaped
group that faces east onto
10th Avenue East. The
buildings are arranged
around a flat lawn and
concrete patio, and are
reached by concrete
pathways.





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Fig. 30 View looking southwest from the sidewalk on 10th Avenue East, into the east-facing
group on that side. Note the level of the complex is raised above the sidewalk grade.



Fig. 31 View of a typical rear façade.

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Three view of the site:

Figs. 32, left: Looking west along
one of the paved paths that serves
and separates two of the
buildings. This view shows
plantings and the back entrances
to these buildings. .

Fig. 33, middle left: Looking west
along the driveway that runs
across the northern portion of
the site, accessible from both
10th and Broadway Avenues
East. This serves tenant parking
that is located in the central
portion of the property, behind
the buildings.

Fig. 34, bottom left: Looking
southwest, showing part of the
tenant parking area behind the
buildings.





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Figs. 35-37 Two styles of entry
porches (top two photos) and a
typical back door with bracketed
porch roof (bottom photo).




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Figs. 38-40 Photos indicating
current conditions show
replacement shingles, extensive
weathering, and failing paint.




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Fig. 41, left: Typical front entry
stairhall.

Fig. 42, below: Typical living
room. This is a first-floor unit,
with hardwood floors.


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Fig. 43, above left: View in
typical unit, showing built-in
shelving, wood-paneled closed
doors and trim. This is a first-
floor unit, with hardwood
floors.

Fig. 44, above right: Typical
kitchen.

Fig. 45, left: View in typical
second-floor unit, which is
carpeted.


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Other George Wellington Stoddard Buildings



Fig. 46, above: Williams &
Company factory, Elliott
Avenue West & West Lee
Street (1931-32). (Photo from
Seattle Times, May 20, 1932)

Fig. 47, left: Two single-family
dwellings for a new
development in the Blue Ridge
neighborhood. Stoddard
designed at least nine different
houses for this “new residential
district.” (Renderings from
Seattle Times, June 2, 1935)

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Fig. 48 Renton Hospital (1945, demolished), shown here in a 1946 photo. (UW
Libraries Special Collections, DM4293)



Fig. 49 Green Lake Aqua Theater (1950, altered), shown here ca. 1951. (UW
Libraries Special Collections, Hupy 5185a-6)
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Other Garden Court Apartments

Figs. 50-57 On the following pages are views of selected existing garden court apartments in the Seattle area. (Aerial
photos from Google Maps, current photos from King County Parcel Viewer.)

Edgewater Apartments (1939-40) 2411 42nd Avenue E, Madison Park




Lock Haven (1948) between 30th & 32nd Avenues NW, NW Market Street, and NW 56th Street, Ballard




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Wedgewood Estates (Oneida Gardens) (1948) 7543-49 39th Avenue NE and 3807-11 NE 77th Street, Seattle




Lock Vista (1949) between 30th & 32nd Avenues NW, NW 50th Street, and NW Market Street, Ballard










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Linden Garden Apartments (1948-50) 910-977 N. 177th Street, Shoreline




Laurel Crest (1949-50) 40th Avenue NE & NE 50th Street, Laurelhurst





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Northgate Apartments (1951) NE Northgate Way between 1st and 3rd Avenues NE, Seattle




Shorewood Heights (1949) North end of Mercer Island




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Figs. 58-63 Original drawings of the subject complex by George Wellington Stoddard, 1943. (North is up on the
drawing sheets, or to the left on this and the following pages.)


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Figs. 64-72 King County Tax Assessor’s archival property record cards, 1943-62. (Puget Sound Regional Archives)


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