OREGON OBSERVER

The
Thursday, June 19, 2014 • Vol. 129, No. 50 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Sue Capelle always knew she
wanted to teach. She just never
thought she’d be able to follow her
dreams in the community where
she grew up.
After 15 years of serving the
Oregon School District as a teach-
er of the hearing-impaired, Capelle
is one of seven staff members retir-
ing this year, all with well over a
decade of service to the district.
They include three administra-
tive staffers with more than 20
years’ service in the district each,
the district’s director of instruction
and Beth Duvick, a fifth-grade
teacher at Rome Corners Interme-
diate.
When Capelle graduated from
Oregon High School in 1971, the
market was “flooded” with teach-
ers.
“Being a practical person, I
knew I would need to have skills
that were sale-able,” she said.
The field of special education
was just beginning to evolve at the
time. But when Capelle’s family
and consumer education teacher,
Ms. Buyarski, took the class on a
field trip to what was then Central
112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 835-8276 • Fax: 835-8277
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UN353939
Annual festival adds fireworks, run
Chamber celebrating 50th anniversary
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
A fi reworks di spl ay and a
10-ki l omet er run are among
the new events that the Oregon
Area Chamber of Commerce has
planned for the chamber’s 50th
anniversary during Oregon Sum-
mer Fest next week.
The annual festival begins
Thursday, June 26, at 5 p.m. and
ends Sunday at 6 p.m. and fea-
tures the carnival and midway
throughout the weekend, with
many local organizations hosting
food booths.
J udy Knut s on, execut i ve
director of the Oregon Area
Chamber of Commerce, is the
chief organizer. She noted that
Summer Fest is the chamber’s
biggest fundraiser of the year.
Knutson has dubbed Thurs-
day night as “Family Night.” She
hopes the fireworks on Thursday
(with a rain date of Friday) will
draw area families to Kaiser Park,
and that before and after many
will stop by the entertainment
tent to hear Oregon’s own Uni-
versal Sound perform classic rock
and dance music from the past
Circle Complete
Oregon native Capelle retires from district
Oregon School District
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Sue Capelle, who has been with the Oregon School District for 15 years, along with many other teachers, retires from the district this year.
Locals share music
with Haiti, Oregon
Risses share Haitian music in Oregon
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
In January 2010, a mag-
ni t ude 7. 0 eart hquake
devastated the Caribbean
island nation of Haiti, kill-
ing as many as 200,000
people and affecting the
lives of 3 million.
Countries from around
the world responded with
humanitarian aid in the
wake of the disaster, but
more than four years lat-
er much of the country
remains in ruins.
Oregon resident Laurie
Riss and her son, Greg,
traveled to Haiti last sum-
mer and will make a sec-
ond trip this summer to
Oregon Village Board
Club denied
liquor license
Club will likely close as Oregon police
chief criticized for failing to inform village
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
The Vi l l age Boar d
deci ded unani mous l y
Monday to deny a liquor
l i cense for t he Uni on
Sport s Cl ub on Braun
Road, which prompted a
manager to say the busi-
ness would have to soon
close.
The 10-year-old club
had applied for a transfer
or renewal of its license to
sell alcohol under a new
agent and a new name –
the Oregon Sports Club.
But chances of it being
permi t t ed t o cont i nue
to sell alcohol appeared
nil after village attorney
Matt Dregne presented
the board with a litany of
violations of the village’s
liquor policies and other
laws at the club.
Per haps even mor e
Relay for Life
Honorary ancer survivor
Sara Fishwild brings
energy to Relay team
Page 8
Retiring OSD staff
Paulette Sphatt – paraprofessional, Oregon
High School – 26 years service
Nancy Outhouse – building administrative
assistant, Prairie View Elementary – 25 years
Kris Deininger – paraprofessional ,
Brooklyn Elementary – 22 years
Anita Koehler – district director of instruc-
tion – 16 years
Sue Capelle – district hearing impaired
teacher – 15 years
Beth Duvick – fifth-grade teacher, Rome
Corners Intermediate – 15 years
Charlene McCartney – food service, Rome
Corners RCI – 14 years
Turn to Retirements/Page 12
Summer Fest
Turn to Fest/Page 12
Turn to Risses/Page 14
Turn to Club/Page 11
2
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Village of Oregon
Board agrees to pay for water
repair at Mason’s on Main
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
The Village will help find
a solution to water leaking
into a South Main Street
business and pay most of
the cost.
The Village Board Mon-
day unanimously agreed
to work with a contractor
hired by business owners
Jerry and Bonnie Thiel,
who estimate it will cost
about $1,000 to fill a void
beneath the sidewalk in
front of Mason’s on Main
restaurant.
Last week village work-
ers removed the sidewalk
in hope of discovering the
cause of the problem.
Once the sidewalk was
gone, “you could see some
settling that left voids under
the gravel,” explained Ore-
gon Public Works direc-
tor Mark Below. “Over the
years it’s eroded away, and
it served as a conduit for
the water.”
A basement wal l was
exposed, wi t h no di r t
around it, he added.
After discussing it Mon-
day, the board decided to
take steps to remediate the
leak and pay a contractor’s
estimate of around $1,000.
The Thiels also plan to hire
a welder to repair a broken
sill plate at the business
entrance.
Not all parties agreed
on the cause of the prob-
lems. Village attorney Matt
Dregne suggest ed t hey
agree to disagree and move
forward toward a solution.
Per Jerry Thiel’s sugges-
tion, Below said the village
plans to remove part of the
curb in front of Mason’s on
Main and turn it into a ramp
that will convey water away
from the building.
Once the voids beneath
the sidewalk are filled, the
sill plate is repaired and the
curb is removed, a village
crew will re-pour the side-
walk, Below said.
“When we pour the side-
walk there will be a 5/8-
inch lip,” he explained.
“We’ll level the sidewalk
about a half-inch below
the sill plate and then have
that lip covering the metal
threshold. It’ll take away
any chance of frost heave.”
Dregne expressed some
concern about doing the
work without a contract
with the Thiels, but village
administrator Mike Gracz
said Tuesday he’s confident
that between contractor
Zander Solutions LLC and
the village’s public works
department, the problem
will be resolved.
“Jerry and Mark made the
point that this is what this
company does for a living,”
Gracz said.
Below estimated the total
cost to the village would be
around $1,500.
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Photos by Scott Girard
The Village of Oregon will help repair a void in the sidewalk in front of Mason’s on Main that will hope-
fully help stop water from leaking into the business.
Once the voids beneath the sidewalk are filled, a metal sill plate is
repaired and the curb is removed, a village crew will re-pour the
sidewalk.
Scott De Laruelle photos
Dog show!
There were plenty of well-behaved canines carousing around the
Oregon Senior Center during last week’s dog show, held outside on
a picture-perfect spring day. Around 10 dogs showed their stuff to
a very appreciative audience.
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
IT’S YOUR BUSINESS.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company
and its Subsidiaries
©2012 006222 – Rev. 6/12
Whether you’ve created the business of your dreams
or it’s a dream-in-progress, you can count on me
to help you protect it. Let’s talk, business owner
to business owner.
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-5100
dsliter@amfam.com
IT’S YOUR BUSINESS.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company
and its Subsidiaries
©2012 006222 – Rev. 6/12
Whether you’ve created the business of your dreams
or it’s a dream-in-progress, you can count on me
to help you protect it. Let’s talk, business owner
to business owner.
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-5100
dsliter@amfam.com
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DeanCare Gold (Cost) is a product of Dean Health Plan, Inc. and is available to Medicare
beneficiaries residing in Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Grant, Iowa, Jefferson, Rock or Sauk
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Four injured as two
trucks collide on Hwy. 14
Fo u r p e o p l e we r e
injured last Friday morn-
ing in a chain-reaction
crash on Hwy. 14 in the
Town of Rutland.
According to a news
rel ease from t he Dane
County Sheriff’s Office,
i t st art ed wi t h a beer
delivery truck running
into a garbage truck and
involved two other vehi-
cles:
Around 10:48 a.m. Fri-
day, June 13, a garbage
truck operated by Waste
Management was stop-
ping to make a pick up
south of Old Stage Road
when a beer del i ver y
truck struck the garbage
truck from behind.
“The beer del i ver y
truck was then rear end-
ed by a … Chevy Sub-
urban,” the release read.
“After initial contact the
Subur ban cr ossed t he
centerline and struck a …
Chevy Blazer head on.”
Dane Count y Sher -
iff’s deputies, along with
fire and EMS units from
Br ookl yn, Evansvi l l e,
Oregon and St ought on
responded.
The driver of the Chev-
rolet Blazer – a 29-year-
old woman from Brod-
head – was t aken vi a
med-flight to UW Hos-
pital with serious, life-
threatening injuries.
The other three drivers
– from Monroe, Edger-
ton and Janesville – were
taken to local hospitals
with non-life-threatening
injuries.
The c r a s h r e ma i ns
under investigation.
– Mark Ignatowski
Town of Rutland
Tower voted down again
SETH JOVAAG
Observer correspondent
It was deja vu in the
Town of Rutland last week
when officials shot down a
proposal to build a 486-foot
radio tower south of Old
Stage Road.
Unani mous vot es l ast
Thursday by both the Town
Board and Plan Commis-
sion came three years after
officials first nixed the pro-
posal from Tomah-based
Magnum Communications
to build a tower to service
Stoughton’s first FM radio
station.
And just like last time,
it appears the debate could
end up in court.
The company wants to
build the tower on farm-
land owned by siblings and
long-time farmers David
Soldwedel and Sue Wollin.
As was the case in 2011,
town officials voted last
week not to rezone the land
from its current status as an
“exclusive agriculture dis-
trict.”
A three-hour meeting last
Thursday drew a crowd of
nearly 50 residents, with
slightly more than half reg-
istering in opposition to the
proposal.
Town chair Dale Beske
said officials felt the zoning
change wouldn’t conform
with state and county rules
designed to preserve farm-
land.
But Magnum’ s l aw-
yer said the town “totally
ignored” a new law created
in 2013 that restricted local
authority over siting radio
towers.
“It’s too bad,” said attor-
ney William White. “It
sets us on a confrontational
course of action. That isn’t
where we wanted to go. We
wanted to be collaborative
and cooperative as part of
the community. But we’ll
do the best we can to deliv-
er the services that we think
people want.”
The t own’s vot e wi l l
next be reviewed by Dane
County’s Zoning and Land
Regulation committee. No
date for that meeting was
set early this week, and
attempts to reach commit-
tee chair Patrick Miles were
unsuccessful.
That same commi t t ee
three years ago basically
rubber-stamped the town’s
decision, as members said
they lacked authority to
overrule the town’s vote. It
remains to be seen if that
will be the case again.
Magnum appealed the
town’s 2011 vote but was
rebuffed by a Dane County
judge last September. Cit-
ing the change in state law
l ast year, however, t he
company reapplied with
Rutland in February.
Tower opponents say its
size and lights would mar
the rural landscape and
reduce nearby propert y
values, while proponents
have said a local radio sta-
tion could improve emer-
gency communication and
air broadcasts of local high
school sports.
White said Magnum has
not planned its next steps
but signaled more litigation
is likely.
“We’ll probably let the
judicial system make the
determination as to what
st andards needed t o be
applied in these circum-
stances,” he said.
Beske conceded that “it’s
hard to know for sure” how
the new state law conforms
with farmland preservation
ordinances, but in the end,
town officials felt they “had
to follow Dane County zon-
ing rules on this.”
“It’s unfortunate, ” he
added, “that the state leg-
islature saw fit to take the
local control away” through
last year’s new law. “We
had gone through the whole
process and then the rules
were changed.”
Photo by Scott Girard
New pipes close streets
Hwy. CC was closed last week as crews replaced a sanitary sewer relay. The pipe was originally installed in 1936.
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook as
“Oregon Observer” and then LIKE us.
4
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Opinion
Thursday, Xxx, 2014 • Vol. 129, Yy
USPS No. 411-300
Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon, WI and additional offices.
Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
The Oregon Observer, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.
Office Location: 125 N. Main Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 608-835-6677 • FAX: 608-835-0130
e-mail: oregonobserver@wcinet.com
ConnectOregonWI.com
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.
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David J. Enstad
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Website
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Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick,
Anthony Iozzo, Mark Ignatowski,
Scott De Laruelle
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Oregon Observer
Stoughton Courier Hub • Verona Press
Summer Fest is all
about making memories
L
ast year was my first Sum-
mer Fest being in charge
as executive director of
the Oregon Area Chamber of
Commerce.
My most memorable moment
was taking a short breath and
watching the vibrant music in
the entertainment tent and all the
people on the dance floor having
a great time. Summer Fest is a
fun, family-ori-
ented commu-
nity event, and
these moments
are where the
community
comes together
and memories
are created.
This year’s
Summer Fest,
set for June
26-29, brings back an old tradi-
tion you might remember, with
the assistance of the Lions Club.
The fireworks display will mark
the Chamber’s 50th anniver-
sary. The show is scheduled for
Thursday night, with rain date of
Friday.
Also, Thursday night in the
main tent, Universal Sound will
play great dance music before
and after the fireworks. There
is no cover charge on Thursday
(sponsored by Mueller Dental),
so come join us to mingle and
enjoy your friends and neighbors.
Our headline bands are Cherry
Pie on Friday night and Super
Tuesday on Saturday night.
The softball tournament kick-
off starts Thursday night, as well.
Watch many Oregon residents
compete with their teams to win
the coveted tournament.
Another great event happen-
ing during the festival is a 2-mile
walk and chip timed 5k/10k run
taking place Saturday morning
with awards. All registered run-
ners will receive a dry-fit neon
orange running shirt. It is so
inspiring watching families and
business colleagues run together
and make it a friends and family
day.
More fun Saturday includes
the art/craft fair with some of our
local crafters (tables still avail-
able for crafters). This will be a
great opportunity for friends and
families to shop eat and enjoy the
festival at the same time. Satur-
day also brings the Tug of War,
at 12:30 p.m.
On Sunday, the parade begins
at 12:30 p.m., with cash prizes
for floats, and the Classic Cus-
tom Car show is all day. The
opportunity to view and talk with
car owners is priceless and time-
less in sharing the past with all
generations.
The Lions will again offer baby
back ribs or BBQ half-chicken
dinner with live music. Proceeds
from this traditional event will
help pay for the fireworks. This
is one of many opportunities dur-
ing Summer Fest to support the
community. Many community
organizations will have their food
booths up, as well as other booths
with merchandise to peruse.
Oregon Summer Fest helps
both area charities and the Cham-
ber – it’s our biggest funding
source. This revenue allows us to
help our members and commu-
nity by continuing to push hard
on our economic development
initiatives.
A stronger business base less-
ens the tax burden on all of us.
We continue to grow as a com-
munity and as a chamber and
doing so together takes planning
and foresight.
If you are thinking about
starting up a business or relocat-
ing one to the area, the Oregon
Chamber would like to help you.
We thank our members, commu-
nity and village for the support
you give the chamber. We are
here to listen to your ideas and
help you achieve your goals.
We hope to see you at Summer
Fest. Come visit our Summer
Fest website – oregonwisummer
fest.com – for more information,
and while you’re there, please
consider signing up to volunteer.
It’s a great way to make a dif-
ference in your community in a
fun festival atmosphere. In fact,
we encourage you to sign up as
a group with your friends and
family.
On Sunday night, when Sum-
mer Fest is over, it is always a
great event where many neigh-
bors and friends are connected.
These lasting memories are
stories to share, moments to
relive and a piece of the Oregon
community. Moments like these
make all the preparation so
satisfying for me and everyone
else who helps and supports our
Oregon Summer Fest.
This year, I look forward to
taking another short breath and
watching the kids play on the
rides – which run all weekend
long – listening to the great
music and observing friends and
families just having fun.
Judy Knutson is the execu-
tive director of the Oregon Area
Chamber of Commerce. For
information on the chamber, visit
oregonwi.com.
Knutson
Community Voices
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to share, download and order prints of
your favorite photos from
local community and sports events.
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directly to you!
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June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
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presents



















Book, Music and Lyrics by:
MEREDITH WILLSON
Story by:
MEREDITH WILLSON and FRANKLIN LACEY



June 20, 21, 26, 27 & 28, 2014 7:30 PM
Matinee June 22, 2014 2:00 PM
Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center
For Reserved Tickets: 608-845-2383 www.vact.org
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Bethel Horizons Summer Camps 2014
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Questions?
Contact Angie at
(608) 257.2577 ext 228
or bhorizons@bethel-
madison.org
tions?
yy
Disability group fundraiser
Saturday at Sportsman’s Club
A Dane County disabil-
ity advocacy organization
will hold a fundraiser at the
Oregon Sportsman’s Club
Saturday.
Access Abi l i t y Wi s-
consin and Madison Area
Safe Hunters will use the
fundraiser to purchase an
all-terrain wheelchair, the
Action Trackchair, for use
by persons with disabilities
in Dane County.
The all-terrain wheel-
chair makes it possible for
people with disabilities to
hunt, fish, bird watch and
participate in other outdoor
activities where they might
not otherwise be able to,
according to a press release
from AAW.
The event is 9 a.m.-5:30
p.m., and will include an
auction, raffles, archery
practice, shooting clays and
many other games and priz-
es at 1721 Sand Hill Road.
Admission is $10, which
includes a picnic lunch,
access to the activities and
entry into a drawing for
prizes. Tickets may be pur-
chases at AccessAbilityWI.
org.
Additional Food will be
available for purchase from
11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Access Ability Wiscon-
sin is a subchapter of the
Pheasants Forever Dane
County chapter that focuses
on improving access to the
outdoors for persons with
mobility issues or disabili-
ties.
Town of Dunn
Burying Ground gate
dedication set for Sunday
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
Town of Dunn officials
on Sunday are dedicating
the completion of building
stone walls and installing
iron gates at the town Bury-
ing Ground.
Offi ci al s have t al ked
about having some sort of
gates at the cemetery for a
long time, said Cathy Has-
slinger, the town’s business
manager.
“I have drawings that I
think are at least 20 years
old from when they did the
restoration of the Burying
Ground,” she said.“They
were envisioning the gate,
and the plan was to use
stone from neighboring
farms to create a stone wall
and to have artisans who
live in the town create some
beautiful gates.”
The wor k t o do t hat
started last year. Rocks
were gathered from farms
all over the Town of Dunn
and were laid out by hand
to make the wing walls on
either side of the gates.
The metal gates were
created and installed by
vol unt eers i n t he t own
experienced in that kind of
work. Town chairman Ed
Minihan and parks commis-
sioner Don Schmidt led the
project, with many helpers,
Hasslinger said.
The gates are 20 feet tall
and “very heavy and stur-
dy,” she added. “I could not
find taller gates anywhere.”
Each gate has a cut out
with a sculpture of a Sand-
hill crane flying through.
“They’re real l y qui t e
beaut i f ul , ” Hassl i nger
observed.
The gates were hung last
fall, and workers finished
putting the stones and the
caps on the walls last week.
“The gates were hung
but the wing walls weren’t
finished,” Hasslinger said.
“Something we wanted to
do for a long time has final-
ly happened.”
The cemetery is on the
corner of Sandhill Road and
County Hwy. B. The dedi-
cation is scheduled to begin
at 4 p.m. Sunday.
Garden tour set for Saturday
The Oregon Garden Club
i s sponsor i ng Gar dens
Galore III, a walking tour
of six fabulous diverse gar-
dens in the Oregon area.
It will run from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. on Saturday, June
21. Tickets are $10 for
adults and $5 for children
ages 10 - 15.  The proceeds
will benefit the Habitat for
Humanity Oregon-Brook-
lyn Satellite.
Tickets can be purchased
on the day of the event at
any of these three sites: 
751-760 Janesville Street,
Oregon; 1828 Sand Hill
Road, Oregon; and 1867
Paddock Place, Fitchburg. 
There are no advance ticket
sales. 
The mission of the Gar-
den Club is “to learn from
fellow gardeners, to spread
the joy of gardening, and
to do a little good along the
way.” 
The event will be held
rai n or shi ne. No pet s
please.
If you go
What: Dedication of
gates at Town of Dunn
Burying Ground
When: 4 p.m. Sunday,
June 22
Where: Corner of
Sandhill Road and County
Hwy. B
Info: Town of Dunn
office, 838-1081
If you go
What: Access Ability
Wisconsin fundraiser
When: Saturday, June
21, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Where: Oregon
Sportsman’s Club, 1721
Sand Hill Road
Tickets:
AccessAbilityWI.org
Oregon student heads to national
SkillsUSA competition
Oregon resident Heather
Serfoss, a student at Madi-
son College, will compete
in the SkillsUSA National
Leadershi p and Ski l l s
Conference to be held
June 23-27 in Kansas City.
Ski l l sUSA suppor t s
technical education and
l eadershi p at t he hi gh
school and college level.
Serfoss is one of nine
Madison College students
who won gold awards in
leadership and technical
skill contests at the Skill-
sUSA Wisconsin State
Conference in April.
She won the gold in the
Job Skill Demonstration
Open category. Students
competing in this category
demonstrate an entry-level
skill in an occupational
area outside their training
program.
State opens Grow Academy at youth facility
The Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Cor r ect i ons ’
Division of Juvenile Cor-
rections (DJC) officially
opened The Grow Acad-
emy during a ribbon cut-
ting ceremony on June 5 on
Hwy. M north of Oregon.
The Grow Academy is an
agricultural science-based
curriculum and an experi-
ential education approach
to support delinquent male
youth in achieving impor-
tant educational, develop-
mental and restorative jus-
tice goals. It’s a new DJC
program designed to meet
the expanding need for
community programming
for delinquent, high school
credit deficient male youth
between the ages of 14 and
18.
Utilizing an evidence-
based correctional program
consisting of an agricultur-
ally-based educational cur-
riculum, cognitive-behav-
ioral treatment and com-
munity partnerships, the
Grow Academy will help
DJC accomplish its mis-
sion of ensuring communi-
ty protection, high-quality
care, youth accountability
and competency building
and reducing recidivism.
The academy’s garden
is 100 feet by 200 feet and
has produce ranging from
broccoli, beans, lettuce,
onions, carrots, peppers
and various types of flow-
ers to a fruit tree orchard
made up of apple, plum
and pear trees.
“Thi s i s goi ng t o be
something we talk about
for years and years t o
come,” said DOC secretary
Ed Wall as he addressed
the crowd and thanked all
those that helped make the
academy possible.
Wisconsin Council on
Chi l dren and Fami l i es
Deputy Director and Wis-
consin’s Governor’s Juve-
nile Justice Commission
Chair Jim Moeser reflected
on the historical and cur-
rent practices within the
juvenile justice system.
In discussing the changes
in juvenile corrections over
the years, Moeser said,
“We go into the fourth
wave with more knowledge
and a belief that we can do
three things at the same
time – make our commu-
nities safer, hold youth
accountable, and provide
youth with the skills and
opportunities to become
successful members of our
community. It will be up
to those of you in this next
generation of professionals
to shape that future.”
The Gr ow Academy
wi l l hel p par t i ci pant s
work toward high school
or HSED compl et i on,
incorporate pro-social atti-
tudes into relationships
and the community, learn
skills that have meaning
for future academic and
career pursuits along with
healthy independent living
and give back to the com-
munity by providing tan-
gible resources for people
in need.
“As juvenile justice con-
tinues to utilize evidence
based practices and innova-
tive approaches to reduce
the risk of future crimi-
nal behavior by youth, the
Division of Juvenile Cor-
rections believes smaller
facilities like the Grow
Academy can be an effec-
tive intervention to long-
term correctional place-
ments for low to medium-
ri sk yout h, ” sai d Kat e
Elvidge, DJC Northwest
Regional Chief.
DJC Administrator Cari
Taylor said that produce
harvested at the academy
will be consumed by youth
in the program; some will
be shared with Oakhill
Correctional Institution as
well as being donated to
local food pantries.
For information, visit
doc.wi.gov/Families-Vis
itors/Juvenile-Services/
The-Grow-Academy
Photo submitted
Grow Academy, an agricul-
tural science-based curriculum
and an experiential education
approach, recently took root
near the Oakhill Correctional
Facility just outside Oregon.
Youth will help grow crops
including vegetables and herbs.
6
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Coming up
Community calendar
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
Pastor Rich Johnson
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. classic service
10:45 a.m. new song service
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
office@communityoflife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Dave Pluss
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575  
608-835-3082 - fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor: Bob Vetter
SUNDAY:
10 a.m. Blended Worship
11 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11:15 a.m.  All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 8:15, 9:30 and 10:45
a.m. Worship West Campus: Corner
of Hwy. PD and Nine Mound Road,
Verona
SUNDAY - 9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m.
Worship (608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. worship service at Oregon
High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.weconnect.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastors Jason and Johanna Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. worship and
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. worship;
5 p.m. The Gathering Sunday night
service with simple supper to follow
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust,
105 S. Alpine Parkway, Oregon - Bob
Groth, Pastor - (608) 513-3435
welcometovineyard.com
SUNDAY - 10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY -
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Gratitude, Contentment and Anxiety
A simple prayer of thanks is a great way to start and end
every day. We have so much to be thankful for, and remind-
ing ourselves of that fact will improve the quality of our lives.
But, how do we know if we are truly and genuinely show-
ing gratitude to God? With our family and friends it is easy
enough to know if we are genuinely grateful. In that case, we
will feel and express appreciation and be happy with our gift.
We might extend this same analysis to God: are we genu-
inely appreciative of God’s gifts to us (our lives, our talents,
our work, and our family and friends) and are we genuinely
content with how things are working out in our lives? A true
sense of gratitude to God should lead to a profound sense
of contentment with our lives. This doesn’t mean that we
won’t strive to make things better; there are many things that
could stand to be improved. But, it does mean that as we go
about our lives we manifest a satisfaction and contentment
with things, and especially the little things we cannot change.
Gratitude naturally brings with it a deep contentment which
will banish fear and anxiety from our lives. So, we should
keep in mind all that we have to be thankful for.
- Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be
glad in it.
Psalm 118:24
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for both channels.
A new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1,
4, 7 and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
WOW 983 ORE 984
Thursday, June 19
• 10-10:45 a.m., “Duke Otherwise”
concert at Prairie View Elementary
Little Theater
Friday, June 20
• 6 p.m. Relay For Life, Mandt
Park, Stoughton, all details at relay-
instoughton.com
Saturday, June 21
• 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Garden tour,
751-760 Janesville Street, Oregon;
1828 Sand Hill Road, Oregon; and
1867 Paddock Place, Fitchburg,
$10
• Green County Dairy Days, Village
of Brooklyn
Sunday, June 22
•7 a.m. - 11 a.m., Pancake break-
fast and bake sale, Brooklyn Fire
Station
• 1 p.m., Haitian music perfor-
mance benefiting music educa-
tion program, St. John’s Lutheran
Church, 625 E. Netherwood St.,
tylee@charter.net
• 4 p.m., Dunn cemetery gate dedi-
cation, corner of Sandhill Road and
Hwy. B
Monday, June 23
• 6:30 p.m., Village of Brooklyn
planning and zoning meeting,
Village Hall
Tuesday, June 24
• 10:30 a.m., Oregon High School
Band performance, senior center
parking lot
• 7 p.m., Oregon Community Band
concert, Waterman Triangle Park
Thursday, June 26
• Oregon Summerfest, oregon-
wisummerfest.com
• 10-11 a.m., Science Alliance:
Zapped!, Prairie View Elementary
big gym
• 3-7 p.m., Oregon Food Pantry
pickup, 1092 Union Road, obfp.org
• 6:30 p.m. Teen books for adults
book club, library, 835-3656
• Dusk, Summerfest fireworks
Friday, June 27
• Oregon Summerfest, oregon-
wisummerfest.com
• 9:30 a.m., Dane County Wii
league championship game, senior
center, 835-5801
Saturday, June 28
• Oregon Summerfest, oregon-
wisummerfest.com
Sunday, June 29
• Oregon Summerfest, oregon-
wisummerfest.com
Monday, June 30
• 1-2 p.m., science lab, ages K-6,
library, 835-3656
Thursday, June 19
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of June 16)
Friday, June 20
“Heather & Dave” Music @
Oregon Senior Center (June 17)
Saturday, June 21
Oregon Community Band
Concert (of June 17)
Sunday, June 22
Worship Service: Faith
Evangelical Lutheran Church
Monday, June 23
“Over 90 Celebration” with
JT Nolan, Music @ Oregon
Senior Center (of June 18)
Tuesday, June 24
“In the Fight” U.S. Army
News
Wednesday, June 25
“Byrd Bros.” Music @
Oregon Senior Center (May 22)
Thursday, June 26
2003 Oregon Summer Fest
Hilites
Thursday, June 19
“Taming of the Shrew” Play
(of Apr. 29)
Friday, June 20
BKE/NKE Orchestra Concert
(of May 20)
Saturday, June 21
PVE Orchestra/Chorus
Concert (of May 20)
Sunday, June 22
“Duke Otherwise” Oregon
Library Event (of June 19)
Monday, June 23
RCI Orchestra Concert (of
May 12)
Tuesday, June 24
OMS Orchestra Concert (of
May 12)
Wednesday, June 25
OHS Orchestra Concert (of
May 29)
Thursday, June 26
OHS Percussion & Jazz
Concert (of May 27)
Monday, June 23
Salisbury Steak in Gravy,
Mashed Potatoes, Gravy,
Coleslaw, Pear Slices, W.W.
Bread
VO Veggie Ribbet in
Veggie Gravy
Tuesday, June 24
Sliced Turkey Ham, one-
half Baked Sweet Potato,
French Style Green Beans,
Pineapple, Multi Grain
Bread, Cookie
VO-Veggie Patty
Wednesday, June 25
Sloppy Joe on Bun, Potato
Salad, Broccoli Flowerets,
Mandarin Oranges, Ice
Cream,
VO-Soy BBQ
Thursday, June 26
Breaded Fish, Cheesy
Hash Brown, Broccoli
Flowerets, Diced Peaches,
W.W. Bread, Pie
VO- Hash Brown Cass.
W/ Soy
SO-California Cobb
Friday, June 27
Tater Tot Casserole,
Carrots, Small Croissant,
Strawberry Short Cake w/
Topping
VO- Soy Casserole
Monday, June 23
AM—Reflexology
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 RSVP Sewing
1:30 Bridge
4:00 Weight Loss Support
6:00 Pickleball at OMS
Tuesday, June 24
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Arthritis Movement
9:30 Bingo
9:45 Tai Chi
10:30 OHS Marching Band
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
Wednesday, June 25
AM—Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
10:30 Animal Visit
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, June 26
AM Chair Massage
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Arthritis Movement
12:30 Shopping at Bill’s
1:00 Cribbage
3:00 Food Pantry Open
Friday, June 27
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Pilates
9:00 “Celebrate Dairy”
9:30 Wii Bowling
Championship Games
Fire/EMS pancake breakfast
As a part of the Green County
Dairy Days celebration, the Brooklyn
Fire/EMS is hosting a pancake break-
fast and open house, 7 a.m.-11 a.m.
Sunday, June 22.
Special guests will include the 2013
and 2014 Green County Dairy Queens
& Smokey Bear.
Additional activities include tours
of the fire station, fire engine rides,
free photos of children donning fire
gear, Med Flight helicopter landing
and display and also a bake sale spon-
sored by the Friends of the Brooklyn
Fire/EMS.
Brooklyn Fire/EMS bake sale
The Friends of the Brooklyn Fire/
EMS is a group of concerned citizens
with the goal of assisting the Fire/
EMS departments with fundraising.
In support of the volunteers, the
Friends of the Brooklyn Fire/EMS are
sponsoring a bake sale in conjunction
with the Pancake Breakfast to be held
at the Brooklyn Fire Station.
Marching band performance
The Oregon Marching Band, now
known as “Shadow Armada” will
be giving their annual performance
between the Oregon Senior Center
and the library at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday,
June 24.
Come out in full force to show your
support for these talented, hard-work-
ing young adults.
Oregon band concert
The Stoughton City Band will join
the Oregon Community band for a
show June 24.
The joint concert takes place at 7
p.m. Tuesday, June 24, at Waterman
Triangle Park.
The Oregon Area Historical Society
will provide refreshments.
Pantry pickup
Oregon-Brooklyn Food Pantry has
pickup coming up Thursday, June
26. Residents in the Oregon School
District are welcomed to come to
the pantry that goes from 3-7 p.m. at
1092 Union Road. For more informa-
tion, visit obfp.org.
Science Alliance: Zapped!
Science Alliance will present its
electricity program called “Zapped!”
from 10 a. m. to 11 a. m. Thurs-
day, June 26, at the Prairie View
Elementary Big Gym.
Kids will see how electricity works
through exciting experiments.
Teen Books for Adults
Love reading teen books but have
reached adulthood? The Teen Books
for the Youthful Adult Book Club is
for adults who want to discuss excit-
ing teen reads.
The group will discuss “Friends
with Boys” by Faith Erin Hicks at
6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 26.
Wii League Championship
The Dane County Senior Center
Wii Bowling Traveling League cham-
pionship game will be held at the Ore-
gon Area Senior Center this year.
Come and cheer on the bowlers at
9:30 a.m. Friday, June 27.
Afterward, stick around for lunch
and cake. Lunch is on a donation
basis and the cake is free. Please call
the kitchen at 835-5801 by Wednes-
day, June 25 to reserve a lunch spot.
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
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immediately pay the entire unpaid Amount Financed as well as our collection costs, attorneys’ fees and court costs related to enforcing your obligations under the Contract. 4G LTE not available in all areas. See uscellular.com/4G for complete coverage details. 4G LTE service provided through King Street Wireless,
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5 lines
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150
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175
*
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160
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190
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Things we want you to know: New Retail Installment Contracts and Shared Connect Plan required. Credit approval required. Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee applies (currently $1.57/line/month); this is not a tax or gvmt. required charge. Add. fees, taxes and terms apply and vary by svc. and eqmt. Offers valid
in-store at participating locations only, may be fulfilled through direct fulfillment and cannot be combined. See store or uscellular.com for details. $140 Price Plan based on $100/mo. 10GB Shared Connect Plan plus 4 lines with discounted $10 Device Connection Charges each. Retail Installment Contract
required to receive discounts, otherwise regular Device Connection Charges apply. Other discounts available for additional Shared Connect Plans. Price comparison based on AT&T Mobile Share Plan and Verizon More Everything Plan for 10GB as of May 7, 2014. Contract Payoff Promo: Offer valid on up to 6
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days of activation date to www.uscellular.com/contractpayoff or via mail to U.S. Cellular
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immediately pay the entire unpaid Amount Financed as well as our collection costs, attorneys’ fees and court costs related to enforcing your obligations under the Contract. 4G LTE not available in all areas. See uscellular.com/4G for complete coverage details. 4G LTE service provided through King Street Wireless,
a partner of U.S. Cellular. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. Kansas Customers: In areas in which U.S. Cellular receives support from the Federal Universal Service Fund, all reasonable requests for service must be met. Unresolved questions concerning services availability can be directed to the Kansas Corporation
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Stoughton
Evansville Oregon
2384 Jackson St., 608-877-9548
613 E. Main St., 608-882-0680 1015 North Main St., 608-835-2980
UN355907
We like to move it!
Brooklyn Elementary’s second-annual Move-a-thon raised $11,000 for outdoor fitness
equipment. This year students moved through a variety of movement stations, exploring
many avenues to keep active and fit.
Left, PAWS groups experienced parachute activities with the help of parent volunteers.
Below, Izzy Goins shows her stuff at the hula hoop station.
Photos submitted
8
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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VICTORIA VLISIDES
Unified Newspaper Group
Plans change.
Sara Fishwild and hus-
band Jon t ook a crash
course in that life lesson
back in 1998, after Sara
was diagnosed with Stage 1
cancer.
“Six weeks out from our
wedding, I got told I had
cancer…” she said.
Though Sara was able
to recover from surgery
and remains cancer free
for 16 years, there was one
thing the then 33-year-old
couldn’t get back after cer-
vical cancer: the ability to
give birth.
A soft-spoken lab tech at
the Forest Products Labo-
ratory on the University of
Wisconsin Madison cam-
pus, Sara said having a can-
cer that took away her abil-
ity to give life could have
left her miserable, but she
didn’t let it take her iden-
tity.
Years later, she’s grate-
ful for what does define
her – her roles as a wife to
Jon and as a mother to their
two adopted children from
India.
Though she considers
herself somewhat of a pri-
vate person, she told the
Oregon Observer that she
wants to open up about her
story to let other survivors
know they aren’t defined
by what cancer took away
from them.
Being able to share one’s
story is part of an annual
event Fishwild participates
in that can be a bright spot
for many cancer survivors
and patients. The June 20
Stoughton-McFarland-Ore-
gon Relay for Life raises
money for cancer research
and lends a place to rally
support for individuals and
families who are affected
by cancer.
This year, Fishwild was
named one of the Relay’s
honorary survivors.
Relay for Life organizer
Amy Ketterer said they
wanted to honor Fishwild
for the energy and enthusi-
asm she and her team have
brought to the Relay for
years.
Fishwild participates in
it yearly, since about 2009,
with local support and fun-
draising group the “Mojo
Warriors.”
She looks forward to the
event each year, but this
year’s Relay has special
meaning because it’s also
on her wedding anniversary
(June 20, 1998) and around
the time of her diagnosis.
Routine check-up
Sara’s diagnosis came
with no real symptoms,
and could have easily gone
undetected in Stage 1, she
said.
After a standard physi-
cal checkup at a Madison-
area clinic, the nurse prac-
titioner found something
she thought was abnormal.
Fishwild said after seeing
a specialist who said there
was nothing to worry about,
she had to advocate for her-
self, going against the doc-
tor's recommendation.
“He didn't want to take a
biopsy…” she said. “I basi-
cally had to insist.”
After the results came
back as positive for can-
cer, she underwent emer-
gency surgery – a radical
hysterectomy where they
removed the cervix and
uterus until the cancer was
removed.
Through her recovery, the
family also had to focus on
the more immediate future:
Would she be able to attend
their already planned wed-
ding?
“They said give her 12
weeks to kinda get moving
again,” Jon recalled.
But Sara had other plans.
She was going to walk as
normally as she could at her
wedding, and she was going
to dance at her reception.
She recuperated at their
house in Stoughton at the
time, with the overwhelm-
ing support of friends and
family.
"They all took their turn
and came and baby sat me,"
Fishwild said.
She said she was used
to being the one helping
others – not the other way
around – and that took a lit-
tle while to get used to.
“For me to have to ask
for help, was hard,” she
said. “My sister said, ‘You
have to accept this help.
Give others the gift of being
able to help you.’”
A physical challenge was
having to wear a catheter
for about 10 days, but that
didn’t stop her from doing
whatever she could to get
the recovery moving. Even
if that meant not-so-grace-
fully walking up and down
the street to get some exer-
cise.
“It was not pretty, but I
did it,” she said.
By her wedding, she said
she was recovered enough
to walk down the aisle and
even do most of the dance
she and Jon had planned for
the reception.
“I think most people at
the wedding knew the situa-
tion… and people knew her
fortitude to make through
the dance,” Jon said.
Becoming parents
Sara said the most chal-
lenging part of recovering
from her cancer, at first,
was the realization that
she’d never give birth.
However , t he coupl e
worked through it together,
and two years later, they
decided to adopt.
The coupl e moved t o
Oregon in ’05 where they
wanted to raise their two
children, adopted in 2001
and 2005. Jaison, now 11,
and Arathi, now 12, both
go to Rome Corners Inter-
mediate School and are
very active, playing several
musical instruments and
doing sports like dance and
soccer.
“There are many ways to
have a family,” Sara said.
“Now, I can’t imagine any
other kids in my life.”
Living cancer-free
She said surviving cancer
taught her to be extremely
vigilant with her family's
health care, and to always
ask for a second opinion at
the doctor’s office.
She also said it helps her
appreciate every second
of her life – even when
she has to be a “crabby
mom, "”she sai d wi t h a
laugh. She remains thankful
that the cancer was caught
early.
“I feel it was such a mir-
acle,” she said of it being
found early on. “A lot of
people have gone through
a lot worse than me. I just
feel very blessed and very
happy that it worked out
like it did.”
While cancer’s not some-
thing that defines her life,
she will always be aware of
it.
“Even this many year’s
out and it still can come to
the surface in a raw way,”
she sai d, choki ng back
tears. “But not in a bad
way, you know, it’s been
turned into something posi-
tive.”
Don’t define me!
Honorary survivor healthy, happy and staying positive 16 years after reproductive cancer
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
The Fishwild family will participate in this weekend’s Stoughton-McFarland-Oregon Relay For Life, held
in Stoughton. From front to back are Arathi, Jaison, honorary survivor Sara, and Jon at their Oregon
home.
Below, the “Mojo Warriors,” Fishwild’s Relay team, raised more than $1,000 at a garage sale for Relay
for Life this year.
Photo submitted
If you go
What: Relay For Life
of Stoughton/McFarland/
Oregon
When: Friday, June 20,
6 p.m.
Where: Mandt Park,
South Fourth St., Stoughton
Info: RelayinStoughton.
com
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Panthers defeat SPASH
4-3 in quarters, fall to Eau
Claire Memorial in semis
JOSH SMITH
Special for the Observer
The Oregon High School boys ten-
nis team continued its “year of firsts”
at the WIAA Division 1 state team
tennis tournament over the weekend.
The Panthers added a State semi-
final appearance to an already suc-
cessful 2014 campaign that included
a Badger South Conference champi-
onship and a WIAA Division 1 sec-
tional title.
Oregon won a thrilling match
over Stevens Point, 4-3, during Fri-
day night’s quarterfinals at Nielsen
Tennis Stadium on the University of
Wisconsin campus. But the Panthers’
season came to an end following a
7-0 loss to Eau Claire Saturday morn-
ing.
“It’s really impressive,” said OHS
head coach Ben Conklin, whose team
finished the year with a 14-5 overall
dual record. “So many firsts starting
with conference, and then Sectionals
and then the Final Four.
“I’m sure the players don’t realize
what a big deal it is to win the first
round and get to the Final Four,” he
added. “We had a great year – a won-
derful year.”
Oregon took the early advantage
in its match with Stevens Point, win-
ning at Nos. 1 and 2 doubles to build
a 2-1 lead headed to singles play.
Oregon’s victory at No. 2 doubles
was key to the victory given how
evenly matched the two squads were,
Conklin said.
Jackson Wilhelm and Drew Christ-
offerson lost their first set, 7-5. But
the Oregon duo rallied to take the
next two sets, 6-2 and 6-2, to claim
the match.
“Once we saw No. 3 doubles
unfortunately lost, we kind of knew
we had to pull a win out somewhere,”
Christofferson said. “We got it done.”
“We knew it was vital and we had
to come through,” Wilhelm added.
Wilhelm and Christofferson raced
out to a 3-0 lead in the second set to
take control. Stevens Point’s team of
Connor Cook and Dakota Zarecki
won the next two, but Christofferson
held serve and Oregon got a break to
seal the set.
The Oregon pairing got out to a 3-0
start in the third set as well. Wilhelm
held serve to go up 4-1 and Christof-
ferson hit a winner down the line to
seal the next game. SPASH survived
one more game but then Oregon
broke serve to take the match.
The Panthers’ top duo of Alec
Onesti and Dakota Tollakson got the
ball rolling with a 6-3 and 6-2 victory
over SPASH’s Trenton Seegert and
Noah Meier.
“They didn’t have a very good
individual tournament last week,”
Conklin said of his No. 1 pairing.
“They won one match but they didn’t
play their best. So today, we told
them we wanted to see their best and
they got to set the tone for everybody
else.
“And they did it. They played their
best and they set the tone.”
Onesti and Tollakson opened the
night with a service break. Then the
pair held serve throughout the first set
and got another break to take the first
set.
Stevens Point’s team appeared
frustrated throughout the second set.
SPASH double faulted twice in the
final game, including match point.
“Tennis is a mental game more
than anything,” Onesti said. “At
the start of the second set, we were
the lower team, but we eventually
overcame that.”
Brady Behrend chipped in a 6-2
and 7-5 win at No. 3 singles and
Charles Donovan clinched the match
with a three-set victory at No. 4 sin-
gles.
Donovan rolled to a 6-1 first set but
dropped the second, 6-4. He rallied to
take the third 6-3 and give Oregon’s
its fourth win of the evening.
“In the second set, he stepped up
his game and I was getting a little
tired, so my footwork wasn’t the
greatest,” Donovan said. “I had to use
my feet more and I was playing a lit-
tle more aggressively (in the third).”
Donovan broke Skyler Cole-
grove’s serve to go up 3-1 in the third
and then extended his lead to 4-1.
Colegrove, who entered the
Panthers fall goal shy of state berth at Waunakee
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
It took less than three minutes for
the Oregon High School girls soccer
team to get on the board last Satur-
day in a WIAA Division 2 sectional
final at Waunakee.
The host Warriors came in ranked
third in Division 2 in the Wisconsin
High School Soccer Coaches Asso-
ciation poll, but it was the Panthers
looking poised to make state early
on.
Despite the early goal, Waunakee
scored two unanswered goals to end
the first half and survived a second-
half barrage by Oregon, as the Pan-
thers’ season came to an end in a 2-1
loss.
“This is much higher expectations
than I thought,” head coach Julie
Grutzner said. “Coming into the sea-
son, we had to replace seven start-
ers, so it was us learning. I felt that
we got better during the season, but
I did not think we would make it this
far and actually compete with Wau-
nakee.
“This is the closest we have been.
We return 13 key players next year,
and we have some nice players in
our program coming up as freshmen.
I hope to be back here again and
have better results.”
There was some bad luck for Ore-
gon on the game-winning goal when
sophomore defender Jess Jacobs
went to help freshman goalie Abby
Breitbach, who finished with seven
saves, on a shot toward the net. The
ball took a tough bounce after being
caught in the wind, and as Jacobs
tried to clear, the ball hit her shin and
went into the net for an own goal.
“It is hard to swallow,” Grutzner
said. “We could have crumbled at
that point, but we kept fighting. We
knew we had 40 minutes to try and
put one in the back of the net, and we
sure were close.”
The Panthers had the wind to their
backs for the second half, and they
controlled the possession for most of
it, coming close to scoring with five
shots on goal and 12 total shots.
Waunakee sophomore defender
Jada Dayne and Mecham, who
finished with seven saves, were two
key players that halted the Panthers’
comeback attempt, Warrior head
coach Jesus Torres said.
“It was nerve wracking, and Jada
got hurt a little bit at the end,” Torres
said. “I was worried because she
Boys tennis
Girls soccer
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore Jen Brien reacts following Oregon’s 2-1 loss to Waunakee Saturday, June 14, in a WIAA Division 2 sectional
final at Waunakee High School.
Photo by Mary Langenfeld
Jackson Willhelm of Oregon High School’s No. 2 doubles team returns the ball during the WIAA boys state D1 tennis tourna-
ment at Nielsen Stadium in Madison Friday. Oregon defeated Stevens Point 4-3 in the quarterfinals before falling 7-0 to Eau
Claire Memorial in the semifinals.
History continues
Girls golf
McCorkle
sisters finish
in top five
Oregon graduate Morgan
McCorkle and sophomore sis-
ter Taylor both finished in the
top five at a Wisconsin Junior
PGA tournament last Friday
at Janesville Riverside Golf
Club.
Morgan finished tied for
second with an 8-over 79,
while Taylor finished tied for
fifth with a 10-over 81.
Madison Edgewood’s Car-
oline Lake won the tourna-
ment with a 7-over 78.
Sport shorts
Mosiman is selected for
Masonic all-star game
Oregon High School senior
Sam Mosiman has been cho-
sen to play in the annual
Masonic state all-star soccer
game for graduating seniors.
Mosiman, who played
center-midfield for the state
champion varsity team, is a
three-year player for the Madi-
son 56ers and four time Olym-
pic Development Program
selection for the Wisconsin
team that competes in the
ODP’s regional tournament.
He will be attending UW-La
Crosse this coming fall.
Jones caps prep career
on high note
More than 60 of Wis-
consin’s finest senior track
and field athletes enjoyed a
final send-off competition
last weekend at the Midwest
Senior Spotlight Meet on Sat-
urday in Joliet, Ill., including
Oregon High School’s Valerie
Jones.
Jones won the 800-meter
run in 2 minutes, 19.58 sec-
onds. Jones also helped the
team Wisconsin 4x800 relay
to a meet-best time of 9:23.86.
Turn to State/Page 10
Turn to Sectionals/Page 10
10
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
a
d
n
o
=
3
5
7
4
0
2
-
0
1
4x100
43.14 seconds
School Record
4x200
129.74 seconds
School Record
Congrats
State-Qualifying
Boy’s Relay Team
Lucas Mathews, Lance Peterson,
Coach Diaz, Jawon Turner, Josh Sromovsky
Galloway, Peterson earn
first-team honors
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Seniors Ross Galloway
and Pierce Peterson both
represent ed t he Oregon
High School baseball squad
as first-team All-Badger
South selections this season.
Galloway was a unani-
mous s el ect i on as an
infielder, while Peterson
was selected as an outfield-
er. Galloway was 16-for-38
(.421) with five doubles,
a triple, four RBIs and 13
runs scored in conference
games. Peterson was 17-for-
39 (.436) with five doubles,
six RBIs and eight runs
scored.
Seni or s Logan Laski
(pitcher) and Jere Bau-
er (catcher) and juniors
Mitch Weber (pitcher) and
Andrew Pliner (outfielder)
all added second-team hon-
ors.
Laski pi t ched 36 1/ 3
innings and allowed 11
earned runs on 38 hits (2.12
ERA). He struck out 23 and
walked 11.
Weber went 29 2/ 3
innings and allowed five
earned runs on 15 hits. He
struck out 43 and walked
17.
Bauer finished with sev-
en RBIs, while Pliner was
12-for-39 (.308) with four
doubles, five RBIs and eight
runs scored.
Oregon finished 8-4 in
the Badger South, finishing
tied for second, and lost in
a WIAA Division 1 regional
final.
tournament with a 27-1 record, rallied within
two games. However, Donovan served out to
take the match.
Behrend’s victory at No. 3 singles was a
hard fought one that left him exhausted.
“He had to dig really deep,” Conklin said.
“It seems like the last couple times, like at
subsectionals, he was the losing end of that
real close match. So it’s great for him, espe-
cially today, to get that close match victory.”
After claiming a 6-2 first set, Behrend
led 4-1 in the second. That’s when Stevens
Point’s Jon Peck came to life, securing four
wins in a row to go up 5-4.
Behrend recovered to win the final three
games to take the set 7-5 and win the match.
Oregon’s No. 3 singles player said he was
concerned about the direction the second set
was headed, but got a boost of confidence
when he tied it 5-5 and was able to extend
points.
Jackson Schneider, who dealt with pain
throughout the tournament due to a back
injury, lost his No. 1 singles match with
Brady Luetschwager in straight sets.
Calvin Schneider lost a third-set tiebreaker
to Blain Bancker at No. 2 singles, 6-4, 2-6
and 10-7, while Oregon’s No. 3 doubles team
of Matt Reisdorf and Spencer Krebsbach lost
in straight sets, 7-5 and 6-3.
Oregon ran into a difficult opponent in Eau
Claire Memorial Saturday morning.
The eventual State runners-up topped the
Panthers, 7-0.
Combined, the Old Abes lost a mere 10
games in doubles play en route to winning
all three matches in straight sets. Eau Claire
Memorial kept that momentum in singles
play, claiming those four matches in straight
sets as well.
When Oregon faced E.C. Memorial during
the season, the Panthers suffered a 6-1 loss
with Behrend recording the lone win of the
day at No. 3 singles. However he was unable
to duplicate the feat this weekend.
The Panthers’ closest match came at No.
4 singles where Donovan dropped a third-set
tiebreaker to Sohil Brahmbhatt and lost the
match, 4-6, 6-1 and 10-3.
Donovan finished the season 25-4 overall.
Jackson Schneider was 10-11, Calvin
Schneider was 18-7 and Behrend was 19-8 at
Nos. 1, 2 and 3 singles, respectively.
Onesti and Tollakson went 17-7 at No. 1
doubles, Wilhelm and Christofferson fin-
ished the year 13-8 at No. 2 doubles and
the No. 3 doubles team of Reisdorf and
Krebsbach was 16-8.
Although the team suffered a lopsided loss
to end the season, Oregon’s coach was still
tremendously proud of all the accomplish-
ments the squad achieved throughout the
year – most notably the team’s Sectional
championship and Team State appearance.
“We had a lofty goal and we reached it,”
Conklin said.
was sitting down and the ball was bouncing
around, but it was a fun game.”
Oregon struck first in the third minute.
Sophomore forward Jen Brien, with the
wind in her face, hit a through ball to the right
side of the field. Sophomore forward Makena
Fanning remained onside and was able to
stay in stride while picking up the pass.
Fanning drilled a shot that curved past
Waunakee junior goalie Olivia Mecham,
who slipped on the play.
“It is pretty difficult,” Fanning said. “I
think we controlled the second half, but I
think it is hard from starting off high with
a goal and then them getting two straight
goals.”
For Fanning and Brien, connecting on
offense is nothing new this season, regard-
less of the stage. They both are expected to
continue to have good chemistry in the next
two seasons.
“We see each other, and it helps a lot with
the offense,” Brien said. “I love working with
her.”
Waunakee tied the game in the eighth min-
ute when senior Maddie Shaw found senior
Macie Maulbetsch on a cross. Maulbetsch
finished the opportunity inside the penalty
box.
Oregon finishes 14-6-1 overall and is a
sectional runner-up for the second straight
season.
“Oregon is very good, and Grutzner is a
really good coach,” Torres said. “It was a tale
of two halves. In the first half, we dominated,
and in the second half, they dominated.
“This is not the last time we are going to
face each other in a sectional final.”
Seniors Kristin Marshall, Eliza Neidhart,
Hailie Schnabel, Megan Brugger, Jess Kutz,
Morgan Wendt, Dani Ironmonger, Megan
Lowe and Lara Frankson all graduated, but
Fanning, Brien and the rest of the team hope
to learn from the examples of the seniors and
try and finally break through to state next
year.
“We are a young team, and we have a lot
of young talent,” Fanning said. “Today could
have gone either way. You always want to
make state, and next year, we plan on putting
in that work to get there.”
Oregon 2, DeForest 0
Oregon made the sectional final with a 2-0
win last Thursday at DeForest in a sectional
semifinal.
Junior Kelsey Jahn broke a scoreless tie
in the second half with a penalty kick in the
50th minute.
“We take PKs in practice everyday, so I
don’t even think about it,” Jahn said. “It just
comes natural now, I guess.”
The Panthers controlled possession for
most of the game, picking up eight corner
kicks in the first half. And after Jahn’s goal,
the girls didn’t stop attacking.
Senior Kristin Marshall added to Oregon’s
lead in the 57th minute, and several other
shots went off the post and the crossbar.
“With Kristin’s amazing goal, it was
another boost,” Jahn said. “It is amazing to
get back to a sectional final with so many
seniors leaving last year.”
Breitbach finished with two saves for the
Panthers, while DeForest junior goalie Kait-
lynne Roling collected five.
Baseball
File photos by Anthony
Iozzo
Seniors Ross
Galloway (above)
and Pierce
Peterson (at right)
were both named
to the first-team
All-Badger South
Conference squad
this year.

Galloway was cho-
sen as an infielder,
while Peterson
was named as an
outfielder.

Oregon was 8-4 in
the Badger South
this season
Home Talent League
Orioles catch fire, win four of last five games
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
After opening the season
with a four-game losing
streak, the Oregon Orioles
have gone on to win four of
their last five games.
Or egon knocked of f
Shullsburg-Benton by the
score of 10-2 on the road
Sunday behind four RBIs
by Abe Maurice.
Mauri ce doubl ed and
homered for the visiting
Orioles, who improved to
4-5 in the Western Section.
Neil Carney earned the
win for Oregon, striking out
two and walking one in six-
and-two-third innings. Car-
ney scattered eight hits and
allowed two earned runs.
Eric Engler closed the
door, striking out five in
two-and-a-third innings of
relief.
Maurice (2-for-5), Engler
(2-for-4) and Sam Schre-
t ent hal er (4-for-5) al l
collected multiple hits for
the Orioles.
It was a much-needed
win after Oregon fell 10-0
against Argyle on June 8 as
Justin Crotty tossed a per-
fect game.
Oregon travels to Platte-
ville at 1 p.m. Sunday.
Oregon, Wiota
No results were available
as the Observer went to
press on Tuesday.
State: First state appearance ends in semis
Continued from page 9
Sectionals: Panthers finish 14-6-1
Continued from page 9
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
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EMERALD INVESTMENTS
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disturbing to village offi-
cials was the fact that Ore-
gon police chief Doug Pettit
– who’s presently on leave
from the department for
undisclosed reasons – had
failed to report the number
of incidents requiring a law
enforcement response dat-
ing back to 2006, when the
club first obtained a liquor
license.
The club opened in 2004
and first hosted a winter
soccer league. A couple of
years later it began holding
weekend dances that were
sometimes attended by 900
people or more.
Dregne cited 344 incident
reports at the club since
2006.
Village President Steve
Staton said the club’s liquor
license should have been
denied or revoked long ago.
He’s not sure why Pet-
tit did not report the club’s
history of problems to the
Village Board.
“At the time of the annual
renewal liquor licenses in
June, the chief of police
should have been reporting
these things to the board,”
Staton said Tuesday. “It’s
disappointing. We should
have been informed of that
by the chief of police, and
he didn’t do that. I don’t
know why he chose not to,
but he chose not to.”
The Village Board has
to “rely on reports from
police” when issuing or
renewing a liquor license,
“and we didn’t get those,”
Staton added.
The license was initially
granted to Jose Alfredo
Razo. In December 2013,
Leon Garcia applied to
become t he cl ub’s new
agent and to change the
business name to the Ore-
gon Sports Club LLC.
Gracia was listed as a
treasurer or vice-president
of the facility from 2006-
09, Dregne told the board.
“Mr. Garcia has been
involved in managing it for
some time,” Dregne said,
adding that Alfredo Razo is
no longer involved with the
business.
Gracia and manager Juan
Serate attended Monday’s
meeting, with Serate inter-
preting for Gracia, who
does not speak English.
Dregne said the Wiscon-
sin Department of Revenue
inspected the business last
month and revoked its sell-
er’s permit. The operation
continued without a permit
to sell alcohol, Dregne said.
He noted the DOR alleg-
edly found illegal gam-
bling machines and sales
of liquor and beer acquired
from an “unaut hori zed
source.”
Dregne told the board
that when the DOR inter-
viewed Serate, “he said
t hey had not acqui r ed
beer unlawfully and had
not refilled liquor bottles
unlawfully. But Mr. Garcia
said they had in fact done
these things.”
Garcia reportedly told
investigators that Alfredo
Razo had failed to make
payments to licensed beer
and alcohol distributors,
and so the club had to buy
product from Woodman’s
and other retailers.
“ Tha t ma y be why
they applied (for a liquor
license) under a new LLC,”
Dregne said.
In July 2009, the Observ-
er reported that the Village
Board discussed problems
at the sports club related
to fire and electrical code
violations. At the time, Pet-
tit forcefully defended the
club’s operations and sug-
gested it may have been
singled out for closer scru-
tiny, possibly because of its
owner and clientele.
Pettit said he’d worked
with Alfredo Razo for five
years and found him to
be responsive and easy to
work with.
Alfredo Razo regularly
hired off-duty officers from
the Oregon Police Depart-
ment to work security at the
club.
In an interview last week
with the Observer, Serate
said, “Alfredo didn’t use
to pay taxes and owes back
taxes.”
He said Alfredo Razo
r et ur ned t o Mexi co i n
December.
Serat e al so sai d t hat
“some people were say-
ing we were getting special
treatment” from the Oregon
Police Department, which
he denied.
On Monday, Dregne said
Oregon police did back-
ground checks on Garcia
and Serate and had “noth-
ing to report.”
“This is an application for
a new license,” Dregne told
the board on Monday. “The
Village Board has broad
discretion about whether to
issue a new license.”
He said the board should
consider the character of
the applicant, agent and
manager, the experience of
the applicant and manager,
and the history of the busi-
ness.
“I believe there would
clearly be a legal basis for
denying the application,
based on what I’ve present-
ed,” Dregne said.
Following Dregne’s pre-
sentation, Serate defended
the operation and blamed
Alfredo Razo for past prob-
lems.
“I didn’t know that Alfre-
do was working without a
license,” he said. “Every-
thing that happened before
December I didn’t know
about.”
Serate said when Alfredo
Razo left in December, he
“left a lot of product and he
owed us money, so we used
what was left.”
He added t hat si nce
December, “everything we
bought was from a distribu-
tor.” But he later admitted
to buying some beer from
Woodman’s because it car-
ried “what the people want-
ed.”
After the board voted
to deny the liquor license,
Serate told them the club
couldn’t continue without
being able to sell alcohol.
“We can’t operate on soc-
cer only,” he said.
Club: Opened in 2004, has had 344 incident reports
Continued from page 1
Oregon History
March 2014
100 years ago (1914)
• Local tobacco growers
were alerted to a new and
distinct variety of Spanish
Tobacco Seed that was now
available from C. R. Martin’s
Cigar Factory in Oregon or
from George Montgomery. It
was said to produce a plant
of greater size, that enhanced
the yield, but maintained its
pointed shape; increasing the
number of leaf points on the
stalk making for a smooth fin-
ish and no baggy leaves. The
cost was 35 cents an ounce or
$5.00 per pound.
• Frightened by a passing
train, a team of horses belong-
ing to a local livery stable broke
loose from the cutter to which
they were harnessed. They
team was finally caught two
miles east of the Village on the
Peterson farm.
• The J. F. Jensen Auto Co.
(located in the present day
Badger Auto Body building)
were selling 1914 Maxwell
autos for $750.00. The ad
noted that “There is no car on
the market that can possibly
compete with it”.
• Donald McGill gave a
Victrola concert in the main
room of Oregon High School
It was noted that the program
would consist of “high class
concert and operatic selec-
tions”. Don was making his
rounds in the community with
this relatively new entertain-
ment. (Don’t know what a
Victrola is or how it worked? . .
.stop by Oregon Area Historical
Museum.)
50 years ago (1964)
The newly proposed forma-
tion of an Oregon Chamber of
Commerce was the agenda of
the fifty-five area business and
professional people meeting at
the VFW Hall. Addressing the
group was Bob Anderson,
membership director of the
State Chamber of Commerce.
The result of the meeting was
the formation of a sixteen man
committee assigned to work
on the next phase of organiz-
ing a chamber. Members
of the committee were Norm
Champion, Bill Mossman, Allan
Gasner, John Struck, Butler
Delany, Dr. Bill Plummer, Earl
Lawson, Lee Henriksen, Bill
Hagstrom, Marv Jensen, Ron
Erfurth, Carroll Kellor, Dave
Mandt, Francis Killerlain,
Roland Cross, and Ed Lawson.
• Ron Tauchen and Larry
Wegger, OHS Juniors, were
elected to the All-Conference
Basketball squad of the
Madison Suburban League
(Central Section).
• The OHS Wrestling Team
finished their season with
several record holders: Dean
Pernot, conference champion
(season record 13-2); Les
Small, fastest pin record in
the conference (19 seconds);
Dennis Kjellstrom, most con-
secutive wins (11 in a row);
Dennis Strander, conference
champion (undefeated in 11
bouts); Russ Spilde, undefeat-
ed season; Ron Sloniker, most
pins for the season (9); Jack
Henriksen, best of the fresh-
men on the varsity squad, with
a record of 13-2-1) The wres-
tling coach was Fred Lehrke.
• The Gamble Store in
Oregon was advertising
Coronado Color TV receivers
that were the ultimate in color
reception. Customers were
encouraged to stop in and see
their favorite program. (At this
time Gamble store was located
at the present site of Peaceful
Hearts.)
• Archie McCallum, manager
of Oregon Milling Co., demon-
strated to local farmers how
they would no longer have to
shovel corn and grain from
their trucks unto conveyer
belts. Now with a truck hoist
they have the means to lift up
the front end a truck and let the
contents slide from the box
onto the belts.
• The OHS Ag Dept. hosted
evening adult classes for area
farmers. OHS Agriculture
instructor, Fenton Abrams,
emphasized how farmers had
to become more efficient in
their operations.
Some area farmers that
attended the classes were Clem
Dalsoren, Erv Noggle, Harvey
Frederickson, Les Gammeter,
Ken Hagemann, Al Koehler,
Bill Lynaugh, Phil Peterson,
John Stone. Bill Martinson
of Martinson Implement in
Brooklyn supplied some of the
equipment.
25 years ago (l989)
• Oregon School District offi-
cials proposed that a three-
year plan be undertaken to
create computer labs in each
of the district’s five schools.
The cost is estimated to be in
excess of $500,000.
• The Straw Hat Players pre-
sented a production of Neil
Simon’s “Brighton Beach
Memoirs”. Cast members
included Jenny Uphoff, Katy
Marshall, Joan Capelle, Carol
Alleman, Joel Kapusta, Chris
Phistry, and Jace Nichols.
David Lawver directed the
play. Mike Watts was stage
manager and Chad Kopenski,
assistant stage manager.
• Village President, William
Kortte, signed a proclama-
tion proclaiming the week
of March 12th. as Girl Scout
Week. There were over 210
girl scouts in the Oregon area
and for the first time this year
there was a Daisy Scout troop
for kindergartens. Girl Scouts
present at the proclamation
signing were Allison Buehler,
Bryn Meyer, Sonya Mueller,
Valerie Pfeiffer, Melissa
Buehler, Ashley Kortte, Katie
Warren, and Amanda Ryan.
Scout leader, Susan Mueller,
was also present.
• Karen Everson was named
Woman of the Year by the
Unlimited Chapter of the
American Business Women’s
Association.
√Amanda Jeidy, a Third
Grade Brooklyn Elementary
School student, was one of the
winners in The Young Writer’s
Contest. Along with the 104
winners from the 12,000
entries submitted, her story
will be published in a Young
Writer’s Anthology. Her
grandfather was the subject of
her entry.
• With wins over Jefferson
and Stoughton, the OHS
Boy’s Basketball Team wins
the Regional Championship.
The leading scorers in the
Stoughton game were Mike
Statz (16), Derek Schaefer
(15), and Ben Conklin (14).
However, their season ends
at the Sectionals when they
lost to Beloit Memorial. Steve
Merry, the league’s leading
scorer with 324 points was
named to the Badger All-
Conference (1st. Team). Derek
Schaefer and Mike Statz were
named to the All-Conference
(2nd. team).
• Champions of the 1989
Oregon Golfer’s Bowling
Tournament were Bud Frye, in
the scratch division, defeating
Bill Marshall (228-222) and
Mike Nelson, in the handi-
cap division, defeating Bob
Everson (222-209).
• Winners in the Boy Scout
Pack #350’s Annual Pinewood
Derby were Darren Hansen,
Chad Schwenn, James
Lederer, Daniel Freiberg, Tony
Knipfer, Adam Hanson, and
Matt Hartwig.
• Oregon Police Chief,
Dough Petit, awards police
officer, Gerard Pehler, the
title of “Officer of the Year”
noting that Gerard exempli-
fies exactly what the Oregon
Police Department wants in its
officers.
10 years ago (2004)
• OHS orchestra, strings and
composition instructor, Leyla
Sanyer, was winner of the 2004
Elizabeth A. H. Green Award, a
national honor given annually
to a public school teacher who
is seen as a leader in his or
her field. The award was pre-
sented by the American String
Teacher’s Association at their
annual meeting in Dallas, TX.
• Alex Olp, an OHS senior
and his brother,Matt, a fresh-
man, qualified to participate
in the WIAA State Swimming
Meet. Alex, was the first boy
swimmer from Oregon to
achieve All-State Honors.
• The Oregon girl’s fresh-
man basketball team wrapped
up a perfect 22-0 season.
Members of the team were
Nikki O’Brien, Carly Saunders,
Rachel Hetland, Jackie
Enzenroth,, Ashly Stone,
Jessica Wendt, Hannah Tilley,
Sarah Schneider, Sheena
Christensen, Chelsey Schulz,
Jessica Johnson, Carly
Vansteendren, Beck McCabe,
and Megan Benson.
• The OHS boy’s basketball
team win the W.I.A.A. Division
1 Regional Tournament with
victories over Janesville Parker
and Fort Atkinson. In the
Janesville Park win, Bren Riese
scored 28 points and John
Fahey, 20 points. Moving on
to the Sectional Tournament,
they had a win over Janesville
Craig but fell short of a W.I.A.A.
Division 1 state berth, losing in
the finals to Beloit Memorial
66-59.
• OHS boy’s basketball
players named to the Badger
South All-Conference 1st.
Team were Derrick Bavery,
Brent Riese, and John Fahey.
Derek Breidenbach received
an Honorable Mention.
• OHS head basketball coach,
Kevin Bavery , announced that
he would be leaving Oregon to
become head basketball coach
at Palmetto Ridge High School
in Naples, Florida. Kevin had
been a coach in Oregon for the
past 20 years.
• Megan Pehler was named
to the Badger South All-
Conference Girl’s Basketball
(1st. Team). Amanda Prawat
and Katie Frisch was awarded
Honorable Mention.
• The Oregon School Board
approved a police liaison offi-
cer agreement with the Village,
providing for 1,400 hours
of police services during the
school year. How and what
to enforce around the High
School facility were issues dis-
cussed.
• The Dane County
Republican Party honored
Lyman Anderson by establish-
ing the Lyman F. Anderson
Local Government Public
Service Award to be given to
a locally elected Republican
that has upheld values of the
Republican Party and given
exemplary service to the office
that he/she has held.
Graduates
A page from the 1914 yearbook shows five Oregon High School
graduates.
12
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Colony in Madison, Capelle
initially didn’t think that
field would be a good fit.
Still, memories of her
childhood lingered, as did
the thought of being able to
help others.
“When I was quite young,
I had memories of seeing
deaf adults communicating
through sign language when
we would go to Delavan to
visit my grandparents,” she
said. “That memory stayed
wi t h me and had great
appeal. “
Capelle did some research
and found out that UW-Ste-
vens Point had a program
in deaf education, and she
decided to pursue that path.
After graduating, she headed
away from home – north, to
Canada, where her husband
worked for the National Park
Service.
Her first job was in Prince
George, British Columbia.
And at the time, she thought
she’d be gone from home for
good.
“We were sure that there
had to be a bigger and better
world to see,” Capelle said.
“And there was. I wouldn’t
trade my travel and expe-
rience working in Canada
and other parts of the coun-
try for anything. It helped
me become the teacher I am
today.”
Northern exposure
In Prince George, she
worked at a preschool for
seven deaf and hearing-
impaired children. During
the afternoons she worked
with hard of hearing students
in a local elementary school.
Soon, her husband’s job
took them east, to Edmonton,
Alberta, where she worked
as a long-term substitute
teacher at the Alberta School
for the Deaf while their chil-
dren were growing up.
After a while living north
of the border, with a young
family, the couple decided
to move closer to their fami-
lies in Wisconsin, and settled
in Winona, Minn., in 1984.
There she worked as an itin-
erant teacher – traveling
from school to school – for
the Hiawatha Valley Educa-
tional Services Cooperative.
“The itinerant model in
deaf education was still
relatively new at that time,”
Capelle said. “I traveled
between school districts up
and down the Mississippi
River, where I would work
individually with students
with hearing loss and consult
with their teachers.”
She worked there for
nearly a decade until 1993,
when her husband had the
“good fortune” of getting a
job in Madison. At that point,
Capelle said there was “no
doubt” they would relocate
to nearby Oregon.
She continued her work
with deaf and hard of hearing
students for CESA 2, a coali-
tion of of school districts that
includes Oregon, until 1998.
That’s when Heather New-
ton knocked at her door to
say she was leaving her posi-
tion as teacher of the deaf
and hard of hearing for the
Oregon School District, and
wanted to know if Capelle
would apply.
“It was exactly what I had
been looking for,” she said.
Since then, she’s worked
at the Oregon School District
and has loved every minute.
“My path through West-
ern Canada and Minnesota
has taken me to the best
job I could have ever asked
for right here in Oregon,”
Capelle said. “By living and
working in other places I was
able to see what an outstand-
ing school district we have in
Oregon. Even though I have
worked here for 15 years, I
have never taken my position
for granted.”
Changing times
Much has changed about
how hearing-impaired stu-
dents are taught since Capelle
started. Most children are
now “mainstreamed” into
their neighborhood schools
rather than being taught
separately, and the technol-
ogy to help their hearing has
taken a huge leap.
“In the ‘70s and ‘80s,
some student hearing aids
were awkward and cum-
bersome,” she said. “Some
students wore body hearing
aids, which were attached
to their torso with a harness.
FM systems had cords which
led from a box harnessed on
their chest to receivers in
their ears.”
This year, Capelle had a
caseload of 14 students rang-
ing in age from 4-21, with
hearing losses varying from
mild to profoundly deaf.
“Some students rely on
two hearing aids, others only
one,” she said.
“One of my students is a
cochlear implant recipient.
All of my students use the
spoken word as their primary
means of communication,
but some do use sign lan-
guage to supplement their
communication needs.”
Capelle traveled among all
of the school buildings in the
district except Netherwood
Knoll.
“My office is at the high
school, but my car becomes
my classroom,” she said.
Deaf education is more
than just sign language,
Capelle said, a notion she
would like to dispel.
“Sign is only one small
aspect of this job,” she said.
“I wear a number of hats in
my role including; monitor-
ing of hearing aids, in-ser-
vice training for classroom
teachers, assessment and
evaluation, assisting with
academic program planning
and preparation and facilitat-
ing opportunities for students
to interact socially with other
deaf and hard of hearing stu-
dents.”
Capelle said she’s proud of
the work she’s done with stu-
dents in self-advocacy.
“My students are aware of
the type of hearing loss they
have, specific information
about their hearing aids and
amplification options, they
are aware of accommoda-
tions necessary to be suc-
cessful in the classroom and
in life,” she said. “Students
have found benefit from the
opportunity to collaborate
with adults from our com-
munity with hearing loss
who serve as role models.”
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FOR THE JULY 9TH
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Classified Ads:
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Friday, July 4, 2014
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GOV. SCOTT WALKER AND THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
want you to be aware of the following public notices
published the week of JUNE 11, 2014:
Search public notices from all state communities online at:
WisconsinPublicNotices.org is a public service made possible
by the members of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association.
DNR Air Pollution Permit Application Reviews: Didion Milling Inc.,
Cambria; Waste Management Of Wisconsin, Inc., Whitelaw; Wpl -
Nelson Dewey Generating Station, Cassville; InterFlex Group, Merrill;
BIDS/PROPOSALS: UW-Eau Claire’s student newspaper, June 19, 2:30
PM;
GENERAL NOTICES: Notice to Heirs Escheated Estates; Consolidated
Annual Performance and Evaluation Report; Withdraw Type A
Registration Permit coverage;
year s. The f our - pi ece
band will perform from 7
– 11:30 p.m.
“Thursday used to be
Youth Night, but we nev-
er got many kids to come
down, so we changed it to
Family Night,” Knutson
explained. “That’s why
we’re havi ng t he fi re-
works on Thursday, and
there’s no cover charge to
see the band.”
The Lions Club is spon-
soring the fireworks. The
club is also hosting the
annual “Thri l l a on t he
Grilla” – a baby back ribs
and a half-chicken dinner
on Sunday afternoon –
with proceeds helping to
cover the cost of the fire-
works.
Also beginning Thurs-
day is the ever-popular
Summer Fest sof t bal l
t our na me nt , wi t h 18
teams vying for the cham-
pionship.
Along with the carni-
val, Friday events include
the band Cherry Pie in the
entertainment tent and hot
air balloon rides from 7-9
p.m., weather conditions
permitting. The proceeds
will benefit the village’s
pump house restoration
project.
Saturday is filled with
act i vi t i es, i ncl udi ng a
two-mile walk and chip
timed 5k/10k run in the
morning, a tug-o-war at
12:30 p. m. and an arts
and crafts fair all day.
The r ock band Super
Tuesday wi l l per f or m
Saturday night, beginning
at 8:30, and will follow
a performance by Quest,
beginning at 6 p.m.
A hi ghl i ght on Sun-
day is the annual Sum-
mer Fest parade through
downtown Oregon, begin-
ning at 12:30 p.m.
Knutson said the parade
typically includes 65 to
70 floats and marching
bands. She’s got 85-100
volunteers lined up and
sai d t he chamber can
always use more help. To
volunteer, sign up at sum-
merfest.oregonwi.com.
Fest: Chamber celebrates
50 years with fireworks, run
Continued from page 1
Retirements: Specialist leaves district after 15 years
Continued from page 1
Submit obituaries, engagement,
wedding, anniversary and birth
announcements online:
www.ConnectOregonWI.com
Fourth grade students go BATty with rescue skills
Recent severe weather
serves as a reminder that
it’s never too early to learn
about staying safe in all
sorts of situations.
Brooklyn fourth graders
participated in a unit called
Basic Aid Training (BAT),
which is sponsored by the
American Red Cross. Stu-
dents learn what to do in
an emergency situation by
practicing skills such as call-
ing 9-1-1, keeping a victim
calm, and giving abdominal
thrusts if someone is chok-
ing.
The class is provided to
fourth grade kids as they are
becoming more independent
and may be in a position to
care for younger brothers
or sisters for brief periods
of time. The kids learn that
if a stranger requires emer-
gency help, not to approach
the victim, but get adult
assistance or call 9-1-1.
In addition to the BAT
class, the Brooklyn fourth
graders also participated in
a pilot project called Project
Pillowcase. This discusses
what families should do
in case of natural disasters
such as windstorms, winter
storms and flash flooding.
Walt Disney co-sponsored
this presentation with the
Red Cross. Each child was
given a special Disney pil-
lowcase to store emergency
supplies, as well as a Project
Pillowcase guidebook filled
with important information
to help keep families safe
and calm until help arrives.
Brooklyn EMS/Fire vol-
unteers also visited the
classroom throughout the
year to help coach emer-
gency skills, as well as pro-
vide important information
on what kids can do to help,
and what equipment they
can expect to see, when the
ambulance arrives. This
information is critical for a
safe, efficient response to an
emergency call.
Officer Barger, of the
Brooklyn Police Depart-
ment, provided a presenta-
tion covering information on
9-1-1 calls. Kids understand
that police protect and serve
communities, and should
not be feared.
In Brooklyn, the phrase
“It takes a village to raise a
child” holds a special mean-
ing when it involves prepar-
ing kids on how to respond
in an emergency situation.
The connection between
school, police, fire and EMS
is a long-standing tradition
in a place where working
together helps create a safer
and more prepared commu-
nity. A special tour of the
Brooklyn Fire/EMS facility,
along with discussions and
demonstrations of a variety
of rescue equipment, brings
the school year close to an
end.
There was even a surprise
visit by “BATTY”, the Red
Cross mascot, this year to
congratulate the kids for
their hard work. The result
is that Brooklyn fourth grad-
ers have become BATty
with rescue skill knowledge.
The Basic Aid Train-
ing class will be provided
to Oregon kids who will
be entering fifth grade next
year as part of the summer
school program. Class sign
up is still open online. The
class will be from 11 a.m. -
12:20 p.m. July 28-Aug. 8.
The instructor is Mr. Schulz,
fourt h grade t eacher at
Brooklyn Elementary.
Computer
Services
• Computer Set-up • Wireless Networking
• Printer Set-up • Computer Tune Up
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Computer
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• Computer Set-up • Wireless Networking
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June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
2013 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT DATA
OREGON WATERWORKS, PWS ID: 11302511
Introduction
We are pleased to present this year’s Annual Water Quality Report to you, dis-
cussing the water quality and services delivered to you every day. Our goal is to
provide a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to be aware
of our ongoing efforts to improve the village╒s water treatment process and at the
same time protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of
your water.
Drinking water for the Village of Oregon area retail and wholesale customers
is provided from three (3) ground source wells. The wells are located in different
stone formations such as Glacial Drift, St. Peter sandstone, Prairie Du Chien Dolo-
mite, Trempealeau Formation, Franconia sandstone, Galesville sandstone, Eau Claire
sandstone and Mount Simon sandstone.
The Village of Oregon currently operates the water system with two full time
employees that are licensed through the State of Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources (DNR). These employees are responsible for sampling the water quality
that includes daily testing of fuoride levels. Chlorine levels are tested twice weekly
and nine (9) bacteria tests and one (1) split sample testing for fuoride are conducted
monthly with the State Laboratory of Hygiene. One (1) bacteria test of raw water from
each well occurs quarterly. These same employees also maintain 49 plus miles of
water mains, 528 fre hydrants and 719 water main valves.
In addition to the three wells, the Village also has three underground reservoirs
and two standpipes and one water tower that store approximately 1.36 million gallons
of water for consumer consumption and fre protection. In 2013 the Village of Oregon
pumped over 276 million gallons of water.
The Village has adopted a wellhead protection plan by ordinance to protect
groundwater at its three existing wells. This plan may be reviewed at the Village Hall
during normal business hours.
We are pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets federal and
state requirements.
Water System Information
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility,
please contact Oregon Water Department at 835-6294. We want our valued customers
to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of
our regularly scheduled Public Works meetings. They are normally held on the fourth
Monday of each month at 117 Spring Street and begin at 5:45 p.m. Please call the Vil-
lage Clerk╒s offce to verify meeting date and time (835-3118).
Health Information
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain
at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about con-
taminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental
Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791).
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than
the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer
undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people
with HIV/AIDS or other immune systems disorders, some elderly, and infants can be
particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking
water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means
to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants
are available from the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline
(800-426-4791).
Source(s) of Water
To obtain a summary of the source water assessment please contact, Don Gray
at (608) 835-6294.
Educational Information
The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers,
lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the sur-
face of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and,
in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the
presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
Ñ Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wild-
life.
Ñ Inorganic contaminants such as salts and metals, which can be naturally- oc-
curring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater
discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
Ñ Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as
agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses.
Ñ Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic
chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production,
and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems.
Ñ Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of
oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that
limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.
FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which shall pro-
vide the same protection for public health.
Defnitions
Detected Contaminants
Your water was tested for many contaminants last year. We are allowed to moni-
tor for some contaminants less frequently than once a year. The following tables list
only those contaminants which were detected in your water. If a contaminant was
detected last year, it will appear in the following tables without a sample date. If the
contaminant was not monitored last year, but was detected within the last 5 years, it
will appear in the tables below along with the sample date.
Disinfection Byproducts
Contaminant
(units)
Site MCL MCLG
Level
Found
Range
Sample
Date (if
prior to
2013)
Violation
Typical Source of
Contaminant
Inorganic Contaminants
Contaminant
(units)
Site MCL MCLG
Level
Found
Range
Sample
Date (if
prior to
2013)
Violation
Typical Source of
Contaminant
Contaminant
(units)
Site MCL MCLG
Level
Found
Range
Sample
Date (if
prior to
2013)
Violation
Typical Source of
Contaminant
Contaminant
(units)
Action
Level
MCLG
90th
Percentile
Level
Found
# of
Results
Sample
Date (if
prior to
2013)
Violation
Typical Source
of Contaminant
Radioactive Contaminants
Contaminant
(units)
Site MCL MCLG
Level
Found
Range
Sample
Date (if
prior to
2013)
Violation
Typical Source of
Contaminant
Contaminant
(units)
Site MCL MCLG
Level
Found
Range
Sample
Date (if
prior to
2013)
Violation
Typical Source of
Contaminant
Health effects for any contaminants with MCL violations/Action Level Exceed-
ances
Contaminant Health Effects
Additional Health Information
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially
for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from
materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Or-
egon Waterworks is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot
control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has
been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by
fushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your
water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you
can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at
www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Information on Monitoring for Cryptosporidium and Radon
Our water system did not monitor our water for cryptosporidium or radon during
2013. We are not required by State or Federal drinking water regulations to do so.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Save Money When Sprinkling Lawns
When sprinkling lawns, you’ll lower your water bill by following this advice:
Sprinkle lawns early in the morning or in the evening. (On hot days, as much as
75 percent of the water evaporates when you sprinkle between noon and 6 p.m. Why
pay for water that won’t reach the grass and plants’ roots?)
Don’t sprinkle lawns more than once a week. (Light frequent sprinkling isn’t
good for your lawn because it encourages a shallow root system rather than a deep,
healthy root system. Established lawns need about one inch of water a week. To
check sprinkling effciency, place a cup on the lawn when you sprinkle. When water
reaches the one inch mark, turn off the sprinkler).
Water Hardness - 18.25 Grains = 310 P.P.M.
Calcium and magnesium - two minerals that cause water to be “hard” - are found
in groundwater throughout Wisconsin, including the Village of Oregon. At 18.25
grains, the Village of Oregon’s water hardness is at a level that responds well to a
home water softening device.
Because water is “softened” by adding salt, install a softener only on your hot
water supply or leave the kitchen tap unsoftened. That way, you’ll avoid adding sodi-
um to your drinking water. Don’t forget: water softeners require regular maintenance,
regeneration, and salt purchases.
If You Have Water Problems
Be sure to call the Village of Oregon Utility if:
Ñ water backs up in your basement,
Ñ you smell sewer gas,
Ñ your water pressure is low,
Ñ your water is discolored, or
Ñ you see water running into the street.
If water is backing up in your basement, stop using all water. Then, call the Vil-
lage of Oregon water utility before you call a plumber or private drain cleaning com-
pany. Village of Oregon utility workers will come out and help you determine if the
problem is in the Village’s line or yours. If the problem is in the Village’s lines, the
Village will fx it at no charge. If, however, the problem is in your line, you are respon-
sible for cleaning or repair.
If you are experiencing unexplained high water use, we can also check your
home’s plumbing for leaks or faulty fxtures. (There is no charge for this service.)
If you experience a water/sewer problem between 7:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., call
(608) 835-6294. If you have water/sewer problem after hours or on weekends, call the
police dispatcher at 835 3111. The dispatcher will contact a utility employee to check
the problem.
About Bottled Water
Under federal law, water bottlers are subject to less rigorous testing, treatment
and public notifcation requirements than community water suppliers. In addition,
bottled water does not contain fuoride, which has been shown to help prevent tooth
decay.
Also, bottled water is more expensive than tap water. If you drink three 20-oz.
bottles of water each day, it will cost you over $1,000 a year. The same amount of Vil-
lage of Oregon tap water will cost you 40 cents for the year.
CONCLUSION
Thank you for allowing us to provide your family with clean, quality water. In
order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
improvements to the water system. These improvements are sometimes refected in
rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding.
Please note it is important to keep the area around the fre hydrants free of snow,
debris, weeds and plantings to ensure the water department is able to maintain hy-
drants properly.
At the Village of Oregon, we are constantly working to provide top quality water
to our customers. We ask that our customers help us protect our water sources,
which are important to our quality of life and future. Thank you for taking the time to
review this report, and please call our offce if you have questions and/or comments.
Mark W. Below
Director of Public Works
Published: June 19, 2014
WNAXLP
Legals
NOTICE
Craig Gieger: you are past due on
rent for Waunakee Mini Storage, 800 S.
Division St., Waunakee, WI 53597.
You have two weeks to contact Kirk
at (608) 849-8313 or your items will be re-
moved and disposed of.
Kobriger Associates
P.O. Box 124
Waunakee, WI 53597
Published: June 12 and 19, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
The regular meeting of the Oregon
School District Board of Education
scheduled for Monday, June 23, 2014 has
been cancelled.
The next regular meeting of the
Board of Education will be July 14, 2014.
A complete agenda will be published in
the July 10, 2014 issue of the Oregon
Observer.
Published: June 19, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
ORDINANCE NO. 14-02
VILLAGE OF OREGON
AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING
FOR THE RE-ZONING OF
PART OF LOT 1, ALPINE
MEADOWS AND OUTLOT
2, DRUMLIN ADDITION TO
ALPINE MEADOWS -- LOTS
1 THROUGH 16 IN DRUMLIN
ADDITION TO ALPINE
MEADOWS
RECITALS
A. Oregon Community Bank owner
of the Property (the “applicant”), fled
an application with the Village of Oregon
requesting that Lots 1 through 16 in the
plat of Drumlin Addition to Alpine Mead-
ows be rezoned.
B. Applicant has requested that
Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 be given an underly-
ing zoning classifcation of Multi-Family
(TR-6) that Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 be placed in
a Planned Development Overlay District,
and has requested approval of a Gen-
eral Development Plan (“GDP”) attached
hereto as Exhibit A.
C. Applicant has requested that
Lots 5 through 16 be given an underly-
ing zoning classifcation of SR-5 that
Lots 5 through 16 be placed in a Planned
Development Overlay District, and has
requested approval of a General Devel-
opment Plan (“GDP”) attached hereto as
Exhibit A.
D. The Plan Commission has con-
ducted a public hearing, preceded by
publication of a Class 2 notice, regard-
ing the proposed changes in zoning and
the proposed GDP. The Plan Commis-
sion has recommended that the Village
Board zone Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 Multi Fam-
ily Residential (TR-6) that such Lots be
placed in a Planned Overly District. The
Plan Commission has recommended that
the Village Board zone Lots 5 through
16 Single Family Residential (SR-5) that
such Lots be placed in a Planned Overly
District, and that the GDP attached hereto
as Exhibit A.
NOW, THEREFORE, the Village
Board of the Village of Oregon, Dane
County, Wisconsin, does ordain as fol-
lows:
ORDINANCE
1. Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the plat of
Drumlin Addition to Alpine Meadows are
hereby zoned TR-6 Multi Family Residen-
tial and Planned Development (PD).
2. Lots 5 through 16 in the plat of
Drumlin Addition to Alpine Meadows
are hereby SR-5 zoned residential and
Planned Development (PD).
3. The GDP attached hereto as Ex-
hibit A is approved.
The above ordinance was duly ad-
opted by majority vote of the elected
members of the Village Board of the Vil-
lage of Oregon at a regular meeting held
on June 16, 2014.
APPROVED:
By: _____________________________
Steven L. Staton, Village President
ATTEST:
By: _____________________________
Peggy Haag, Village Clerk
1st reading: June 16, 2014
2nd reading: Waived
Adopted: June 16, 2014
Published: June 19, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
POLICE REPORT
Reports collected from the log book at the Oregon Police
Department.
April 16
10:15 a.m. A woman reported the sink in the women’s bath-
room at the Oregon Public Library was pushed over and water
was all over the floor.
4:20 p.m. A 28-year-old woman reported receiving calls
from a spam number and asked that they stop. The caller
responded, “I will take you off list if you suck my [expletive]”
and hung up. Police attempted contact, but the caller hung up.
The woman blocked the number.
April 17
7:30 a.m. A crossing guard at the intersection of Soden
Drive and East Lincoln Street reported a car that continually
failed to stop for the stop sign. When the woman attempted to
get the car’s license plate, the car’s 30-year-old female driver
stopped, reversed and threatened the crossing guard. Police
contacted the driver, who said the crossing guard always
jumped in front of her car.
11:46 a.m. A woman reported a 53-year-old woman with a
brain injury was at the library harassing patrons by asking for
money, rides and trying to sell her jewelry. The woman said
the 53-year-old had taken rides from strangers and patrons
were complaining about feeling harassed. Police met with the
woman’s family and connected them to resources.
April 18
12:12 a.m. A Meriter Hospital nurse contacted police about
a possible sexual assault that occurred at Headquarters on
April 17 at 1 a.m. The nurse said the possible victim would
not sign the release of information form, and that the possible
victim was an adult who did not want to make the report at the
time. Police placed the SANE kit into evidence. A 31-year-old
person, who was a possible suspect, contacted police about
the incident and reported he received harassing calls about
the incident.
April 19
11:30 p.m. A 69-year-old man reported his house on the
800 block of Timber Ridge Way had been egged the previous
night. The man believes it’s the same kids he has reported for
speeding and “ding dong ditching” in the past.
April 22
2 p.m. A 48-year-old woman reported someone calling
claiming to be from Publisher’s Clearinghouse who told her to
find the highest hill and hang herself.
3 p.m. A 67-year-old man reported a phone scam in which
individuals claiming to be Microsoft employees called him
looking for his credit card information to work on his com-
puter. The man did not provide the callers with information.
April 23
10:12 a.m. A 38-year-old woman reported two men tried to
open the window of her 11-year-old son’s bedroom around 4
a.m. on the 200 block of Orchard Drive. The men ran off when
they saw her, and it was the second attempt of the week.
April 24
9:28 p.m. An Anytime Fitness owner reported an employee
observed a 45-year-old man standing near the loading dock
and peaking in windows. The man was a member at the club
and told police he had just worked out. However, he has been
to Monona, Middleton and Oregon Anytime Fitness facilities
and never works out. The man was upset and stated he was
being harassed.
– Scott Girard
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook as
“Oregon Observer” and then LIKE us.
14
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
hel p peopl e t here i n an
unusual way – t hrough
music education.
Before they go, they’ll
hold a free performance
this weekend at St. John’s
Lutheran Church to raise
awar enes s of BLUME
Haiti, a program that sends
music teachers to Haiti to
build confidence and self-
esteem.
“ We pl a n t o r e t ur n
to Haiti to volunteer as
teachers at summer music
camps,” Laurie Riss wrote
in an email to the Observ-
er. “The organization that
supports our trips is called
‘BLUME Haiti’ – Build-
ing Leaders Using Music
Education.”
Ri ss, a cel l i st i n t he
Ma d i s o n S y mp h o n y
Orchestra, said she was
“hooked” on going to Hai-
ti after visiting Lawrence
Uni versi t y i n Appl et on
last year, where her son
Greg was studying music.
Greg is an award-win-
ning marimba player who
graduated this spring with
a degree in percussion per-
formance.
Laurie, who also plays
i n t he al l - woman j azz
band Ladies Must Swing,
expl ai ned t hat one of
t he uni ver si t y’ s musi c
professors, Janet Antho-
ny, has been traveling to
Haiti for years to teach
music and often takes stu-
dents along to volunteer in
music camps.
One of Anthony’s for-
me r s t ude nt s ma de a
documentary film about
music education in Haiti,
which Laurie Riss said she
vi ewed duri ng her vi si t
last year to Appleton.
“It was fi l med before
the earthquake and then
after the earthquake,” she
recalled.
“It’s very moving, and
after I saw it I was totally
hooked and thought I have
to go to Haiti.
“ And t he n my s on,
Greg, was on board, too,”
she added. “He likes the
idea of going out into the
world and sharing music.”
Laurie’s trip to teach in
Haiti was an eye-opener,
and not i n t he way she
expected.
“I was surprised at how
much actual playing I did,
because they’re playing at
a really high level down
there,” she said. “We had
a full orchestra and were
pl ayi ng l i ke Beet hoven
symphony and some of
the major repertoire that
we play at Madison Sym-
phony. I was al so sur-
prised that they’re very
hooked on Western classi-
cal music.”
With all of the problems
that have beset the Haitian
people, it may be hard to
understand the importance
of teaching music in a one
of t he wor l d’ s poor est
countries.
But t he st udent s Ri ss
met are “very vocal” about
the importance of bring-
ing music education to the
poor, she said.
“When they can learn
how to be musicians, it
gives them a huge sense
of accomplishment, and
they really appreciate the
sense of community,” she
explained. “It’s a bigger
contribution to their expe-
rience than just bringing
the basic necessities. They
get a sense of how they
can become better people
and just more contributing
to their community. We
can come and help them
build a house, but this is
teaching them a skill that
applies on an individual
level.”
Riss said Sunday’s event
at St. John’s Lutheran will
include Haitian music for
four cellos, some of which
was written by her Hai-
tian students and teachers.
It will also feature video
presentations that show
t he programs t hat t hey
participate in, and discus-
sions with the teachers and
founding members of the
BLUME Haiti organiza-
tion.
Dave Johnson
(608) 835-8195
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R PUMPING
SERVICE LLC
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3
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• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
U
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Brooklyn
Village-wide Garage Sales
Friday, June 20 & Saturday, June 21
205 4th St., Friday and Saturday,
June 20-21 9am-4pm. Furniture, col-
lectibles, housewares, clothing bag
sale, much more.
201 Church St., Methodist Parson-
age. Baked goods, brats, hot dogs,
ships, soda. Jewelry, books, dish
clothes, knick knacks.
11010 Hwy 14, between Brooklyn/
Evansville. Thursday, 2-6pm, Friday,
8am-6pm, Saturday, 8am-3pm. Huge
Sale! Rain or shine.
349 Juniper St., Thurs-Saturday,
8am-4pm. Cash & Carry 31 products,
baby equipment, lots of baby clothes
NB-24 months, many household
items and holiday décor.
100 E. Main St., enter from Market
St., Fri. & Sat. 8-4. Please support the
Brooklyn Historical Society.
1068 Starr School Rd., June 21,
8am-6pm, June 22, 8am-2:30pm.
Baby/toddler, household, kitchen,
glassware.
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MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED - TRUCK DRIVER
Drivers - CDL-A Train and work for us! Professional,
focused CDL training available. Choose Company
Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease
Trainer. (877)369-7893 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.
com (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HBI UTILITY CONTRACTOR Telephone Industry Has
IMMEDIATE openings ïAerial Technicians, ïCable Plow/
Bore Operators, ïForemen, ïCDL Laborers. Training
Offered. Travel Required 920-664-6300. www.holtger.
com EOE by AA (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefits! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classified spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
143 NOTICES
HERO MILES to find out more about
how you can help our service members,
veterans and their families in their time of
need, visit the Fisher House website at
www.fisherhouse.org (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
340 AUTOS
1998 FORD MUSTANG Bright blue,
White leather interior. 4 speed. New
transmission. Needs work. Good engine.
$1000/obo. 608-669-2243
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
tage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vacation.
Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
work taken care of! 800-856-5491 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
$2,000,000 LIQUIDATION @ Boat
World. Financing Available on over 700
new and used Pontoons, Fishing Boats,
Deck Boats, Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye
Boats, Cuddys, Cruisers up to 35 Feet
& Outboards @ the Guaranteed Best
Prices! Crownline, Axis, Malibu, Triton,
Alumacraft, Mirrorcraft, Misty Harbor
& Crest Pontoons. American Marine &
Motorsports Super Center, Schawano.
Where Dreams come true. 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
2 TRAILERS Two wheelers.
8'x10' bed with loading tail gate.
3.5'x7' bed. 608-882-0887.
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
CARRIERS NEEDED for delivery
of WSJ to Oregon/Stoughton area.
Must be available early a.m., 7 days
a week, dependable vehicle. Route
earns between $950. to $1200/month.
For more information
call Pat 608-212-7216
FULL TIME Cook. Immediate opening.
Server/waitress, must be over 18. Apply
at Koffee Kup Restaurant in Stoughton.
Pay based on experience. Apply in
person at: 355 E. Main
NOW HIRING all positions. Sugar &
Spice Eatery. Apply in Person. 317 Nora
St, Stoughton
OUR CLINIC Is looking for a
reliable, self starter to assist our
providers in a growing healthcare
practice. The ideal candidate will
have excellent computer skills,
strong customer service skills and
the ability to work independently.
Some supervisory skills would be
preferred. Please respond via email
to: lsmchirostaff@lsmclinics.com

SCHOOL BUS DRIVER AM or PM.
Must have CDL. Oregon Schools.
Send resume to ajwiedel@gmail.com
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
UNITED CEREBRAL Palsy is seek-
ing caring, dependable people to work
as Respite Providers. Provide care for
people with developmental disabilities.
A variety of part-time positions are avail-
able, working with children and adults of
all ages! Contact Shannon at 608-273-
3318 or shannpnmolepske@ucpdane.
org. AA/EOE
437 CUSTOMER SERVICE
& RETAIL
SUPER 8 Verona has an immediate
opening for our Front Desk Staff. $9-10/
hr. Paid training, paid holidays, paid
vacation. Apply in person 131 Horizon
Dr. VeronaSuper
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
COMPANY DRIVERS. $2000 Sign On
Bonus. Class A, 2 yrs. exp.
Company Drivers .44cpm East & .40 all
other. Health/Dental/Vision/401K
Regional & OTR Owner Op's
78% of line haul 100% FS Plate
Program. No Electronics. Tom
800-972-0084-x6855
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay Including
Performance and Safety Bonusus!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation and Holiday Pay
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week
100% No Touch- 12 mo. CDL/A
Exp Preferred 888-545-9351 ext 13
www.doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
452 GENERAL
OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton
M-F. 4 hours/night. Visit our website:
www.capitalcityclean.com Or call our
office: 831-8850.
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
ARE YOU interested in learning more
about natural area restoration in a hands-
on environment? The Friends of Edna
Taylor Conservation Park meet on the
4th Saturday of each month to maintain
the park's prairies and trails. A volunteer
leader will provide training, guidance and
the necessary tools during the project.
The residents of Oak Park Place love to
visit the zoo in the summer- please join us.
We need help pushing wheel chairs and
then we will all have lunch together there.
Prefer adult volunteers with the stamina
to push wheel chairs. We also need vol-
unteers to meet us at the zoo. Be part of
the Rythm and Booms clean up crew. Vol-
unteers are needed not only at the festival
site, but also in the 8 public parks around
Lake Monona to help pick up trash and
restore the park and beach area after the
event. A city of Madison Parks official will
be there to meet and direct volunteers.
Call the Volunteer Center at 608-246-
4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn abut other
volunteer opportunities.
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING
Crack filling, striping.
No Job Too Small.
Call O&H: 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818

DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade.
Call 608-235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and sur-
rounding area. Merry Law Offices. 608-
205-0621. No charge for initial consulta-
tion. "We are a debt relief agency. We
help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code."
RESEARCH SERVICES: We locate
Family, Former Friends, Neighbors
Classmates, Co-workers. www.
joysresearchservices.com
Joy 608-712-6286
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
BUNDLE & SAVE! DirecTV, Internet &
Phone from $69.99/mo. Free 3-months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime & Cinemax.
Free Genie 4-room Upgrade. Lock in 2
year savings. Call 800-918-1046 (wcan)
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
If you go
What: Haitian music per-
formance benefiting music
education program
Who: Laurie and Greg
Riss and others
Where: St. John’s
Lutheran Church, 625 E.
Netherwood St., Oregon
When: 1 p.m. Sunday,
June 22
Info: Laurie Riss, tylee@
charter.net
Risses: Concert will benefit Haitian music education program
Continued from page 1
Panels: 6’x8’-1x4” DE treated $28 or 6’x8’-
1”x6” w/Custom milled back $30, $25/unit
Round Cedar Fence Posts: $2.49 and up,
lengths to 17’
Pickets: Cedar 1”x4”-6’ DE $.90 or 1”x6”-6’
DE treated $.99
Fence Boards: Full 1” thick rough sawn,
1”x6”-16’ pine or oak
Barn Boards: Full 1” thick, 12” width
$.95/lineal ft.
Cedar Siding: 8” bevel $.64/lineal ft.
Steel Roofing & Siding: 38” width $1.39/
lineal ft. and up
OSB Sheathing: 3/4” thick T&G, cut offs
32”x48” and larger $.30/sq ft.
Flooring: Prefinished Brazilian Walnut (Tropical IPE)
3’1/4” and 5’ @ $495/sq ft. and up. Also stocking #1
Southern Yellow Pine Dimension Lumber T&G
Knotty Pine: 1”x8” T&G units $.49/linear ft
Treated Deck Boards: 5”/4” x 6” $.35/lineal ft
262-495-4453 ANICH LUMBER CO. PALMYRA, WI
FENCING
June 19, 2014 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
601 HOUSEHOLD
ESTATE SALE Lloyd & Pat Hensel's
in Stoughton
Thursday-Friday, June 19-20,
8:30am-4:00pm.
1017 Park View Dr.
606 ARTICLES FOR SALE
2 WINDOW Air Conditioners. 10,000BTU,
$125. 18,000BTU $250. Used 1 season.
Sam 608-556-0778
648 FOOD & DRINK
SHARI'S BERRIES Order delicious
strawberries for any occasion. Save 20%
on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh
dipped berries starting at $19.99. Visit
www.berries.com/happy or call
800-975-3296 (wcan)
THRILL DAD with 100% guaranteed,
delivered to the door Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 67% plus 4 FREE burgers - The
Favorite Gift - Only $49.99. Order Today
800-931-1898 Use code 79377PXR or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/father72
652 GARAGE SALES
EVANSVILLE 260 Garfield Ave. Sat-
urday, June 21 from 8-4. Multi-family
crafter and mini flea market sale. Original
crafts, antiques, furniture and many other
special items too many to list.
OREGON 4444 Old Stone Rd. 6/19,
10-7pm, 6/20, 8-5pm, 6/21 8-?. Quality
furniture, clothes, decor, household misc.
STOUGHTON 1114 Oakwood Ct. June
19-21, 9am-5pm. Household, Christmas,
leather jackets.
STOUGHTON 1208 Giles. June 19-20,
8am-5pm. Multi-family. Something for
everyone!
STOUGHTON 2116 Blue Heron Ct. 6/20,
12pm-6pm, 6/21, 8am-1pm. Clothing
3X-4X, kitchen, home decor, solid wood
and antique furniture. Cash only.
STOUGHTON 2371 Cty A East. June
20-21, 9am-5pm. Something for every-
one.
STOUGHTON 501 Anne Dr. June 20,
8am-3pm, June 21, 9am-3pm. Multi-
family sale. Furniture, hand tools, house-
wares, home & holiday decor, toys, girls
clothes 4T-6, boys clothes newborn-
12months, 3-4T, baby crib, pack-n-play,
playhouse, girls toddler bed, baby items,
more!
STOUGHTON 701 Pleasant View Dr.
6/19, 1-6pm. 6/20, 8am-5pm, 6/21, 8-?.
Multi-family.
STOUGHTON 742 Kensington
Square. June 19-20, 10am-4pm. June
21, 9am-noon. See craigslist.
STOUGHTON BLUE Heron Ct. Multi-
family. 6/19, 2pm-?, 6/20-21, 8am-4pm.
Furniture, tools, hunting, cell phones,
women's clothing and accessories, bed-
ding, luggage, collectibles, housewares-
too many to list.
STOUGHTON MOVING Sale.
709 Hyland Dr. June 19-21,
8am-6pm. Everything priced to go.
Household, Books, Furniture.
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
$$$ FOR OLD Guitars, Basses and
AMPS by Gibson & Fender as well as
others. 920-467-4762 (wcan)
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 PETS
GERMAN SHEPHERD Pups. AKC OFA.
Excellent temperament. Import stock.
Guaranteed. 715-537-5413 www.jerland.
com #2680001-DS (wcan)
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS ENJOY 50%off 100
blooms of Peruvian Lilies with free glass
vase- your price $19.99 plus s/h. Plus
save 20% off your order over $29! Visit
www.proflowers.com/ActNow or call 800-
615-9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
1958 CRUISER, Inc. Holiday 250
16' Runabout w/1959 TeeNee Trailer.
1981 75hp Evinrude motor. Antique
wood, rare find. $7,000/obo
815-621-9592
CAMPING EQUIPMENT 4 person tent,
Coleman lantern, 4 sleeping bags,
ground tarp, water jug in storage box.
$80. 608-669-2243
FISH CANADA Kingfisher Resort.
Cottage-Boat-Motor-Gas/ $75. per
person/day. Call for specials. 800-452-
8824 www.kingfisherlodge.com
(wcan)
STOCK YOUR pond or lake now. Order
early. Varieties of Pan/Game fish. Forage
minnows. Aeration systems. Pond weed
control products. roeselerfishfarm.com
920-696-3090 (wcan)
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114
705 RENTALS
BROOKLYN BEAUTIFUL Modern
upper 1 bedroom apartment in quiet
neighborhood available August 1.
Stove, refrigerator, W/D included. $525.
per month plus $525.security deposit.
Utilities not included. 1 year lease. No
pets. No smoking. If interested call
608-669-2460
BROOKLYN DUPLEX 2 BR, 1BA, w/
appliances plus washer & dryer, full
basement not finished, C/A, $650/month
plus deposit utilities not included, 1 year
lease, no garage, off street parking, no
pets, no smoking.
608-669-2460.
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$725 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available
Now. Handicap Accesible 608-212-0829
STOUGHTON LARGE 2 Bedroom.
Beautiful kitchen and bath, appliances,
hardwoods, cathedral ceilings. Quiet,
private. No Smoking. 608-238-1692
SUN PRAIRIE Duplex 3BR, 2BA. Large
open kitchen, living room, large family
room w/fireplace. Walk out on ground
level, large deck off kitchen and din-
ing area. Located near high school and
shopping. Nice neighborhood. $1,295.
plus security deposit of 1/2 months rent.
Call Brady at 608-286-5282
VERONA 1&2 Bedroom Apartment $595-
740. in a small 24 unit building. Includes
heat, hot water, water & sewer, off-street
parking, fully carpeted, dishwasher and
coin operated laundry and storage in
basement. Convenient to Madison's west
side. Call KC at 608-273-0228 to view
your new home.
VERONA WESTRIDGE DUPLEX.
Deluxe 3 bedroom, 2000 sq. feet, 2.75
bath, family room, A/C, fireplace, deck,
2.5 garage. No pets. $1,325/mo. 608-
845-8914
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central loca-
tion. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN Location
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, Laundry,
Heat and Water included.
$650./mo. Call 608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
730 CONDOS &
TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT
RANCH STYLE Condo- 416 New Age
Circle, Verona- 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
1380 SF with a full unfinished basement
for storage. One car attached garage,
includes all appliances, private entry
& deck.
Available immediately. $1500. rent per
month. Call Liz at 608-577-7526 or
e-mail lizishere@charter.net
740 HOUSES FOR RENT
BROOKLYN-OREGON Country Living.
3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch, 2 car garage,
A/C, $1000 + utilities pr/month. Security
deposit $1000, credit check, references.
No smoking, 1 small cat or dog under
25lbs. with $25 monthly fee. Available
Aug. 1st. 608-217-9186
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
760 MOBILE HOMES
HIGHLAND MOBILE HOME for sale.
Many high efficiency appliances and new
steel front door/storm. $10,000/OBO.
608-835-8552
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Oregon Observer
820 MISC. INVESTMENT
PROPERTY FOR SALE
ABSOLUTE AUCTION 50 Acre Started
Tree Plantation in the Town of Harrison,
Waupaca Co.
Nolan Sales LLC, Marion, WI.
800-472-0290 WI Lic. Auctioneers #165
and #142 www.nolansales.com
for details. (wcan)
845 HOUSES FOR SALE
VERONA 119 N Main St. 2 story, 5BR,
1BA. $149,900 Contact 608-845-6685
870 RESIDENTIAL LOTS
OREGON BERGAMONT
Lot 442 with full exposure
Gated. By owner. Make offer!
608-212-2283

965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
2014 FIRST Crop hay, big square bales,
16% moisture, 21% protein, 151 RFV.
608-325-2656
970 HORSES
GOOD RIDING Mule, $400. Decker
Pack Saddle, $125. 10x10 Kennel.
507-259-7445
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
REGISTERED ANGUS Yearling and
Mature Bulls. All bulls are fertility tested
and have current EPD information. Bulls
are gentle and are from high quality
genetics.
815-266-6260
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
905 AUCTION SALE DATES
HUGE ESTATE SALE June 19-21
203 2nd St, Brooklyn, WI
9am-5pm
Entry numbers Thursday 8:15am
Four generations of collectibles
Cash only please.
Over 100 Pictures
at www.estatesale.com
Downsizers Estate Sales
815-766-1611
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
Part-time. Excellent Wages
20+ hours/wk. CDL bonus program
Paid training/testing. Signing bonus.
5501 Femrite Dr. Madison
Call Paul at 608-310-4870 or email
paulm@badgerbus.com
EOE

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
& PARATRANSIT
DRIVERS
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Dishwashers Needed
On a given day, Epic’s cafeteria can serve upwards of
3,200 people in our dining facility. As a member of our
dishwashing team, you’ll be working in a fast-paced,
air-conditioned environment helping to clean the
equipment and utensils needed to provide great food
and service to our co-workers.
Responsibilities include: cleaning and stocking
dishes, utensils, cooking equipment; miscellaneous
kitchen cleaning and additional job-related duties.
Epic offers competitive wages, full benefts, full-time
hours, and paid vacations. We’re looking for candidates
who are self-motivated, quick, and able to work 8 hour
shifts.
Apply online at careers.epic.com, or stop by to fll out an
application in person.
1979 Milky Way, Verona, WI 53593
Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.SummerWorkNow.com

For more information or to apply contact:
Please email resume to
b.kriel@callcpc.com or call 800-914-3755
*Must be over 24 years old
*Have a min 18 mos. tractor trailer exp. or
6 mos. T/T experience with a certificate
from an accredited truck driving school.
*Meet all DOT requirements.
*To be willing & able to unload freight
* $21.90/hour (Overtime after 8 hours)
or $0.4650/mile
* Full Benefits Package that includes:
Disability Ins., Dental, Life Ins., Health Ins.
with Prescription Card
* 401K Pension Program with Co. Contribution
* Paid Holidays & Vacation
* Home everyday except for occasional layover
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK.
The best drivers drive CPC
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
FULL TIME DRIVERS
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private Fleet Operation
based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreen’s stores
within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat.
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Do You Like to Meet People?
Are You Up For A Challenge?
Can You Adapt To Change?
Are You Self-Motivated?
Do You Possess Computer Skills?
If you’ve answered yes, we are very interested in talking to you. We are seeking
candidates for a fex full-time opening in our Stoughton front offce. Responsibilities
for this position include but are not limited to selling and processing classifed ads,
selling special projects by phone, processing circulation data, receptionist duties
and proof reading.
We are an employee-owned company offering a competitive benefts package
including 401K, ESOP, vacation, and more.
If this fex full-time position interests you and you have the equivalent of a high
school diploma and at least two years of offce/computer experience plus a valid
driver’s license, send your resume today.
Apply online only at:
www.wcinet.com/careers
Woodward Communications, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Affrmative Action Employer. WCI maintains a tobacco-free campus. All qualifed persons are encouraged to apply.
STOUGHTON, WI OFFICE
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Openings in DeForest and Dodgeville
$2,000 Signing Bonus
DeForest – Field Service Dispatch Supervisor
Dodgeville – Field Service Technician, Ag Technician

zieglercareers.com
CAREERS START HERE
An EEO Employer including
disability and veterans.
Candidates must possess a minimum of a valid driver’s license and high school
diploma/GED. Excellent wages, bonus plan and advancement opportunities,
along with a comprehensive beneft package, (paid retirement, 401K, medical,
life & AD&DF, etc.) Interested candidates must apply online at
www.ingrambarge.com under marine careers EOE/M/F/V/D
Join the Employer of Choice on the Inland Waterways
• Deckhands
• Culinary Cooks
• Vessel Engineers
• Towboat Pilots
(Fleet & Line Haul)
16 - The Oregon Observer - June 19, 2014
Come early for the
best selection!
1828 Sandhill Road, Oregon, WI
608-835-7569
Hours:
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
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CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on Sun-
rise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left on
Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Nether-
wood Road. Turn left and go through Oregon
past Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn right
and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left at
Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past Wal-
green’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.

It’s Time for Our Annual
Check out our weekly In-Store Specials!
Come and visit Wisconsin’s
Premier Grower of Quality
Bedding Plants and Hanging Baskets.
Thank you for supporting local agriculture
by shopping outside the box!
WE WILL BE OPEN JULY 4 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
10% off our
entire inventory
Annuals • Perennials
Garden Accent Items • Mulch • Potting Soil
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10% Off Sale!
Summer Hours
Start June 23
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

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