Thursday, June 19, 2014 • Vol. 48, No. 4 • Verona, WI • Hometown USA • ConnectVerona.

com • $1
The
Verona Press
The
Verona Press
Nobody knows Verona
like Bartels
235-2927
kbartels@cbsuccess.com
cbsuccessrealty.com/bartels
Coldwell Banker Success Kathy Bartels
Kathy Bartels
U
N
3
4
7
6
3
7
2014-2015 Season
Isthmus Brass
Saturday, November 22, 2014
The fnest professional brass
players in the Midwest
Sons of the Pioneers
Saturday, February 7, 2015
The music of the American West
celebrating the West
Cooney’s Irish Cabaret
Saturday, April 25, 2015
One of the greatest singing
sensations in Irish Music
Verona Area Performing Arts Series
Watch for your brochure to order season tickets www.vapas.org • 848-2787
3
5
7
8
6
9
-
0
1
HOMETOWN DAYS
Photos on pages 7-8
Photos by Scott Girard
Above, room 206 at Country View Elementary School took the worst damage of the tornado that hit the Verona area early Tuesday morninga, with a gaping hole opening
up in the wall. Bookcases, chairs and kid’s books were strewn about the classroom. Below, a view of debris in the yard outside Country View and houses on Tamarack
Way that sustained damage.
Twister shreds school
Police close neighborhood with power lines down, gas leak worries
JIM FEROLIE AND
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Almost exactly three years
ago, a twister came through
town just as Dorothy was
calling for Auntie Em.
It destroyed some garag-
es, tore up some trees and
made a general mess of
things in Verona. But it
wasn’t nearly as devastat-
ing as Tuesday morning’s
storm.
Country View Elemen-
tary School sustained sev-
eral million dollars’ worth
of damage, eight or more
families were kept out of
their homes at least through
Tuesday night and power
lines came down all over
the northwest side of the
city after an EF3 tornado
with 140 mph-plus winds
Construction
begins on new
tennis courts
VAHS will now have
8 courts on site
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Anyt i me t he Ver ona
Area High School tennis
teams hosted a varsity ten-
nis meet, at least one match
didn’t take place on the
high school courts.
That’s because with only
six courts, the lowest num-
ber in the Big Eight Confer-
ence, there was at least one
spillover match that had to
be played at Harriet Park.
“(It’s) always kind of dif-
ficult for some, because a
lot of times parents want
their kids playing up on
the big courts,” said VAHS
boys tennis coach Rick
Engen.
That will all be history
beginning this fall, when
construction on new courts,
eight total, finishes in time
for the girls’ tennis season.
“We’ll be able to get all
of our varsity matches on at
one site,” said VAHS girls
tennis coach Mark Happel.
“We were the only school
in the conference that did
not have eight courts.”
Construction is set to
begin in May, so over the
summer, that means fewer
options for tennis players
in the Verona community
while the courts are being
built.
“These courts are used
Turn to Tennis/Page 2
Turn to Tornado/Page 9
2
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
complimentary initial exam
and/or cosmetic consultation
for the first 100 new patients
in celebration of
national
smile month
new patient promotion during June 2014 • up to $118 value
Our team is committed to
using the latest advances and
taking time to comfortably get you
where you want to be for the long term.
Caring for Mt. Horeb for 19 Years
522 Springdale Street, Mt. Horeb
(608) 437-5564
www.familydentalcarellc.com
U
N
3
5
3
5
2
6
Tim Andrews Horticulturist - LLC
608-223-9970
www.tahort.com
Caring for our Green World since 1978
It's all about the details!
Fall Cleanups, Tree and Shrub Pruning, Planting and
Removals, Stump Grinding, Mulching and Complete
Landscape Makeovers.
U
N
3
5
3
7
8
4
Call now to schedule a treatment to
protect your ash trees for two full years
against the Emerald Ash Borer.
GOV. SCOTT WALKER AND THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
want you to be aware of the following public notices
published the week of JUNE 11, 2014:
Search public notices from all state communities online at:
WisconsinPublicNotices.org is a public service made possible
by the members of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association.
DNR Air Pollution Permit Application Reviews: Didion Milling Inc.,
Cambria; Waste Management Of Wisconsin, Inc., Whitelaw; Wpl -
Nelson Dewey Generating Station, Cassville; InterFlex Group, Merrill;
BIDS/PROPOSALS: UW-Eau Claire’s student newspaper, June 19, 2:30
PM;
GENERAL NOTICES: Notice to Heirs Escheated Estates; Consolidated
Annual Performance and Evaluation Report; Withdraw Type A
Registration Permit coverage;
Tennis: Courts open to community; Teams will have 8 courts to play on in proposed plan
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
constantly,” said Engen.
“If you ever come out here
in the summer time, there’s
not a court to be found
sometimes because they’re
so busy.”
With a pair of courts at
Harriet Park for tennis play-
ers still to use this summer,
Engen said the two months
without courts at VAHS
will pay off in the long run.
“It’s going to be a great
facility, not just for the
school and the players in
the programs, but the com-
munity itself,” he said.
That community use was
also a key component of the
city kicking in $25,000 to
the project and a $20,000
gr ant f r om t he Uni t ed
States Tennis Association
for the courts.
Engen sai d t he ci t y’s
deci si on t o put money
toward the project, which
came after he heard it was
considering a new court
project at Harriet Park, “got
the big ball rolling.”
The school board unani-
mous l y a ppr ove d t he
$344,577 bid from Mad-
ison-based Wolf Paving
at its April 7 meeting, the
final step for the project.
In addition to the USTA
grant and the city fund-
ing, the tennis program has
raised $14,000 through fun-
draisers and sales of paved
bricks at the entrance to the
new courts. Engen said the
teams still hope to reach
their original $20,000 goal.
Both Engen and Happel
said the biggest change for
their teams will be practic-
es, with improved supervi-
sion and full team work.
“Usually we have pretty
decent numbers of play-
ers coming out, and space
is always an issue,” Engen
said. “Having the six here
and two in Harriet is help-
ful, but then you’ve got to
split people up. This way
I can have a large prac-
tice here. It’ll be nice hav-
ing them all at one spot for
practice.”
I n addi t i on, t he new
asphalt has a life expec-
tancy of 25-35 years, which
Engen said is much longer
than the previous pavement
that had begun to show
cracks.
Engen is simply excited
for the project, which he
has been thinking about for
five or six years, to come to
its final step.
“I’m just glad that we can
finally come together and
get this done,” he said. “It’s
going to be a good feeling
when it’s all done.”
Construction is expected
to be completed by July
31, and an alumni match in
mid-August is planned as
the first use of the court by
the VAHS programs.
Continued from page 1
Rending courtesy of Verona Area School District
Above is a rending of the new proposed tennis court plan to
include eight full tennis courts for high school teams and the com-
munity to use. At right is the space where the tennis courts will be
built.
Fifth-graders get an early look at careers
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Fifth-graders won’t be
ent eri ng t he workforce
anytime soon.
But that doesn’t mean
they can’t start thinking
about their future career
possibilities now, and a
unit at Sugar Creek Ele-
mentary School this year
allowed fifth-graders to do
just that.
“It ’s never t oo earl y
to start,” said fifth-grade
teacher JoBeth Kroetz.
K r o e t z s a i d t h e
three-week career unit has
sparked lots of interest
from students thanks to a
diverse set of guest speak-
ers from a Verona alder to
a Madison police officer.
The latest visitor was
U.S. Attorney John Vau-
dreuil, who was appoint-
ed by President Barack
Obama to the post in 2010.
Kroetz said the students
loved his presentation, and
have enjoyed the informa-
tion they’ve received from
all of the visitors.
As part of the unit, stu-
dents have researched and
created displays of “what
you need, what kind of
schooling, what kind of
salary, what the work envi-
ronment is like, what your objectives are” at their different careers, Kroetz
said. They will share those
displays with each other at
the end of the unit.
She said students’ ideas
have ranged from tradi-
tional health professions
or a marine biologist to the
tougher to classify “inven-
tor.”
“Another little boy wants
to live off the land, just fig-
ure out how to build and
make stuff on his own,”
Kroetz said.
Fifth-grader Lazerek Austin
stands with U.S. Attorney
John Vaudreuil after
Vandreuil’s presentation to
fifth-graders researching
career possibilities Thursday,
May 29.
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
3
U
N
3
4
0
5
7
4

8 weeks of professional karate lessons
taught by our staff of State Certified
Instructors, your karate uniform, and
your White Belt for only $99!
www.kaverona.com
New Student Special!
That’s right, I Kick
Like A Girl!
Karate is NOT just a guy’s sport, it’s a
sport that builds strength and
confidence no matter who you are.
Now’s the time to tackle life head on!
Call us today at 845-1333!
Mon. & Thurs. 9:30-8 • Tues., Wed., Fri. 9:30-5:30
Sat. 9:30-4 • Sun. 12-4 • 2805 W. Beltline Hwy at Todd Dr.
Sergenians.com • 608-271-1111
HIGH DENSITY APPROVED CUSHION.
LIFETIME GUARANTEED INSTALLATION.
MOVING THE FURNITURE.
REMOVAL & RECYCLING OF OLD CARPET.
Only Sergenian’s
Smart Choice Package Includes:
U
N
3
4
7
5
2
6
Krantz
Electric
Inc.
2650 N. Nine Mound Road, Verona, WI 53953
(608) 845-9156 • www.krantzelectricinc.com
Solar Installation • Residential • Commercial
Industrial • 24-Hour Service
Solar Panels Saving Energy Today
For a Brighter Tomorrow! U
N
3
4
7
7
2
0
Town of Verona
County rezoning on
June 26 plan agenda
The Town of Verona plan
commission will discuss
and vote on a county rezon-
ing plan at its June 26 meet-
ing.
The county’s plan gets rid
of “ag exclusive zoning,”
which affects who can take
a Farmland Agriculture tax
credit from the state.
The process has been
ongoing for a few years,
and was in response to state
law changes, Brian Stand-
ing from the Dane County
Planning and Development
department told the Press in
April.
Town planner/adminis-
trator Amanda Arnold said
the plan commission must
make a decision June 26
to keep with the county’s
timeline. The decision will
then go to the Town Board
July 1 and the county later
in July.
Arnold said she’s had
“a few citizens raise some
concerns” with the rezon-
ing changes, and said it will
be up to the commission to
decided whether to adopt
all of the county’s propos-
als or modify them.
Arnold also encouraged
anyone with questions or
concerns on the rezoning to
contact her before the meet-
ing so the commission can
be prepared to discuss all
concerns that are out there.
Arnold’s email is aarnold@
town.verona.wi.us.
There will also be time at
the meeting to raise further
concerns.
Arnol d sai d t hat i t ’s
not an option to maintain
current zoning for those
properties that are being
r ezoned, becaus e t hat
would require a change to
the comprehensive plan,
“and that would be a longer
process.”
Affected property own-
ers should have received a
letter in the mail about the
changes.
The meeting is at 7 p.m.
Thursday, June 26, at Vero-
na Town Hall.
If you go
What: Plan Commission
meeting
When: June 26
Where: Town Hall
Info: town.verona.wi.us
Verona Area School District
Exploration Academy adjusts schedule
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Exploration Academy
students and advisers will
have 18 days of even more
flexibility next year.
On late start Mondays,
EA students, which will
number 80 for the 2014-15
school year, will not have
to attend school.
Instead, they will devel-
op a “Late Start Monday
Learni ng Pl an, ” whi ch
will include community-
based work experiences,
time outside of the normal
school day or regular proj-
ect work.
“We’ve long said that
students don’t necessar-
ily need to be within the
four walls of the classroom
or the school to engage in
learning,” outgoing EA
di rect or Mi ke Murphy
said. “What we’d really
like to do is promote …
that students could get out
into the community or just
work more flexibly rather
than feel like they just need
to be in the classroom.”
The new plan fits with
the mission of increased
personalized learning for
students at the charter high
school, which opened for
its first year in fall 2013.
The school has students
meet the same standards
as all high school students
statewide, but allows them
to choose the projects they
work on to meet those stan-
dards and does not hold
t hem t o t he t radi t i onal
classroom setting.
The changes to late start
Mondays, of which there
are 18 each year, will also
help staff better work with
students in the commu-
nity and develop their own
advising methods for per-
sonalized learning.
“That would afford us
some time to work in a
more collaborative man-
ner, as well as our staff
members getting out to the
community where our stu-
dents are working,” Mur-
phy said, mentioning that
it was an “immense” task
this year to develop per-
sonalized plans and get the
school off and running.
St aff woul d use hal f
of the time, equal to nine
days, for “professional
learning community col-
laboration” amongst them-
selves and the other half to
work with students outside
of the normal school day
for an evening showcase
event or something similar.
Murphy said parents of
current and incoming EA
students all were support-
ive of the idea.
“I don’t think we had
anyone say ‘you can’t do
that, that’s not going to
fly,’” he said.
Advi ser Chad Wel t y
said it would allow him to
better work with students
out in the community and
make more connections
himself.
“I wasn’t able to get (to
students in the community)
as frequently as I would’ve
liked,” Welty said.
At least one adviser will
remain at EA on late start
Mondays for students who
are unable to go elsewhere
because they rely on the
bus or transportation at
only certain times of the
day.

Board passes
preliminary budget
The board approved the
$62 million dollar prelimi-
nary 2014-15 budget Mon-
day night.
The budget would bring a
mill rate drop to $12.10 per
$1,000 of equalized value on
a home. The new rate would
save the owner of a $250,000
home an average of $42.50
on their property taxes.
The district is required to
pass a budget before the fis-
cal year begins July 1, but
it won’t be finalized until
October after official enroll-
ment numbers come in to
determine state aid.
The mill rate numbers will
vary somewhat from com-
munity to community within
the school district.
Borrowing planned
Th e b o a r d a l s o
approved a resolution to
borrow up to $35 mil-
lion to fund the changes
to the retirement system
for district employees.
The money woul d
be sold as promissory
notes to cover the costs,
and will help pre-fund
the obligations to retir-
ees rather than the “pay
as we go” system the
district currently has,
board president Dennis
Beres said.
“Between the changes
that we’ve made and
trimming those future
obligations and the time
value of money by allo-
cating money to a bond-
ing resolution, we’re
able to pre-fund the
amount of future obli-
gations and drastically
reduce the total obliga-
tion to the taxpayers,”
Beres said.
The borrowing will
now go through unless
a petition with at least
7, 500 electors or 20
percent of the voters
from the last gubernato-
rial election signing is
filed within 30 days.
The borrowing comes
as the district changes
the health benefits for
future retirees based
on a “tier system” to
save the district mon-
ey. District business
manager Chris Murphy
said the changes mean
the annual cost will be
around $2.5 million, but
that would have grown
to $5 million within
20-30 years without the
changes.
Un i o n s f o r d i s -
trict support staff and
teachers supported the
changes when they were
introduced two weeks
ago and were involved
in yearlong negotia-
tions.
The official changes
to the employee hand-
book will be voted on at
the July 14 board meet-
ing.
– Scott Girard
Subscribe to
by calling
845-9559
or log on
connectverona.com
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Add us on Facebook
and Twitter as “Verona Press”
4
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Opinion
Thursday, June 19, 2014 • Vol. 48, No. 4
USPS No. 658-320
Periodical Postage Paid, Verona, WI and additional offices.
Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
The Verona Press, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.
Office Location: 133 Enterprise Drive, Verona, WI 53593
Phone: 608-845-9559 • FAX: 608-845-9550
e-mail: veronapress@wcinet.com
ConnectVerona.com
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.
General Manager
David J. Enstad
david.enstad@wcinet.com
Advertising
Donna Larson
veronasales@wcinet.com
Classifieds
Kathy Woods
ungclassified@wcinet.com
Circulation
Carolyn Schultz
ungcirculation@wcinet.com
News
Jim Ferolie
veronapress@wcinet.com
Sports
Jeremy Jones
ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Website
Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick,
Anthony Iozzo, Mark Ignatowski,
Scott De Laruelle
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
WOODWARD COMMUNICATIONS,INC.
A dynamic, employee-owned media company
Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
Printed by Woodward Printing Services — Platteville
NATIONAL NEWSPAPER
ASSOCIATION
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year in Dane Co. & Rock Co.. . . . . . . . .
$
37
One Year Elsewhere. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
45
Verona Press
Oregon Observer • Stoughton Courier Hub
A thousand days of
learning in Mallorca
I
lived in Mallorca, Spain, for
more than a thousand days.
I don’t remember which
sunrise was my thousandth in a
foreign country where I had been
building a life over the course of
years; just like many of my expe-
riences there, important moments
dawned on me unnoticed, only to
be grasped much after the fact.
In a bit under
four years, I
don’t know the
exact moment
when I became
fluent in Span-
ish, or began to
understand the
local language,
Catalan.
I’m not sure
when I began
to feel comfort-
able with Spanish customs like
kissing people on the cheeks in
greeting. I don’t know how many
days I spent walking the streets
of my town until I knew it better
than any other place I had lived.
One thousand is a round, siz-
able number. It seems like an
achievement. But the truly won-
derful, valuable moments can’t
be pinned to a specific day, or
even moment. The best things I
gained from living in Mallorca
grew with me and continue to
become more important over
time.
As my understanding of the
Mallorcan way of life grew, I
developed a growing web of
connections and insights. For
example, at first I was baffled by
the Catalan language and why
everyone preferred to speak it
rather than the national language,
Spanish, which everyone from
all corners of the country would
understand.
But as I listened and watched
over the months, I saw grandpar-
ents speaking in Catalan to their
grandchildren. I heard children
playing and singing nursery
rhymes in it.
I saw friends greet each other
in the tongue that had been
passed down to them by tradi-
tion, and I realized that Catalan
was the “home” and “friend”
language of Mallorca. It had
come first. Spanish was formal,
official; a handshake instead of
a hug.
And so I began to learn Cata-
lan through osmosis. I glimpsed
into the depth of something that
was once so foreign that I was
in danger of resenting it for not
understanding it. In doing so, I
embraced the need to let go of
what made me comfortable —
my prior knowledge of Spanish
— and I learned start over, hum-
bly, with an open mind.
Keeping an open mind became
my most valuable skill. As I
spent more time in Mallorca, I
found that there was always more
to see, do and understand.
It became a cascade; the deeper
my understanding of Mallorcan
culture and tradition became, the
wider my perspective became on
Mallorca as a whole. It became
clear that learning was simply
the gateway to more learning,
and I ended up encountering new
places, customs and words right
up through my very last day on
the island.
Even as my plane took off for
the United States from Palma de
Mallorca, I realized it wasn’t the
end of the story.
A thousand days was enough
time to become aware that an
experience is never really “com-
plete” or “over.” I would take my
learning with me, and it would
blend into the larger story of my
life. I hadn’t gained an ending;
I had gained a new home, a new
set of friends, new languages and
experiences and new perspectives
that would continuously inform
what life brought me afterwards.
I had gone through a lot of
growth since the day I stepped
off the bus in Porreres, Mallorca,
and was so lost that I had to fol-
low a stray dog to the central
plaza. I now had a bit over a
thousand days of insight.
A thousand days. A collec-
tion. A notebook of single pages
that form part of a book, not yet
finished, but no longer the same
story as before.

Kelsey Dionne is a 2005
Verona Area High School gradu-
ate who has been living on the
Spanish island of Mallorca since
2010.
Letters to the editor
Dionne
Community Voices
Wisconsin deserves marriage equality
My wife and I recently celebrat-
ed our thirty-fifth wedding anni-
versary. We are awarded all of the
respect and privileges that come
with a state-sanctioned marriage.
Many other loving couples have
been in similar long-term relation-
ships, however due to their sexual
orientation, they have been denied
a state-recognized marriage cer-
emony.
For them, marriage was unat-
tainable due to a law that only
recognized so-called “traditional
marriage.” Not only were they
denied a marriage license, but also
the basic rights that came with
it: tax advantages, estate rights,
health-care options, and end of
life decision-making rights. In
short, they were deemed not equal
in the eyes of the law.
Last week, that changed in Wis-
consin. With a ruling that a ban
on marriage is unconstitutional,
couples who have waited for years
to be recognized celebrated and
consecrated their vows. Images
and stories of recent same-sex
marriages capture the love that
unites us as well as the joy of a
long-fought victory over state-
sponsored discrimination.
However, even in the midst
of the joyful occasions, there are
some who wish to return Wiscon-
sin to the dark days of marriage
discrimination.
Some state officials remain
steadfastly wed to the idea that
love needs to be restrained, that
state-recognized relationships are
only suitable for some, that more
than 123,000 Wisconsinites are
second-class citizens. Though
polls statewide and nationally
show that strong majorities favor
equal marriage rights, and courts
have deemed marri age bans
unconstitutional, Scott Walker,
J. B. Van Hollen, and the vast
majority of Republican legislators
remain opposed to equal marriage
rights for all. They will use their
offices to appeal the ruling.
However, i n t he end t hei r
appeals will fail and love will
win. Wisconsin, along with the
nation, understands that equal
means equal.
In our nation’s history, a war
was fought and slavery was abol-
ished. Women won the right to
vote, Jim Crow was abolished and
civil rights obtained, interracial
marriage was deemed lawful, and
many other battles for equality
were won. In the end, history will
record the story of love winning
out after an epic struggle and the
dour attitude of those who wished
to deny it. The latter will remain
on the wrong side of history.
Tim White
Town of Springdale
The Verona Press encourages citizens to engage in discussion
through letters to the editor. We take submissions online, on email and
by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high let-
ter volume, and the editorial staff reserves the right not to print any
letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take pri-
ority over submissions from recently printed authors. Please keep sub-
missions under 400 words.
Submit a letter
Coming up
Film: Secret Life, Secret
Death
“Secret Life, Secret Death” tells
the haunting story of Genevieve
Davis’s grandmother, who fell into
bootlegging and prostitution in gang-
land Chicago and northern Wiscon-
sin in the Roaring ‘20s.
Join others for a screening and dis-
cussion at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, June
24, at the library.
Davis is also the film’s director,
and will lead a discussion following
the film. “Secret Life, Secret Death,”
the book and DVD, will be available
for sale and signing. The film con-
tains brief adult content.
Kids’ Book Group
Join the library’s kids’ book
group, where kids discuss and eat
snacks inspired by the book at 4 p.m.
Wednesday, June 25.
This month’s pick is the first book
in the humorous children’s espio-
nage thriller series “N.E.R.D.S.:
National Espionage, Rescue, and
Defense Society” by Michael Buck-
ley.
Registration is required for this
program aimed at 9-12 year olds.
Theatre Games
Join teaching artist and perform-
er, Johanna Gorman-Baer, in some
“Whose Line”-style improvisational
games at 4 p.m. Wednesday, June
25, at the library.
No registration is required for
this program intended for kids ages
11-18.
David Landau
Dave is a former first grade teach-
er, an award winning musician and
entertainer, and a very silly man.
Catch two shows – at 12:30 p.m.
and 2 p.m. – Thursday, June 26, at
the library.
The kids sing some, move some,
act some, dance some, shout just a
little bit, and laugh a bunch.
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
5
DeanCare Gold (Cost) is a product of Dean Health Plan, Inc. and is available to Medicare
beneficiaries residing in Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Grant, Iowa, Jefferson, Rock or Sauk
Counties. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description
of benefits. For more information contact the plan. You must continue to pay your
Medicare Part B premium. Benefits, provider network, premium and/or copayments may
change on January 1 of each year. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply.
Medicare evaluates plans based on a Five-Star rating system. Star ratings are calculated
each year and may change from one year to the next. This is an advertisement and is
intended to obtain insurance prospects. For more information call (877) 301-3326 or for
TTY dial 711 or call (877) 733-6456. Hours of Operation: October 1, 2013, through February
14, 2014, Monday through Sunday 8:00 a.m.– 8:00 p.m., February 15, 2014, through
September 30, 2014, Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m.– 8:00 p.m. and October 1, 2014,
through February 14, 2015, Monday through Sunday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
DeanCare Gold (Cost) is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract.
Enrollment in DeanCare Gold depends on contract renewal.
H5264_2050-0114-StarAd for Y0023_CMS Accepted
©2014 Dean Health Plan, Inc.
Top-notch care on a fixed income?
Dean makes it truly affordable.
Our 5-Star Medicare rated DeanCare Gold (Cost)
Plan covers more and costs less.
• Exceptional Dean care with premiums of just
$68/month or $113/month with no copays
• Coverage includes hearing and vision—plus
worldwide urgent and emergency care
• Your premiums will never increase
due to age
• With a network of nearly 2,000 Dean
doctors, you’re bound to fnd a great ft!
As low as $68/month
Request your DeanCare Gold
fact kit today.
Call 1-877-301-DEAN (3326)
TTY users dial 711 or call
1-877-733-6456
DeanCare.com/Medicare
2014 recipient
of Medicare’s
highest rating
5

presents



















Book, Music and Lyrics by:
MEREDITH WILLSON
Story by:
MEREDITH WILLSON and FRANKLIN LACEY



June 20, 21, 26, 27 & 28, 2014 7:30 PM
Matinee June 22, 2014 2:00 PM
Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center
For Reserved Tickets: 608-845-2383 www.vact.org
U
N
3
5
6
4
3
1
VAHS grads focus on new album
VICTORIA VLISIDES
Unified Newspaper Group
Aft er st art i ng a hi gh
school band as a “joke,” two
2014 Verona graduates just
dropped their band’s debut
album.
Al i vi a Kl ei nf el d and
Emma Witmer (her stage
name is Ronnie) are part of
the local band Modern Mod
that came together and had
local radio play starting in
2010.
Witmer, who’s played
drums since grade school,
and Kleinfeld, who started
playing bass in 2008, tossed
around the idea, but then
got serious about it, adding
three other members from
other local high schools.
In a 2012 interview with
the Verona Press, the girls
laugh about how the band
came to be, but say they
can’t live without it now. In
fact, both of them are “tak-
ing a year off” from school
after graduating last week-
end to see how far they can
take their musical careers.
The band has had local
radio play on 1055 Triple
M, won the battle of the
bands competition last year
and played shows at Madi-
son venues like Brat Fest
and The Frequency.
They had a release show
for their first album “Tun-
nels,” in April after suc-
ces s f ul l y l aunchi ng a
Kickstarter campaign to
help fund the album. The
campaign raised more than
$5,000 with 119 people who
donated. They’ve previous-
ly recorded a few tracks to,
had music online on some
unofficial EPs, but this is
their first official album.
They said they’ve gotten
a good response so far to
the album, with more local
radio play and their album
being sold at some record
stores, but hope to expand
the scope of their music in
the coming year.
While Witmer and Klein-
feld are busy practicing for
their next show June 22 at
the Madison Area Music
Awards in Madison, they
took some time to detail
to the Verona Press how
the album came to be and
where they want to take
their music in the future.
Q&A
This is your first album?
Ronnie: The songs we’ve
previously released were
just sort of thrown out there
for free, just as demos, but
we decided we had to do the
real deal and professionally
record an album.
How long did it took you to
record the album, and what
kind of tracks are on it?
Alivia: It was quite a long
process, but incredibly fun,
and a great learning expe-
rience. The album is ten
tracks, and as far as the
emotion behind them, we
found a good variety, many
of these songs more light
and upbeat, but some pretty
hard hitting as well, or both.
R: We have a range of
emotions on there. We have
love songs, songs about
just having good times, but
also songs about wanting to
move away, feeling useless,
or just getting plain sick of
the winter (a familiar feel-
ing to everyone here in Wis-
consin). Basically just a ton
of things we were feeling as
we grew up writing these
songs. Our songs are pretty
catchy, pretty easy to hum
along to.
How has your sound pro-
gressed from when you first
became a band?
A: Our music definitely
went more into an alterna-
tive direction than when we
started. We progressed, and
still continue to, with every
new song we write.
R: In the early days, we
had members who listened
to metal, classic rock, and
pop country, but there was a
tiny bit of overlap between
our musi c senses- j ust
enough to squeeze some
original material out of. We
had a problem with keep-
ing our sound steady, just
because whoever wrote it
would obviously sway it
more towards their sense
of music. Now we have a
much more cohesive style
all around, just so whoever
writes the songs will always
be able to write it to fit our
sound.
What was a challenge in
trying to make the record?
A: It was very difficult
to find time to lay down all
the tracks; time is always a
challenge for us, being stu-
dents and having jobs, as
well.
R: A big challenge was
choosing which studio to
do it at. We toured a few
around Wisconsin, but we
pretty much had to decide
how much outside help
from producers, engineers,
etc., that we wanted. We
ended up recording at The
Exchange Studios in Mil-
waukee with Jack LeTour-
neau, and I think the album
turned out so much better
with him than it would if
we attempted to do most of
it on our own. It definitely
would have been a differ-
ent outcome if we recorded
with anyone else.
What do you feel has kept
you guys together as a
band?
A: Our musical tastes is a
big factor, but we have all
become such close friends.
My band mates are my best
friends, so it only makes
sense to continue to make
music together.
R: I think we see the band
as sort of a vacation from
our adolescence. Obviously,
we have fun with it, but it’s
empowering having some-
thing that you’re passion-
ate about outside of school,
without anyone telling or
teaching you how to do any-
thing. It’s nice being able to
play a show knowing that
you set it up, you got the
people there, and you wrote
the songs that everyone’s
singing along to.
What was the most fun part
about making your own
record?
R: I guess writing it was
definitely the most fun part.
The recording process isn’t
actually fun, it’s more like
work, driving towards per-
fection for 16 hours at a
time, sleeping for six, then
going at it another 12 hours
or so. Writing is the more
creative side to it, when
someone brings in a basic
idea and the whole band
shapes it into a full song.
It’s just really remarkable to
see the whole process.
How were you able to pay
for it?
A: We put together some
money we’ve earned from
playing shows over the
years, but mostly we were
supported by friends, fami-
ly, and fans who contributed
to our successful Kickstart-
er campaign.
How has the release gone
so far?
A: The release has been
excellent! Our release party
was packed. We’ve been
getting some radio airplay
and we are selling our CDs
at some record stores like B
Side on State Street.
What will the future of the
band hold? You just gradu-
ated from high school. Is
the band going to stick
together? Are you off to col-
lege?
A: It’s going to be music
24/7 next year. Hard work,
but really exciting stuff!
R: At this point, we’re
doing the “year off” thing.
We’re going to push this
band as far as it can go and
hope that by next year we
have reason to continue
with this thing!
Photos submitted
Modern Mod members Emma
Witmer (fourth from left) and
Alivia Kleinfeld (next to Witmer)
are part of the band Modern
Mod, which just released its
debut album. They raised more
than $5K on their Kickstarter to
help fund the album, “Tunnels,”
which was release this spring.
6
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Coming up
Community calendar
Call 845-9559
to advertise on the
Verona Press
church page
430 E. Verona Ave.
845-2010
Gratitude, Contentment and Anxiety
A simple prayer of thanks is a great way to start and end
every day. We have so much to be thankful for, and remind-
ing ourselves of that fact will improve the quality of our
lives. But, how do we know if we are truly and genuinely
showing gratitude to God? With our family and friends it is
easy enough to know if we are genuinely grateful. In that
case, we will feel and express appreciation and be happy
with our gift. We might extend this same analysis to God:
are we genuinely appreciative of God’s gifts to us (our lives,
our talents, our work, and our family and friends) and are
we genuinely content with how things are working out in
our lives? A true sense of gratitude to God should lead to a
profound sense of contentment with our lives. This doesn’t
mean that we won’t strive to make things better; there are
many things that could stand to be improved. But, it does
mean that as we go about our lives we manifest a satisfac-
tion and contentment with things, and especially the little
things we cannot change. Gratitude naturally brings with it
a deep contentment which will banish fear and anxiety from
our lives. So, we should keep in mind all that we have to be
thankful for.
- Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be
glad in it.
Psalm 118:24
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Road, Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
allsaints-madison.org
Pastor Rich Johnson
8:30 and 10:45 a.m. worship times
THE CHURCH IN FITCHBURG
2833 Raritan Road, Fitchburg, WI
53711
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 8 and 10:45 a.m.
THE CHURCH IN VERONA
Verona Business Centre
535 Half Mile Rd. #7, Verona.
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 9 a.m.
FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008 • memorialucc.org
Phil Haslanger
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
(608) 271-6633
Central: Raymond Road & Whitney
Way
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 & 10:45 a.m. Worship
West: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine
Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Worship
LIVING HOPE CHURCH
At the Verona Senior Center
108 Paoli St. • (608) 347-3827
livinghopeverona.com, info@living-
hopeverona.com
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
201 S. Main, Verona
(608) 845-7125
MBCverona.org
Lead pastor: Jeremy Scott
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
REDEEMER BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
102 N. Franklin Ave., Verona
Pastor Dwight R. Wise
(608) 848-1836 www.redeemerbible-
fellowship.org
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Family Worship Service
RESURRECTION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Wisconsin Synod, 6705 Wesner
Road, Verona
(608) 848-4965 • rlcverona.org
Pastor Nathan Strutz and Assistant
Pastor: Jacob Haag
THURSDAY
6:30 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship Service
ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC
PARISH
301 N. Main St., Verona
(608) 845-6613
Stchristopherverona.com
Fr. William Vernon, pastor
SATURDAY 5 p.m. Sunday Vigil,
St. Andrew, Verona
SUNDAY 7:30 a.m., St. William,
Paoli
9 and 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
Daily Mass: Tuesday-Saturday at 8
a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
ST. JAMES EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
427 S. Main Street, Verona
(608) 845-6922
www.stjamesverona.org
Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter
Narum
Services 5 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Sunday - office hours 8-4 Monday,
Tuesday and Thursday; 8 a.m. to
noon Wednesday and Friday
SALEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
502 Mark Dr., Verona, WI
Phone: (608) 845-7315
Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor
Laura Kolden, Associate in Ministry
www.salemchurchverona.org
9 a.m. worship service - Staffed
nursery from 8:45-10:15 a.m. - 10:15
a.m. Fellowship Hour
SPRINGDALE LUTHERAN
CHURCH-ELCA
2752 Town Hall Road (off County
ID)
(608) 437-3493
springdalelutheran.org
Pastor: Jeff Jacobs
SUNDAY
8:45 a.m. Communion Worship
SUGAR RIVER
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
130 N. Franklin St., Verona
(608) 845-5855
sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org,
sugarriverumc.org
Pastor: Gary Holmes
SUNDAY
9:00 & 10:30
Contemporary worship with chil-
dren’s Sunday school.
Refreshments and fellowship are
between services.
WEST MADISON BIBLE CHURCH
2920 Hwy. M, Verona, WI 53593
Sunday (nursery provided in a.m.)
9:15 a.m. - Praise and worship
10:45 - Sunday School (all ages)
6 p.m. - Small group Bible study
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST – Located at Hwy. 92 & Ct.
Road G, Mount Vernon
(608) 832-6677 for information
Pastor: Brad Brookins
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST –
At Hwy. 69 and PB, Paoli
(608) 845-5641
Rev. Sara Thiessen
SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship
What’s on VHAT-98
Thursday, June 19
• 12:30 and 2 p.m., Magic Morgan
and Lilliana, VPL, 845-7180
• 4-6 p.m., I’m Board! Games, VPL,
845-7180
Friday, June 20
• 11:45 a.m. Doug Brown music,
Verona Senior Center, 845-7471
• 7:30 p.m. “Music Man,” VAHS
PAC, $15, vact.org
Saturday, June 21
• 10 a.m., Bike plan listening ses-
sion, city hall
• 10:30 a.m., Spanish/English story
time, VPL, 845-7180
• 11 a.m. - 11 p.m., Summer
solstice celebration, Wisconsin
Brewing Company, 848-1079
• 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., Dog wash and
brat stand, Animal Hospital of
Verona, 845-6700
• 7:30 p.m. “Music Man,” VAHS
PAC, $15, vact.org
Sunday, June 22
• 2 p.m. “Music Man,” VAHS PAC,
$15, vact.org
Monday, June 23
• 1-3 p.m., Open Art Studio:
Robots, VPL, 845-7180
• 6:30-8:30 p.m., “Koran by Heart”
film screening and discussion, VPL,
845-7180
• 6:30 p.m., Finance committee,
City Center
• 7 p.m., Common Council, City
Center
Tuesday, June 24
• 10 a.m., Scams and ID theft talk,
Verona Senior Center, 845-7471
• 1-8 p.m., Crafty Tuesdays for
Teens, VPL, 845-7180
• 6:30-8:30 p.m., “Secret Life,
Secret Death” film screening and
discussion, VPL, 845-7180
Wednesday, June 25
• 4-5:30 p.m., Theatre Games for
teens, library, 845-7180
• 4-5 p.m., Read it and Eat Kids’
Book Group, library, 845-7180
Thursday, June 26
• 12:30 and 2 p.m., David Landau:
Music and Comedy for Kids, library,
845-7180
• 3:30-5 p.m., Anime and Manga
Club, library, 845-7180
• 6:30 p.m. Town of Verona plan
commission, Town Hall
• 7:30 p.m. “Music Man,” VAHS
PAC, $15, vact.org
Friday, June 27
• 7:30 p.m. “Music Man,” VAHS
PAC, $15, vact.org
Saturday, June 28
• 10 a.m.-noon, Scare Tactics:
Deer and Rabbit Prevention, library
• 7:30 p.m. “Music Man,” VAHS
PAC, $15, vact.org
Doug Brown concert
The Verona Senior Center is hosting
musician Doug Brown for a birthday/
anniversary lunch at 11:45 a.m. Friday,
June 20.
He’s been called one of the finest pick-
ers in the Midwest for his work as a gui-
tarist, and has also produced an album as
a jazz pianist.
VACT opens music man
The Verona Area Community Theater
will presenting their production of Mer-
edith Wilson’s “The Music Man” at the
Verona High School Performing Arts
Center on June 20, 21, 26, 27 and 28 at
7:30 p.m. each night, and a matinee per-
formance on June 22 at 2 p.m.
Tickets can be reserved by calling 845-
2383, and cost $15 for adults and $10 for
students and seniors.
Bike plan feedback
Join District 1 alder Elizabeth Doyle
to share your thoughts and ideas on how
we can improve the bicycling experi-
ence in Verona. As the representative for
our city, she will bring your feedback to
the Regional Bike Plan Policy Advisory
Committee.
The discussion takes place from 10-11
a.m. Saturday, June 21, at city hall.
Summer solstice at WBC
The Wisconsin Brewing Company will
hold a “Picnic by the Pond” Saturday,
June 21, to celebrate the Summer Sol-
stice.
The event will run from 11 a.m. to 11
p.m. and includes activities like horse-
drawn wagon rides, an attempt at the
“World’s Largest Beer Float” with inter-
tubes and music.
After dusk, the company will hold its
first fire in its fire pit and give everyone
a chance to enjoy a s’more. A new beer,
“Zenith,” will also be unveiled at the
event.
Dog Wash & Brat Stand
Enjoy a brat and give your dog a scrub
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 21,
at Animal Hospital of Verona, 203 W.
Verona Ave.
All proceeds from the day go to our
Help-A-Pet-Fund. The Help-A-Pet-Fund
was established in 2000 to help cover the
cost of necessary medical care for patients
whose families are unable to afford treat-
ment. The fund is also used to cover basic
medical costs for stray and surrendered
animals while they are in our care.
Bicycle ride
People are invited to bring their bicy-
cles to join riders from the McFarland
Senior Center for a bike ride and lunch at
the Verona Senior Center at 10 a.m. Mon-
day, June 23.
To register for a bike path pass with the
DNR, call 266-2621.
Film: Koran by Heart
Each year during Ramadan, more than
100 students from the Islamic world
arrive in Cairo to compete in the world’s
oldest Koran-reciting contest.
A documentary – “Koran by Heart” –
follows the quests of three 10-year-old
competitors. See the film at 6:30 p.m.
Monday, June 23, at the library.
Dr. Ibrahim Saeed, president of the
board of The Islamic Center of Madison,
will lead a discussion following the film.
Scams and ID theft
Ryan Adkins from the Verona Police
Department will be at the senior center
at 10 a.m. Tuesday, June 24 to talk about
scams and identity theft.
He’ll talk about how to safeguard your
information and how to avoid the scam
artists.
Wednesday, June 18
5 p.m. – Common Council from 6-09-
14
7 p.m. - Capital City Band
8 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Thursday, June 19
7 a.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
5 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
7 p.m. - Words of Peace
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. – McPherson School at
Historical Society
Friday, June 20
7 a.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
4 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
8:30 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. - Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Saturday, June 21
8 a.m. – Common Council from 6-09-
14
11 a.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
1 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
4:30 p.m. – McPherson School at
Historical Society
6 p.m. – Common Council from 6-09-
14
9 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. - McPherson School at
Historical Society
11 p.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
Sunday, June 22
7 a.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
9 a.m. – Resurrection Church
10 a.m. - Salem Church Service
Noon - Common Council from 6-09-14
3 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
4:30 p.m. - McPherson School at
Historical Society
6 p.m. – Common Council from 6-09-
14
9 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. – McPherson School at
Historical Society
11 p.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
Monday, June 23
7 a.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. - Foot Care at Senior Center
4 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
9 p.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
10 p.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Tuesday, June 24
7 a.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Promise Band at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
5 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Resurrection Church
8 p.m. - Words of Peace
9 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. - McPherson School at
Historical Society
Wednesday, June 25
7 a.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
6 p.m. – Common Council from 6-23-
14
7 p.m. - Capital City Band
8 p.m. – Foot Care at Senior Center
10 p.m. - Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
Thursday, June 26
7 a.m. – Pam Vankampen at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. – Promise Band at Senior
Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Parkinson’s Presentation at
Senior Center
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. – McPherson School at
Historical Society
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
7
HometownDays2014
Fun in the
sun
Although it had new man-
agement, Verona’s annual
Hometown Days festival was
the same fun weekend for most
Veronans, and Mother Nature
cooperated, even holding off on
predicted rain on Sunday after-
noon so everyone could enjoy
the festival until the end. The
weekend included plenty of kids
activities at the carnival all week-
end, fireworks Thursday night,
the parade Sunday and plenty
more in between. Above, Myles
Steger, 3, of Verona shows
what a tiger does Saturday
while local balloon artist Tami
Topper-Schroeder prepares him
an orange tiger balloon animal.
Watching are mother Holly and
brother Henry, also 3. Right,
Dorothy on stilts gives an excit-
ed wave to the crowd as she
passes by at Sunday afternoon’s
parade.
Photo by Mike Gorski (right)
Photo by Evan Halpop
Photo by Jim Ferolie
Photo by Jim Ferolie
Noelle Tarrant brings her coatimundi, Isabelle, around to the gathered crowd Saturday afternoon to
give kids a chance to pet her. The raccoon-like creature from South America was one of several exotic
animals Tarrant brought out in her popular show, ZooZort. Others included an albino Burmese python,
a giant spur thigh tortoise, a monitor lizard, a wallaby, a bearded dragon, a chameleon and a giant
marine toad.
8
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
adno=357302-01
Driftmier Design
Relocation Sale 
One Day Only!
Saturday, June 21
10 am - 2 pm
107 S. Main St., Verona
Cabinets  Furniture  Kitchen Gadgets
Prices below dealer cost!
Everything must be gone by 6/29!
For questions or photos, contact Cathy:
cathy@driftmierdesign.com  608-338-5645
Photos by Scott Girard
Above, a clown waves to parade watchers on Main Street. Below,
A young girl makes a move to pick up the candy thrown near her,
though she didn’t have many kids around her to compete with.
Below, A New Glarus firefighter climbs up the ladder on the back of
the manually propelled fire “truck.” The firefighter’s family cheered
him on from the side of West Verona Avenue.
Photo by Jim Ferolie
Joe Garrison, 9, enjoys tumbling around on the WOW balls on Saturday afternoon.
Photos by Scott Girard (above), Evan Halpop (left) and Jim
Ferolie (below)
Above, Nolah Johnson, 6, waves as she rides
by on the carousel with her older sister Anya,
9. Left, Milo Burns (front left) rides in the car
ride with Annabelle Charles (back left) and
Duncan Charles (back right) on Thursday.
Below, A group of kids checks out a snake that
herpetologist Tom Kessenich holds during the
Snakes Alive program Saturday.
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
9
tore through the community
shortly after midnight.
Amazingly, no injuries
were reported. Just a lot of
worry as people all over
Verona woke up their kids
and headed to the base-
ment to wait out the storm
after hearing sirens go off at
about 12:05 a.m.
Some lost power, some
lost Internet, some lost
cable or satellite and almost
everyone lost sleep. But
out si de of t he Count ry
View area and the Epic
campus, there was little
actual damage.
That area was blocked off
almost immediately, with a
perfect storm of problems –
gas leak concerns, downed
power lines and awake,
alert and curious residents
wandering around to check
out the torn-off rooftops
and other shocking sight-
ings in the area.
“Anyone want to claim
the roof thats in my front
yard??” Carter Court resi-
dent Emily Nierman posted
on Twitter a few minutes
after reporting that a torna-
do had hit her house.
Within the hour, buses
arrived from Madison Metro
Transit to ferry residents to
safe areas such as Memo-
rial Baptist Church. The city
evacuated at least 19 fami-
lies, eight of which had been
returned to their homes by
the time Gov. Scott Walker
stopped by to tour the dam-
age Tuesday afternoon.
Several more families had
been evacuated from Town
of Verona homes just to the
west, including one in which
at least three destroyed
vehicles could be seen in the
large yard.
By 5 p. m. , t he “vast
majority” in the town were
allowed to return home,
with the building inspec-
tor still unable to access a
couple of homes on Cross
Country Road, town admin-
istrator Amanda Arnold
said.
Cl eanup effort s were
quick all over the area, with
about 25 emergency, utility
and public works agencies
descending on Verona by
dawn. At that point, much
of the evidence of damage,
like a downed street sign on
Cross Country Road, was
already fixed, though Tam-
arack Way remained closed
to traffic through the day
as crews cleared trees and
other debris.
Community efforts were
evident all over the area,
as well, from a pair of local
pizza restaurants donating
food for residents and emer-
gency personnel to the Sal-
vation Army and Red Cross
helping displaced residents
find food and shelter while
they waited out inspections.
At 6 p.m., police were still
restricting traffic on Tama-
rack, but the area was a bee-
hive of activity, with neigh-
bors gathering for outdoor
meals, tree-trimming and
roofing companies enjoy-
ing a bonanza, utility crews
clearing dangerous areas,
insurance adjusters taking
claims and television news
media from as far away as
Milwaukee posting on-site
reports of the situation.
Still, the hubbub was
confined mostly to the area
west of Country View while
streets just a block away
were mostly normal, save
for a flattened trampoline or
swingset here and there.
It made the tornado’s
path through the neighbor-
hood apparent.
“We’re comfortable that
the damage is limited to a
small inner perimeter num-
ber, pretty much on Tama-
rack and Kettle Court, ”
Verona police chief Bernie
Coughlin reported at the
news conference.
School damage
The same could be said
of the elementary school
itself, with the western half
sustaining severe damage
while the eastern side sat
mostly unharmed.
The western side, spe-
cifically a set of first grade
and K-1 classrooms, had
glass scattered about, inte-
rior doors broken apart and
exterior walls completely
destroyed. In a few areas,
the clocks had stopped at
12:10, leaving a clue as to
when the tornado made its
way through.
One classroom, facing
the playground behind the
school, lost its wall, leaving
a gaping hole big enough
Tornado: No injuries despite
severe damage in some areas
Continued from page 1
Turn to Tornado/Page 10
Photos by Darren Lee
A large tree on the corner of Nine Mound and Cross Country roads was uprooted.
The tornado destroyed a set of classic cars, owned by John, below, including a turquiose 1929 Chevy that was used in the Johnny Depp
movie “Public Enemies,” which was filmed in Wisconsin.
Left, the forest near
the Endor building at
Epic lost some trees.
Most damage on the
campus appeared to be
superficial.
Right, a state trooper
works traffic patrol on
Nine Mound Road, in
front of the property
above on Cross Country
Road.
Photos by Jim Ferolie
10
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
for a truck to drive through
and bricks strewn about like
cardboard on the concrete
outside.
The early estimate on
repairs was $3-4 million,
with all of that covered by
insurance other than the
$25,000 deductible, Verona
Area School District super-
intendent Dean Gorrell said.
That price includes the like-
ly replacement of the entire
roof, which sustained heavy
damage.
But Gorrell said the dis-
trict hopes the school will
reopen by Sept. 1 in time for
next school year.
Gorrell qualified that opti-
mism by saying there would
be no way to know before
the district assessed the
overall structural damage.
Crews will begin demo-
lition this week and assess
how much structural dam-
age was done, especially on
the seemingly untouched
eastern side of the building.
Gorrel l not ed t hat an
analysis done within the
last year to determine safe
spots for tornado drills in
the school did its job, as
the areas deemed the saf-
est were largely unharmed.
Although no students were
present for this incident, it
was good to know the spots
held up, Gorrell said.
As of Tuesday, Gorrell
said the first priority was to
restore power or get tem-
porary power to the site to
begin dehumidifying the
school, which had standing
water throughout.
Findorff will manage the
project, and Gorrell said
the biggest delay will be
getting materials for the
rebuild. Findorff project
manager Mike Dillis, who
also managed the construc-
tion of Badger Ridge Middle
School, told Gorrell they
hoped to find a way to make
it happen by September.
“We can put a man on
the moon, build the Empire
State Building, we should be
able to do this,” Dillis said.
Overall picture
Around 2,500 Veronans
were without power at the
peak of the storm, but that
was down to 66 by 4:30
p.m. Tuesday afternoon, and
Scott Reigstad of Alliant
Energy said most of those
would be cleared up by the
evening.
The storm also damaged
seven poles on Cross Coun-
try Road and crews spent the
day repairing those.
The tornado appeared to
have made its way into west-
ern Madison, as well, and
Platteville also sustained
Tornado: School damage estimated at $3-4 million, hope to have open by September
Continued from page 9
Turn to Tornado/Page 11
An entire classroom wall was knocked out, leaving bricks and other material strewn about the concrete and grass outside, though part of the wall remained. It was one of at
least four classrooms that were completely destroyed by the tornado.
Photos by Scott Girard
The tornado damaged Country View Elementary school inside and out, wrecking benches on the playground, scattering debris in the lunchroom and completely destroying a set of classrooms, though an
American flag remained hanging intact in one of them.
Shards of glass littered the floor thanks to broken windows all around the building, though much of the damage was contained to the roof and the western side of the build-
ing. The eastern side looked largely untouched. Crews had begun cleaning that morning and the next step was to dehumidify the building once power was restored.
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
11
heavy damage from its own
tornado created by the same
storm.
In all, about 5,000 people
lost power. Dane County
declared a state of emergen-
cy, with about 350 reports of
storm damage.
In Verona, the only other
area to take significant dam-
age was the billion-dollar
Epic campus, where the
tornado appeared to have
touched down for the first
time.
Company officials did not
respond to a late request for
information, but the storm
clearly tore down some
trees and signs and report-
edly blew out some win-
dows. Former Verona alder
Jeremy Charles, a longtime
Epic employee, surveyed
the damage overnight and
said it looked like it initially
touched down on top of the
Farm Campus garage on the
south side of the 800-acre
property and appeared to be
mostly external.
Madison Gas & Electric
confirmed damage to its gas
lines in the Country View
area early Tuesday, but by
late morning, it confirmed
there were no leaks and
said it would perform future
inspections for any homes in
need of repairs.
Spokesman Steve Kraus
said gas to damaged homes
was shut off as a precaution
“because you don’t know if
there’s internal damage in
the house with the pipe.”
He added that the util-
ity would do “a full inspec-
tion of the meter and all the
pipes leading up to it” at
each home before returning
service.
A memo from city admin-
istrator Bill Burns sent out
at 6 p.m. summed up the
damage by saying it affected
approximately 50 homes in
the surrounding area.
“City staff have com-
pleted an initial assessment
of affected properties,” the
email said. “Currently there
are eight homes that have
been deemed uninhabitable.
An additional 21 homes are
classified with moderate
damage and 25 with minor
damage.”
That was a far cry from
the June 8, 2011, tornado
that ripped through the
southern part of the Town
of Verona and the Eastview
Heights neighborhood in
the city along a 17.6-mile
path. It had knocked down
some power lines and trees
and tore up the beer tent
just prior to the opening of
Hometown Days, but most
damage was minor – includ-
ing some lucky spots where
large trees fell between
houses.
It also had at least one
amusing story, with the tor-
nado sirens going off while
the Verona Area Communi-
ty Theater cast was rehears-
ing “The Wizard of Oz” –
just as the Wicked Witch of
the West was getting ready
to ride into town on her
broomstick.
Cleanup efforts
Thi s t i me i t was bad
enough to get the governor
to make a driving tour of
the area just after he toured
hard-hit Platteville.
Walker and police chief
Coughlin spoke in a brief
news conference shortly
before 3 p.m. in front of
Count ry Vi ew Tuesday
afternoon, where he dis-
cussed the state’s emergen-
cy management program to
provide aid to the area and
especially the school.
He also touted the inter-
agency work by emergency
responders from all over the
county and the way Vero-
nans had responded to help
each other.
“ Ne i ghbor s he l pi ng
neighbors, literally and
throughout the region, ”
Walker said. “Oftentimes
people take (warnings) for
granted. When a warning’s
issued like that… it’s time
to go to a basement.”
Coughlin took note of the
tireless work provided by
the many responders, many
of whom appeared to be
volunteers or on overtime.
“(We’re) trying to make
as much progress as we can
here during the daylight
hours,” Coughlin said.
Community pitches in
Jane Vaughn is the sec-
retary at Memorial Baptist
Church, and when her hus-
band, who works for Dane
County 911, was called in
overnight, she let him know
the church’s doors were open
to anyone who needed them.
About five or six fami-
lies did, with one staying
the full night and the others
stopping in for brief shelter,
water or other supplies.
“It’s just part of being in
the community,” Vaughn
said. “It’s a tough time, so
we fed some people today.
“We want to help in the
days to come with the clean
up and providing water,
food, whatever’s needed.”
The Red Cross was also
at the church to help any
di spl aced fami l i es, and
Vaughn said the church’s
doors would be open as
long as they needed to.
The church wasn’t alone,
though, as a pair of pizza
companies from the area
also offered to help resi-
dents and first responders
who spent the day helping
clean up.
Toppers brought pizza
to the fire station for first
responders around lunch
time.
Madison-based La Fortuna
Pizza later offered free pizza
at the Verona Farmers’ Market
to first responders or displaced
residents, “No proof neces-
sary, honor system works just
fine,” the company wrote in
a Facebook status. The status
was shared 33 times, and the
company later thanked every-
one “for demonstrating what it
means to be a community” in
another post.
Tornado: Community groups offer food, shelter to responders, displaced residents
Continued from page 10
Photo by JIm Ferolie
Above, Bruce Company trucks line up to haul away brush on Breckenridge Court.
Photo by Jim Ferolie
The Verona Police Department used Badger Ridge Middle School as a staging area overnight.
Houses on
Tamarack
Way sustained
some of the
heaviest dam-
age in the city
from the torna-
do, with roofs
and siding torn
from them
Photo by
Scott Girard
For more
photos
See
Page 12
and
Ungphotos.
SmugMug.
com
12
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
VAHS students attend Badger Boys State
Verona Area High School
has selected the 2014 repre-
sentatives to the 73rd ses-
sion of Badger Boys State.
Badger Boys State is a
youth leadership program
sponsored by the Wisconsin
American Legion designed
to educate youth in the
duties, privileges, rights,
and r esponsi bi l i t i es of
American citizenship. The
program has been devel-
oped on the fundamental
principle that young people
learn best by actively par-
ticipating in the process.
As much as possible, the
mechanics of government
in Badger Boys State are
modeled after Wisconsin’s
own government at the city,
county and state level.
Students selected this
year are: Kye Hanson, son
of Paul and Britta, Noah
Roberts, son of Brian and
Heather, and Conlin Bass,
son of Greg and Coleen.
Badger Boys State rep-
resentatives are selected by
local high schools through-
out Wisconsin based on
their qualifications as good
students, exhibiting strong
leadership skills and in the
top third of their class. Pre-
vious Badger Boys State
graduates are prominent
today as leaders in pub-
lic office, business and the
armed forces.
The week-long Badger
Boys State program began
last week on June 8 in
Ripon.
The annual pr ogr am
brings together approxi-
mately 850 high school
students from across Wis-
consin to create a 51st state
known as Badger Boys
State.
Badger Boys State par-
ticipants develop their own
party platforms, pass local
ordinances and utilize a
state patrol and judicial
system to enforce the laws
and constitution of the 51st
state. Additionally, citi-
zens choose from a series
of schools of instruction
– ranging from law school
and peace officer school,
to schools on lobbying and
campaign strategies. Bad-
ger Boys State participants
also have an opportunity to
participate in a variety of
team sports that compete
throughout the week, a band
and choir, Color Guard, and
write for the Badger Bugle
Citizen, the official news-
paper of Badger Boys State.
The participants are spon-
sored to Boys State through
the generosity of the Vero-
na American Legion and
the Verona Optimists.
For more information on
the program and follow the
session go to badgerboys
state.com.
5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
10'x20' $58 Month
10'x25' $65 Month
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI STORAGE
U
N
3
4
7
6
5
7
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR THE JULY 9TH
GREAT DANE SHOPPING NEWS
Display Ads:
Wednesday, July 2 at 3pm
Classified Ads:
Thursday, July 3 at Noon
Our offices will be closed
Friday, July 4, 2014
For Results You Can Trust
125 N. Main St.
Oregon, WI 53575
835-6677
135 W. Main St.
Stoughton, WI 53589
873-6671
133 Enterprise Dr.
Verona, WI 53593
845-9559
Rental Aids – Small Monthly Payment
WISCONSIN
HEARING AIDS
1310 Mendota St., Madison, WI 53714
244-1221 • 1-800-646-0493
www.wisconsinhearingaids.com
Tom
Pippin
UN343506
Panels: 6’x8’-1x4” DE treated $28 or 6’x8’-
1”x6” w/Custom milled back $30, $25/unit
Round Cedar Fence Posts: $2.49 and up,
lengths to 17’
Pickets: Cedar 1”x4”-6’ DE $.90 or 1”x6”-6’
DE treated $.99
Fence Boards: Full 1” thick rough sawn,
1”x6”-16’ pine or oak
Barn Boards: Full 1” thick, 12” width
$.95/lineal ft.
Cedar Siding: 8” bevel $.64/lineal ft.
Steel Roofing & Siding: 38” width $1.39/
lineal ft. and up
OSB Sheathing: 3/4” thick T&G, cut offs
32”x48” and larger $.30/sq ft.
Flooring: Prefinished Brazilian Walnut (Tropical IPE)
3’1/4” and 5’ @ $495/sq ft. and up. Also stocking #1
Southern Yellow Pine Dimension Lumber T&G
Knotty Pine: 1”x8” T&G units $.49/linear ft
Treated Deck Boards: 5”/4” x 6” $.35/lineal ft
262-495-4453 ANICH LUMBER CO. PALMYRA, WI
FENCING
See website or call for
information on other
classes.
www.springdaleyoga.com
215-7218
NEW CLASS
Yoga Without Props
Thursdays, June 12, 19 & 26, 7-8 p.m.
Meditation 101
Mondays, July 7, 14 & 21, 7-9 p.m.
Free Newcomer’s Class
Saturday, August 2, 10:30 a.m.
Beginning Yoga
Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.
& Fridays, 8:30 a.m.
Many other classes
2674 Allen Dr., off Cty. Rd. PD
Between Verona & Mt. Horeb
U
N
3
5
3
8
1
1
Bethel Horizons Summer Camps 2014
1eµee vllluge
Muslc Cumµ wlth Leothu Stunley
Culturul lmmerslon
Lnvlronmentul Lducutlon Cumµs
Adventure Cumµs
Leuders ln 1rulnlng
8lke & Cunoe und Rlver r 1rlµs
www.bethelhorizons.org org
mmµ µµs
p
Questions?
Contact Angie at
(608) 257.2577 ext 228
or bhorizons@bethel-
madison.org
tions?
yy
Gov. Scott Walker, right, visited
the Country View Elementary
School neighborhood to assess
the damage and talk with
residents. He then held a press
conference in front of the school
with Verona police chief Bernie
Coughlin.
Photo by Kimberly Wethal
Top right, a trampoline
did not stay where it
belonged in the Kettle
Creek neighborhood.
Photo by Erica Werner
McAndrews/Facebook
Right, utility crews
work on Cross Country
Road, which had trou-
ble with downed power
lines.
Below, an outdoor meal
is shared in the evening
amid the chaos of the
cleanup efforts.
Photos by Jim Ferolie
For more photos
See
Ungphotos.SmugMug.com
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectVerona.com
The
Verona Press
13
Boys lacrosse
Photo by Josh Smith/Daily Jefferson County Union
Senior goalie Rachel Romens holds up the state runner-up trophy as teammates
celebrate with her Saturday, June 14, after the state championship game at Perkins
Stadium at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. The Wildcats lost 5-4 to Hartland
Arrowhead.
Girls lacrosse
Softball
Photo by Josh Smith/Daily Jefferson County Union
Senior Connor Novotny celebrates Verona’s 7-6 overtime win over Waunakee Saturday, June 14, in the Division 1 boys lacrosse state championship at Perkins Stadium at
the University of Wisconsin - Whitewater.
Overtime magic
Cioci’s goal gives Cats
state championship
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Senior attacker Jack Cioci was
dealing with injuries the past few
seasons, but he was healthy this
year.
And it was a good thing for the
Verona Area High School boys
lacrosse team, as Cioci was the
one who grabbed the puck early
in overtime of the state champion-
ship game last Saturday at Perkins
Stadium at the University of Wis-
consin - Whitewater.
Cioci not only got a shot off, but
he was able to bury the game-win-
ner as the Wildcats defeated Wau-
nakee 7-6 to claim the Division 1
title.
“I couldn’t believe it that after
the three years I was hurt that I
was able to score the goal that
won us the championship,” Cioci
said. “The whole time our coach
(Michael Storts) talked about earn-
ing our right to win. It was always
easy to stay focused because we
all had the same goal of winning a
state title.”
Waunakee took a 6-5 lead with
seven minutes to play when Mitch
Cords scored with an assist to
Payton Smith, but senior Kenny
Keyes was able to keep the Verona
season alive with an unassisted
equalizer with just over a minute
left in regulation.
Verona jumped out to a 3-1 lead
earlier with goals by sophomore
Josh Novotny, junior Trey Kazda
and senior Alex Kramer. Kazda
had an assist on the Kramer goal.
Brett Templin cut Verona’s lead
with a goal at the start of the third
quarter, but Cioci scored with an
Comeback falls short in state final
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
No team had come to within
nine goals of Hartland Arrow-
head all season until the state
championship game last Satur-
day, but a late comeback by the
Verona Area High School girls
lacrosse team fell short in a 5-4
loss.
The Wildcats scored three
times to cut the deficit to one at
Perkins Stadium at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin – Whitewa-
ter, and head coach Sue Romens
said the girls had control and
could have won the game if
there was just a little more time.
“ Eve r yone woul d ha ve
loved to see a state champi-
onship, because we had such
an outstanding season,” Sue
Romens said. “But the fact we
came to within a goal of Arrow-
head … I think that tells you
how the girls played Saturday.”
Junior Jessica Eversoll made
it 5-4 after getting a pass from
sophomore Amanda Best with 2
minutes, 33 seconds to play, and
there was a few chances to tie
at the end, including a potential
foul that wasn’t called, Romens
said.
Junior Sarah Guy (unassisted)
and junior Jenna Butler (assisted
by junior Maddison Jeddeloh)
started the comeback.
“I think our girls did an out-
standing job and really surprised
Arrowhead, because I don’t
think they expected the competi-
tion,” Sue Romens said.
Arrowhead went up 5-1 with
15 minutes to go after goals by
Kara Vana (assisted by Paige
Kruse) and Jessica Janzer (unas-
sisted).
Verona struck first in the first
half with a goal by Butler, but
Arrowhead answered with three
goals before halftime.
Callie Tjarkson (assisted by
Vana), Sarah Haun and Vana
(assisted by Kruse) all scored.
Senior goalie Rachel Romens
finished with 10 saves, while
Arrowhead goalie Grace Knoe-
bel collected five.
The girls squad finishes the
season 15-3 overall and returns
all but two players from this
year’s team.
Season
ends in state
quarterfinals
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
I t was a t ough end-
ing for the Verona Area
High School softball team
Thursday in a 5-1 loss to
Hort onvi l l e i n a WIAA
Division 1 state quarter-
fi nal at UW-Madi son’s
Goodman Stadium.
The Wi l dc a t s ( 22- 3
overall) were able to knock
off Madison La Follette
twice on their way to a
Big Eight Conference title
and a state berth, and they
also knocked off Westosha
Central, which made the
state semifinals.
But that success was put
on hold Thursday as Hor-
tonville was able to jump
out to a 3-0 lead early with
errors and a few miscues
being the culprit.
“This is loss isn’t what
you woul d cal l a qual -
ity loss,” head coach Todd
Anderson said. “We made
some mi st akes, and we
didn’t execute. When we
execute and when we don’t
make mistakes, we win.
“The key i s t hat t hi s
loss doesn’t diminish the
successes of the season.
… We set out to do some
amazing things, and we
did them all but win here
today.”
But the loss is not some-
t hi ng t hat t arni shes t he
entire season, which was
the most successful since
Verona l ast made st at e
in 2010. Senior captain
Emma Ray said the girls
became family as the sea-
son progressed.
“We all have all come a
long with each other, and I
will remember these girls
for the rest of my life,”
Ray said. “This is such a
great team, and it is hard to
go out this way.”
Ray hadn’t al l owed a
run all postseason until
Turn to Softball/Page 14
Turn to Girls Lax/Page 14
Turn to Boys Lax/Page 15
14
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Join us for our
Grand Opening Event
on June 21st!


You’re invited!
• Free food and beverages from 11am-3pm
• In-store offers and specials!
• Giveaways and Register-to-Wins:
• Wisconsin Dells passes
• Brewers tickets
• Country on the River tickets
• Bluetooth Headset and Speakers
Verona
611 Hometown Circle., 608-848-7600
3
5
3
9
8
8
-
0
1
the bottom of the third of the state
quarterfinal. A throwing error and a
few infield hits on bunts loaded the
bases for the Polar Bears.
Sophomore second baseman Ally
Fox brought in the first run with an
RBI groundout, and senior shortstop
Katie Uhlenbrauck followed with a
2-run single.
“We don’t give up very many
runs, and giving three like that puts
us in a hole,” Anderson said. “If we
execute earlier and get a run or two
ourselves, we are not down three.
We are close or tied.
“I don’t think we gave up, but that
is a very good team, and it is hard to
come back from that.”
The Wildcats were able to get
on the board in the sixth, and they
threatened for more runs. Senior
f i r st baseman Bai l ey Bui sker
walked, and Ray singled to right
field to put runners on the corners
with one out.
Senior third baseman Bea Kealy
then reached on a fielder’s choice
and picked up an RBI as Buisker
scored.
But that was all the offense Vero-
na could muster in the inning.
Verona had a chance to score in
both the second and third innings,
as well. In the second, a few throw-
ing errors on bunts led to runners
on the corners with two outs. The
inning ended with a pop up.
In the third, sophomore center
fielder Heather Rudnicki, who made
a running catch near the wall in the
first inning, singled and advanced to
second on a wild pitch.
She was doubled off of second
later, however, when the umpires
said she left early on a sacrifice fly.
“I am waiting to see the video to
see if the call of leaving early on the
fly was right. If it was, awesome,
but I was not happy with the call,”
Anderson said. “But that doesn’t
loom as large if we execute on our
other plays – if we get some bunts
down and make some other things
happen. When we don’t do that,
it puts a lot of pressure on each at
bat.”
Hortonville scored its other two
runs in the bottom of the sixth. An
throwing error by Buisker led to
one run, and senior designated hitter
Heidi Huebner picked up an RBI
fielder’s choice.
Sophomore pitcher Sammi Sul-
livan went the distance in the win,
allowing a run on four hits. She
struck out two and walked two.
Ray took the loss. She allowed
no earned runs of five hits in six
innings. Ray struck out four and
walked two.
State: Verona finishes 22-3 overall
Photos by Anthony Iozzo
Above, Heather Rudnicki (11) and Steph
Keryluk hug as the rest of the Verona
Area High School softball team reacts
in the background following a 5-1 loss
to Hortonville last Thursday in a WIAA
Division 1 state quarterfinal at Goodman
Stadium at the University of Wisconsin
- Madison.
At right, Keryluk tags out a Hortonville run-
ner at second base on a steal attempt.
Continued from page 13
Sue Romens said this
year was better than expect-
ed with so many first-year
coaches. She added that the
future looks bright for the
Wildcats to be back next
year.
“When you look at our
overall season … I think
i t i s phenomenal , ” Sue
Romens said. “We have to
remind ourselves that we
had an outstanding year and
played relentlessly with all
of our players on the field.
We can’t be more proud of
our girls and our coaches.”
Lacrosse is still a club
sport at VAHS, but Romens
added she believes that
the sport might be a sanc-
tioned WIAA high school
sport in the next few years,
especially when witness-
ing the growth of the youth
lacrosse program in Verona
the last four years.
Verona 10, Mukwonago 9 (OT)
The Wildcats made the
state final with a 10-9 win
over Mukwonago in over-
time on June 11.
Junior Sarah Guy picked
up three goals, while soph-
omore Abby Filsinger and
Jeddeloh added two goals.
Butler had a goal and two
assists, and junior Sammy
Seymour added a goal and
an assist. Junior Julia But-
ler also scored a goal, while
Bethany Russell had an
assist.
Romens finished with 17
saves for Verona.
Eversoll and Seymour
each forced three turnovers
on defense, while sopho-
mor e Mor gan Fr i t zl er ,
freshman Elena Herman,
Best and Filsinger all added
one forced turnover.
Photo by Josh Smith/Daily Jefferson County Union
Amanda Best (20) passes around an Arrowhead defender Saturday.
Girls Lax: Cats finish 15-3
Continued from page 13
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
15
Sophomores make second-team honors
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Sophomore catcher Ben
Rortvedt and sophomore
outfielder Keaton Knueppel
both represent the Verona
Area High School base-
ball team as second-team
all-Big Eight Conference
selections.
Rortvedt was 14-for-47
(.298) with a home run,
four doubles, 11 RBIs and
seven runs scored in confer-
ence games.
Knueppel was 18-for-49
(.367) with two doubles,
two triples, 11 RBIs and six
runs scored. He also pitched
34 innings and allowed 15
earned runs on 37 hits. He
was 4-3 with 36 strikeouts
and 21 walks.
Seni or s Mi t ch Fl or a
(outfielder), Troy Granick
(infielder), John Moynihan
(utility) and Ryan Pyn-
nonen (pitcher) also made
the list as honorable men-
tions.
Fl or a was 16- f or - 51
(.314) with three doubles,
a triple, eight RBIs and 11
runs scored, while Granick
was 11-for-31 (.355) with
eight RBIs and 12 runs
scored.
At the plate, Moynihan
was 11-for-38 (.289) with
two doubles, nine RBIs and
seven runs scored. Moyni-
han also pitched 30 2/3
innings and allowed nine
earned runs on 31 hits. He
was 2-2 with four saves,
collecting 36 strikeouts and
17 walks.
At the plate, Pynnonen
was 7-for-21 (.333) with
four doubles, five RBIs and
six runs scored. As a pitch-
er, Pynnonen was 1-1 with
a save. He allowed eight
earned runs on 23 hits in 20
innings, while striking out
15 and walking two.
Verona finished 9-9 in
the Big Eight Conference
and finished as a WIAA
Division 1 sectional runner-
up.
Three Cats make first team
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Verona Area High
School girls soccer team
earned three first-team all-
Big Eight Conference play-
ers this season.
Senior forward Felicia
Retrum, senior defender
Maddie Hankard and soph-
omore midfielder Emily
Krogman all made top hon-
ors.
Retrum finished with
11 goals and four assists,
while Krogman picked up
nine goals and four assists.
Hankard was a leader in the
backfield, as the Wildcats’
only allowed more than
two goals in a game once.
Senior Madison Westfall
(goalie) and freshman Dani
Gilboy (defender) also
made the team as honor-
able mentions.
Westfall finished with
88 saves in 19 games (.978
save percentage).
Verona was 6-2-1 in the
Big Eight, finishing tied for
second place. The season
ended in a WIAA Division
1 regional final.
Photo submitted
Anderson helps Crush to
second-place finish at USSSA qualifier
Verona resident Meghan Anderson (age 13) helped her Mad City Crush U12 girls fast pitch softball
(Mad City Crush is based in Madison) finish second at the Little America Open (USSSA Qualifier)
June 7-9 in Marshall.
The Crush finished 3-1, losing 3-1 to the Mad City Chaos in the championship game.
Girls soccer
File photos by
Anthony Iozzo
Seniors Emily
Krogman
(above,
13), Maddie
Hankard (6)
and Felicia
Retrum
(at right)
all earned
first-team
all-Big Eight
Conference
honors this
season.
File photos by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomores Ben Rortvedt (above) and Keaton Knueppel (below pitching) both earned second-team all-
Big Eight Conference honors this season.
Home Talent League
Cavs remain undefeated in Western Section
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Danny Koss hit a grand
slam and scored five times
for the visiting Verona Cav-
aliers, who rolled 24-4 over
host Argyle on Sunday.
Verona improved to 10-0
Western Section with the
seven-inning blowout.
Cole Kroncke gave up
four runs over six innings
and struck out six for the
win. He scattered nine hits.
Justin Scanlon threw the
final inning of relief, strik-
ing out two and walking
one.
Scanlon and Kroncke
combined to go 4-for-8 at
the plate. Both doubled.
Derek Burgenske (2-for-
3), Landon Flora (2-for-4)
and Koss (3-for-6) all had
multiple hits.
With the win, the Cavs
now have a two-game lead
on home field advantage for
the playoffs with only six
games remaining.
Verona hosts Ridgeway at
1 p.m. June 29.
Verona 11, Argyle 6
The Cavaliers committed
five errors Saturday, but sur-
vived to hold off the Argyle
Beavers 11-6.
Girls golf
Smith finishes tied for fifth place in Junior PGA event
Ve r ona Ar e a Hi gh
School junior Bailey Smith
finished tied for fifth place
last Friday in a Wisconsin
Junior PGA tournament at
Janesville Riverside Golf
Club.
Smith shot a 10-over 81
and tied with Oregon soph-
omore Taylor McCorkle
and Mi l t on’s CheyAnn
Knudsen.
Madison Edgewood’s
Caroline Lake took first
with a 7-over 78. Ore-
gon gr aduat e Mor gan
McCorkle and Madison
resident Robyn Blanchard
tied for second with an
8-over 79.
Boys Lax: Cats defeat Marquette in semis
Photo by Josh Smith/Daily Jefferson County Union
The Verona Area High School boys lacrosse team celebrates a state title Saturday.
assist to Josh Novotny to make it 4-2.
Waunakee came right back with three
goals, two by Mark Herzberg, and another
by Templin, and then junior Jake Taylor
scored to knot the game at 5-5.
“Waunakee is a team we played before
and we knew we could match their talent,”
Cioci said.
Senior Sam Becker finished with 12
saves for Verona, while Kyle Katterman
collected 10 for Waunakee.
The Wildcats had their banquet on Mon-
day, but Cioci said the thought of being a
state champion hasn’t completely set in
yet.
“We haven’t watched the game film yet,
and I think that is when it will sink in. But
right now, it is still kind of surreal,” Cioci
said.
Verona 13, Marquette 12
Verona was able to get revenge on the
team that defeated them at state last season
on June 11 with a 13-12 win over Mar-
quette University High School.
Cioci scored four goals, while Kazda
and Keyes added three and two goals,
respectively.
Senior Zach Nechvatal, sophomore
Dominic Sabbarese and Kramer all added a
goal. Senior Connor Novotny and Kramer
also collected three assists each.
Becker finished with 22 saves.
Continued from page 13
Baseball
16 - The Verona Press - June 19, 2014
PRESCHOOL
Q. With my child out of school for the summer, what’s the
best thing I can do to prevent them from losing ground
academically and still have fun?
A. Read to them! For young children, read a variety of picture
books but most ages can also enjoy listening to “chapter books.”
Reading a chapter a day can be a great way to draw them into a
story and keep them wanting more. If a whole chapter is too long for your child, stop at an exciting
part and when you return to the book, ask them to recap what was happening when you stopped.
Ask them to predict what might happen in the next chapter. Some older children enjoy alternating
between being the reader and having you read to them. You’ll be creating great summer memories
while you are helping your child’s skills stay strong.
The Caring Center/Verona Montessori House
402 W. Verona Ave. • Verona • (608) 845-8620
www.caringcenter.com
Q. What is the 2014 limit for Section 179 expensing of fixed assets?
A. Good question – no one knows for sure. Background: Section 179 is also
known as the “frst year write-off” of fxed assets. It gives smaller businesses
a deduction for the entire cost of long-lived assets (except real estate) in the
year of acquisition. To help the economy recover from the recession, the
Section 179 deduction limit was expanded from $25,000 to $500,000 in recent
years. Unless Congress acts, the 2014 limit falls back to $25,000. Momentum
to reinstate the $500,000 limit exists in Congress, but election year politics is
holding up a deal. Our read: it’s “likely” that the $500,000 limit will pass after
the election – most likely in December. A smarter government wouldn’t make
us guess what the rules of the game are, but that’s where we stand right now.
Greg Andrews, CPA
HomeTown Tax & Financial, S.C.
110 Enterprise Dr., Suite 104 • Verona • (608) 845-5511 • www.hometowntax.net
CPA
DENTIST
Q. I seem to get Canker sores a lot. Is it true that my toothpaste may be causing
my Canker sores?
A. Canker sores, or Apthous ulcers, are generally small or medium sized, painful
sores that can develop apparently spontaneously inside the mouth. Canker sores most
commonly occur on the tongue, gums or inside the cheek or lips. There are many known
triggers of canker sores including stress, trauma, medications and chemical exposures.
Two known chemical triggers are Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and Pyrophosphate,
both common additives in toothpastes. Pyrophosphate is a tartar control agent added to
toothpaste and SLS is a foaming/cleaning agent. Although not always easy to find, there
are readily available pastes that do not contain these compounds. If you find that you
develop canker sores more than a few times per month, try changing your toothpaste.
Read the labels before you buy and avoid pyrophosphate and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate.
Make sure that the paste does have fluoride. Fluoride is a vital component to decay
prevention and does not contribute to sores. Remember that if you have any sore that
does not completely heal in 10 days; a dentist should evaluate it.
Dr. James Sands, DDS
1010 North Edge Trail • Verona, WI • (608) 848-4000
(corner of Hwy. M and Cross Country Rd.)
PHYSICAL THERAPY
Q. What is heat stroke and how can it be treated?
A. As a Physical Therapist, I encourage patients to exercise on a regular basis. During the upcoming Summer
months, we need to be cautious of the possibility of heat stroke. Our bodies produce a tremendous amount of
internal heat and we normally cool ourselves by sweating through the skin. In situations where there is high
heat, high humidity and/or vigorous work in the hot sun, the body’s cooling system may begin to fail and the
body temperature cannot be lowered as quickly as necessary. This allows heat to build up to dangerous levels,
which require immediate medical attention. Persons with cardiovascular and respiratory issues or those taking
certain medications have an even higher risk of heat stroke. Symptoms of heat stroke include: headache,
dizziness, dehydration, disorientation, agitation, confusion, fatigue, hot/dry/fushed (but not sweaty) skin,
elevated temperature, increased heart & respiratory rates, seizure and/or loss of consciousness. To decrease
the symptoms of heat stroke, do the following: get the person indoors and gently apply cool water to the skin
following by fanning to stimulate sweat glands, apply ice packs to the groin and underarm areas, have the
person lie down in a cool area with their feet slightly elevated. Contact your physician and follow their advice.
Remember to use caution in this hot and humid weather, particularly with children, the elderly and with pets.
Susan Armstrong, MPT
Physical Therapist
Comprehensive Therapy Services
1049 N. Edge Trail • Prairie Oaks
(608) 845-2100 • Verona, WI 53593 • www.stellarrehab.com
CHIROPRACTOR
Q. Is it more benefcial for athletes to get a massage the day before or
after an event?
A. The best answer for athletes is to do both, however if asked to pick one
I would say it is better for athletes to receive massage as soon after their
event as possible. Post event Massage Therapy helps facilitate and shorten
the recovery process. It helps keep the muscles infused with oxygenated and
nutrient rich blood; this keeps the muscles from becoming knotted and stiff,
which allows you to be less sore and tight the days following your event. The
exception to this choice depends on how you are feeling the days before your
event. Should you feel like your legs are heavy or your body is generally tight from training then
I would recommend a pre-event massage so that you can get your legs refreshed and the muscles
loosened so that you can go into your event feeling the best you can possibly feel.
212 E. Verona Ave., Suite B • Verona, WI
(608) 848-1800 • unwinchiropractic.com
Keith & Kinsey Schulz
Real Estate Team
REAL ESTATE
Q. What can I do if I’m selling on deadline?
A. Selling a home quickly due to a variety of circumstances can be very stressful. You
want the best price you can get in a quick time frame. We suggest hiring an agent (like
us!) who can keep you calm throughout the process. You want to use amazing photos,
not ones from your cell phone. Hire a professional photographer (we do!). A majority
of home searches begin online and those photos are your frst impression. Clean out the
junk! You'll be moving so now’s the time to go through and sort/donate items you don’t
use. A less cluttered home (and closets!) will show much better when people are touring
it. Price is also key! Keep your emotions out of the sale. Sure, you brought your home
to this place but that memory isn’t worth an extra $10,000 to anyone but you. You don’t
want to give it away either. We, as experienced agents, will help you determine the best
price according to the housing market. We will make sure your home gets the attention it
deserves to sell at a price you’ll be happy with.
Making a Difference, One Home at a Time!
(608) 492-2272
kschulz@KeithAndKinsey.com
www.KeithAndKinsey.com
Ask the Verona
HEATING/COOLING
Q. How efficient is my air conditioner, and should I consider replacing
it?
A. The efficiency of your air conditioner is based on its SEER rating and how
well it has been maintained. Air conditioners that are 15 years old or more
probably fall into the 6-8 SEER rating range. A new 13-16 SEER air condi-
tioner could give you savings in the 35-60% range over your existing unit.
Even air conditioners installed as little as 5 years ago could cost 20-35% more
to operate than today’s models. Any repairs needed in addition to energy sav-
ings may justify replacing even these units. For these and any other questions
on your HVAC system, contact Dave at OK Heating & Air Conditioning.
Dave Kaltenberg
161 Horizon Dr., Suite105 • Verona, WI
53593 (608) 845-8494
SENIOR CARE
Q. Why should Comfort Keepers care for my elderly mom or dad?
A. Comfort Keepers
®
provides home care for senior loved ones who are still living independently in their
homes, independent living facility or assisted living facility. As people age, they become weaker and more
susceptible to injuries from common activities like picking up objects or going down the stairs and even
falling. Comfort Keepers offers families the opportunity to be proactive about the safety and happiness of
their senior loved ones. The home care provided by Comfort Keepers covers a spectrum of care services
such as personal care (bathing, ambulating, incontinence) transportation, Alzheimer’s and dementia care,
light housekeeping, post-surgery care, and even skilled nursing care. If a family member or an elderly loved
one calls to set up a free consultation, a Comfort Keepers home care specialist will visit their home to assess
the senior’s living situation. At that time the caregiver can conduct a free home assessment to allow for better
maneuverability, to eliminate fall-risks, and discuss what they think the best care schedule for the senior will be. Whether it’s a couple
times a week, a couple hours a day, or even around the clock, Comfort Keepers can help your loved one! To learn more about home care
call Comfort Keepers today at (608) 442-1898. We have been serving the Dane County area with quality caregivers for nearly 15 years.
Stephen Rudolph
FACHE, CSA
5396 King James Way, Suite 210, Madison, WI 53719
(608) 442-1898 • www.comfortkeepers.com
INVESTMENTS
Q. Are there different risk levels for municipal bonds?
A. If you’re seeking additional investment income, you may want to consider municipal bonds. Your
interest payments will likely be free of federal taxes, and possibly state and local taxes, too — although
some “munis” are subject to the alternative minimum tax. But some municipal bonds carry different risk
levels than others, so it pays to know the difference. All municipal bonds are subject to interest rate risk —
the risk that you could lose principal if you sell your bonds before they mature while new bonds are being
issued at a higher rate. Another type of risk is default risk. General obligation bond issuers are required to
do everything possible, including raising taxes, to make interest payments on time and in full. But revenue
bonds depend on the revenue generated by specifc projects. Given this more restricted income stream,
revenue bonds may carry more risk than general obligation bonds. Overall, however, municipal bonds have
had an excellent track record of avoiding defaults. Nonetheless, you’ll want to be aware of any bond’s risk factors before you invest.
This article was written by Edward Jones for the use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
Brendon Diers, AAMS
®
Financial Advisor
Brendon Diers, AAMS
®
, Financial Advisor
161 Horizon Dr., Suite 107a • Verona, WI 53593
(608) 845-2533 • Member SIPC
brendon.diers@edwardjones.com • www.edwardjones.com
If you would like to join our Ask a Professional page, contact Donna Larson at 608-845-9559 to find out how!
Lee Unwin
CMT, CSCS
ATTORNEYS
Q. Can evidence that I refused to take a breathalyzer test be used against me in court?
A. Typically, the Fifth Amendment prohibits the State from using a defendant’s statements against
him. A defendant’s refusal to submit to a breathalyzer test is a statement, which could be used in
court to convince the jury that he did not take a breathalyzer because he had consumed alcohol. As
such, the Supreme Court has ruled that it violates a defendant’s Fifth Amendment rights for the
State to use his refusal to submit to a breathalyzer against him. Wisconsin drivers, on the other hand,
have no constitutional right to refuse to take a breathalyzer test. State law requires a driver to take
a breathalyzer or other test for intoxication when requested by a police offcer. The reason for this
statute is to identify and remove drunk drivers from the public roads in order to prevent accidents.
The consequence for a driver refusing to take a breathalyzer test is that evidence of that refusal may
be used in court against him. The bottom line is that you have a constitutional right to refuse an
intoxication test so long as you are not driving.
2 E. Miffin St., Ste. 200, Madison WI 53703 • 608.257.5661
law@axley.com • www.axley.com
Attorney
Tyler Wilkinson
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
17
Ask the Verona
Q. How often should I have the duct work in my home cleaned?
A. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association believes that the frequency in
which a system should be cleaned will be based upon the preference of the home
owner. There are many factors to consider when trying to determine the frequency of
a residential duct cleaning including; Are there any pets in the home? Does anyone
in the household have allergies or asthma who might benefit from a reduction in the
amount of indoor air pollutants in the home’s system? Are there any smokers? These
questions will help determine if you should have your system cleaned more often
than not. Occupants of the home that are more sensitive to allergens and dust would
benefit from having their ducts cleaned more frequently than those who do not have
sensitivities to dust and allergens. We recommend having your ducts cleaned every
3 years for those who are more sensitive and 5 for those who are not.
Justin Vondra
Environmental Specialist
Dirty Ducts Cleaning, Environmental & Insulation, Inc.
3025 Perry St., Madison, WI 53713
(608) 204-3828
www.dirtyductscleaning.com
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALIST
ADVERTISING
Q. How do I get on this page?
A. It’s simple, just call (608) 845-9559. We can fill you in on
all the details. Don’t miss out on this valuable piece of advertis-
ing that runs every month in the Verona Press and Great Dane
Shopping News.
Your Photo
Here!
Verona Press &
Great Dane Shopping News
133 Enterprise Dr. • Verona • (608) 845-9559
connectverona.com
WINDOW FASHIONS & COVERINGS
Andrea Hedquist,
Owner/Designer
Andrea@exquisiteWD.com
(608) 609-1488, call/text
www.exquisiteWD.com
Find me on
draperies • blinds • shades • home furnishings
Q. Can you help shade my deck or patio?
A. Absolutely! A custom window fashions expert is the best person to help you
with external shades. Outdoor grade solar or E-Screen roller shades are perfect for
open patios and decks to shade from the harsh sun and make your outdoor space
more livable. There are unique cable guide and sway protection features available
and products you can still enjoy the view through while providing privacy and golf
ball protection! Consider track mounted shades to make your space bug-proof!
With so many color and pattern choices, call today to take your outdoor space from
Overheated to Oasis!
LONG TERM CARE
(608) 845-6465
303 S. Jefferson St., Verona, WI
www.fourwindsmanor.com
Q. How can I help my elderly loved one stay hydrated?
A. 1. Offer fluids on a regular basis throughout the day.
2. Encourage 8-oz. of fluid intake every time the senior takes
medication.
3. Keep water bottles and/or a water cooler available throughout
the day wherever the senior is (for example, in bed, on the patio,
throughout the house or at the senior living community).
4. Provide favorite summertime beverages such as watermelon drinks,
orange or lemon drinks, mint/cucumber drinks, or your senior’s
favorite beverage (make sure the beverage is not caffeinated or
alcoholic because these can dehydrate rather than hydrate).
For more information about assisted living, call Four Winds Manor & Lodge.
Heather Mortenson
Program Director
adno=357302-01
Driftmier Design
Relocation Sale 
One Day Only!
Saturday, June 21
10 am - 2 pm
107 S. Main St., Verona
Cabinets  Furniture  Kitchen Gadgets
Prices below dealer cost!
Everything must be gone by 6/29!
For questions or photos, contact Cathy:
cathy@driftmierdesign.com  608-338-5645
Nonprofit donates more than $100K to schools
After just three years,
Tri 4 Schools’ events have
donated over $100,000 for
local schools to boost their
health and fitness resources.
Tri 4 Schools is a local
nonprofit started by Vero-
na resident Katie Hensel.
She is the executive direc-
tor of the organization that
donates 100 percent of reg-
istration fees for their kids’
triathlons and youth muds
runs back to the school of
each participant.
In 2014 alone, $25,000
has been donated as a result
of two sell-out events that
are mostly in Dane County,
including Verona, Middle-
ton and Waunakee.
“It has always been the
goal of Tri 4 Schools to
encourage kids to live a
healthy and active life-
style,” Hensel said.
“For many kids today,
phy-ed classes and other
wellness programming at
school is their only expo-
sure to physical activity.
To reach $100,000 donated
back to local schools to
support the health of kids is
astounding.”
In order to ensure a safe
event for all the kids, Tri 4
Schools relies on a dedicat-
ed team of volunteers and
is always looking for more
people who want to help
in the fight against child-
hood obesity. To volunteer,
go to tri4schools.com/get-
involved/volunteer.

Photos by Focal Flame Photography
The Verona-based nonprofit Tri 4 Schools hosted the youth mud
run last month in Verona.
More photos!
To view or purchase more photos go to Focal Flame’s webpages:
focalflamestore.com/Running/2014-Tri-4-Schools-Spring-Mud
18
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Huge Moving -
Downsizing Sale
Verona, 700 Cabrillo Dr.
Saturday, June 21, 8am-
2pm. Furniture, Home
goods, collectibles,
American Girl/Barbie’s
and artwork.
U
N
3
5
3
8
0
9
• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
U
N
3
5
2
8
1
1
PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
CONTRACT SALESPERSON Sell aerial photography
of farms,commission basis, $1200-$2,500 weekly
depending on sales experience, travel required. More
info msphotosd.com or 877/882-3566 (CNOW)
FOR SALE- MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE
MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED - TRUCK DRIVER
Drivers - CDL-A Train and work for us! Professional,
focused CDL training available. Choose Company
Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease
Trainer. (877)369-7893 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.
com (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HBI UTILITY CONTRACTOR Telephone Industry Has
IMMEDIATE openings ïAerial Technicians, ïCable Plow/
Bore Operators, ïForemen, ïCDL Laborers. Training
Offered. Travel Required 920-664-6300. www.holtger.
com EOE by AA (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefits! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classified spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
143 NOTICES
HERO MILES to find out more about
how you can help our service members,
veterans and their families in their time of
need, visit the Fisher House website at
www.fisherhouse.org (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
340 AUTOS
1998 FORD MUSTANG Bright blue,
White leather interior. 4 speed. New
transmission. Needs work. Good engine.
$1000/obo. 608-669-2243
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
tage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vacation.
Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
work taken care of! 800-856-5491 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
$2,000,000 LIQUIDATION @ Boat
World. Financing Available on over 700
new and used Pontoons, Fishing Boats,
Deck Boats, Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye
Boats, Cuddys, Cruisers up to 35 Feet
& Outboards @ the Guaranteed Best
Prices! Crownline, Axis, Malibu, Triton,
Alumacraft, Mirrorcraft, Misty Harbor
& Crest Pontoons. American Marine &
Motorsports Super Center, Schawano.
Where Dreams come true. 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
2 TRAILERS Two wheelers.
8'x10' bed with loading tail gate.
3.5'x7' bed. 608-882-0887.
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
CARRIERS NEEDED for delivery
of WSJ to Oregon/Stoughton area.
Must be available early a.m., 7 days
a week, dependable vehicle. Route
earns between $950. to $1200/month.
For more information
call Pat 608-212-7216
FULL TIME Cook. Immediate opening.
Server/waitress, must be over 18. Apply
at Koffee Kup Restaurant in Stoughton.
Pay based on experience. Apply in
person at: 355 E. Main
NOW HIRING all positions. Sugar &
Spice Eatery. Apply in Person. 317 Nora
St, Stoughton
OUR CLINIC Is looking for a
reliable, self starter to assist our
providers in a growing healthcare
practice. The ideal candidate will
have excellent computer skills,
strong customer service skills and
the ability to work independently.
Some supervisory skills would be
preferred. Please respond via email
to: lsmchirostaff@lsmclinics.com

SCHOOL BUS DRIVER AM or PM.
Must have CDL. Oregon Schools.
Send resume to ajwiedel@gmail.com
UNITED CEREBRAL Palsy is seek-
ing caring, dependable people to work
as Respite Providers. Provide care for
people with developmental disabilities.
A variety of part-time positions are avail-
able, working with children and adults of
all ages! Contact Shannon at 608-273-
3318 or shannpnmolepske@ucpdane.
org. AA/EOE
437 CUSTOMER SERVICE
& RETAIL
SUPER 8 Verona has an immediate
opening for our Front Desk Staff. $9-10/
hr. Paid training, paid holidays, paid
vacation. Apply in person 131 Horizon
Dr. VeronaSuper
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
COMPANY DRIVERS. $2000 Sign On
Bonus. Class A, 2 yrs. exp.
Company Drivers .44cpm East & .40 all
other. Health/Dental/Vision/401K
Regional & OTR Owner Op's
78% of line haul 100% FS Plate
Program. No Electronics. Tom
800-972-0084-x6855
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay Including
Performance and Safety Bonusus!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation and Holiday Pay
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week
100% No Touch- 12 mo. CDL/A
Exp Preferred 888-545-9351 ext 13
www.doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
452 GENERAL
OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton
M-F. 4 hours/night. Visit our website:
www.capitalcityclean.com Or call our
office: 831-8850.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
ARE YOU interested in learning more
about natural area restoration in a hands-
on environment? The Friends of Edna
Taylor Conservation Park meet on the
4th Saturday of each month to maintain
the park's prairies and trails. A volunteer
leader will provide training, guidance and
the necessary tools during the project.
The residents of Oak Park Place love to
visit the zoo in the summer- please join
us. We need help pushing wheel chairs
and then we will all have lunch together
there. Prefer adult volunteers with the
stamina to push wheel chairs. We also
need volunteers to meet us at the zoo.
Be part of the Rythm and Booms clean
up crew. Volunteers are needed not
only at the festival site, but also in the
8 public parks around Lake Monona to
help pick up trash and restore the park
and beach area after the event. A city
of Madison Parks official will be there
to meet and direct volunteers. Call the
Volunteer Center at 608-246-4380 or
visit www.volunteeryourtime.org for more
information or to learn abut other volun-
teer opportunities.
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING
Crack filling, striping.
No Job Too Small.
Call O&H: 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818

DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade.
Call 608-235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and sur-
rounding area. Merry Law Offices. 608-
205-0621. No charge for initial consulta-
tion. "We are a debt relief agency. We
help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code."
RESEARCH SERVICES: We locate
Family, Former Friends, Neighbors
Classmates, Co-workers. www.
joysresearchservices.com
Joy 608-712-6286
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
BUNDLE & SAVE! DirecTV, Internet &
Phone from $69.99/mo. Free 3-months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime & Cinemax.
Free Genie 4-room Upgrade. Lock in 2
year savings. Call 800-918-1046 (wcan)
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
601 HOUSEHOLD
ESTATE SALE Lloyd & Pat Hensel's
in Stoughton
Thursday-Friday, June 19-20,
8:30am-4:00pm.
1017 Park View Dr.
606 ARTICLES FOR SALE
2 WINDOW Air Conditioners. 10,000BTU,
$125. 18,000BTU $250. Used 1 season.
Sam 608-556-0778
648 FOOD & DRINK
SHARI'S BERRIES Order delicious
strawberries for any occasion. Save 20%
on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh
dipped berries starting at $19.99. Visit
www.berries.com/happy or call
800-975-3296 (wcan)
THRILL DAD with 100% guaranteed,
delivered to the door Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 67% plus 4 FREE burgers - The
Favorite Gift - Only $49.99. Order Today
800-931-1898 Use code 79377PXR or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/father72
652 GARAGE SALES
EVANSVILLE 260 Garfield Ave. Sat-
urday, June 21 from 8-4. Multi-family
crafter and mini flea market sale. Original
crafts, antiques, furniture and many other
special items too many to list.
OREGON 4444 Old Stone Rd. 6/19,
10-7pm, 6/20, 8-5pm, 6/21 8-?. Quality
furniture, clothes, decor, household misc.
STOUGHTON 1114 Oakwood Ct. June
19-21, 9am-5pm. Household, Christmas,
leather jackets.
STOUGHTON 1208 Giles. June 19-20,
8am-5pm. Multi-family. Something for
everyone!
STOUGHTON 2116 Blue Heron Ct. 6/20,
12pm-6pm, 6/21, 8am-1pm. Clothing
3X-4X, kitchen, home decor, solid wood
and antique furniture. Cash only.
STOUGHTON 2371 Cty A East. June
20-21, 9am-5pm. Something for every-
one.
STOUGHTON 501 Anne Dr. June 20,
8am-3pm, June 21, 9am-3pm. Multi-
family sale. Furniture, hand tools, house-
wares, home & holiday decor, toys, girls
clothes 4T-6, boys clothes newborn-
12months, 3-4T, baby crib, pack-n-play,
playhouse, girls toddler bed, baby items,
more!
STOUGHTON 701 Pleasant View Dr.
6/19, 1-6pm. 6/20, 8am-5pm, 6/21, 8-?.
Multi-family.
STOUGHTON 742 Kensington
Square. June 19-20, 10am-4pm. June
21, 9am-noon. See craigslist.
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
STOUGHTON BLUE Heron Ct. Multi-
family. 6/19, 2pm-?, 6/20-21, 8am-4pm.
Furniture, tools, hunting, cell phones,
women's clothing and accessories, bed-
ding, luggage, collectibles, housewares-
too many to list.
STOUGHTON MOVING Sale.
709 Hyland Dr. June 19-21,
8am-6pm. Everything priced to go.
Household, Books, Furniture.
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
$$$ FOR OLD Guitars, Basses and
AMPS by Gibson & Fender as well as
others. 920-467-4762 (wcan)
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 PETS
GERMAN SHEPHERD Pups. AKC OFA.
Excellent temperament. Import stock.
Guaranteed. 715-537-5413 www.jerland.
com #2680001-DS (wcan)
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS ENJOY 50%off 100
blooms of Peruvian Lilies with free glass
vase- your price $19.99 plus s/h. Plus
save 20% off your order over $29! Visit
www.proflowers.com/ActNow or call 800-
615-9042 (wcan)
Legals
NOTICE
The City of Verona Plan Commis-
sion will hold a Public Hearing on Mon-
day July 7, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall,
111 Lincoln Street, for the following
planning and zoning matters:
1) The purpose of the hearing is
to hear public comments on proposed
amendments to the City of Verona Com-
prehensive Plan 2010 – 2030 for the West
End development located on West Vero-
na Avenue. The proposed changes will
impact lots 2 and 3 of a future certifed
survey map (CSM) that will divide the
property. An exhibit map can be viewed
in the offce of the Director of Planning
and Development. The existing plan
identifes the property as a commercial
subdivision with some residential land
uses. The proposed amendments would
designate lot 2 for future multi-family
uses and lot 3 as public institutional for
a future school use.
Interested persons may comment
on these planning and zoning matters
during the public hearing at the July
7th Plan Commission meeting. The Plan
Commission will make recommenda-
tions on these matters, which will then
be reviewed by the Common Council for
a fnal decision on Monday, July 14th.
Contact Adam Sayre, Director of
Planning and Development, at 848-9941
for more information on these items or
to receive copies of the submittals.
Kami Scofeld,
City Clerk
Published: June 19, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
The City of Verona Plan Commis-
sion will hold Public Hearings on Mon-
day July 7, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall,
111 Lincoln Street, for the following
planning and zoning matters:
1) Zoning Map Amendment to re-
zone Lot 27 of Liberty Business Park
located at 1135 Liberty Drive from the
current Suburban Industrial (SI) zoning
to the proposed Suburban Commercial
(SC) zoning district.
2) Conditional Use Permit on Lot
25 of Liberty Business Park to allow a
Group Development consisting of two
(2) fex-buildings at 807 Liberty Drive.
3) Conditional Use Permit on Lots
16 and 17 of Liberty Business Park to al-
low for the construction of a four-story,
66-foot tall hotel at 846 Liberty Drive.
Interested persons may comment
on these planning and zoning matters
during the public hearings at the July
7th Plan Commission meeting. The Plan
Commission will make recommenda-
tions for these matters, which will then
be reviewed by the Common Council for
fnal decisions on Monday, July 14th.
Contact Adam Sayre, Director of
Planning and Development, at 848-9941
for more information on these items or
to receive copies of the submittals.
Kami Scofeld,
City Clerk
Published: June 19 and 26, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
EXHIBIT A
NOTICE TO THE ELECTORS
OF THE VERONA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT DANE
COUNTY, WISCONSIN
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the School Board of the above-named
School District, at a meeting duly called,
noticed, held and conducted on June 16,
2014, adopted a resolution entitled:
RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE
BORROWING OF NOT TO EXCEED
$35,000,000; AND PROVIDING FOR THE
ISSUANCE AND SALE OF GENERAL
OBLIGATION PROMISSORY NOTES
THEREFOR
Said Resolution was adopted
pursuant to the provisions of Section
67.12(12), Wisconsin Statutes to autho-
rize a borrowing in an amount not to ex-
ceed $35,000,000 for the public purpose
of paying the cost of general and current
municipal expenses of the District con-
sisting of fnancing unfunded other post
employment benefts and supplemental
pension liabilities.
Copies of said Resolution are on
fle in the District offce, located at 700
North Main Street, Verona, Wisconsin
53593 and may be inspected weekdays,
except holidays, between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Section 67.12(12)(e)2, Wisconsin
Statutes provides in part that a referen-
dum is required on the question of this
borrowing only if a petition is fled within
30 days after this publication signed by
at least 7,500 District electors or 20% of
the District electors voting for Governor
at the last general election, whichever
is the lesser. If no such petition is fled,
then the Resolution shall be effective
without a referendum.
Dated this 16th day of June, 2014.
BY THE ORDER OF
THE SCHOOL BOARD
Kenneth L. Behnke
District Clerk
Published: June 19, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
C
A
N
C
E
L
E
D
LEGAL NOTICE – FOR SALE
Abandoned property by Robyn Gundersen from
Emerald Investments. Property includes various
miscellaneous items. Sale shall commence at
8:00 a.m. on July 7, 2014 at Cleary Building
Corp., 190 Paoli St., Verona, WI. Unit #30
a
d
n
o
=
3
5
6
7
0
6
-
0
1
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Add us on Facebook and
Twitter as “Verona Press”
June 19, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
19
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
1958 CRUISER, Inc. Holiday 250
16' Runabout w/1959 TeeNee Trailer.
1981 75hp Evinrude motor. Antique
wood, rare find. $7,000/obo
815-621-9592
CAMPING EQUIPMENT 4 person tent,
Coleman lantern, 4 sleeping bags,
ground tarp, water jug in storage box.
$80. 608-669-2243
FISH CANADA Kingfisher Resort.
Cottage-Boat-Motor-Gas/ $75. per
person/day. Call for specials. 800-452-
8824 www.kingfisherlodge.com
(wcan)
STOCK YOUR pond or lake now. Order
early. Varieties of Pan/Game fish. Forage
minnows. Aeration systems. Pond weed
control products. roeselerfishfarm.com
920-696-3090 (wcan)
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114
705 RENTALS
BROOKLYN BEAUTIFUL Modern
upper 1 bedroom apartment in quiet
neighborhood available August 1.
Stove, refrigerator, W/D included. $525.
per month plus $525.security deposit.
Utilities not included. 1 year lease. No
pets. No smoking. If interested call
608-669-2460
BROOKLYN DUPLEX 2 BR, 1BA, w/
appliances plus washer & dryer, full
basement not finished, C/A, $650/month
plus deposit utilities not included, 1 year
lease, no garage, off street parking, no
pets, no smoking.
608-669-2460.
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$725 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available
Now. Handicap Accesible 608-212-0829
STOUGHTON LARGE 2 Bedroom.
Beautiful kitchen and bath, appliances,
hardwoods, cathedral ceilings. Quiet,
private. No Smoking. 608-238-1692
SUN PRAIRIE Duplex 3BR, 2BA. Large
open kitchen, living room, large family
room w/fireplace. Walk out on ground
level, large deck off kitchen and din-
ing area. Located near high school and
shopping. Nice neighborhood. $1,295.
plus security deposit of 1/2 months rent.
Call Brady at 608-286-5282
VERONA 1&2 Bedroom Apartment $595-
740. in a small 24 unit building. Includes
heat, hot water, water & sewer, off-street
parking, fully carpeted, dishwasher and
coin operated laundry and storage in
basement. Convenient to Madison's west
side. Call KC at 608-273-0228 to view
your new home.
VERONA WESTRIDGE DUPLEX.
Deluxe 3 bedroom, 2000 sq. feet, 2.75
bath, family room, A/C, fireplace, deck,
2.5 garage. No pets. $1,325/mo. 608-
845-8914
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available for
spring/summer. Great central location.
On-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dishwash-
er and A/C. $720-$730/month. Call 255-
7100 or www.stevebrownapts.com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN Location
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, Laundry,
Heat and Water included.
$650./mo. Call 608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
730 CONDOS &
TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT
RANCH STYLE Condo- 416 New Age
Circle, Verona- 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
1380 SF with a full unfinished basement
for storage. One car attached garage,
includes all appliances, private entry
& deck.
Available immediately. $1500. rent per
month. Call Liz at 608-577-7526 or
e-mail lizishere@charter.net
740 HOUSES FOR RENT
BROOKLYN-OREGON Country Living.
3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch, 2 car garage,
A/C, $1000 + utilities pr/month. Security
deposit $1000, credit check, references.
No smoking, 1 small cat or dog under
25lbs. with $25 monthly fee. Available
Aug. 1st. 608-217-9186
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
760 MOBILE HOMES
HIGHLAND MOBILE HOME for sale.
Many high efficiency appliances and new
steel front door/storm. $10,000/OBO.
608-835-8552
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLAE. The
Verona Press Classifieds. Call 873-6671
or 835-6677.
820 MISC. INVESTMENT
PROPERTY FOR SALE
ABSOLUTE AUCTION 50 Acre Started
Tree Plantation in the Town of Harrison,
Waupaca Co.
Nolan Sales LLC, Marion, WI.
800-472-0290 WI Lic. Auctioneers #165
and #142 www.nolansales.com
for details. (wcan)
845 HOUSES FOR SALE
VERONA 119 N Main St. 2 story, 5BR,
1BA. $149,900 Contact 608-845-6685
870 RESIDENTIAL LOTS
OREGON BERGAMONT
Lot 442 with full exposure
Gated. By owner. Make offer!
608-212-2283

965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
2014 FIRST Crop hay, big square bales,
16% moisture, 21% protein, 151 RFV.
608-325-2656
970 HORSES
GOOD RIDING Mule, $400. Decker
Pack Saddle, $125. 10x10 Kennel.
507-259-7445
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
REGISTERED ANGUS Yearling and
Mature Bulls. All bulls are fertility tested
and have current EPD information. Bulls
are gentle and are from high quality
genetics.
815-266-6260
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
905 AUCTION SALE DATES
HUGE ESTATE SALE June 19-21
203 2nd St, Brooklyn, WI
9am-5pm
Entry numbers Thursday 8:15am
Four generations of collectibles
Cash only please.
Over 100 Pictures
at www.estatesale.com
Downsizers Estate Sales
815-766-1611
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Verona Press unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
Part-time. Excellent Wages
20+ hours/wk. CDL bonus program
Paid training/testing. Signing bonus.
5501 Femrite Dr. Madison
Call Paul at 608-310-4870 or email
paulm@badgerbus.com
EOE

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
& PARATRANSIT
DRIVERS
U
N
3
5
0
1
4
0
Injection Molding - Press Operator
Openings on First & Second Shift
The Press Operator is responsible for placing
inserts, picking, trimming, inspecting and
packaging small injection molded plastic parts.
Other responsibilities may include fnishing
operations at the press during production.
This position requires attention to detail and
dependable attendance.
Please stop at our corporate offce for more
information and to complete an application.
Equal Opportunity Employer
adno=355144-01
U
N
3
5
7
2
2
7
Dishwashers Needed
On a given day, Epic’s cafeteria can serve upwards of
3,200 people in our dining facility. As a member of our
dishwashing team, you’ll be working in a fast-paced,
air-conditioned environment helping to clean the
equipment and utensils needed to provide great food
and service to our co-workers.
Responsibilities include: cleaning and stocking
dishes, utensils, cooking equipment; miscellaneous
kitchen cleaning and additional job-related duties.
Epic offers competitive wages, full benefts, full-time
hours, and paid vacations. We’re looking for candidates
who are self-motivated, quick, and able to work 8 hour
shifts.
Apply online at careers.epic.com, or stop by to fll out an
application in person.
1979 Milky Way, Verona, WI 53593
Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.SummerWorkNow.com

Specialized Light Assembly, full or part-time
The work requires energetic people that can work on
their feet for periods of 4-6 hours, must have excellent
eye/hand coordination and hand/fnger dexterity. Work
requires assembling parts either individually or as part
of a team at the rate of 200 – 300 per hour. Work shifts
are 4 - 8 hours/day, Monday – Friday, between the hours
of 5 a.m. and 9 p.m.
Production Positions, Plastic Molding, full-time
This work requires operating plastic molding machines
in a high tech facility. Prior experience in plastic
manufacturing is required. Should be mechanically
inclined in order to help maintain the equipment as
necessary. Must have shift fexibility. EOE
Apply in person M-F, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Minitube of America, 419 Venture Ct., Verona, 845-
1502, or email your resumé to
hr@minitube.com.
U
N
3
5
3
7
5
0
For more information or to apply contact:
Please email resume to
b.kriel@callcpc.com or call 800-914-3755
*Must be over 24 years old
*Have a min 18 mos. tractor trailer exp. or
6 mos. T/T experience with a certificate
from an accredited truck driving school.
*Meet all DOT requirements.
*To be willing & able to unload freight
* $21.90/hour (Overtime after 8 hours)
or $0.4650/mile
* Full Benefits Package that includes:
Disability Ins., Dental, Life Ins., Health Ins.
with Prescription Card
* 401K Pension Program with Co. Contribution
* Paid Holidays & Vacation
* Home everyday except for occasional layover
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK.
The best drivers drive CPC
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
FULL TIME DRIVERS
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private Fleet Operation
based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreen’s stores
within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat.
a
d
n
o
=
3
5
6
7
1
6
-
0
1
Do You Like to Meet People?
Are You Up For A Challenge?
Can You Adapt To Change?
Are You Self-Motivated?
Do You Possess Computer Skills?
If you’ve answered yes, we are very interested in talking to you. We are seeking
candidates for a fex full-time opening in our Stoughton front offce. Responsibilities
for this position include but are not limited to selling and processing classifed ads,
selling special projects by phone, processing circulation data, receptionist duties
and proof reading.
We are an employee-owned company offering a competitive benefts package
including 401K, ESOP, vacation, and more.
If this fex full-time position interests you and you have the equivalent of a high
school diploma and at least two years of offce/computer experience plus a valid
driver’s license, send your resume today.
Apply online only at:
www.wcinet.com/careers
Woodward Communications, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Affrmative Action Employer. WCI maintains a tobacco-free campus. All qualifed persons are encouraged to apply.
STOUGHTON, WI OFFICE
U
N
3
5
6
2
5
4
Openings in DeForest and Dodgeville
$2,000 Signing Bonus
DeForest – Field Service Dispatch Supervisor
Dodgeville – Field Service Technician, Ag Technician

zieglercareers.com
CAREERS START HERE
An EEO Employer including
disability and veterans.
Candidates must possess a minimum of a valid driver’s license and high school
diploma/GED. Excellent wages, bonus plan and advancement opportunities,
along with a comprehensive beneft package, (paid retirement, 401K, medical,
life & AD&DF, etc.) Interested candidates must apply online at
www.ingrambarge.com under marine careers EOE/M/F/V/D
Join the Employer of Choice on the Inland Waterways
• Deckhands
• Culinary Cooks
• Vessel Engineers
• Towboat Pilots
(Fleet & Line Haul)
20 - The Verona Press - June 19, 2014
Come early for the
best selection!
1828 Sandhill Road, Oregon, WI
608-835-7569
Hours:
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
.
F
I
S
H

H
A
T
C
H
E
R
Y

R
D
.
CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on Sun-
rise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left on
Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Nether-
wood Road. Turn left and go through Oregon
past Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn right
and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left at
Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past Wal-
green’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.

It’s Time for Our Annual
Check out our weekly In-Store Specials!
Come and visit Wisconsin’s
Premier Grower of Quality
Bedding Plants and Hanging Baskets.
Thank you for supporting local agriculture
by shopping outside the box!
WE WILL BE OPEN JULY 4 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
10% off our
entire inventory
Annuals • Perennials
Garden Accent Items • Mulch • Potting Soil
U
N
2
7
9
5
7
9
10% Off Sale!
Summer Hours
Start June 23
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful