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4 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
JUNE 19, 2014
Volume 21 / Issue 8
NEWS 6 OBAMA’S LGBT EXECUTIVE ORDER
by Justin Snow
8 CONGRESSIONAL MOMENTUM
by Justin Snow
10 LANIER HOSTS TOWN HALL MEETING
by John Riley
14 COMMUNITY CALENDAR
SCENE 18 CHEF ART SMITH’S POWERBEAR PARTY
Photography by Ward Morrison
FEATURES 20 AMERICAN WATERS
Interview by Justin Snow
25 BALTIMORE PRIDE
Photography by Ward Morrison and
Aram Vartian
28 AN LGBT TRAVELLER’S GUIDE TO
CHARM CITY
by Troy Petenbrink
OUT ON THE TOWN 30 HAPPY TIMES
by Doug Rule
32 THE SINGING NURSE
by Doug Rule
34 SUCH PUSHOVERS
by Doug Rule
STAGE 36 UNHAPPY DAYS
by Doug Rule
GAMES 38 WAITING GAMES
by Rhuaridh Marr
PETS 41 INTERPETS
by Rhuaridh Marr
NIGHTLIFE 45 CLUB HIPPO’S POST-PRIDE PARTY
Photography by Ward Morrison
SCENE 53 THE STARS OF RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE
SEASON 6 AT TOWN
Photography by Ward Morrison
54 LAST WORD
5 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
6 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Obama Acts
After years of delay, Obama moves to prohibit federal contractors from
LGBT discrimination
President Barack Obama meets with Chief of Staff Denis McDonough in the Oval Office
by Justin Snow
P
RESIDENT BARACK OBAMA
will take executive action to pro-
hibit federal contractors from
LGBT workplace discrimination.
According to a White House official,
Obama has directed his staff to prepare an
executive order for his signature prohib-
iting federal contractors from discrimina-
tion on the basis of sexual orientation or
gender identity — a move long sought by
LGBT-rights advocates that builds upon
Obama’s legacy as the strongest LGBT
ally to ever occupy the White House.
“The action would build upon exist-
ing protections, which generally prohibit
federal contractors and subcontractors
from discriminating in employment deci-
sions on the basis of race, color, religion,
sex, or national origin,” the White House
official told Metro Weekly. “This is con-
sistent with the President’s views that
all Americans, LGBT or not, should be
treated with dignity and respect.”
For more than two years, Obama’s
White House has been forced to de-
fend a broken campaign promise made
by Obama when he was a candidate for
president in February 2008. It was then
that Obama filled out a presidential-
candidate questionnaire for the Hous-
ton GLBT Political Caucus indicating he
would support a nondiscrimination pol-
icy that includes sexual orientation and
gender identity for federal contractors.
In April 2012, White House senior advis-
er Valerie Jarrett told leaders from some
of the nation’s largest LGBT-rights orga-
nizations that Obama would not sign an
executive order prohibiting federal con-
tractors from discrimination on the ba-
sis of sexual orientation or gender iden-
tity. Since that meeting, the White House
has sought to defend its decision by tell-
ing supporters and the press that Obama
favors passage of comprehensive federal
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legislation in the form of the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) that
would protect nearly all workers, rather
than just employees of federal contrac-
tors. That argument hasn’t sat well with
LGBT activists, who have been some of
the president’s most passionate defend-
ers. They too support ENDA, but argue
signing an executive order is necessary
and a tangible step forward the president
could take now.
At the beginning of this year, Obama
announced a shifting strategy to use his
pen to take executive action when Con-
gress won’t act. While that strategy has
been applied to minimum wage, with
Obama signing an executive order to raise
minimum wage for federal contractors
while the White House still pushes for
federal legislation raising the minimum
wage for all Americans, and to narrow-
ing the income gap between genders, the
White House has found itself in a con-
tradictory position on the executive or-
der for LGBT federal contractors. Asked
in February by Metro Weekly why sign
an executive order raising the minimum
wage for federal contractors if the strat-
egy is comprehensive federal legislation,
White House press secretary Jay Carney
responded simply, “I take your point.”
That puzzling position grew more
complicated last month after Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden said in an interview with
The Huffington Post said he did not see
“any downside” to signing such an order,
but reiterated the need to pass ENDA.
The Senate approved ENDA 64-32 last
November, but the bill has languished in
the Republican-controlled House of Rep-
resentatives where Speaker John Boehner
has voiced his opposition to the bill and
refused to allow it to come up for a vote,
although the bill has continued to gain bi-
partisan support as recently as last week.
“Countless LGBT workers across the
country will be able to rest easier once
a strong executive order is in place, but
there is no denying that the time has
come to do even more,” HRC President
Chad Griffin said in a statement. “The
House of Representatives must seize this
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News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Senate Confirms Two Gay Black Judicial Nominees
25 Favorite Shots from the Capital Pride Fest
7 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
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When Obama does attach his signature
to that executive order, it will further ce-
ment his legacy on LGBT rights. The first
sitting American president to openly en-
dorse same-sex marriage, he has all but
ensured that a Democrat will never again
be able to run for the White House without
supporting marriage equality. Under his
direction, Attorney General Eric Holder,
the nation’s first African-American attor-
ney general, and the Justice Department
ceased defending the Defense of Mar-
riage Act (DOMA) in federal court. When
the Supreme Court heard arguments in
same-sex marriage cases for the first time
in March 2013, Obama’s solicitor general,
Donald Verrilli, urged the Supreme Court
justices to strike down DOMA as well as
California’s same-sex marriage ban. The
repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” bears his
signature, and the White House has indi-
cated his openness to at least a review of
the military’s existing ban on transgender
service. And early on Obama endorsed
ENDA and promised to sign it into law
when it reaches his desk.
“President Obama is proud of the ac-
complishments he and his Administration
have made to advance and promote equal-
ity, justice, and dignity for all members of
the LGBT community,” the White House
official said. “From signing an inclusive
Hate Crimes law to passing the Affordable
opportunity to immediately pass the Em-
ployment Non-Discrimination Act, and
we will continue to fight for the greatest
number of civil rights protections for the
greatest number of LGBT people around
the country.”
In 29 states it is legal to fire or refuse
employment to someone based on their
sexual orientation, and in 32 states it is
legal to do so based on their gender iden-
tity. About 20 percent of the American
workforce, amounting to around 28 mil-
lion workers, is employed by federal con-
tractors.
“The President has declared 2014 a
year of action – vowing to use the power
of his pen and phone to take action on be-
half of the American people to strengthen
the economy and the middle class,” the
White House official said. “His actions
have been driven by the core American
principle that if you work hard and play
by the rules, you should have the oppor-
tunity to succeed, and that your ability to
get ahead should be determined by your
hard work, ambition, and goals – not by
the circumstances of your birth, your sex-
ual orientation or gender identity.”
It is not yet clear when Obama will
sign the executive order, but with the
White House’s annual LGBT Pride
Month reception set for June 30, such an
event could provide an opportune setting.
Care Act, from reauthorizing the Violence
Against Women Act with provisions to
protect LGBT victims to ensuring equal-
ity in federal housing, we have taken many
important steps forward. While work re-
mains to ensure that all Americans, re-
gardless of sexual orientation or gender
identity, are equal under the law, we look
forward to continuing to make progress in
the months and years ahead.”
During a June 17 appearance at the
Democratic National Committee’s LGBT
Gala in New York City, Obama addressed
his decision to sign the executive order
and was greeted with a roar of applause
from supporters.
“Because in the United States of
America who you are and who you love
shouldn’t be a fireable offense,” Obama
said in explaining his decision to take ex-
ecutive action. Looking forward, Obama
said that ultimately it would be better if
Congress passed a more comprehensive
law in the form of ENDA.
“Don’t take the pressure off Con-
gress,” Obama continued. “This seems
to be a pattern these days. Everybody’s
just given up so much on Congress that
we end up doing something through ex-
ecutive order, and that’s helpful, but it
doesn’t reach everybody that needs to be
reached. Congress needs to start working
again.” l
JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Congressional Momentum
Bipartisan support for ENDA grows in the House
by Justin Snow
T
HE NUMBER OF HOUSE
Democrats who are not co-
sponsors of the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act
dropped to eight May 12 as Rep. Jim Costa
became the latest member of Congress
to attach his name to the piece of LGBT-
rights legislation.
The California Democrat’s support for
ENDA, which would prohibit most em-
ployers from discrimination on the basis
of sexual orientation and gender iden-
tity, came one day after the bill gained
its eighth Republican cosponsor in the
House of Representatives.
As first reported by The Advocate, GOP
Rep. Frank LoBiondo of New Jersey at-
tached his name to ENDA on May 11. Lo-
Biondo voted for ENDA in 2007, although
that version of the bill did not contain
protections for transgender Americans.
“The growing bipartisan support for
ENDA in the House continues to put
more and more pressure on Speaker
Boehner to act, and it’s never been clearer
to the LGBT community that only the
Speaker stands in the way,” Drew Ham-
mill, spokesperson for House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi, told Metro Weekly.
With Costa’s support, only eight Dem-
ocrats still do not cosponsor ENDA: Reps.
Dan Lipinksi (Ill.), John Barrow (Ga.),
Bennie Thompson (Miss.), Mike Mc-
Intyre (N.C.), Pete Gallego (Texas), Henry
Cuellar (Texas), Gene Green (Texas) and
Nick Rahall (W.Va.).
But while ENDA continues to gain sup-
port in the House, with its number of co-
sponsors up to 206, there remains no clear
path forward for its passage. Indeed, since
ENDA passed the Senate last November
with a 64-32 vote, the bill has languished
in the Republican-controlled House of
Representatives where Speaker John
Boehner has voiced his opposition to the
bill and refused to allow it to come up for
a vote. (ENDA supporters inside and out-
side Congress have insisted that if Repub-
licans allowed ENDA to come to the floor
for a vote, it would have the votes to pass.)
Following the surprising primary de-
feat of House Majority Leader Eric Can-
tor (R-Va.) last week by a tea party chal-
lenger, the prospect of progressive legis-
lation advancing this Congress became
even more unlikely. Although Cantor was
not a supporter of ENDA, according to a
political operative close to ENDA strategy
in the House, many members are in the
process of making personal calculations
on whether to attach their names to the
bill as cosponsors, which in some cases
could mean putting their heads on the
chopping block.
“Cantor’s loss has complicated the
landscape and definitely put progressive
issues in peril,” the operative said.
While the chances of progressive leg-
islation advancing in the current Con-
gress continue to dwindle, a debate has
reemerged among activists over the scope
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10
tion. But while they argue ENDA’s reli-
gious exemption as written is broader
than it is under Title VII of the 1964 Civil
Rights Act for other minority groups and
would open the door to LGBT discrimi-
nation in places far beyond churches and
synagogues, narrowing ENDA’s religious
exemption could also cause shaky Repub-
lican support to collapse entirely.
“For me, my job is I’m a mathematician
trying to get to 218 votes,” out Rep. Mark
Pocan (D-Wisc.) told Metro Weekly. “And
if that’s the issue then we need to figure
out how to get something done in this
current environment. Either you change
who is in those seats, which is something
I’m working on for this fall, or we at least
try to get something done as broad as pos-
sible, which can then be improved in the
future when we have those opportunities.
But certainly sitting back isn’t an option.”
According to Pocan, the discussion
taking place over the religious exemption
is important, but that plank of ENDA has
proven just as important during his dis-
cussions with potential Republican sup-
porters like Rep. Paul Ryan (Wisc.). “My
particular role and those in Congress is
getting to that magic 218,” Pocan said.
The religious exemption as written
also has a track record of success. Indeed,
last November ENDA passed the Senate
with the support of 10 Republicans — the
most Senate Republicans to ever vote for a
of ENDA’s religious exemption — a point
of contention that has long plagued the
bill as currently written.
The American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU), Lambda Legal, the National
Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR) and
the Transgender Law Center released a
joint statement in April 2013 “expressing
very grave concerns with the religious ex-
emption in ENDA.”
“It could provide religiously affili-
ated organizations – far beyond houses of
worship – with a blank check to engage
in employment discrimination against
LGBT people,” the statement continued.
“It gives a stamp of legitimacy to LGBT
discrimination that our civil rights laws
have never given to discrimination based
on an individual’s race, sex, national ori-
gin, age, or disability. This sweeping, un-
precedented exemption undermines the
core goal of ENDA by leaving too many
jobs, and LGBT workers, outside the
scope of its protections.”
They argued, for example, that the
religious exemption as written could al-
low for a Catholic hospital that employs
people of other faiths to still be able to fire
or refuse to hire an LGBT person.
The legal groups NCLR and the
Transgender Law Center, which both
lauded ENDA’s passage in the Senate last
year, have since rescinded their support
for the bill due to the religious exemp-
piece of LGBT-rights legislation — in part
due to the religious exemption. When the
religious exemption was adopted with
a 402-25 vote in 2007 as an amendment
in the House proposed by Rep. George
Miller (D-Calif.), it received the backing
of not only Democrats like Nancy Pelosi,
Barney Frank and Tammy Baldwin, but
Republicans like John Boehner, Eric Can-
tor and Paul Ryan.
“ENDA in its current form is a biparti-
san compromise and one that passed the
United States Senate with a strong bipar-
tisan vote,” said Drew Hammill, Pelosi’s
spokesperson.
Regardless of the growing debate over
ENDA’s religious exemption, advocates
say it is imperative to continue to gather
cosponsors so as to put members of Con-
gress on the record absent a House vote
on ENDA this session.
“The increasing support is in part due
to all of the huge momentum we’re see-
ing across the country for LGBT equal-
ity overall,” Fred Sainz, vice president of
the Human Rights Campaign, told Metro
Weekly. “Members see this as the moral
thing to do and the politically advanta-
geous thing to do as well to sign up as a
supporter of this bill. And that’s some-
thing we should continue to take advan-
tage of so by the end of this session we
can have as many cosponsors on the re-
cord as possible.” l
JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Lanier Hosts Town Hall Meeting
MPD chief meets with community activists to discuss LGBT issues, police procedure
by John Riley
M
ETROPOLITAN POLICE
Department Chief Cathy
Lanier, several depart-
ment heads within MPD,
government leaders and community ac-
tivists from within the LGBT community
came together on Tuesday, June 10 at the
Department of Employment Services
headquarters for the first-of-its-kind
meeting to discuss issues related to polic-
ing and the department's interaction with
LGBT people.
The meeting, which was moderated
by local radio host Sheila Alexander-Reid,
served as an open forum for a number of
activists who had long raised concerns
about police treatment of LGBT people,
particularly LGBT victims of crime.
Lanier fielded many questions related
to violent incidents, particularly those
committed against members of the Dis-
trict's transgender community, noting that
there had been twelve prominent trans-
gender murders in the past decade, five of
which were closed with an arrest of a sus-
pect. Lanier said that the remaining cases
remain "active and open," but cautioned
that while police have some strong leads
in those cases, they do not have enough
evidence needed to make an arrest.
"We really live in a CSI generation
now," Lanier said, referring to a popular
TV drama. "But there a just a few things
that will determine whether we can close
a homicide: Is there a witness? Did some-
body see what happened? ...Is there physi-
cal evidence? Is there some other infor-
mation that people in the community can
give us that will lead to information or
eyewitnesses...?"
Lanier also tackled the issue of police
conduct, urging members of the LGBT
community to file complaints against offi-
cers who either refuse to take action when
a crime is committed, or who mistreat or
use anti-LGBT language against victims
of crimes. Lanier said that, in either case,
penalties can range from a significant sus-
pension to termination. Those who feel
they have been mistreated have the option
of reporting to MPD within 90 days, or to
the Office of Police Complaints, an external
office within District government tasked
with receiving, investigating and mediating
various complaints involving MPD officers,
within 45 days of the incident.
The biggest task for Lanier and many
of the officers in attendance at the com-
munity meeting was addressing how
they seek to implement the recommen-
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12
of their routine policing.
Lanier also told the audience that
MPD realized that some of the officers
in its GLLU-affiliate program - meaning
those who have undergone LGBT-sen-
sitivity training and are stationed in in-
dividual police districts but who are not
part of the GLLU core staff - were not a
good fit for the program, and cut those
individuals from the affiliate program.
She said MPD is hoping to find newer af-
filiates who are a better match as a way of
finding officers who will be able to build
relationships with community members
and earn their trust over time.
Most activists in attendance, includ-
ing several from organizations like Help-
ing Individual People Survive (HIPS),
the DC Trans Coalition (DCTC), and
Gays and Lesbians Opposing Violence
(GLOV), seemed to view the meeting and
the interaction with law enforcement of-
ficers as a positive.
“I think it was a great first step to
bridge the gap between MPD and the
transgender community, to build trust
between the two,” Paul Tupper, chair of
GLOV, said following the meeting “...I
think the conversation was candid, and I
walked away learning a lot.” l
"You can't listen to a story like that
and not be affected if you have a heart,"
Lanier said. "You want cops to hear com-
pelling stories."
Lanier also made news when she
agreed to attend the Nov. 20 Day of Trans-
gender Remembrance in person, as part
of an effort to make herself more visible
and accessible to the community. And she
told the audience that MPD is no longer
standing behind legislation that allowed
the creation of "prostitution-free zones,"
(PFZs) which allow police to declare cer-
tain areas as PFZs in order to force people
to disperse from an area.
"We don't use them anymore anyway,
so they can get rid of them," Lanier said,
referring to the D.C. Council, which is
slated to hear a bill aimed at repealing
PFZs. That bill, co-introduced by Coun-
cilmembers David Grosso (I-At-Large),
David Catania (I-At-Large) and Mary
Cheh (D-Ward 3), could still face an up-
hill battle, as Council Chairman Phil
Mendelson has previously indicated he
believes PFZs are useful in disrupting
the sex trade by forcing people to dis-
perse, even though high-ranking officials
in MPD have testified before the Council
that MPD is no longer using PFZs as part
dations made by the Anti-Defamation
League (ADL) Hate Crimes Assessment
Task Force, which, at Lanier's behest,
conducted an external review of MPD's
responses to crimes involving members
of the LGBT community that may be mo-
tivated by bias. Sgt. Matthew Mahl, head
of the MPD's Gay and Lesbian Liaison
Unit (GLLU), told those attending the
meeting that the department is looking
at best practices and incorporating those
into its LGBT-related sensitivity training
for new officer recruits. While in previ-
ous years, sensitivity training was carried
out by an all-volunteer squad comprised
of civilians at personal cost, Lanier said
the department is going to shoulder more
of the responsibility for carrying out such
trainings, though she did say that there
was a possibility that they might ask com-
munity activists to develop pre-recorded
trainings to assist in this effort.
But Lanier added that she wants train-
ees to hear personal stories from people
who have experienced violence, discrimi-
nation, or police mistreatment in order
for them to understand how best to deal
with the community, recalling how she
was personally moved by a story told by
local transgender activist Ruby Corado.
JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
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SUNDAY, JUNE 22
CHICK CHAT, a lesbian, age 50+ singles group,
takes a trip to the Maryland Institute College of Art.
Admission is free. Meet at 1301 W. Mt. Royal Ave.,
Baltimore, Md. 2-3 p.m. Rain or shine. RSVP by
emailing woernerc@yahoo.com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
Join LINCOLN CONGREGATIONAL TEMPLE –
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST for an inclusive,
loving and progressive faith community every
Sunday. 11 a.m. 1701 11th Street NW, near R in
Shaw/Logan neighborhood. lincolntemple.org.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,
8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas
Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.
MONDAY, JUNE 23
WEEKLY EVENTS
Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a
program of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. No cost, newcomers
welcome. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary, 1200 S St. NW.
dcscandals.wordpress.com.
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. No appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012
14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social
group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Contact Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. More info, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SATURDAY, JUNE 21
The DC Center hosts its LGBT ASYLUM
SEEKERS/ASYLEES FORUM for asylum seekers
and refugees. The DC Center. 2000 14th St. NW,
Suite 105. 7-9 p.m. thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
LGBT community, holds Saturday morning Shabbat
services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush luncheon.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/
time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,
Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. dignitynova.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite
411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For appointments other
hours, call 301-422-2398.
THURSDAY, JUNE 19
SMYAL Allies hosts second annual SMYAL FOR
SUMMER fundraiser. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Josephine
Butler Parks Center, 2437 15th St. NW. 202-567-
3156. smyal.org
WEEKLY EVENTS
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m.
Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia social
group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in Reston,
11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor bar, 7-9
p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410
7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
FRIDAY, JUNE 20
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session
at Hains Point, 927 Ohio Dr. SW. 6:30-8 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m.
The DC Center, 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. 202-
682-2245, gaydistrict.org.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 5-7 p.m. 2049
N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington. Appointments:
703-789-4467.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
testing@smyal.org.
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE
SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000
14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening
affinity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-
0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets
7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
TUESDAY, JUNE 24
WEEKLY EVENTS
A COMPANY OF STRANGERS, a theater chorus,
meets 7:30-9:30 p.m. A GLBTA and SATB looking
for actors, singers, crew. Open Hearth Foundation,
1502 Massachusetts Ave. SE. Charles, 240-764-
5748. sites.google.com/site/charlesbutler333/
acompanyofstrangers
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
15 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
HISTORIC CHRIST CHURCH offers Wednesday
worship 7:15 a.m. and 12:05 p.m. All welcome.
118 N. Washington St., Alexandria. 703-549-1450,
historicchristchurch.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave. Walk-
ins 2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call
Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978.
JOB CLUB, a weekly support program for job
entrants and seekers, meets at The DC Center. 2000
14th St. NW, Suite 105. 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. More info,
www.centercareers.org.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. No appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012
14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 11 a.m.-
2 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington.
Appointments: 703-789-4467.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316. l
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
holds monthly meeting. The DC Center. 2000 14th
St. NW, Suite 105. 6-7 p.m. thedccenter.org.
Center Faith and Center Global, programs of The
DC Center, present LGBT ASYLUM: HOW FAITH
COMMUNITIES CAN RESPOND. 2000 14th St.
NW, 2nd floor Community Room. 7-8:30 p.m.
thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session
at Hains Point, 927 Ohio Dr. SW. 7-8:30 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.
DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary, 1200 S St. NW.
dcscandals.wordpress.com.
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/
Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social club
serving greater D.C.’s LGBT community and allies
hosts an evening run/walk. dcfrontrunners.org.
THE GAY MEN’S HEALTH COLLABORATIVE
offers free HIV/STI screening every 2nd and 4th
Tuesday. 5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday LGBT
Clinic, Alexandria Health Department, 4480 King
St. 703-321-2511, james.leslie@inova.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy
Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
16
LGBTCommunityCalendar
JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
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17 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
18 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
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Chef Art Smith’s
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Thursday, June 5
Liaison Capitol Hill
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
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21 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
It started with a tweet.
At 11:18 a.m. on May 16, 2012, the indie rock band Here We Go Magic announced on Twitter that they had
picked up a hitchhiker somewhere in eastern Ohio. “Just picked up John Waters hitchhiking in the middle of
Ohio. No joke. Waters in the van,” the band tweeted. Photos of Waters, with his signature pencil-thin mustache,
soon followed.
It wouldn’t take long for the news that cult filmmaker and renaissance man John Waters, perhaps best known
for his movies Hairspray and Pink Flamingos, was hundreds of miles from his Baltimore home, holding a piece
of cardboard with “End of 70 West” scrawled on it and apparently hitchhiking cross country, to go viral. For
those familiar with Waters, who has been affectionately dubbed “The Pope of Trash,” ”The Sultan of Sleaze” and
“The Baron of Bad Taste” during his nearly five-decades long career, the news was greeted with puzzlement, but
also an apparent sense of understanding. “Director John Waters hitchhiking in Ohio… why?” The Baltimore Sun
asked. “It’s so weird, it can only be true.”
Waters was at the start of a journey across America. Days earlier, he had walked out of his home in Baltimore
at the crack of dawn and set out for his apartment in San Francisco — some 2,850 miles away. Although no
stranger to hitchhiking, Waters didn’t know how long it would take or when he would see the city he has come
to be so synonymous with again.
“I thought it might take a month or two, which was really discouraging because in the beginning it was much
harder the second and third day in Ohio, and through Kansas and Missouri,” says Waters. “It got really tough.”
Instead, it took him nine days and 21 rides to reach San Francisco, with some of his generous drivers posting
photos of Waters along the way, and others never having a clue who he was.
Two years after his trip west, Waters has published Carsick, chronicling what he calls his “hobo-homo jour-
ney.” Part fiction, as Waters offers readers an outlandish glimpse into his mind in vintage Waters fashion, detail-
ing his best and worst case scenarios (we’ll get to the part about his magic asshole shortly), the book is also an
homage to a lost American pastime of getting into cars with strangers.
And with the 68-year-old Baltimore legend seemingly as ready for an adventure as ever (and annoyed with a
culture overdosing on political correctness), Waters hopes others will stick out their thumbs and share in the fun
this summer — even if it’s just for a trip down the street to Whole Foods.
G
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METRO WEEKLY: What possessed you to hitchhike across
America and write a book about it?
JOHN WATERS: I have a soft spot for hitchhiking. I did
a lot when I was young. I did it in Provincetown way
later in life as an adventure and as a date — I’d ask
people to go hitchhiking with me. And then I thought
of the idea of really having the nerve to try it again and
to hitchhike across the whole country. I’ve had a life
of hitchhiking. I’ve always liked it. I’ve always found
it sexy, romantic, even dangerous and adventurous. A
reality show before there was such a thing.
MW: Did you ever take a first date out hitchhiking?
WATERS: No, but I’m not saying I wouldn’t. As a matter
of fact, maybe I’ll try that this summer. I usually took
friends. Once I took Patricia Hearst with me. But I
think it would be a romantic first date to take someone
hitchhiking. Most definitely. And it would be different,
it would be a different first date.
MW: It definitely would be different.
WATERS: Especially if something terrible happened and
you rescued them.
MW: That could be a moment for some real heroism.
When you went to your publisher with this idea, you
write in the book that it was a very short pitch. What
was their reaction?
WATERS: Their reaction was “Yes.” And that’s one thing
American Waters
After a cross county hitchhiking adventure,
cult flmmaker and author John Waters
pays homage to a lost American pastime
Interview by Justin Snow
7
22 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
I learned a long time ago. I had a movie producer who once said
to me, “Whenever they say yes, never ask one question and get
away before they can say no.”
MW: The beginning of the book is fiction, with your best and worst
expectations. How did the actual experience live up to those expec-
tations?
WATERS: Like all things, fantasies are better left undone. You
need to save one fantasy. You should die with one fantasy left
that you didn’t do. But fantasies are extreme, especially when
you ask me to think up the worst.
That’s a challenge — the worst and the best are tough. It’s
like when people ask about the ten best films ever. It’s a tough
choice. So I had to go through a lot of thinking to think what
would be the most interesting to me and be a varied thing so it
wasn’t all the same. I also tried to make it funny. The
sex in the book is, I think, funny. The best is I have
a sex in a car in a demolition derby, I’m with
an exhibitionist bank robber and I get anally
raped by a spaceman and have a magic ass-
hole and my magic asshole later sings a
duet with Connie Francis. Do I really
expect that to happen in real life?
No, I don’t. But it’s a fantasy.
And the worst would be
having diarrhea when
you’re hitchhiking. That
would be really ter-
rible. And getting
picked up by sports
fanatics or getting
trapped in Kansas, a state I
really like but sodomy for men
and women or any couples is still
illegal there.
All of the stuff in the fiction was
true as far as the location and how long
it would take me to get there. We spent a
lot of time researching it so the timing would
be accurate. I did do a lot of research for the fic-
tional parts.
MW: What was the reaction from your family and friends
or staff to you doing this?
WATERS: The staff was opposed to me doing this, but what could
they say? They work for me. I didn’t tell my family until just
before, but they are so used to anything really. I didn’t tell my
mother until it had broken in the press and I kind of had to. She
wasn’t upset because hitchhiking was not bad to her. When I
went to private school all the kids hitchhiked home. It was a
normal thing to do then.
Now, reading the book, nothing is more mortifying than
having your employees read your insane sexual fantasies. My
mother unfortunately died this year — she was 91, she had a
great life. But the only good thing I can think about my mother
dying is she wasn’t meant to read this book. She would be proud,
though, because I just found out today it’s number 12 on The
New York Times Best Seller list, which really startled me. My
mother would be really happy, and my dad, too.
MW: It seems hitchhiking has become rather taboo. What do you
think happened?
WATERS: What happened is there are serial killers that pick up
women who are hitchhiking alone, who are sometimes hookers.
There’s The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Even in my own movies,
in the hitchhiking scenes, something horrible happens to the
hitchhiker. It’s an easy villain, it’s an easy drama, and it’s an easy
danger to imagine. I don’t think it’s really probably any more
unsafe than it ever was.
I’ve been doing this book tour where I do lots of radio, and
many people have called in with their hitchhiking experiences.
And most everybody has great ones. Once a couple even met
hitchhiking and got married. But then there’s scary ones, too,
every once and awhile. Nothing bad ever happened to me hitch-
hiking. Once somebody pulled a gun and shot it out the window,
but I just thought, “Oh this is so Joan Didion.” People came onto
me when I was young — and sometimes I said yes.
MW: Did you have any gay experiences on this hitchhiking trip?
WATERS: Not one. And as far as I know, not one gay per-
son picked me up on this trip. A single woman did, a black
person did, a cop did, a trucker. But no gay brothers.
MW: What do you think that says about gay people?
WATERS: They’re pussies! [Laughs.] I don’t know, it’s just maybe
luck, but I was surprised in a way. Not that I thought some-
body was going to pick me up and come onto me, I wasn’t
expecting that, but I imagined in one of the [book’s
fictional] parts that I fall in love with a door-to-door
knife salesman. I don’t know what the answer to
that question is though. And how do I know if
they were gay or not, but I pretty much never
felt that they were.
MW: Tell me about the morning where
you woke up and said, “This is the
day,” and walked out of your Balti-
more home.
WATERS: Well I felt like a fool, actually.
I was so afraid the neighbors would see
me. It was six in the morning, it was incred-
ibly quiet and there was no one on the street.
I walked to the corner and there were no cars. I
had to stand there for 15 minutes before a car came
by. And then no cars stopped. I was two blocks from my
house at that point because I had walked to another corner
and I thought it would be a little busier and it wasn’t. All of the
cars were coming into the city, not leaving it because it was so
early in the morning. And then I just stood there and it started to
rain and I thought, “I never imagined this.”
But I couldn’t go home. I said I was doing it. So I just stood
there. It took me an hour maybe before the first ride. But it never
seemed real until the end of the second ride because I really
didn’t know where I was when I got dropped off, and that’s
when you’re really hitchhiking. Because you know the streets
and everything but then you really realize you’re on a long jour-
ney cross country when you know you’re on Route 70 but you
don’t know where you are really.
MW: Would you do it all over again?
WATERS: There’s no reason to do it all over again. There couldn’t
be a sequel to this book because it would be the same thing. But
I know I can hitchhike and I do know I would again if I had to if
something weird happened. But I knew that even before I wrote
the book. Now, I think if I went hitchhiking, people would think
I’m just promoting the book, so I can’t do it anymore.
MW: When was the last time you yourself picked up a hitchhiker?
WATERS: That’s a good question. It was in Provincetown and it
was, I assume, a lesbian who looked great. She was just going
home from the beach. And I saw her other days so I saw that she
did do this. And there’s another woman in Provincetown and
she is Forrest Gump. All she does is walk from Truro to Prov-
incetown and back. And that’s a far distance but she really is like
“I’ve
had a life
of hitchhiking.
I’ve always liked it.
I’VE ALWAYS FOUND
IT SEXY, ROMANTIC, EVEN
DANGEROUS AND
ADVENTUROUS.
A reality show before there
was such a
thing.”
23 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
Forrest Gump and I picked her up once.
MW: What makes you pick up or not pick up a hitchhiker?
WATERS: First thing, if they’re cute that helps. Second-
ly, if they look like you’d like them, that you’d want to
be their friend, that helps. The third one is the surprise
of it. If it’s somebody you figure could really use your
help and doesn’t look scary — if they’re not escapees.
And that’s the thing, if you just saw someone on the
interstate walking around with no luggage or anything,
I wouldn’t pull over, either. The main thing is not to
scare people, basically. Look interesting.
MW: This is your seventh book. Your last book, Role
Models, came out four years ago.
WATERS: And it’s in its eighth printing. And Carsick has
had three printings and it has only been out a week.
It’s exciting.
MW: It seems you’re very much becoming John Waters
the author.
WATERS: But wasn’t I always? I wrote all my movies.
MW: I was going to ask, should we expect another John
Waters film one day?
WATERS: Who knows, you probably have a better
chance of getting another John Waters book, but I
have meetings about movies still, and I have meetings
about TV shows. So I hope so, but I have other ways to
tell stories. I do my spoken word show, I have photog-
raphy shows. I have lots of ways to tell my stories and
I always think you need to have many careers because
the business in each one of them changes and you’ve
got to be ready to go the next week, which luckily I
have been. And, you know, I was a journalist for a long
time. And if worst came to worst, if everything fails, I’d
go work in a bookshop again. If I could find one that’s
still open.
MW: Is there any one of those vocations you enjoy more
than anything else?
WATERS: The writing. I wrote my movies, I wrote my
books. It’s the one thing all of them share. But with
writing I have to think up stuff every day. It doesn’t
matter which career I’m in, I’ve got to think up stuff.
MW: I think it was Dorothy Parker who said she loved having writ-
ten but wasn’t exactly a fan of the writing process.
WATERS: Every morning I go into my room and write. It doesn’t
matter if I’m writing a book or a movie, I’ve got to think up
something every morning. I’ve got to think of something. So I do
write every morning and to me it’s not harder to write a book or
a movie, they’re the same.
MW: I wanted to talk to you a bit about Baltimore. What’s your
take on how the gay community in Baltimore evolved since you
were a kid?
WATERS: I’m not the person to ask because I don’t go to gay bars
much. All the gay people I like go to mixed bars. They go to hip-
ster bars. The young people today divide going to straight and
gay bars, which I think is healthy. I like redneck bars here. In
Provincetown, I go to the straight bars because I like minorities.
I’m not the person to ask about the gay community, which
I’m certainly for and they’ve been incredibly supportive and
everything. I miss the gay bookshop that isn’t here anymore.
Certainly I’ve been to The Hippo. I miss going to Leon’s, the old-
est gay bar in the world — there’s still people in there I knew 50
years ago, still sitting on the same stool having the same drink.
I’m for that. I always wanted the Leon’s sign that was out front.
I wanted to give it to Pat Moran for her birthday.
I have great memories here of Howard Street with Pencil and
Cleopatra and all the street queens I wrote about in Role Models.
So, I like neighborhood gay bars. There’s one in Highlandtown,
I forget the name, and if I had to pick my favorite gay bar in
Baltimore I would pick that one. And I do miss the Port in the
Storm, which used to be the scariest lesbian bar, but no longer
is really like that. I miss the old school hustler bars. Now every-
thing is more generic, it’s safe, it’s nice, it’s politically correct and
everything.
MW: You mention how everything is politically correct —
WATERS: And gayly correct.
MW: Right. And it seems that things have gotten very mainstream.
Last time you spoke to Metro Weekly in 2009 you were asked
about the marriage equality movement and you said it was being
fought badly because the movement kept losing.
WATERS: But then I went with [Gov. Martin] O’Malley and cam-
paigned and we won, which was great.
MW: And marriage equality is winning all over the place now. So
I’m curious what your thoughts are on the state of LGBT rights?
WATERS: Well, of course I’m for gay marriage. Straight and gay
people both understand how hard it is to find someone to fall in
love with. Why would anyone’s love threaten someone? That is
a mystery to me. But at the same time, because we can now get
married, doesn’t mean we have to. I know so many people who
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24 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
have known someone a week and they’re rushing out to get gay
married. Well, in California, we have no-fault divorce. It is a
hustler’s feeding frenzy of gold-digging. Be careful, there’s gay
divorce, there’s gay alimony now. You don’t have to get married.
I always joke that the new minority that’s going to be the
most hated, besides transsexuals who feel they made an irra-
tional decision and want to reverse the operation, are gay men
who can be married but don’t want to. So I think we might have
to team up here and fight against a new kind of discrimination.
I find it delightful, I love weird strips within the gay commu-
nity. This to me is great, the obscure battle of minority culture.
I find great interest in it, the same way all the radical feminists
were my favorite. I loved all that kind of writing and I still love it.
MW: Being gay no longer seems like the subversive lifestyle it once
was. We’ve talked about marriage equality, and now we have
three gay Republicans running for Congress. Has the movement
lost its edge a bit?
WATERS: In some ways it was fun when it was illegal and we’d
have police battles and stuff, but it’s progress and I am for every
bit of progress. I think it’s making everything better. It might
make it duller sometimes, but it’s still better. That’s what always
happens with success. The punch is gone, the newness of it is
gone, but it’s assimilated and eventually there might not even be
gay bars anymore. It’s like having a black bar. Do they have them
now? I’ve always hated segregation and been radically against it.
MW: You’ve lived in Baltimore, New York, San Francisco and
you’ve mentioned Provincetown. And now you’ve hitchhiked
across middle America. Where do you think the best place to be gay
is and how did the middle of the country compare with those east
and west coast cities?
WATERS: I’ve always thought Baltimore is the best place to be,
gay or straight. Gay because the boys are the cutest here, they’re
the most open-minded and everyone’s not so defined. It’s also
the only city in the country that’s still cheap — and it’s conve-
niently located.
The difference in middle America was that everybody was as
progressive and open-minded, although in a very different way,
than any radical, sexual fighters that I know on both the east and
west coasts. People were incredibly open-minded, they just did
not like freeloaders, which is odd because hitchhiking is free-
loading. As long as you worked and believed in something and
stuck up for it, they might not even believe in what you believe
in, but they wanted you to define yourself. The only thing they
all bitched about was people who didn’t work.
MW: You’ve decided to stick around Baltimore your whole life,
whereas a lot of people seem to get up and move.
WATERS: Yeah but they all come back.
MW: Baltimore kind of has the reputation as D.C.’s ugly little
brother.
WATERS: I’ve always said that everybody in Washington thinks
Baltimore is hillbillies and everybody in Baltimore thinks Wash-
ington is square. And they’re both right. They don’t mix. It’s too
scary, that Baltimore-Washington expressway. There’s too many
drunken drivers.
It is odd how little they mix. They mix with the museums,
they mix with the art world, but as far as I know — and I think
this is true — is if anybody is going to go away from Washington
they go to New York and if anybody is going away from Bal-
timore they go to New York. They don’t
really go back and forth that much.
MW: Why do you think that is?
WATERS: Maybe it’s the same way L.A. and
San Francisco don’t like each other. And
it might not be that they don’t like each
other, but I still get lost in Washington and
I think in both cities you’ve got to watch
your back. But that’s not it. Both cities can
be dangerous.
I like Washington. I go there, but you
see, I always used have to go there to go to
the movies because you couldn’t see a lot of
movies here. But everywhere now is cool.
You don’t have to leave wherever you live
to catch up with art or movies because of
the Internet and the global community, so in a way everywhere
is being reinvented now.
I was just there in Washington yesterday driving around in
neighborhoods I remember as being scary neighborhoods and,
like everywhere else, they’re fancy now. That’s good in some
ways because if that didn’t happen, it’d be Detroit — and I under-
stand it probably is really fun to live in Detroit now if you’re not
poor, because there has to be an artist community there that’s
thriving, there has to be people who moved there looking to do
something new, whereas it’s pretty hard to want to do something
new and move to New York with how much it costs. I have an
apartment there and I love it but I couldn’t afford to move there
today for what it costs.
MW: Working in the arts and entertainment industry, has it become
more difficult to surprise people and maintain that reputation?
WATERS: I don’t even ever try. But, to be honest, if you read
Carsick there are scenes in there — I do have a magic anus that
sings Connie Francis — I don’t think I’ve exactly gone fully
mainstream. But the fact that that could be a New York Times
best-seller is startling. And I haven’t changed.
MW: What surprises you?
WATERS: Only bad things surprise me. Stupid things. Romantic
comedies, racism, people who could possibly be against gay
adoption. How could you be against that? A child is better in an
orphanage?
But you don’t preach — you make people laugh and they listen
to you. Nobody gets mad at me anymore. I can go on these talk
shows and say the most ludicrous things — nobody gets mad,
because I’m not mean.
MW: Is that the key, just being good to people?
WATERS: It is. And making fun of things you love. There’s enough
things to hate.
Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America (Farrar, Straus
and Giroux) sells for $26 and is available at Amazon.com, Barne-
sandNoble.com and other online retailers. l
“I’ve always thought
Baltimore is the best place to be,
gay or straight.
THE BOYS ARE THE CUTEST HERE,
THEY’RE THE MOST OPEN-MINDED,
and everyone’s not so defned.”
25 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
BaltimorePride
Saturday, June 14
Photography by
Ward Morrison
and Aram Vartian
26 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
27 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
BaltimorePride
28 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
H
OURS AFTER MARYLANDERS VOTED FOR THE
legalization of same-sex marriage in November 2012,
Baltimore’s tourism officials announced the launch
of a special website — baltimore.org/lgbt-weddings
— to provide information for same-sex couples seeking to marry
and also promote the state’s largest city as a venue for their
weddings.
While the LGBT marriage marketing effort was viewed as a
groundbreaking campaign to some, Baltimore has been actively
pursuing gay travelers for a number of years – touting its cultur-
al attractions, restaurants, nightlife and accommodations. And
the best way to learn about Baltimore and to gauge its “LGBT-
friendliness” is to visit.
See
With more than 20 museums and galleries located in the heart
of Baltimore, arts and culture lovers can find plenty of ways to
spend their time in Charm City. Two world-class museums, the
BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART and the WALTERS ART MUSEUM, have
permanently eliminated admission fees, so that the treasures
inside can be enjoyed by everyone. Visitors can also explore the
history of pop culture at GEPPI’S ENTERTAINMENT MUSEUM, which
includes a section on gay Baltimorean filmmaker John Waters,
or view nontraditional, original works by self-taught artists at
the AMERICAN VISIONARY ART MUSEUM.
Baltimore’s most popular attraction is the NATIONAL AQUAR-
IUM. Its living collection includes over 17,000 animals from
more than 750 species of fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and
mammals all residing in award-winning, naturalistic habitats.
The aquarium is an anchor attraction for downtown Baltimore’s
Inner Harbor, where visitors can also explore the Maryland SCI-
ENCE CENTER, tour the USS CONSTELLATION (the only Civil War
ship still afloat), and catch a water taxi to historic Fort McHenry.
Eat
You can’t even think about dining in Baltimore without the
thought of crab cakes popping into your head. FAIDLEY SEAFOOD’s
lump meat Maryland style crab cakes are among the best you’ll
find in the city. A family-owned and operated business since
1886, it’s located in downtown Baltimore’s Lexington Market.
Just north of the Inner Harbor area is Baltimore’s Midtown
district and where visitors will find CITY CAFÉ on Cathedral
Street. Serving contemporary American cuisine, the gay-owned
cafe always draws a crowd. Another Midtown option is SASHA’S
on N. Charles Street. Sasha’s, too, has a creative American menu
that counts John Waters among its fans. In addition to its full-
service restaurant, Sasha’s also operates a café at CENTER STAGE,
the state theater of Maryland and Baltimore’s largest profes-
sional producing theater.
CAFÉ HON, in Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood, gives
a campy nod to the historic local culture and dialect of
“Bawlmer.” In addition to serving up good American comfort
food, the restaurant started Honfest, now a nationally recog-
nized annual weekend street festival that includes a Best Hon
pageant (picture the women from Hairspray) and attracts plenty
of attention from the drag queen community.
Good Evening, Baltimore
Charm City has been courting LGBT travelers for years
By Troy Petenbrink
29 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
Play
D.C. has Dupont Circle, San Francisco has the Castro and Bal-
timore has Mount Vernon. Part of the Midtown district, Mount
Vernon is ground zero for Baltimore LGBT nightlife. It’s here
you’ll find GRAND CENTRAL on N. Charles Street, the city’s largest
gay bar with multiple bar areas, a dance floor and sidewalk seat-
ing. Upstairs, in what is dubbed “The Loft,” Grand Central offers
an outdoor deck, pool tables and a swanky lounge.
Across the street is THE HIPPO. Drawing a large mix of gay
men, lesbians and open-minded heteros, it has a street-front
saloon with outdoor seating as well as a large dance club that
is extremely popular on Friday and Saturday nights. About four
blocks away on W. Read Street is the casual neighborhood bar,
THE DRINKERY.
For the “leather and Levi” crowd, Mount Vernon’s TRIPLE L
(Leon’s Leather Lounge) on W. Chase Street recently opened
and quickly gaining fans. And located in the Seton Hill area,
southeast of Mount Vernon, is CLUB BUNNS on W. Lexington
Street, a dance club popular with Baltimore’s large African-
American LGBT community.
If the timing is right, visitors might be lucky enough to catch a
performance by CHARM CITY KITTY CLUB at The Baltimore Theatre
Project on W. Preston Street. Charm Kitty Club describes itself
as a group of cabaret performers who have come together “to
foster, showcase and celebrate creative expression among les-
bian, dyke, bisexual, transgender, transsexual and genderqueer
individuals as well as our allies.”
Sleep
As part of Baltimore’s effort to attract LGBT visitors, the
city’s tourism officials made a concerted effort to ensure that
its hotels would be welcoming. The result is more than 30 of
the city’s hotels are TAG Approved, a designation offered by
Community Marketing Inc. to officially recognize hotels that
are committed to equal treatment of their guests regardless of
sexual orientation.
Among the city’s many LGBT welcoming properties is the
HOTEL MONACO BALTIMORE, a Kimpton Hotel, which is located
downtown in the historic Baltimore & Ohio Railroad headquar-
ters on N. Charles Street, built in 1906. The original marble floor
and Tiffany stained-glass windows were retained as part of the
conversion. Also housed in a historic downtown building, is the
LORD BALTIMORE HOTEL on W. Baltimore Street. Owned by Rubell
Hotels, which also owns the Albion Hotel in Miami Beach and
the Capitol Skyline Hotel in D.C., the hotel recently completed a
multimillion-dollar renovation.
In the Mount Vernon area, visitors who want to be close to
the city’s LGBT nightlife will find the WYNDHAM BALTIMORE PEA-
BODY COURT on Cathedral Street and BRAXTON HOTEL on Park
Avenue. For LGBT travelers who prefer the larger full service
hotels, the BALTIMORE MARRIOTT INNER HARBOR HOTEL AT CAMDEN
YARDS and the HILTON BALTIMORE are good choices.
More information on visiting Baltimore is available at
baltimore.org. l
Good Evening, Baltimore
Charm City has been courting LGBT travelers for years
By Troy Petenbrink
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JUNE 19 - 26, 2014
SPOTLIGHT
ALICE SMITH
Soul-pop singer-songwriter Alice Smith is as
understated and sophisticated as Christina Aguilera
is crassly exaggerated, and every bit as vocally
talented. Her music, including her astonishingly
superb and long-overdue sophomore set She, is
better, too. Released last year She charts the ups
and downs and ins and outs of love, even just
friendship, with musical twists and lyrical turns as
sharp and surprising as they come. This weekend the
Brooklyn-based Smith returns to her hometown of
D.C. “You want to do good at home,” she told Metro
Weekly in 2012. “Whenever I go [to D.C.], and there’s
people there, somehow it’s always a little surprising,
but it’s also always really exciting.” In fact, there’s
enough demand at home that the Howard Theatre
Compiled by Doug Rule
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Happy Times
Colman Domingo’s proud career as actor, budding playwright
M
AYA ANGELOU WAS AN INNOVATOR AND WAS SUCH AN
inspiration to me,” Colman Domingo says, reflecting on the sto-
ried author’s recent death. “We stand on her shoulders, since
we’re the next generation.” Years ago, as part of the cast on Logo’s The Big
Gay Sketch Show, one of Domingo’s recurring skits was impersonating Ange-
lou. He portrayed her reading sexually explicit posts from Craigslist.
But Domingo’s work in television comedy is a side note to more notable
stage and film work. He played a supporting role in Passing Strange both
on Broadway and in Spike Lee’s 2009 film adaptation. He was also in The
Scottsboro Boys, one of the last collaborative musicals from John Kander and
the late Fred Ebb that earned Domingo a 2011 Tony nomination as featured
actor. “I’m very proud to be part of these historical, passionate projects,” he
says. “Things that actually have importance and meaning and hope in mak-
ing some change in the world.”
The 44-year-old Philadelphia native, who’s been openly gay his entire
career — “I’ve always been comfortable with who I am” — also has a budding
career as a playwright. In 2010 he won a GLAAD Media Award and a Lucile
Lortel Award for his Off-Broadway one-man show A Boy and His Soul. And
right now Center Stage, Baltimore’s premier theater company, offers Wild
With Happy, first staged by New York’s Public Theater in 2012. Domingo
describes the play as “a dark comedy about faith” and “my first piece that I
was really writing for other actors to do.” Forrest McClendon, a longtime friend and colleague, stars in the Baltimore produc-
tion, directed by Jeremy B. Cohen.
“It’s about an African-American gay man who loses his mother and he’s sort-of stuck in his life,” he says. “And the thrust of
the play is moving him to believe in something again.”
Speaking of influential motherly types, Domingo never did get a chance to meet the legend he impersonated all those years
ago — though he takes heart in the secondhand knowledge that he did, in fact, make her laugh.
“Maya Angelou was aware that I portrayed her and apparently she got a real tickle out of it.” — Doug Rule
Wild With Happy runs to June 29 at Center Stage, 700 North Calvert St., in Baltimore. Tickets are $19 to $62.
Call 410-986-4000 or visit centerstage.org.
hosts not one but two shows this weekend. Friday,
June 20, and Saturday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m. and The
Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. Tickets are $25 to
$60. Call 202-588-5595 or visit thehowardtheatre.
com or alicesmith.com.
BUYER AND CELLAR
Actor Michael Urie is best known from ABC’s
Ugly Betty, where he played Vanessa Williams’s
flamboyant, conniving assistant. But in the Barbra
Streisand-themed play Buyer and Cellar, the 33-year-
old is not just playing another diva’s assistant, he
actually portrays the diva in a few scenes. Urie, who
has been playing Alex, Streisand and a handful of
other characters in Jonathan Tolins’s play for over
a year now, appears at Harman Hall in a short run
of the show presented by the Shakespeare Theatre
Company. Opening night is Friday, June 20, at 8
p.m. To June 29. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW.
Call 202-547-1122 or visit shakespearetheatre.org or
buyerandcellar.com
CHAMBER DANCE PROJECT
Contemporary Ballet with an Edge is the inaugural
Kennedy Center appearance by this former New
York-based ballet company, now a Washington-
based ensemble. Artistic director Diane Coburn
Bruning leads six principal dancers from major ballet
companies along with a string quartet performing live
accompaniment. The program includes: Bruning’s
Exit Wounds: and then they came home, a powerful
male duet exploring memory and loss; plus a tango-
infused ballet, a world premiere from Argentina’s
acclaimed choreographer Jorge Amarante in his first
work for an American company. Thursday, June
26, through Saturday, June 28, at 7:30 p.m. Also
Saturday, June 28, at 2 p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace
Theater. Tickets are $40 to $50. Call 202-467-4600
or visit kennedy-center.org.
31 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
32 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
LYNDA CARTER
The Virginia-based Wonder Woman and staunch
supporter of the LGBT community returns to the
Kennedy Center for an annual cabaret, this time with
the new show, “This Time of My Life,” presented by
Potomac Productions. Saturday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m.
Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $25 to
$65. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
NSO POPS
Steven Reineke closes out the NSO Pops season for
a program perfectly timed with the new film Jersey
Boys. In fact, “The Midtown Men” features four
performers from the original Broadway musical
that begat the film. The foursome showcase their
trademark sounds and moves next weekend, in a
show with the orchestra featuring renditions of
songs by the Beatles, the Drifters — and of course the
Four Seasons, Frankie Valli’s group which inspired
this whole shebang. Friday, June 27, and Saturday,
June 28, at 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall.
Tickets are $20 to $85. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
SIDE SHOW
Oscar-winner Bill Condon (Chicago, Dreamgirls)
helms a new Kennedy Center reimagining of this
1997 musical by writer Bill Russell and composer
Henry Krieger (Dreamgirls) about conjoined twins
Daisy and Violet Hilton, tracing their growth
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The Singing Nurse

Renowned for her stint on E.R., Gloria Reuben brings her
chanteuse side to Blues Alley
I
WAS 100 PERCENT EMOTIONALLY EXHAUSTED FROM PORTRAY-
ing that role, as much as I loved it,” says Gloria Reuben, who, starting in
1995, spent five seasons portraying Jeanie Boulet, the HIV-positive nurse
on NBC’s mega-hit show E.R.
“I know the message carried a great deal of strength and hope to people
around the world,” she says. But she had no intention of becoming an activist
on the issue until years later, after learning that AIDS had become the leading
cause of death among young black women in the U.S. This despite the great
strides in both public awareness and medical advances allowing people with
HIV “to literally get their lives back.”
“I felt I had to use the platform of what I had done,” she says. “I started going
into communities and I started talking about protection, testing, awareness. Cultural
issues that were really exacerbating the problem, the whole thing.” These days the
Canadian-born U.S. citizen is still advocating on the issue — as well as pointing out
“disturbing” realities, such as the fact that “to this day there hasn’t been another one
on network television” — another character living with HIV, that is.
In between acting and activism, Reuben has a side career in music. For example, did you know she was Tina Turner’s
backup singer and dancer on her 2000 tour?
“’Please forgive me’,” Reuben recites what Turner said to her during a chance meeting after the VH1 Divas Live/99 con-
cert, “’but you’re so pretty. Can you sing and dance? … You should come on tour with me next year.’” Reuben, who studied
music and ballet at the Canadian Royal Conservatory, thought that would be the end of it, until she got the call to audition in
Turner’s hotel room. “I’ve had some nerve-wracking auditions,” she says.
Next week Reuben will perform at Blues Alley, offering two shows of “standards and songs that people are familiar with,”
mostly jazz and cabaret tunes, with a special emphasis on the late, great D.C. native Shirley Horn. But no Tina Turner. “Why?
When the first was so amazing, there’s no way you’re going to be able to do it better.” – Doug Rule
Gloria Reuben performs Tuesday, June 24, at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m., at Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Tickets are $25,
plus $10 minimum purchase. Call 202-337-4141 or visit bluesalley.com.
from circus attraction to famous stage performers.
This potentially Broadway-bound production was
developed in association with the La Jolla Playhouse.
Now to July 13. Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater.
Tickets are $45 to $130. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
THANK YOU FESTIVAL:
TIESTO, ABOVE & BEYOND, KREWALLA
Global Citizen and World Childhood Foundation
present this concert featuring several of the biggest
names in today’s EDM scene, from Tiesto to Above
& Beyond to Krewella to Cedric Gervais to Alvin
Risk. It’s all meant to raise money and awareness for
organizations and activists fighting in various ways
to help save children around the world from disease,
violence, abuse, and poverty. Thursday, June 26,
starting at 4 p.m. Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475
Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md. Tickets are
$45 to $99 for all but VIP tickets. Call 800-551-SEAT
or visit merriweathermusic.com or globalcitizen.org.
FILM
SING-A-LONG GREASE
Wolf Trap offers the chance to sing-a-long to the
hits from the 1978 Olivia Newton-John and John
Travolta flick, aided by animated subtitles on screen.
You know the ones, from “You’re The One That I
Want” to “Greased Lightning” to “Summer Nights.”
Saturday, June 21, at 8:30 p.m. The Filene Center at
Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $25
to $38. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
STAGE
AVENUE Q
Despite the time that’s passed since Robert Lopez,
Jeff Marx and Jeff Whitty first sent their profanity-
spewing puppets on stage to deliver such toe-tappers
as “The Internet is for Porn,” “Everyone’s a Little Bit
Racist” and that ode to loud sex “You Can Be as Loud
as the Hell You Want (When You’re Makin’ Love),”
Avenue Q is just as funny, surprising and good-
naturedly shocking as ever. Olney Theatre presents
a production of the show directed by its own artistic
director Jason Loewith and choreographed by Bobby
Smith. To July 6. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-
Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md. Tickets are $43.50 to
$63.50. Call 301-924-3400 or visit olneytheatre.org.
BOEING BOEING
No Rules Theatre Company offers a production of
this French farce by Marc Camoletti, as translated
by Beverley Cross and Francis Evans, focused on a
Ð60s-era playboy successfully juggling affairs with
three fiancées, all flight attendants — until weather and
technological advances get in the way. Matt Cowart
directs the No Rules show featuring Nick Kowalczyk,
Jamie Smithson, Sarah Olmsted Thomas, Sherry
33
HAPPY DAYS
Scena Theater presents Samuel Beckett’s darkly
comic classic starring multi-time Helen Hayes
Award winner Nancy Robinette as the happy-
go-lucky Winnie struggling to uncover meaning
in her static, lonely life. Stephen Lorne Williams
stars as Winnie’s totally aloof husband, who hasn’t
helped her existential crisis one bit. To July 5. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are
$35 to $40. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org
or scenatheater.org.
HEALING WARS
Arena Stage presents a world-premiere theatrical
dance piece from celebrated choreographer Liz
Lerman exploring the experiences of the healers
tasked with treating the physical and psychic wounds
of battle. Bill Pullman stars among an ensemble of
dancers representing medics and soldiers from the
Civil War to today. To June 29. The Mead Center
for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Call 202-488-
3300 or visit arenastage.org.
JUDGMENT AT NUREMBERG
The American Century Theater offers a production
of Abby Mann’s riveting play about the World War
II war crime trials that raises important moral
issues still relevant and controversial today. Joe
Banno directs this rarely produced but critically
praised courtroom drama starring a large cast of
TACT veterans, including Craig Miller, Bruce Alan
Rauscher, Steve Lebens, Mary Beth Luckenbaugh,
Karin Rosnizeck — and Christopher Henley of WSC
Avant Bard making his TACT debut in a role played
by Montgomery Clift in the 1961 Oscar-winning film
version that also starred Judy Garland. To June
28. Gunston Theater Two, 2700 South Lang St.
Arlington. Tickets are $32 to $40. Call 703-998-4555
or visit americancentury.org.
KILLER JOE
A four-year-old theater company, See No Sun On
Stage presents this play from the author of August:
Osage County, exploring stereotypes in a withering,
rustic outlook on America’s disenfranchised and
focused on a family who hires a man to do away
with their mother to collect on her insurance
policy. To June 29. District of Columbia Arts Center
(DCAC), 2438 18th St. NW. Tickets are $22 to
$25. Call 202-462-7833 or visit dcartscenter.org or
seenosunonstage.com.
ORDINARY DAYS
Signature Theatre’s Matthew Gardiner, who
must be the busiest working director all around
D.C., helms a Round House Theatre production
and the area premiere of up-and-coming gay
composer Adam Gwon’s musical Ordinary Days.
Touted as a refreshingly honest, funny musical
about the difficulty of making real connections in
Berg, Jenna Berk and Helen Hedman. To June 29.
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
Call 703-820-9771 or visit norulestheatre.org.
CABARET
If you can’t make it up to Broadway to see the revival
of the revival of the popular Kander & Ebb original,
the queer-identified theater company Richmond
Triangle Players offers its own production of the
show throughout the month of Pride. The show
focuses on the decadent and sexually liberating era of
1930s Berlin and how the Nazis killed off the culture
and many of its most creative and forward-thinking
leaders, both Jews and gays alike. Penny Ayn Maas
directs and choreographs RTP’s production, staged
in an intimate cabaret style. To June 28. Richmond
Triangle Players, 1300 Altamont Ave. Richmond.
Tickets are $32 to $35, or $18 for the preview. Call
804-346-8113 or visit rtriangle.org.
CLOAK AND DAGGER
Signature Theatre closes out its season with a
world premiere musical comedy by actor Ed Dixon
(Signature’s Sunset Boulevard). A screwball send-up
of the 1950s film noir and mile-a-minute whodunit,
Cloak and Dagger features four actors — Dixon,
Christopher Bloch, Erin Driscoll, Doug Carpenter
— playing nearly 20 roles as directed by Signature’s
Eric Schaeffer. Pride performance is Friday, June
20, at 8 p.m. To July 6. Signature Theatre, 4200
Campbell Ave., Arlington. Tickets are $40 to $95.
Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
DISNEY’S THE LION KING
The Kennedy Center welcomes another two-month
run of the 16-year-old Tony-winning musical
featuring music by Elton John and Tim Rice and
directed and designed by Julie Taymor, complete
with puppetry. Can you feel the love this summer?
Now to Aug. 17. Kennedy Center Opera House.
Tickets are $40 to $195. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
ENTER OPHELIA, DISTRACTED
Taffety Punk Theater Company, whose tagline is “We
Will Rock You” and styles itself as a sort of theatrical
rock band, presents an original work created by one
of D.C.’s most expressive actors, Kimberly Gilbert,
in collaboration with choreographer Erin Mitchell
and musician Amy Domingues. Enter Ophelia,
Distracted is a feminist twist on Shakespeare’s
Hamlet. Performances Friday, June 20, Saturday,
June 21, Friday, 27, and Saturday, June 28, at 8 p.m.
June Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 7th St. SE.
Tickets $15. Call 202-547-6839 or visit chaw.org or
taffetypunk.com.
FREUD’S LAST SESSION
Theater J stages a production of Mark St. Germain’s
brainy play about a clash between intellectual giants
Sigmund Freud and C.S. Lewis during World War
II, when Lewis was as-yet unknown. Serge Seiden
directs Rick Foucheux and Todd Scofield. Extended
to July 6. The Aaron and Cecile Goldman Theater,
Washington, D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529
16th St. NW. Tickets are $30 to $55. Call 202-518-
9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.
GROUNDED
Through its Studio Special Events series, Studio
Theatre welcomes London’s Gate Theatre and its
visceral production of George Brant’s gripping solo
show about the world of remote warfare — aka the
use of drones — which was a sold-out hit at the
Edinburgh Fringe. Christopher Haydon directs Lucy
Ellinson, who plays a pregnant hotshot military
pilot who flies drones in Afghanistan from a trailer
outside Las Vegas. To June 29. Studio Theatre,
14th & P Streets NW. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org.
the overwhelming hubbub and pace of urban life.
Erin Weaver, Will Gartshore, Samule Edgerly and
Janine DiVita star. Extended to June 29. Round
House Theatre, 4545 East-West Highway, Bethesda.
Tickets are $35 to $50. Call 240-644-1100 or visit
roundhousetheatre.org.
PURO TANGO 2
GALA Theatre offers a sequel to a 2012 hit tango
musical revue, with singers and dancers from
Argentina and Uruguay — where the stirring musical
genre was born. Conceived and directed by GALA
favorite Hugo Medrano, Puro Tango 2 features
vocalists Nelson Pino, Maria de los Angeles and
Elisa Cordova, with the dance duo Jeremias Massera
and Mariela Barufaldi, and Cecilia de Feo as emcee.
Pianist Alvaro Hagopian offers musical direction,
with Nario Recoba on the bandoneon and Dominic
Martinez on bass. Closes this Sunday, June 22.
GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th St. NW.
Tickets are $38 to $42. Call 202-234-7174 or visit
galatheatre.org.
SOME GIRL(S)
Unquiet Theatre Company presents the latest from
the American theater provocateur Neil LaBute,
focused on one single man’s panicked rush to
reconnect with any of his old girlfriends — anything
but settle for the one woman who actually wants to
marry him. Remaining performances Friday, June
20, and Saturday, June 21, at 8 p.m., and Sunday,
June 22, at 2 p.m. W-3 Theatre at Workhorse Arts
Center in the former DC Prison, 9601 Ox Rd. Lorton,
Va. Tickets are $20. Call 703-584-2900 or visit
workhorsearts.org.
SOURCE FESTIVAL
Throughout June, Cultural DC presents its annual
theater festival dedicated to the up-and-coming and
named after its black box theater in the heart of
bustling 14th Street. This year’s Source Festival
features three full-length plays, 18 10-minute plays
and three “artistic blind dates” built on themes of
mortality, revenge and quests. To June 29. Source,
1835 14th St. NW. Tickets are $10 to $20 for each
show, $45 for a three-play package or $100 for
an all-access pass. Call 202-204-7760 or visit
sourcefestival.org.
SWING TIME! THE MUSICAL
Mike Thornton, an actor who has worked with
the satire group the Capital Steps, and his wife
Cecelia Fex have teamed up as co-producers for
this new band-era musical revue about a group
of performers putting together a wartime radio
broadcast. Featuring film clips plus a live jazz band,
the show features tunes made popular by Duke
Ellington, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Tommy
Dorsey and Cab Calloway. Now to July 31. U.S. Navy
Memorial’s Burke Theater, 701 Pennsylvania Ave.
METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
34 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
NW. Tickets are $19 or $49. Call 202-393-4266 or
visit swingtimethemusical.com.
THE TOTALITARIANS
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company is the local
stop on a National New Play Rolling World Premiere
of Peter Sinn Nachtrieb’s The Totalitarians. Robert
O’Hara directs this high-energy farce focused on
the absurdity of the current state of politics and
campaigning — specifically the secret lies told in
the bedroom and the public lies told on the stump.
The focus is on an ambitious speechwriter who has
stumbled on a perfectly patriotic — and perfectly
meaningless — slogan that she hopes can advance
her unpredictable, gaffe-prone candidate, seemingly
modeled, at least indirectly, on Sarah Palin. To
June 29. Woolly Mammoth, 641 D St. NW. Tickets
range from $35 to $72.50. Call 202-393-3939 or visit
woollymammoth.net.
WILD WITH HAPPY
Center Stage presents this new comedy by
playwright/actor Colman Domingo focused on the
struggles of a gay man whose acting career is going
nowhere, and now his personal life is in shambles
too — his boyfriend leaves him and his mother dies
in quick succession. But he does have a boisterous
aunt, and an extroverted best friend, who take up
the challenge to cheer him up. Jeremy B. Cohen
directs a cast featuring Forrest McClendon, James
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Pushovers
It’s easy to fall for this catchy folk/pop lesbian trio
L
OOKING FOR A NEW SUMMER JAM? CONSIDER
“XOXO,” the last track on the debut album Falling For It
from the lesbian folk/pop trio The Pushovers.
Featuring edgy, slow-burning verses that melt into a bright
girly chorus, the ‘80s-stamped, EDM-esque song stands out
from contemporary pop radio by virtue of the Pushovers’
signature three-part harmony — which factors into even the
rap from Liz DeRoche. “It’s a harmony rap, which is kind of
amazing,” Mara Levi says. A high school music teacher, Levi
initiated forming the band nearly six years ago at D.C.’s Phase
1, recruiting first vocalist/guitarist Nancy Eddy and then DeR-
oche, who also plays keyboards and drums. DeRoche, known
as “the Singing Lizard” for her work as an “electro-kindie” act
making music for kids, is also a member of the band supporting
local musician Tom Goss.
Falling For It was years in the making, in large part because the women are an “LDB,” or “long-distance band.” Only DeRoche
remains in D.C., as Levi has uprooted to Brooklyn and Eddy to Baltimore. But the final product proves it was worth the wait, and
worth the more than $10,000 that fans contributed via Kickstarter, a website that helps artists fundraise in order to launch vari-
ous creative projects. In addition to hiring designers for high-quality t-shirts and posters, the upfront funds from fans allowed
the band to record with a D.C. hardcore punk scene pioneer, rocker/producer J. Robbins — “an incredible musician whose tal-
ents are all over this record,” as DeRoche puts it. The strong, wide-ranging debut album includes the first song the band wrote
together. The catchy, punchy It Gets Better-themed anthem “Boy or Girl” finds the women chanting “Step off” to the naysayers
and bullies who ask, “Are you a boy or a girl? Why don’t you fix up your hair?”
This weekend the band stops in D.C. for a CD Release Concert. “Corner Store is a really awesome place and a really great
listening room,” Eddy says. Adds Levi, “Expect silliness and harmonies. Maybe a fun cover.” – Doug Rule
The Pushovers perform Saturday, June 21, at 6 p.m., at Corner Store Arts, 900 South Carolina Ave. SE. Tickets are $15.
Call 202-544-5807 or visit cornerstorearts.org.
Ijames, Chivas Michael and Stephanie Berry. To June
29. Center Stage, 700 North Calvert St., Baltimore.
Tickets are $19 to $62. Call 410-986-4000 or visit
centerstage.org.
COMMUNITY THEATER
PLAZA SUITE
The Little Theatre of Alexandria offers a community
production of Neil Simon’s three-act comedy
exploring the bargains involved in love and marriage,
all set at New York’s Plaza Hotel. Remaining shows
Thursday, June 19, at 8 p.m., and Friday, June 20, at
8 p.m. The Little Theatre of Alexandria, 600 Wolfe
St., Alexandria. Tickets are $20. Call 703-683-0496 or
visit thelittletheater.com.
MUSIC
AVICII
Tim Bergling wasn’t even passed college age when
he started his music career, and within a year he
was already a superstar. As sick of it as you may
be, it’s still hard to believe it’s been three years
already since his Etta James-sampling breakthrough
hit “Levels,” and nearly a year since his debut album
True featuring his great megahit “Wake Me Up!”
with singer/songwriter Aloe Blacc. These days the
24-year-old superstar DJ is gaining attention for “A
Sky Full of Stars,” his stirring single with Coldplay —
and for buzz that he’s worked on new material with
Madonna. Sunday, June 29, at 8 p.m. Jiffy Lube Live,
7800 Cellar Door Drive, Bristow, Va. Tickets are $31
to $81. Call 703-754-6400 or visit livenation.com.
CYRUS CHESTNUT QUARTET
“Brubeck Reimagined” is a special concert by
this internationally renowned pianist in tribute
to another renowned pianist Dave Brubeck, who
helped popularize jazz worldwide more than a half-
century ago and died in 2012. Chestnut and his
quartet debuted this tribute show to rave reviews in
Philadelphia last year. Wednesday, June 25, at 8 p.m.
Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets
are $25 in advance, or $30 day of. Call 202-408-3100
or visit sixthandi.org
DEBO BAND
Rolling Stone refers to this 11-piece Ethiopian-
American group’s sound as “a Red Bull-ed marching
band.” The Boston-based brassy funk group is led
by saxophonist Danny Mekonnen and fronted by
charismatic vocalist Bruck Tesfaye. D.C.’s Feedel
Band, billed as an “EthioJazz” group, joins for a
performance in the Artisphere Ballroom with
additional music spun by D.C. Afrobeat DJ Underdog.
Friday, June 27, at 8 p.m. Artisphere, 1101 Wilson
35
Pixar films, from Finding Nemo to Up to Monsters,
Inc. Friday, June 20, at 8:30 p.m. The Filene Center at
Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $30 to
$58. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
PEACHES & HERB
The original Peaches, Francine Hurd Barker, died in
2005, but by then D.C.-born Herb Fame was already
on his fifth Peaches in touring around his hit-making
duo, known for the late-70s pop/R&B hit “Reunited”
and the disco great “Shake Your Groove Thing.”
(Barker didn’t like the rigors of touring, so she was
out early.) Fame returns for a hometown show with
his current Peaches, Wanda Mackle. Friday, June
27, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon
Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $45. Call 703-549-7500
or visit birchmere.com or peachesandherb.com
THE INSERIES: LA TRAVIATA
After 25 years of producing pocket opera, and in
honor of the composer’s 200th anniversary, the
InSeries presents the full-length Verdi masterpiece
La Traviata — in English “The Fallen Woman” —
about a socially unacceptable love affair. Nick Olcott
directs a production featuring acclaimed tenor Jesus
Hernandez and Randa Rouweyha in the lead roles,
plus a cast of eight others. Remaining shows are
Saturday, June 21, at 3 p.m., Monday, June 23, at 7:30
p.m., and Saturday, June 28, at 8 p.m. GALA Theatre
at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th St. NW. Tickets are $21 to
$44. Call 202-234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org and
inseries.org.
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
Wolf Trap presents the only area performance of
the Philadelphia Orchestra, regarded as one of the
world’s leading orchestras, here performing one
of the world’s greatest orchestral compositions,
Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Bramwell Tovey
conducts the orchestra as well as the Choral Arts
Society of Washington and Wolf Trap Opera soloists,
who will join to sing the piece’s triumphant finale
“Ode to Joy.” Saturday, June 28, at 8:15 p.m. The
Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $25 to $65. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.
THE SELDOM SCENE
Formed over 40 years ago in Bethesda, the
progressive bluegrass band Seldom Scene remains
especially popular in its hometown region. The
group returns to Alexandria’s seated show palace
the Birchmere for another Saturday night show, this
time with special guests John Starling, Tom Gray
and Rickie Simpkins to celebrate Long Time…Seldom
Scene, a new Smithsonian Folkways Recording.
Saturday, June 28, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere,
3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are
$29.50. Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com or
seldomscene.com.
WOLF TRAP OPERA: HANDEL’S GIULIO CESARE
Handel’s most popular opera, Giulio Cesare focuses
on Julius Caesar’s visit to Egypt in 48 B.C. and
his encounter with the exotic Cleopatra. Anthony
Walker conducts a new Wolf Trap Opera Company
production performed in Italian with English
supertitles and featuring John Holiday in the title
role and Ying Fang as Cleopatra. Friday, June 27, at
7:30 p.m., Sunday, June 29, at 3 p.m., and Tuesday,
July 1, at 7:30 p.m. The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635
Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $36 to $88. Call
877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.
ZAC BROWN BAND
An eight-piece band from Georgia straddling the
Southern rock/country divide, the Zac Brown Band is
led by its namesake vocalist/guitarist but also includes
Jimmy De Martini, who doubles as a violinist/fiddler,
John Driskell Hopkins, a bassist/ukulele player, and
Blvd., Arlington. Tickets are $15 in advance, or $18
day-of. Call 703-875-1100 or visit artisphere.com or
deboband.com.
DIANA ROSS
The Supreme diva returns for a second year in a row
at Wolf Trap, but if you don’t already have tickets,
you’ll have to make due with lawn seats if you’re
coming out. That is, if even those remain by the
time you try to order tickets. You can’t hurry love,
tis true, but you can and must hurry ticket-buying.
This concert is sure to sell out. At least this year’s
concert features an opening act, Diana’s daughter
(with Berry Gordy) Rhonda Ross, and it is also on a
weekend: Ms. Ross was punctual to a fault last year,
when a fair number of fans were tied up in traffic
at the prompt 8 p.m. start time. So get there early.
Sunday, June 29, at 8 p.m. The Filene Center at Wolf
Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Only $35 lawn seats
remain for the show. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.
KATY PERRY
The superstar stops by for two nights on her
Prismatic World Tour featuring Capital Cities as
opening act. Tuesday, June 24, and Wednesday,
June 25, at 7 p.m. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW.
Tickets are $29.50 to $153.50. Call 202-628-3200 or
visit verizoncenter.com.
LIRA
A star in her native post-apartheid South Africa, the
mono-named singer/model/actress Lira is working
to break into the American market with an Sade-
esque blend of R&B, jazz and Afropop. She stops by
the Howard Theatre on a tour to support her U.S.
debut album Rise Again featuring charming first
single “Feel Good.” Monday, June 23, at 8 p.m. The
Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. Tickets are $17.50 in
advance or $22.50 day-of. Call 202-588-5595 or visit
thehowardtheatre.com or alicesmith.com.
MICHELLE RAYMOND BAND
Bassist Dan Shorstein, electric guitarist Giorgio
Carvallo and drummer Lance LaRue will support
local lesbian singer/songwriter/guitarist Michelle
Raymond in her namesake band, which performs
another free concert at Columbia Heights restaurant/
music venue Acre 121. Friday, June 20, at 10 p.m. Acre
121, 1400 Irving St. NW. Free. Call 202-328-0121 or
visit acre121.com or michelleraymondband.com.
NATIONAL ORCHESTRAL INSTITUTE
AND FESTIVAL
The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the
University of Maryland presents this 27th month-
long festival pairing outstanding young classical
musicians with world-renowned conductors,
including James Ross, Christopher Seaman and
Leonard Slatkin. The festival continues this weekend
with:
Seaman conducting the musicians in a program
headlined by Holst’s The Planets on Saturday, June
21, at 8 p.m.; and a free Family Concert featuring
Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf and musicians
offering their own interpretations on children’s
books, on Sunday, June 22, at 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.
The festival concludes with Leonard Slatkin
leading a performance of Shostakovich’s powerful
Fifth Symphony on Saturday, June 28, at 8 p.m.
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, University
of Maryland, University Boulevard and Stadium
Drive. College Park. Tickets are $25, and free for
the Family Concert. Call 301-405-ARTS or visit
claricesmithcenter.umd.edu.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
AT WOLF TRAP
Emil du Cou leads the NSO@Wolf Trap program
Pixar in Concert, featuring scenes and songs from
two percussionists, Chris Fryar and Daniel de los
Reyes. They make a local stop on its Great American
Road Trip Tour. Sunday, June 22, at 7 p.m. Jiffy Lube
Live, 7800 Cellar Door Drive, Bristow, Va. Tickets are
$29.50 to $102. Call 703-754-6400 or visit livenation.
com and zacbrownband.com.
DANCE
K-ARTS DANCE COMPANY
Korea National University of Arts presents this
student troupe in a mixed repertory program
featuring: Mi Sook Jeon’s Nothing to Say, a modern
dance piece about the lethargic, nihilistic lifestyle
of so many of today’s youth; Inside of Truth, a ballet
by YoungGeol Kim; and three traditional Korean
dances directed by Sung Ok Yang. Friday, June 20,
at 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. Free,
but tickets required and available beginning at 5:30
p.m. day-of the show. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
RICHMOND BALLET
Billed as “a funny and magical performance for the
entire family,” this celebrated Virginia dance troupe
offers Cinderella’s Sister, featuring Prokofiev’s
enchanting score, dazzling young dancers and
lessons on the history of ballet. Wednesday, June
25, and Thursday, June 26, at 10:30 a.m. Theatre-in-
the-Woods at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $10 to $48. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.
COMEDY
HAL SPARKS
Best known as Michael from Showtime’s Queer as
Folk, these days the Los Angeles-based Hal Sparks
dabbles in various media, from starring on the
Disney XD cable channel’s hit series Lab Rats, to
performing as lead singer and guitarist for rock trio
Zero 1, to guest-hosting and starring on progressive
radio stations nationwide. This weekend Sparks
returns to the Arlington Drafthouse for two nights
of stand-up comedy. “I can’t think of a time,” the
straight Sparks told Metro Weekly in 2012, “when
I was against gays being married, women voting
and having the right to choose, and every minority
having protection under the law.” Friday, June 27,
at 10 p.m., and Saturday, June 28, at 7:30 p.m. and
10 p.m., at Arlington Cinema N’ Drafthouse, 2903
Columbia Pike, Arlington. Tickets are $20. Call 703-
486-2345 or visit arlingtondrafthouse.com.
MICHAEL CHE
As part of its free nightly Millennium Stage
programming the Kennedy Center welcomes the
standup comedian Michael Che, who is also the
newest cast member of Comedy Central’s The Daily
Show with John Stewart. One of Rolling Stone’s “50
Funniest People” and Variety’s “Top 10 Comics to
Watch,” Che has spent the past year writing for
Saturday Night Live. Tyler Richardson offers an
opening set. Thursday, June 26, at 6 p.m. Kennedy
Center Family Theater. Free. Call 202-467-4600 or
visit kennedy-center.org. l
METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
FOR MORE OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS
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36 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Robinette (R) and Williams
Unhappy Days
Scena stages Beckett’s
absurdist classic
N
ANCY ROBINETTE IS CURRENTLY PLAYING
a part that a knighted British actress once touted
as a pinnacle role for actresses, akin to Hamlet for
male actors. And in that sense, Robinette playing
Winnie in Happy Days makes a kind of sense. Robinette is, after
all, the reigning grande dame of D.C. theater.
If only the role of Winnie made a kind of sense. If only Happy
Days, the Samuel Beckett tragicomedy that Scena Theater is
producing at the Atlas Performing Arts Center, was worth the
trouble to see. But even if you know what it’s about — or sup-
posed to be about — going into it, chances are you’ll still leave
feeling at least a little bewildered by the whole affair. Or even a
little disgruntled, especially once you learn that was, in fact, the
Irish playwright’s intent all along.
Beckett was celebrated in the post-world war period of the
mid-20th century for his work in helping pioneer what came
to be known as the “Theatre of the Absurd.” A branch of the
modernist movement in art, this absurdist style is essentially
the opposite of the traditional, satisfying method of storytelling,
in which things actually happen, meaning gets imparted and
there’s a sense of resolution about it all. There’s none of the sort
in Happy Days. Winnie is buried waist-deep in a mound of dirt at
the play’s start, and by its end, about 100 long minutes later, only
her head remains exposed on a sunbaked, barren beach. There’s
no explanation for how she got there, or why her companion
Willie (Stephen Lorne Williams) won’t help her out, instead
leaving her mostly alone.
Of course it’s all meant to be a metaphor. Winnie is living
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37 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
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an ordinary, lonely life, taking increasing pleasure — and pain
— in the most routine of occurrences, existential trappings and
material goods, the latter of which can be easily tucked away
in her oversized handbag. Eventually she’ll sink and become
consumed by the great big world that surrounds her — as will
we all. In Winnie’s relentless optimism and loquacious nattering
— and Willie’s contrasting dour detachment and laconic com-
munication — Beckett seems to be offering dated commentary on
gender. (And it has been suggested that this play was Beckett’s
retort to his wife’s request for a happy play.) But he also seems
to be commenting on the absurdity of life and the different ways
people cope.
Ultimately, you may cope with the absurdity of this play bet-
ter than I did. You may even forgive some of the oversights of
this production, directed by Scena’s Robert McNamara. Why,
for instance, did designer Michael C. Stepowany use stretched
beige fabric to evoke sand on a beach, rather than actual sand or
dirt? But you certainly won’t leave with anything but apprecia-
tion for Robinette’s work. No doubt she’s far from the pinnacle
of her career.
Happy Days ( ) runs to July 5 at Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $35 to $40. Call 202-399-7993
or visit atlasarts.org or scenatheater.org.
ED DIXON WON A HELEN HAYES AWARD the last time he
appeared on Signature Theatre’s stage, portraying Max in the
musical Sunset Boulevard. Now he returns to the Shirlington
showplace to play a dozen characters — in his very own musical,
Cloak and Dagger, a spoof of whodunit mysteries from the mid-
20th century. The focus is on Nick, played by the overly polished
Doug Carpenter, a third-rate detective in New York, who battles
the mob and other assorted characters in his quest to find a
missing golden statue, a Golden Venus seemingly modeled after
Helena Troy, a blonde bombshell who becomes his client and
love interest. Stunning Signature star Erin Driscoll plays Troy
in full girly glory in this world premiere production directed by
Signature’s Eric Schaeffer.
Cloak and Dagger will ultimately win you over, especially
with its touching and particularly funny finale, which only
comes after a whole series of madcap shenanigans — plus the
great mid-show number “Shake Your Maracas.” Dixon and
Christopher Bloch both assume multiple roles, many of them in
questionable taste — stereotypes of first-generation Americans
of Chinese, Indian, Cuban and Italian descent. But most of the
jokes are with the characters, and not at their portrayal. And
the funniest moments are of Dixon in drag, portraying, ahem,
“A Real Woman.” Some of the jokes are forced or familiar, but
nothing egregious.
The music is perfectly pleasant and hummable, and the
Signature team of designers, led on sets by Daniel Conway,
has done its typical up-to-snuff job in allowing you to escape
into a world of exaggerated reality much as if watching a
black-and-white detective movie — with the occasional pop
of color from the golden statue and the blonde-haired and
red-dressed Driscoll (costumes by Kathleen Geldard). With-
out giving anything away, there’s thankfully not much inno-
cent about the whole shebang.
Cloak and Dagger (HHHHH) runs to June 22 at Signature The-
atre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Tickets are $40 to $95. Call
703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org. l
38 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
No Man’s Sky
Waiting Games
It was look now, play (much)
later at this year’s E3 Expo
A
NOTHER YEAR, ANOTHER E3. THE ELEC-
tronic Entertainment Expo once again took over
downtown Los Angeles, bursting at the seams
with tidbits and details of the games we can look
forward to playing in the near and distant future. Compared
with last year, where the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 had their
coming out parties, publishers focused heavily on what every
gamer yearns for most: games. Yes, it seems everyone doubled
down this time, to push as much content as possible, after 2013’s
rather software-starved approach. Unfortunately, those hoping
to have a wealth of fresh gameplay in their hands over the com-
ing months were left somewhat unsatisfied – there were still far
too many games announced for 2015 – but what was on show
was still pretty spectacular. Even Nintendo managed to buck
expectations and showcase some pretty compelling reasons to
pick up a Wii U, which is certainly saying something given cur-
rent sales.
Microsoft, as is tradition, was first out of the gate with its
conference. Redmond’s team sorely needed to make up for the
last couple of years, where Kinect-based titles and entertain-
ment superseded gameplay and fresh IPs. Last year, the Xbox
One debuted with much fanfare over its DVR abilities and voice-
activated controls, but few real games to tempt those from their
Xbox 360s and PlayStations 3s. No matter, as this year all was
mostly forgiven. Microsoft’s 90-minute presentation was noth-
ing short of a master class in tight editing, with game announce-
ments coming thick and fast. CALL OF DUTY: ADVANCED WARFARE
got things running, showcasing its futuristic setting and new
additions to a franchise that has become increasingly stale over
the years, before Microsoft shoveled coal into the engines and
really got things moving.
FORZA HORIZON 2 is launching Sep. 30, which should appease
those hungry for more of its open-road driving action, while
those who picked up Forza 5 at the One’s launch (which, accord-
ing to Microsoft, is over half of all One owners) will finally be
getting Germany’s legendary Nürburgring racetrack – consid-
ered a must-have for any serious racing game – in a free update
some seven months after the game launched. Better late than
never, we suppose. EVOLVE, from the makers of zombie co-op
shoot-em-up L eft 4 Dead, put a tempting spin on traditional
co-op gameplay — four players face off against giant monsters,
with the twist being that said monster is controlled by a fifth
player, not computer AI. Xbox One owners can enjoy exclusive
access to its beta ahead of an October release.
Indeed, cooperative play seemed to be a big focus of E3.
Fable, Microsoft’s much-loved fantasy RPG franchise, returned
as FABLE LEGENDS, which debuts four player co-op and some
stunning new visuals, though footage of the game seems to
games
by RHUARIDH MARR
39 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
Sunset Overdrive
Legend of Zelda Wii U
lack some of the wit and unique quality that has accompanied
previous entries in the series. Countering that was Microsoft’s
end-of-conference tease, its “one more thing” announcement.
CRACKDOWN — yes, the franchise that became popular due to its
inclusion of a Halo 3 beta but transpired to be a pretty decent
game in its own right, returns on Xbox One following a lacklus-
ter sequel on 360. Judging by the reaction of the crowd, it was
a popular decision, as four player co-op (yes, again) was dem-
onstrated alongside new, shiny graphics and some impressive
environment destruction abilities.
If you’re in the mood for something over-the-top and wacky,
though, SUNSET OVERDRIVE could be just what you’re looking
for. Threatening to upstage everything else on show, its bright,
colorful graphics and tongue-in-cheek references look set to put
an amusing spin on the grossly overused “kill all the zombies/
mutants/whatevers” trope that has affected (infected?) far too
many games of late. Here, the general populous has become
mutated as a result of drinking a new energy drink, and it’s up
to you (and your friends) to take them down with a variety of
fantastic, fantastical weaponry. While Sunset was one of the
biggest games on show, Microsoft also showed a lot of love to
gaming’s smaller creators. Indie developers, who’ve received a
lot of love from Sony recently, are being given renewed focus by
Microsoft to ensure they aren’t left behind in the battle to recruit
excellent indie PC developers to create content for consoles. One
such example came from the developers of acclaimed indie game
Limbo, who debuted their new game INSIDE, which looks to be
just as simple yet emotional as its black and white predecessor,
but with a colorful, Orwellian dystopia to wander through.
Of course, it’s important to remember why Microsoft is so
important to gaming in the first place: Master Chief. The main
character of the Halo franchise has become a mascot for Xbox
fanboys everywhere, touted as the influence behind many of
the mechanics of the majority of first-person shooters available
today. Halos 1 and 2 were masterpieces of gameplay, multiplayer
and storytelling on the original Xbox (though 3 and 4, at least in
this reporter’s opinion, were somewhat less compelling). That
made Microsoft’s announcement of the Master Chief Collection
one of the greatest “greatest-hits” compilations of our time.
Consisting of all four main games in the franchise, all run-
ning at 1080p and 60fps on Xbox One, with over 100 multi-
player maps from every game and every piece of DLC, it puts
every other HD collection remake to shame. Gamers can jump
between every story mission and every multiplayer map – with
friends in tow – letting gamers relive the glory days of Halo 2
(one of the greatest multiplayer games in history) back when
Xbox Live was in its infancy. For $60, it’ll be an absolute steal
when it launches Nov. 11.
Really, it was Microsoft’s main rival that had everything
to lose. Sony unofficially “won” 2013’s E3 with a presentation
that saw the eagerly awaited reveal of the PS4, as well as its
$399 starting price – $100 lower than the price Redmond had
announced for the Xbox One earlier that day. Some amus-
ing barbs at their rival’s flip-flopping over the One’s features
and price, and a worked-up crowd created an energy that was
undeniably powerful. This year? Everything kind of fell apart.
Perhaps it was the absence of Jack Tretton, who stepped down
as President and CEO of Sony’s American operations. Perhaps
it was the apparent absence of any kind of editing. Sony’s two-
hour conference dragged, particularly during a middle segment
focused on facts and figures and a presentation about an upcom-
ing TV show exclusive to PlayStation that offered absolutely
nothing beyond a premise and some concept art. Why it got at
least five minutes on stage is anyone’s guess.
Perhaps Sony has earned the right to consume two hours
and gloat about its successes. The PS4 has now topped Ameri-
can sales charts for five straight months, and is the undisputed
leader of this current generation. Microsoft failed to announce
any sales figures – they didn’t even touch upon a new Kinect-less
bundle for the One which retails at the same price as the PS4 in
an attempt to boost sales. Sony reveled in taking a break from
games to discuss Project Morpheus, a highly-anticipated virtual
reality headset which they claim will come to market some time
in 2015, while PlayStation TV was announced, a $99 device akin
to Apple TV that can stream movies and TV shows, as well as
PlayStation games through Sony’s PS Now streaming service.
That’s not to say that there weren’t plenty of games, though.
The creators of Dark Souls announced BLOODBORNE, a violent,
horror adventure which tasks players with exploring a city
cursed with an endemic illness. Like Dark Souls, expect to die.
A lot. Keeping with the gruesome, THE ORDER 1886 showcased
some more of its horror side, with another violent trailer giv-
ing gamers a deeper glimpse into what they can expect. Initial
media reactions to the game were mixed, but the team behind
it are said to have made a lot of improvements to the gameplay.
Here’s hoping it pays off when the game launches in February.
Sony offered another look at THE LAST OF US, which has been
buffed from its already-beautiful PS3 version for a PS4 release,
though those that have already played through the incredible
game will find little new to enjoy here. If you need something a
little more… horrendously violent? Enter LET IT DIE, from Suda 51.
Not a great deal is known, but the trailer and subsequent chatter
detail a free-to-play, asynchronous online game, which will fea-
ture brutal combat. Should a person die in game, their soul will
be uploaded to the game’s servers and used as enemies in other
players’ games. Expect more details on the PS4 exclusive at the
40 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
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Tokyo Game Show.
If you’re not one for horror or zombies – yours truly included
in that group – then Sony had you catered for with LITTLEBIG-
PLANET 3. The latest installment in the series sees adorable
protagonist Sackboy joined by three friends, Swoop, Toggle and
Oddcloth, to add greater depth to an already stellar platformer.
What’s more, any user-created levels from the first two games
will work here, so it’ll launch with thousands of additional
levels out of the box (and via the Interwebs). ABZU, meanwhile,
is a spiritual successor to Sony’s beautifully ethereal Journey,
created by the art director of that game and featuring music
by Austin Wintory, who gave Journey its incredible score. It
offers a similarly striking art style and setting — an underwater
world ripe for exploration – and should offer more mellow-yet-
engrossingly emotional gameplay. Fans of ‘90s cult classic GRIM
FANDANGO were offered a surprise when Sony announced a re-
mastered edition for PS4 and PS Vita, bringing the acclaimed
dark-comedy adventure game into the modern era.
Two announcements, arguably, stole Sony’s show – though
both were far from surprises. Sony’s “and one more thing” game
was the highly anticipated UNCHARTED 4, the first edition of the
franchise on PS4. Set to launch at the end of next year, little is
known about what adventures Nathan Drake will be undertak-
ing, though he will be on the hunt for pirate treasure this time
around. Rumored to be Drake’s final outing, the gorgeous trailer
was confirmed after its debut to be running in-game – a clear
sign that this latest game will continue its predecessors’ claims
as some of the most beautiful games ever made. Even with big-
budget sequels and fresh IP, though, there was one game that
generated more buzz than any other, at any other conference.
NO MAN’S SKY, an indie game developed by a studio of just ten
people, is an incredibly ambitious sci-fi game. Dropping play-
ers onto their own unique planet, it gives them the tools to take
their adventure into space, where a procedurally generated open
universe offers potentially unlimited gameplay and exploration.
With dreamy visuals and gameplay that includes deep explora-
tion and altercations with planet-based predators and other
spaceships, its sheer scope is reason enough to be excited.
Nintendo once again eschewed the “big conference” mental-
ity of its competitors, opting for another digital event, with a pre-
recorded broadcast featuring a highlights reel of what Nintendo
fans can expect over coming year. Unfortunately, while SUPER
SMASH BROS. should offer some compelling party action when
it launches later this year, Nintendo failed to offer any other
compelling reasons to buy a Wii U now, which is what it really
needs. Sales are in the toilet and consumers are apathetic at best.
However, hold off until next year to buy a Wii U and you’re
in for a treat. First up is HYRULE WARRIORS, a game combining the
lore of the Legend of Zelda series with the frenzied, massive-scale
combat of the Dynasty Warriors franchise. Expect over-the-top
special moves, hoards of Zelda enemies and playable charac-
ters including Link, Zelda, Midna and Impa, with more to be
announced. Continuing with the Zelda franchise, THE LEGEND OF
ZELDA WII U is an all-new Zelda game for, well, the Wii U. Kind of
obvious, really. Hyrule was the main focus of Nintendo’s presen-
tation, with beautiful graphics and an impressive sense of scale
to world. This new game seeks to break from the constraints
of recent Zelda games, removing the strict dungeon-crawling
nature of past titles and moving to an open, freely traversable
world. Even Link has been overhauled, eschewing his green tunic
for a new blue number. Expect to see both Zelda games next year.
One surprise from Nintendo’s camp was SPLATOON, a fun
twist on the competitive shooter that removes the violence and
gore and pumps in heavy doses of fun and color. Players take
part in 4v4 matches, armed with paint guns and tasked with
coating as much of the world in their team’s color before the
round is up. Want to take out a member of the opposing team?
Shoot them and they’ll pop like a paint-filled balloon, which
means this is one shooter playable by both adults and kids
alike. A unique twist is the ability to transform into a squid at
any time, using the paint to scale objects and offer new vantage
points on combat. Expect it to launch… well, next year. Just like
every other game you want to play now. Nintendo rounded out
its presentation with a surprise announcement: STAR FOX. The
3D scrolling classic gets a gorgeous update, with the GamePad’s
motion sensor used to steer the Arwing fighter, Landmaster tank
and a new helicopter vehicle. Shigeru Miyamoto is directly in
charge of the project and it’s assured to be everything fans of the
series expect it to be. Sadly, it won’t drop until 2015. C’est la vie.
E3 is always a case of looking to the future of gaming, but this
year’s conference seemed all too focused on games releasing in
2015 as opposed to this year. The new generation of consoles has
been criticized for a lack of content to justify upgrading from the
PS3 and 360, while the Wii U continues to struggle to offer any
compelling reasons at all for jumping ship. Next year is shaping
up to be a great year for gaming, though, with games from third-
party manufacturers including FAR CRY 4, ASSASSIN’S CREED UNITY
and RISE OF THE TOMB RAIDER all expected to launch alongside the
first party titles announced at the various hardware manufactur-
ers’ conferences. That’s not to say that it wasn’t an impressive
show. There really was something for everyone on display, span-
ning all genres and running the gamut from mainstream to indie.
It’s just a shame that so much teased to those in attendance was a
case of: look, but don’t touch. At least for another year, that is. l
41 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
Interpets
Six websites where
pet lovers should flock
W
ELCOMING A PET INTO YOUR HOME ISN’T
just an easy way to gain Instagram follow-
ers – because who doesn’t love a cute puppy
picture? – it’s also a full-time commitment to
make sure the animal receives the best care and training pos-
sible. Whereas owners, both current and prospective, used to
rely on their vets or self-help books, nowadays seeking advice
for something pet-related is as simple as using your smartphone.
We’ve found six websites that’ll make the entire experience of
having a pet infinitely more rewarding and enjoyable.
PETFINDER.COM is one of the best ways to search for your
perfect pet. At the time of writing, they have over 300,000
animals available to adopt, sourced from over 13,000 adoption
groups throughout North America. From dogs to cats, horses to
hamsters, snakes to pigs, they have a wide variety of creatures
and critters to suit every taste. Petfinder serves as a database,
pooling data from the thousands of organizations that contribute
their animal listings to it – indeed, their main aim is to increase
public awareness of the availability of high-quality adoptable
pets. Updated daily, the site also contains numerous forums,
discussions and articles to help get you set-up for adopting and
to assist potential owners in making their homes as welcoming
and pet-ready as possible.
Should you give one of the thousands of homeless animals
their “forever home,” you’re going to need supplies. Food, bed-
ding, collars, harnesses, tanks, cages, medicine and hygiene care
— whatever your pet needs, you can find it at DOCTORS FOSTER
AND SMITH (drsfostersmith.com). The good doctors have been
in operation since 1983, when they opened their first animal
hospital. Their aim? Make your pet’s life happier and healthier
– and who can argue with an end goal like that? Of course, as
primary caregiver, it’s you who will have the greatest impact
on your pet’s health, so they’ve distilled a wealth of information
and products to help keep your pet at their best into one website.
Healthcare, particularly prescriptions, can be expensive, but
Doctors Foster and Smith attempts to make it as easy as possible
with low prices, 12-hour shipping and owner support available
via email, phone or instant messaging. Need further help? User
forums offer guidance and advice on virtually every topic and
question imaginable.
Of course, there’s one key ingredient every dog owner needs
in order to enjoy their pet: training. More often than not, any
problems caused by an unruly pup are a result of poor training by
its owner – fail to keep your energetic friend under control and it
can cause all manner of headaches down the line. Not everyone
pets
by RHUARIDH MARR
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42 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
can afford to hire trainers, or attend specialized classes, though,
which makes CESAR’S WAY (cesarsway.com) the perfect pit stop
en route to adopting a dog. With a multitude of free advice
from renowned TV dog trainer Cesar Milan and the website’s
curators, including articles and videos, it’s easy to learn the
simple tools and tricks needed to make sure your new best friend
doesn’t destroy your favorite couch or urinate all over that
expensive rug you just bought. If you need further help, Cesar’s
books and DVDs are available to purchase, but with so much
free information available they’re almost superfluous – just don’t
say that to his (very handsome) face.
Even with the best training and healthcare, there’s always the
chance that something outside of your control could go wrong.
A big concern for pet owners? Poison. We’re not just talking
the bubbling liquid in the bottle with a skull on it: prescription
medication, household products, human food and chocolate are
all potentially poisonous to animals. For instance, lots of owners
still like to give their pets chocolate (dogs, in particular, have an
affinity for the heavenly substance). However, it can cause vom-
iting, diarrhea, raised heart rate, and even seizures. The ASPCA
reportedly receives, on average, 26 calls a day relating to pets
ingesting chocolate, so it’s clearly still something owners aren’t
doing enough to prevent. Luckily, the ASPCA’s website, ASPCA.
ORG, has everything you need to avoid accidentally poisoning the
family pet. As well as lists of the most common toxic substances
for animals – which include certain plants, lawn products and
household cleaning items – the ASPCA also provides invaluable
advice on how to poison-proof your home. However, should
the worst happen, there’s also information on spotting the
symptoms of poisoning and what steps owners can take to help
a poisoned animal. It’s definitely worth a read, as it could save
Kayla
“She loves people watching and playing at the dog park.
She also is a water rat! Loves swimming. Just the biggest joy of my life.”
Dennis’s 2 1/2 year-old BeshaPoo
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43 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014 43 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
your pet’s life.
Owning a pet can be stressful and requires a lot of time and
effort, but it also reaps its own rewards. The bond between
humans and their animals is incredibly strong, which is what
makes THE DODO (thedodo.com) such great reading. Think of it
as Tumblr for animal-lovers. With content curated from across
the Internet, you’ll have a wide variety of animal-related articles
to peruse. An average trip to the site could include an article full
of GIFs of cows really enjoying a good scratch, or a story about
a trainee fireman saving a kitten from a canal. I practically over-
dosed on cuteness at the sight of a sea lion pup that had rolled in
sand to protect itself from sunburn. There are some particularly
sobering articles as well. Pugs may be an Internet sensation and
a highly coveted companion pet, but one article highlighted
the breeding practices that have led to their flat-faced, chubby
appearance and the numerous health-problems it causes. Think
videos of pugs snoring are adorable? It’s because they can’t
breathe properly. If you’re truly an animal lover, The Dodo is
definitely worthy of inclusion in your daily reading.
If, however, all you want is to see adorable pictures, videos
and GIFs of creatures, great and small, head straight over to CUTE
OVERLOAD (cuteoverload.com). If you can ignore the occasionally
idiotic captions and descriptions attached to content – do we
really think dogs call us “hoomins”? – there’s a wealth of stuff
guaranteed to make you smile. If cute kittens, precious pups and
quirky Quokkas (look them up, they’re ridiculously cute) are all
you want from the Internet, Cute Overload is the place for you.
Plus, if you think your pet is worthy of global fame, they accept
submissions from readers, so that picture you snapped of your cat
sleeping awkwardly could soon brighten the day on the other side
of the world. How’s that for reaping the rewards of ownership? l
NIGHT
LIFE
45 METROWEEKLY.COM
t
THURS., 06.19.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRI., 06.20.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
LISTINGS
46 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
The Boys of Hump,
9pm-2am • VJ Tre and
Friday night videos •
$5 Cover • 1 Free Rail/
Domestic Drink from
9pm-10pm • $5 Smirnoff
favors all night
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka
• DJ Wess upstairs,
BacK2bACk downstairs •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SAT., 06.21.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • $5 Absolut &
Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after
9pm • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Freddie’s Follies Drag
Show 8 pm-10pm,
10pm-1am Karaoke
GREEN LANTERN
495 Bears presents Bears
Can Dance • Featuring DJ
Jeff Eletto of Bears Can
Party • Doors open 9pm •
No Cover
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Doors 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
Featuring dj TWiN • Drag
Show starts at 10:30pm
• Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
downstairs • Doors open
10pm • Cover $8 from
10-11pm, $12 after 11pm
• 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Doors
8pm • Cover • 21+
SUN., 06.22.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm • Crazy
Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke
8pm-1am
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
47
t
METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
Club Hippo Post-Pride Party with
DJ Susan Morabito
Saturday, June 14
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Pop Goes the World with
Wes Della Volla at 9:30
pm • Happy Hour: 2 for
1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Sunday Brunch, 11am-3pm
• Bottomless Mimosas •
$15 per person
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+
MON., 06.23.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
48 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
TUES., 06.24.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
2-for-1, all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • No Cover • Safe
Word: A Gay Spelling
Bee, 8-11pm • Prizes to
top three spellers • After
9pm, $3 Absolut, Bulleit
& Stella
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 06.25.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Half-Price Burger Night
• Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
THURS., 06.26.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRI., 06.27.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
49 METROWEEKLY.COM JUNE 19, 2014
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
BOOM: Shirtless Bears
Dancing hosted by DJ
Boom • Music by DJ
Onyx Theo Storm • Doors
open 9pm • $5 Cover
after 10pm • $5 Smirnoff
favors all night
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka
• DJ Wess upstairs,
BacK2bACk downstairs •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
50 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
51 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
52 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
53 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
The Stars of RuPaul’s
Drag Race Season 6
Saturday, June 7
Town
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON

The AMA seeks to ensure that
transgender patients always receive appropriate preventive care regardless of whether or not
it matches with the gender on the birth certificate.”
— American Medical Association President ARDIS DEE HOVEN in a statement imploring states to end requirements that
transgender individuals undergo surgery before their legal gender can be recognized.
(AMA)

Obviously,
homosexual attractions are not a ‘choice’
in the vast majority of cases.

— TONY PERKINS, head of the Family Research Council, in a statement posted to the FRC’s website. Perkins made the statement in
response to Texas Governor Rick Perry’s declaration that homosexuality was akin to alcoholism.
(FRC)

I encourage players, sports people to
declare their sexual orientation without fear.
That’s the only way they will find the right to sexual orientation accepted.

— NAVI PILLAY, UN Human Rights Commissioner, in a statement during a UN sports equality event. Pillay’s comments were
aimed at the World Cup, though soccer has been resistant to embrace openly gay players. Pillay stated that it was “a shame, in
this day and age” that gay soccer players “had to hide who they really are.”
(Reuters)

This is consistent with the President’s views that all Americans, LGBT or not, should be
treated with dignity and respect.”
— A White House official on President Obama’s intentions to sign an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from
LGBT workplace discrimination.
(Metro Weekly)


You are my daughter — you deserve the same love and acceptance and to share in the same freedoms to
marry the person you love.”
— An excerpt from a letter penned by Texas State Senator JUAN “CHUY” HINOJOSA (D-Mission) to his openly gay daughter on
Father’s Day. Hinojosa previously sponsored a bill aimed at legalizing civil unions in Texas, but has
now confirmed that he supports full equal marriage.
(Waco-Tribune Herald)
54 JUNE 19, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM

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