You are on page 1of 50

45

DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
KABADKHANA:
the makings of
a community
DRAFT
January 27 2012
46
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
3 # Project Description
4 # Approach and Design process
8 # Community Analysis
9 # The Madrasi Colony Solution
12 # Case Studies
14 # Case Study 1: Open Spaces
22 # Case Study 2: Streetscape
34 # Case Study 3: Naala

44 # Housing
47 # Team Members
48 # Acknowledgements & References
49 # Contacts
CONTENTS
DRAFT
January 27 2012
47
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
The Housing Studio takes its departure from the
current policy initiative under Rajiv Awas Yojana
(RAY), a fagship program for providing Housing
and Basic services to the urban poor. The
studio investigated current practice of poverty
alleviation as realized in a recent housing
project for the Madrasi Colony slum, which
provided new G+3 residential dwellings on the
site of the former slum. In contradistinction to
the development approach applied at Madrasi
Colony, the studio went on to investigate
alternative, scaled and participatory design
methods, as propagated by RAY, to improve
a notifed slum in the Kabadkhana area in the
northern part of Bhopal. The intent of the studio
is to understand the existing neighborhood as
an intricate material, spatial and social fabric,
and to provide case study approaches and
solutions to build upon the existing qualities of
the place to improve the living conditions of the
urban poor.
kabadkhana(+):
studio housing
Three major case study areas were identifed
and worked on, namely the existing open and
public spaces in and around the public middle
school to rethink the potential of open spaces to
strengthen community and public life, the naala
along the northern border of our study site to
rethink water management and how it relates to
the material fows within the neighborhood, and
lastly an exemplary street section connecting
the naala and open public spaces to investigate
the domestic reality of the neighborhood.
The investigations and design proposals
were developed under the preposition that
it is preferable to work with and build upon
the existing materiality and built fabric of a
neighborhood rather then to erase and build
anew. The wide range of proposals serve to
illustrate possible material solutions as well as
processes applied to build upon found qualities
of any particular slum site. RAY acknowledges
a scaled approach from basic services to in-
fll improvements and to entirely new housing
developments. Based upon our design research,
propositions for new housing schemes were
developed, and suggestions for material
standards in larger scale housing developments.
project description
48
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
approach and processes
1
1. Interviews with local community
2. Using Replay Method to involve the children.
3. Garbage collection at school
4. Taking measurements for proposed site
5. Building relationships to understand daily routines
2 3
5
4
49
approach and process
The traditional understanding of the design
process focuses on a linear approach, where
the process is a series of distinct stages leading
to a fnal product. In this approach, different
actors and disciplines contribute their particular
knowledge and expertise at key stages during
the design process. However this linear
approach is not suitable for complex problem
solving, instead it needs to be cyclic and
refective process where all design disciplines
are involved at every stage. Collaboration
between all members of the team generates
innovative outcomes and is imperative if the
goal is to enhance and to do justice to the
complex and multifaceted social and material
realities of the urban poor.
During the preparation and execution of our
design research, our team of architects, urban
designers, planners and researchers worked
closely together on a variety of participatory
methods to understand the executed solution
at Madrasi Colony and to arrive at inclusive and
participatory suggestions for the Kabadkhana
neighbourhood.
At Madrasi Colony we surveyed the material
evidence in regards to quality, use and
hierarchies of spaces, construction quality,
and qualitative narrative assessments by the
inhabitants.
We approached the design task at Kabadkhana
with two strategies in mind:
a) identifying the perceptions of the spatial and
social realities of the community and
b) to use our own observations as basis for
design recommendations. These two sets of
information were put into dialogue through
community interaction and discussions of design
proposals with community stakeholders.
THE DESIGN PROCESS COMPARISON NON-SEQUENTIAL PRO-
under
standing
Photo Essay
Listening
DEFINE observe
create
ideas
TEST PROTOTYPE
Site visits
Photo essay
surveys
interviews
Identifcation
of 5 issues
3 projects
sketches
draws
modeling
sketches
models
events
education
material
New Parallel Processing
yesterday
today
Project Ende Project Start
Project Ende Project Start
Single-disciplne Alone work
yesterday
today
Project Ende Project Start
Cross-disciplne
Complex
Problems
through
the design
process
Multiple
Discipline
Single
Discipline
yesterday
Single
Problems
today
MULTIDICIPLINARY PRO-
DESIGN THINKING MODEL FOR PARTICIPATORY DE-
SIGN
50
design process case study
On the basis of community input and our own
observations a set of educational, spatial and
material interventions were developed that
can strengthen and improve the found urban
conditions on a short, mid- and long-term basis.
The community input and engagement was
solicited through three strategies:
1) Identify community stake holders, such as
educational, religious and other community
decision makers and facilitators.
2) Engage with Children both formally
and informally focusing on the children as
gatekeepers to the community both in a spatial
and social sense. Games in classroom and in
informal environments were used for community
mapping and as entrance to other members of
the community (parents, teachers etc.)
3) Spatial Observations through feldwork
Both qualitative and material problems were
identifed by talking to the community and
through informal observation and mappings.
The design process of underwent various loops
with involving the stakeholders during the
development of the proposals.
SITE ANALYSIS/ DATA COLLECTION
Interviews with principal, local community
Replay mapping exercises with the children
Walks with children onsite
Involving community in taking photographs of
their daily routines
PARTICIPATORY DESIGN OUTCOME
Taking measurements with local community
Turning locals desires into a spatial reality
Educating locals on technology and design
options through prototypes
DESIGN PROPOSAL
outcomes
The outcomes of our research and design studio
were manifold and correspond to the various
agendas to frame our proposals. The guiding
questions were:
1) What are the defciencies of the Madrasi
Colony that can serve as lessons learned
for future policy, development and building
approaches?
2) What are the qualities of the Kabadkhana
neighbourhood that can be strengthened and
built upon for improving and upgrading the
neighbourhood?
3) What are the problems within the
neighbourhood on a material and urban level
that require improvement as perceived through
the community?
In regards to the Madrasi Colony we perceived
voiced discontent by the inhabitants regarding
various aspects of the new housing, such as lack
of livelihood spaces, affordability, open drainage
and quality of building. Further we perceived
some basic and easily avoidable design faws
such as lack of diversity in the dwelling units,
missing cross ventilation, and under utilised
spaces for ventilation and daylighting. In regards
to the overall layout of the settlement a distinct
lack of consideration to the public and open
spaces was the general perception.
Despite the fact that the Kabadkhana site is
classifed as notifed slum we encountered a
multifaceted community with a rich layering
of social and spatial evidence. A number of
open and public spaces was used by different
members of the community at different times
and for different occasions and we perceived
a quality and attachment that marks a living
community.
The problems that were voiced by the
community and that were also noted by the
team through on-site observations concerned
water and waste water, garbage removal,
education and basic services.
MEMORY GAME
DETAILED DESIGN PROCESS
51
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
initial thoughts
We began by asking ourselves What are slums?
And the answers seemed to always fall into
three categories - living conditions, relationships
and personal perceptions. From this point we
started to communicate with the residents and
occupants of the neighborhood, asking them
what it is they needed and what they wanted to
improve their living conditions.
The initial site visits made us aware of
something we had taken for granted of all these
whileour carpet term community did not do
justifcation to the rich cultures, personalities,
history, landscape that layered Kabadkhana. To
consider community as a homogenous group of
desires, needs and characteristics and propose
design according to such presumptions would
have negative implications because the root
of the issues will not be suffciently addressed.
If we were to bring a signifcant change in a
sensitive manner, the word community would
require a more in depth exploration.

what is community?
RELATION-
SHIPS
A
POSITIVE
FuTuRE
PLACE
MAKING
+
KABADKHANA:
what people
want
ELDERLY
WOMEN
MEN
CHILDREN
OUTDOOR
INDOOR
STREETS
HOUSES
COMMUNITY
CENTERS
PARKS
52
Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
is madrasi colony G+3
the solution?
PROCESS
At frst we visited Madrasi colony and tried to
understand what a rehabilitation project for a
slum is? What has government done for the
slum dwellers? We collected information about
their lifestyles, socio-economic status, physical
and environmental status along with current
services provided to them. We also went to
Kabadkhana, as one of the notifed slums of
Bhopal to understand what a slum is and how
do the people live there?
We did a survey in Kabadkhana because
learnings were not done by us in Madrasi colony
before JNNURM project intervention. Hence
it was necessary to understand the slum, the
communities living in slums, their need and
issues.
There we learnt what is the actual need of the
community in terms of living together and work
together.
Based on our understandings/learnings and
looking into the issues generated out of
Rehabilitation project like that in Madrasi colony
we again came to Madrasi colony and tried to
check issues with regard to not only physical but
the social aspect. Hence we tried to redesign the
housing clusters with our perception applying
certain concepts like Incremental housing. We
also gave proposals for the Kabadkhana to
improve their lifestyles by giving proposals and
identifying major issues like Garbage disposal,
drinking water, Naala redevelopment, and
making children aware of how can they solve
their small problems by the things available all
around them.
uDPFI guidelines and Bhopal Master Plan are the
main governing bye-laws that we have followed.
COMMuNITY LIFE
OVERVIEW
BROKEN WALLS
53
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
POLICY FRAMEWORK MADRASI
High-rise Multi-Level Construction:
Sr.
No.
Standard Height above 24
meters
18 to 24 meters
high buildings
12.5 to 18.0
meter high
buildings
1 Plot Size 2000 sq. m 1500 sq. m 1000 sq. m
2 Frontage of plot
on wider road
30 m minimum 21 m minimum 18 m
3 Minimum width
of road
Not less than 30
m
Not less than 18
m
12 m
4 Front Open
Space
Minimum Half of
the height of
proposed
building
12.0 m 9.0 m
5 Side and Rear
Open Space
Minimum of
building height
6.0 m 6.0 m
6 Ground
Coverage
30 % 30 % 30 %
7 F. A. R. 1:2.0 1:1.50 1:1.30
8
Marginal open spaces should be kept free from obstructions for fire-
fighting vehicles.
9
Parking provisions should be as per Madhya Pradesh Bhumi Vikas Rules,
1984, Rule 82.
10
Fire fighting equipments and related provisions, water supply, wastewater
disposal arrangements etc shall be as per Madhya Pradesh Bhumi Vikas
Rules, 1984 and latest provisions of National Building Code..
11
Prior to Construction of High Rise Buildings, permission from Committee
formed under Rule 14 (a) of Madhya Pradesh Bhumi Vikas Rules, 1984
must be obtained. Only after that Competent officer depending upon
jurisdiction can give relevant permission.
12
These provisions are for all categories of uses and not withstanding any
provisions in any specified uses in any zone, if the height exceed 18.0
meters refer (M.P. Bhumi Vikas Niyam 1984)

BY-LAWS
Number ofDwelling Unitsshallbe104 per
hectareandthepopulationshallbe250
personsper hectare(Maximum).
For plots with area greater than 5000 square
meters, ground coverage and F.A.R. calculations
will be applicable to 60% of land area only and
this provision will be applicable to multi-storey
buildings, group housing and all other types
of schemes.
54
what is community:
learning from kabadkhana
This proposal looks at the Kabadkhana area,
specifcally the site bordered by Chhola Road
to the east, the Veer Sawarkar statue and
attached road to the south, the forested area to
the west and the naala to the north. This area is
typifed by semi-pucca housing, inter dispersed
with occasional pucca houses and clusters of
kucha houses bordering the naala. In terms of
slum settlements this area is signifcantly more
developed than many, but still lacks much
infrastructure including a permanent drainage
network, sanitation systems and connection
to municipal water in most areas. There is a
large waste disposal issue, particularly in the
naala, which leads to health issues within the
community and the children.
The majority of work for men within the
community comes the Kabadkhana scrap yards
and the burgeoning workshops along Chhola
Road. The womens role is predominantly a
household one; doing washing and cleaning
during the day whilst the men are working and
the children are at school or playing.
The community has a fairly even disbursement
of Hindi and Muslim families, and as such has
both Hindu temples, and Muslim mosques
situated within the sites boundaries. There is
also one government primary - middle school,
one government high school and a private
Muslim school situated within the community.
CIRCULATION
HOME
STREETS
WOMEN
<
<
HOME
WORK
MEN
<
<
The people
HOME SCHOOL STREETS
CHILDREN
<<
<
<
< <
+
55
BASE MAP
KABADKHANA
+
open
spaces
=
streetscape
naala
Three case studies
During our interviews with local residents,
we identifed fve key issues that need to be
addressed within Kabadkhana.
These issues are:
Access to water;
Solid Waste collection;
Education (children and adult);
Infrastructure services; and
Housing.
In consultation with local residents, we proposed
to explore three particular case studies open
space adjacent to a local school and Hindu
temple; a typical streetscape and the naala that
borders the north of Kabadkhana. These case
studies allowed our team to develop a range of
proposals, at both the micro and macro scale
and for short, medium and long term solutions.
By developing a detailed understanding of these
case studies, the team was then able to propose
solutions for housing for the urban poor.
56
MAPping basic services
While mapping the slums for basic services
like water, housing, sanitation etc., we found
many interesting observations. The worst
water conditions correlated to worst housing
conditions. The municipality sewage line
network was installed only to relatively better
off lanes. We identifed problems and tried
to come up with strategies for architectural
intervention.
BASEMAP
HOUSING AND WATER CONDITIONS
WATER CONDITION
WATER -WORST AFFECTED AREAS
57
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
The open spaces case study focuses on a central
space around a government school and a Hindu
temple with attached park.
#1 open spaces
Case Study #1 Open Spaces
connecting public spaces
information dissemination
participatory design
Our frst intervention was a garbage separation
and education program in the school. This
included our group going to the school and
running education classes including a memory
game, coloring in books and other activities
to educate the children about the necessity
of sanitation and garbage collection and
separation. The day ended in the children and
the global studio participants doing a clean
up of the school yard, and having the rubbish
removed by the council.
Part of the master plan for the school and
temple area also included a connection between
the school play yard and temple park. This link
from the back of the school creates stronger
and aver connections for the children in
Kabadkhana.
58
Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
SHANKAR
DAYAL
SHARMA
SCHOOL
1
GARBAGE
EDUCATION
PROGRAM
2
PARK
UPGRADE
3
VERTICAL
GARDEN
4
CASE STUDY #1
OPEN SPACES
COMMUNITY
HALL
#1 Case Study Open Spaces
Existing Condition
attached to a Hindu temple
dilapidated and barren
no vegetation
no playground around school
Site Needs
facilities for daily activities
grass for the children to play on
general regeneration of the site
59
shankar dayal
sharma school
Community Hall
We identifed a conglomerate of open public
and semi-public spaces around the existing
Public School in the southern part of the
neighborhood. The area is currently functioning
as a sort of public focus for community activities
and has the potential to strengthen communal
life and spatial neighborhood identity.
Three key issues were identifed that should be
addressed to improve the existing conditions
and strengthen its social and spatial potential.
These issues are:
access to drinking water and sanitary
facilities;
garbage separation and removal; and
access and physical quality of spaces.
From this observation we developed a series
of interlocking proposals which can be
incorporated into a lesson plan and can facilitate
improvements to the spatial conditions.
SITE BEFORE PROPOSED MASTERPLAN
CONNECTION OPEN SPACE SCHOOL
Temple
school
60
SCHOOL yard
School+Program to create a set of spatial
and action proposals that can act as a possible
toolkit for how to approach improvements to
improvisational housing, public education and
social communal space.
1) Identify school and key stake holders this
might also include children as stakeholders in
the community.
2) Engage with Children both formally and
informally
a) games in the classroom RePlay, community
mapping
b) games in informal spaces RePlay and
community maps where children play based on
shadowing the children.
SITE BEFORE DESIGN PROPOSAL
BASEMAP SCHOOL ADDITION FOR SECuRITY GuARD
NEW SCHOOL FRONT
61
Garbage education program
When it came to milestones the process was
inclusive and fuid utilizing the various skills and
disciplines in an organic way amongst the team.
We focused on the children as gatekeepers, and
also unique in terms of how they interact with
the spatial environment in that they might use
the local space differently.
Spatial Observations through feldwork
Both qualities and material problems were
identifed by talking to the community and
through informal observation and mappings.
Implementation in 3 Parts
We approached the design task with two types
of strategies in mind utilizing graphic design to
create a set of educational tools to support and
work with the spatial recommendations that
were being made to the site.
We also proceeded based on interviews with
the principal and mapping exercises as well as
conducting site visits.
From a graphics program we focused on
creating a rich iconic language that could be
used for educational purposes as well as for
use on location. We began frst with building an
iconic symbol for the neighbor hood that might
perhaps unify various smaller communities
of houses and create a sense of integration
amongst diverse members of the community.
This resulted in a logo for the neighborhood
Kabadkhana+.
On the basis of community input and our own
observations a set of educational, spatial and
material interventions were developed that can
strengthen and improve the found conditions on
a short, mid- and long-term basis.
3 Key Locations of Focus:
Open Spaces within the Public School
Open Spaces surrounding the Public School
Community Hall
MEMORY GAME INVOLVING THE TEACHER
SCHOOL YARD CLEAN UP
62
SITE MAPPING WITH THE CHILDREN
ExISTING FESTIvAL FLOAT PROPOSED FESTIvAL FLOAT
park upgrade
Located adjacent to a Hindu temple, the park
is a meeting place for local residents and users
of the temple. The park is well patronised
with children, men, women and the elderly
all making use of the space for their daily
activities. Members of the temple society assist
in management of the park. Working with local
residents we undertook a participatory design
process by inviting them to draw their ideas
fort he park. As a result of this consultation, we
propose to upgrade the park with new paving;
improvements to the drainage system; and
provide new landscaping, park furniture and
playground equipment. An existing festival
foat could be reused to create this playground
equipment.
63
VERTICAL
GARDEN
4
FILTER
CLEANING
& WASTING
GREY
WATER
RE-USABLE
WATER
ORGANIC
MATTER
>
>
>
>
>
>
PROPOSED SYSTEM DETAIL
vertical garden
Kabadkhana is a diverse community which
makes the majority of its income from the
innovative reuse of scrap materials. It was from
this idea that we decided to make a vertical
garden using discarded water bottles. This
had multiple values as it not only taught the
residents of the area about the possibilities
of scrap reuse for community projects, but
also about water sanitation, recycling and
environmentally sustainable principles whilst
also providing extra food supplies for the
community.
The vertical garden begins with a rudimentary
sieve which separates solid waste such as food
scrap from household grey water. From this
point the water travels through a second flter
which comprises layers of charcoal brick and
sand. This partially fltered water is then routed
to the main vertical gardens, which contains
edible plants such as herbs and spinach, where
the water is fltered once again through the root
systems of the plants.
64
EDUCATION PROGRAM
WITH CHILDREN IN
CLASS INCLUDING
COLLuDING BOOK AND
MEMORY GAME ABOUT
SANITATION AND GAR-
BAGE SEPARATION
SYMBOLIC PLANTING
OF TREE IN SCHOOL
GROUNDS
CLEAN UP AND WASTE
SEPARATION ACTIVITY AT
SCHOOL
l
o
n
g

t
e
r
m
m
i
d

t
e
r
m
s
h
o
r
t

t
e
r
m
classroom school community
SCHOOL BUILDING UPGRADE
INCLUDING NEW PERMA-
NENT ROOFING WITH CEIL-
ING TO THE MAIN BUILDING,
PLANTING OF FuRTHER
TREES, NEW CLASSROOM
PLACEMENT AND MASTER
PLANNING TO CONNECT
GREEN OUTDOOR SPACES
NEW ADDITION SECURITY
GUARD
WASTE SEPARATION
FACILITY
IMPLEMENTATION WITHIN
TEMPLE AREA
PATHWAY BETWEEN
SCHOOL AND TEMPLE AREA
FOR STRONGER AND SAFER
CONNECTIONS
REDEVELOPMENT AND MASTER
PLANNING OF TEMPLE PARK AREA
INCLUDING PLAY EQUIPMENT AND
FESTIvAL FLOAT uPGRADE
FINALISATION OF
COMMUNITY HALL WITHIN
SCHOOL
short, medium and longterm
suggestions
ACTION PLAN MATRIX
EDUCATION PLAN TO
FOLLOW uP ON
CLASSROOM ACTIVITY
REGARDING SANITA-
TION AND WASTE SEP-
ARATION
IMPLEMENTATION OF GAR-
BAGE SEPARATION WASTE
FACILITIES
RENAMING OF SCHOOL TO
CREATE OWNERSHIP AND
IDENTITY WITH
COMMUNITY
65
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
upgrade for community life
India, Bhopal, Kabadkhana -
The women within the street were the frst point
of contact, with a group of neighbors sitting
on a common stoop, socializing and reliving
a recent marriage of one of their daughters.
Further towards the naala another group of
women sat outside their homes, washing clothes
together and preparing meals for when their
husbands returned that night. The women within
this street seem to have a strong social network,
and were the most vocal of the groups about
changes that could occur in their neighborhood.
The men and children are not forgotten within
this area though, and freely occupy the space
along side the women. The children are able
play cricket and games in the street due to its
larger width, and the men gather outside a small
temple on privately owned land.
It was from these groups, and their wishes
for their street that the four proposals were
established- a new drainage grate, an upgraded
community space on the street side, a Womens
Education and Training Centre and an infll
house design.
#2 STreet Scape
Case Study #2 Street
community space community hall
infill housing drainage system
building Community enhancing Vibrancy
empowering women

66
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
2
CASE STUDY #2
STREET SCAPE
COMMUNITY
SPACES
1
GENDER
EMPOWER-
MENT
2
DRAINAGE
3
INFILL
HOUSING
4
WATER
5
#2 Case Study Streetscape
Existing Condition
# systematic upgrade of the
drainage system to reduce
blockages from solid waste
and allow water to fow freely
towards the naala through a
series of grated drains and
potential bioswales
Site Needs
# systematic upgrade of
the drainage system to
reduce blockages from
solid waste and allow wa-
ter to fow freely towards
the naala through a series
of grated drains and po-
tential bioswales
67
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
1 2 3
4 7 6
5
Case Study #2 Street
type of houses
1. Kucha houses have little stability and do not provide much shelter against nature
2. Washing drapes over a semi-pucca house, with a temporary tin roof.
3. Even the more elaborate houses within e street do not have permanent roofng.
4. The construction and houses within the street show wear and tear.
5. The small pucca temple hides behind an array of washing and scaffolding.
6. The foundations stand for a pucca house to be built in the future.
7. The concrete roof of a pucca house doubles as useable space.
68
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
1 2 3
4 6 5
Case Study #2 Street
activities
1. Women use the concrete roads for doing their washing.
2. Improvised games are played on the streets by adults.
3. Children play cricket in the streets with whatever is available.
4. Meal preparation is a common activity within the street.
5. Everyday activities, such as sewing, are completed on the front stoop.
6. Children play in abandoned and derelict paddle boats.
69
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
1 2 3
4 6 5
Case Study #2 Street
street occupation
1. Washing outside of the home, on the stoop and street.
2. Men gather, sitting on a small step outside their home.
3. Women and their families are often found sitting on stoops in the public space.
4. Men cluster on the street to gamble and play games.
5. Families bring out furnitures such as chairs and beds to sit on the street.
6. This kucha house provides open space to the street which the children and women occupy.
Building relationships to understand
daily routines
70
BEFORE
AFTER
community spaces
Another area of defciency within the street,
is the lack of an established Community
space within the street, after observing the
locals gathering on the ground or bringing
out furniture to sit on. An open plot of land
outside a small temple was targeted for a
potential redevelopment by the community.
This proposed design replaces the existing
dirt ground with paving to make the area a
more formal and defned public space. This
existing site contains old scaffolding used as
a temporary stage for festivals and stacks of
old wooden crates. These items can be reused
and adapted to create a more permanent and
substantial stage and seating area adaptable
for multiple formal and informal uses. To the
southern end, planting and trees create privacy
for the neighbouring home and provide a soft
boundary. Finally a mural by the children adorns
the northern wall, allowing the community to
make their mark on the area and take ownership
of the site.
71
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
PROPOSED SITE
WOMEN PREPARING FOOD YOUNG WOMEN
gender
empowerment
WOMENS EDuCATION AND TRAINING CENTRE IN THE KABADKHANA
NEIGHBOURHOOD
Identifying theNeedWithintheCommunity
As the majority of work in this area comes from the scrap yards, garbage
collection and mechanics, womens employment is limited, and was one
of the frst issues identifed within the community. Through discussions
with the local women in various locations throughout the village, it
was established that a majority of women would like some form of
employment that could be completed at home. The suggestions included
stitching, candle making and painting among others.
Discussions within the community also led to the understanding that
many girls were not receiving a proper education past the age of 11 to 13,
due to a number of factors. These included excuses such as the families
not wanting their daughters to cross the busy Chhola Road to go to local
middle and high schools, the private schools were too expensive, the
government schools werent providing good education so there was no
point in sending the girls, and government schools which were affordable
were too far away. In essence the education for girls seemed to always
fall into the too hard basket, and was largely ignored.
From this it was clearly identifed that there needed to be some form of
further educational training for older girls as well as vocational training
for women that could improve chances of gainful employment. However,
due to the areas predominance of male occupations including scrap
metal collection and mechanics, the women do not have skills within
areas, which would be of use to create employment from home. It
was from this and further discussions with the women in parts of the
community which led to the suggested following proposal for a Womens
Education and Training Centre (WETC).
72
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
The most promising solution to poverty that
has been discovered so far is education. It is
through learning and further education that the
urban poor can better make their own informed
decisions, empowering them to take control of
their own futures and break the poverty cycle.
Education and gender equality are also outlined
in Millennium Development Goals 2 and 3.
Through suggestions from the community, a
suitable site to house the WETC was discovered
a vacant premises along one of the main
streets within the site, towards the naala. This
semi-pucca house is suitable for the purposes of
providing a private space in which the women
and girls can gather for classes in a variety of
purposes, and due to its location along a major
road within the community, it is easily accessible
to both women and younger girls without effort.
This site can be rented from the current private
owners for Rs 1,500 / month.
The initial set up of the program and centre
would focus foremost on the basic education for
teenage girls and vocational / skills training for
older women currently working within the home.
The current costings obtained from the Nirmal
Welfare Training Institute, Bhopal set prices at:
- Stitching and embroidery classes
Rs100/hour
- Agarbati (fragrance sticks) classes Rs120/hour
- Candle manufacturing classes
Rs110/hour
The current costings for English classes are as
follows:
- English for Housewives
Rs140/hour
- Basic English Rs200/hour
As stitching and embroidery were the most
popular suggestions amongst the community
initially, 3 classes of one hour each are
proposed. This will help to accommodate larger
numbers and allow the women to become more
profcient within this skill, as it produces one of
the most valuable products to sell. Agarbati and
candle manufacturing class would be run once
a week for one hour. English for housewives
is also a very valuable skill within the market
place, and a useful tool, for women to have in
the community. A class twice a week would be
proposed to help the women maintain continuity
and practise within the areas of speaking,
reading, writing and listening. These classes
would best be run during the hours of schooling,
after mothers have dropped off their children at
school.

As the success of each of these classes is
established, classes can be either be added or
dropped depending on their popularity and
viability. There would be the possibility to
extend this program with further vocational
courses for women including housewifery, frst
aid and administration courses. For the girls,
basic educational class can be added in addition
to the English classes including mathematics,
science, history and geography.
Another major opportunity that is present within
the development of the Womens Education
and Training Centre is the chance for better
education and development specifcally devoted
to the betterment of the Kabadkhana area and
the womens ability to alleviate poverty in their
community. This could include micro-fnance
programs, self-employment classes and other
things to help the women better establish their
business, and in turn break the cycle of poverty.
For this program to be a success however,
a non-government organization needs to
associated with this program to help the women
and community establish the program in the
frst instance. This will include organisational
works such as establishing the rental premises,
sourcing materials needed for the classes and
funding for these initial endeavours. An on-
going presence will also be required of the
organization to provide assistance in the running
of this centre until the community and women
are at a stage of self-reliance. The reward from
this proposal would be immense, seeing the
women and girls of the Kabadkhana region
empowering themselves and their community
to alleviate poverty and move forward in
anticipation of the other UN Millennium Goals.
gender empowerment
Proposal:
Womens' Education and Training Centre
73
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
FutureSustainability
The future sustainability of this program relies
heavily on the community and involvement from
the women and girls who will beneft from this
centre. After initial start up costs of Rs 5,000,
the monthly cost is approximately Rs 6,400
per month (Rs 4,100 for training, Rs 800 for
materials and Rs 1,500 for rental costs). For the
women of this community this is a large amount
of money and their monthly income is not able
to cover these costs, especially without a steady
income.
However this program has the ability to
empower women to take control of their future
both fnancially and personally. By providing
extra programs that educate the women in
areas such as micro-fnance and business
management, they have the ability to further
continue the program. This means that the
women can take the WETC back, to create what
they feel is most important to their community.
The WETC not only empowers the women,
but also creates greater social bonds within
the community, strengthening its spirit and
willingness to participate in other programs. This
can lead to a better atmosphere and unity within
the area, which will in turn lead to cooperation
for projects such as street renewal programs
and proposals for government funding for
infrastructure.
For further information please contact:
Anna Rubbo (Convenor Global Studio)
Email:
Mattias Neumann (Mentor Group 1, Global Studio
Bhopal 2012)
Email:
Alexandra McRobert (Participant Group 1, Global
Studio Bhopal 2012)
Email: alexmcrobert@hotmail.com
74
PROPOSED PROTOTYPE
SECTION THROUGH DRAINAGE SYSTEM
Drainage
A common problem among the residents was
the open drains and solid waste. A simple
metal grate drainage system would not work in
Kabadkhana, as the metal would be stolen for
resale. So instead a simple timber grate made
from easily sourced materials was proposed.
This makeshift drain can be made from wood or
bamboo fnd on the site, and is covered at one
end with chicken wire. This grate is placed into
the open drains, consecutively In a connected
network. The larger timber grate drops the
majority of the solid waste from going in and
clogging the drainage, allowing it to be swept
away easily. Smaller debris which falls into
the drain is then caught by the chicken wire.
The grate can then be removed and emptied,
allowing the water to fow smoothly to the
naala.
75
HOUSING PRINCIPLES
Infill housing
As part of the streetscape we also looked into
infll housing that could be proposed for vacant
lots within the site. From this we established
four keys points that need to maintained in any
proposed development:
There must be an acknowledgment of the
strong connections between the street and
the home, as it is not just a road but an
extension of the house and a social space;
Housing needs to be incremental starting
with a base model that has the ability to be
built upon as the family grows;
The distinct hierarchy of spaces from
open and public at the front through to
enclosed and private at the rear needs to be
maintained; and
There needs go be potential for three stories
to incorporate livelihoods such as shops or
the ability to lease parts of their homes for
extra income.
76
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
water
Observation
While mapping the water systems operating in the Kabadkhana , we
found that the poorer communities are using water from this particular
well for their daily use ,sometimes even for drinking.
The ground water table is quite low. So they pump water into the well
from the nearby pump to raise the level. From the well, another pump
supplies water to various areas within the slums.
Problem- The cleaner water from the pump gets mixed with the dirty
water from the well .Also the supply water pressure to surrounding areas
is low and so the network lines do not go very far from the source.
Opportunity
An overhead tank above the well can segregate the cleaner water from
the pump and the dirty water from the ground.
The system will work on gravity to provide cleaner water at higher
pressures to the worst hit communities within the slum. The network lines
can spread deeper into the slums due to the higher pressure.
The space beneath can be converted into a social space for the
community with informal seating and spaces for people to gather. The
murals painted on walls provide relief from the drudgery of day to day
life. The overhead tank can act as a landmark for the settlement. A see-
saw (or a merry go round) used by children to play can also be installed
to pump water to the tank.
PROPOSED NETWORK FROM OHT
EXISTING SITE
PROPOSED DESIGN
77
l
o
n
g

t
e
r
m
m
i
d

t
e
r
m
s
h
o
r
t

t
e
r
m
home cluster community
short, medium and longterm
suggestions
ACTION PLAN MATRIX
USING LOCAL SOURCED
AND RECYCLED
MATERIALS CREATE
COMMUNITY SPACES
& PLACES ALONG THE
STREET
PROVIDE GARBAGE
SEPARATION AND
COLLECTION FACILITIES
PROVIDE OVERHEAD
WATER TANK TO IMPROvE
LOCAL ACCESS TO CLEAN
WATER
DEvELOP INFILL HOuSING
MODULES & TYPOLOGY
IMPROVEMENTS TO LOCAL
INFRASTRuCTuRE INCLuDING
PAVING, DRAINAGE AND
STREETSCAPE
DEVELOP WOODEN
DRAINAGE PROTOTYPE TO
ENSURE SOLID WASTE DOES
NOT ENTER THE NAALA
78
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
The naala redevelopment
The project gets its initiation after the detailed
study and analysis of the housing, sanitation,
and wastewater conditions in Kabadkhana slum
in Bhopal. From this study the Housing Studio
concluded that problems like open drains with
its associated health hazard, swampy areas with
contaminated water, lack of accessible green
spaces, poor garbage disposal at the edges of
#3 naala
Case Study #3 Naala
the naala needed to be addressed. In addition
lack of the accessible open spaces force the
residents to use the unhygienic surrounding for
their daily recreational and routine activities.
ACCESSIBLE SPACES FOR RECREATION
SANITATION IMPROVEMENT
ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY

79
Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
REDEVELOP-
MENT OF THE
NAALA
1
#3 Case Study Naala
CASE STUDY #3
NAALA
ROOT ZONE
TREATMENT
1
LAND
SCAPING
1
BIO-
SWALES
1
Existing Condition
# forgotten space of the community
# large amounts of garbage
# complete lack of sanitation and drainage
Site Needs
# listed as one of the kids least favorite
places, the naala requires urgent atten-
tion in our design proposals
80
A B C
soappits. bioswales. rootzonetreatment.
debristrap. vegetationcover. garbagebins.
boardwalk. footbridge. sitting areas.
flexibleopenspaces.
MASTERPLAN
SECTION 1 - 3
site analysis
The drainage problem around the nalla was
accentuated by the inability of drain lines from
the Kabadkhana streets to reach the nalla. This
was particularly due to the topography of the
area; a gentle slope that begins to rise at the
edge of the nalla.

There was a general lack of garbage dumping
facilities like dust bins which forced the
residents to use the naala as a dumping
site. As we noted from our interaction with
the residents, the concerned authority had
signifcantly failed to manage the solid waste
problem. According to them, they [the
authority] were simply incompetent. In addition
solid waste from the surrounding areas covered
by the naala always fows in the Kabadkhana
area because no system was in place to stop this
waste fowing into the area.
We also noted that although a number of people
resided at the bank of the Naala, the entire area
was still seriously isolated and inactive. There
was no connection across the Naala and the two
communities on either side were close to each
other and yet very far apart.
The characteristic spatial uses around naala
mostly was for recreational space as women and
kids used spend most of their time around these
spaces that has generated an immense need of
developing them into better public spaces. The
sanitation and garbage disposal was making the
situation worse.
The biggest challenge we encountered while
working was the lack of awareness among the
residents about their surroundings. nd creating a
sense of ownership of the pubic spaces to have
proper maintenance of the spaces.
la
n
d
s
c
a
p
e
d
s
lo
p
e
p
la
n
t
s
p
e
c
ie
s
in
c
lu
d
e
:
r
e
t
a
in
in
g
s
it
t
in
g
w
a
ll
t
im
b
e
r
f
o
o
t
b
r
id
g
e
t
e
r
r
a
c
e
d

m
o
u
n
t
m
a
n
g
r
o
v
e

v
e
g
e
t
a
t
io
n

b
u
f
f
e
r
w
it
h

b
o
a
r
d
w
a
lk
f
o
a
t
in
g
d
e
c
k
c
o
n
n
e
c
t
in
g
81
AFTER
Root zone treatment System
NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR
RECREATION
The swampy lands along the naala are drained
by the wastewater and water runoff from the
streets and households making it a flthy space.
The topographic conditions at the site are also
reason of stagnant water in the area. Using this
as an opportunity we have proposed a root zone
treatment zones in these swampy areas where
the plants and microbial activity will be a key
source of cleaning the wastewater collecting
these areas.
A timber footbridge is designed to link the new
proposed mangrove (boardwalk and terrace
seats) to an existing recreational open area.
Ripraps protect the edge of this space and
provide a safe area for children to play.
flexible outdoor space
Re-graded, re-landscaped
to control naala erosion and
create a safer environment for
play and gathering
terracedmount
Acts as a viewing platform
to the mangrove habitat
Scenic gathering space
for recreation
mangrove
Part of root zone treatment
Acts as a vegetative buffer
for air and noise pollution
from adjacent land uses
BEFORE
82
AFTER
Soak Pits
FORMAL EDGE OF STREET/
OPEN SPACE INTERFACE
The major problem of lack of sanitation
infrastructure has further enhanced the level of
problems in sense of hygiene and surroundings
of naala. There was no sewerage system in
the area except the open drains and few areas
though had under ground sewerage system
but were not connected to any household.
Due to this major problem was faced by the
residents living along the naala bank as all waste
was drained directly in these areas making it
very unhealthy and unpleasant. Dealing these
problems the proposal of soak pits came upon,
by providing the soak pits at every street end
towards naala bank to tackle the waste coming
out from the street drains. This will separate the
solid waste and liquid waste and will further help
cleaning the grey water to certain extent. The
overfow of these pits is directed into the root
zone treatment areas for further cleaning and
maintaining the fow of wastewater.
Channelisation creates safer and cleaner spaces
for people to sit and gather
BEFORE
flexible outdoor space
Existing waste is cleared, trees and grass cover
are planted to create a comfortable space.
formalchannel
Water is drained through proper concrete channels with a
grate above so as to maintain sanitation and safety of the
streetscape.
83
creating accessto
nature'Sbackyard
Retaining wall protects house
from naala erosion and allows
step access to naturalistic open
space
ripraps
New landscape for
recreation and edge
erosion protection
floating bridge
Timber footbridge connecting
adjacent banks
public spaces
BACKYARD LANDSCAPES
Improving existing public spaces for better
recreational activities.
Terraced steps and foating decks allow a visual
and physical link for communities along the strip
of proposed ripraps to control erosion,
BEFORE
AFTER
84
BIOSWALES
Where drainage has yet to be addressed,
bioswales are proposed to serve that purpose.
This also softens the residential landscape,
creating comfortable spaces for communities to
gather.
BEFORE
AFTER
gathering spaces
Cantilevered platforms are the
nodes of social activity
Gravelbase
Bioswale can be made of gravel
for durability and fexibility
especially during rain events
trapezoidshape
Research has shown that this
shape is the most effcient for
water treatment in bioswales and
it fts the context of the site.
85
AFTER
ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL
SUSTAINABILITY
A series of root zone treatment areas are
proposed through a simple construction
of retaining seating walls and intentional
vegetation planting. A secondary result is
the expansion of available open space. Along
with a landscaped slope flled in through
on-site garbage and small footbridges, new
opportunities for exploring and playing emerge.
BEFORE
timber boardwalk
Connecting recreational
spaces over root zone
treatment plants
retaining sitting wall
Practicalities aside, they are
visual links in the landscape
and linear spaces for people
to move and rest.
new openspace
Flexible space can be used for
urban container agriculture, open
play, picnic, washing clothes and
other social activities.
86
policies
Millennium Development Goals:
GOAL 7: Ensure environmental sustainability. It
specifes the grey water recycle augmentation
for existing water use effciency.
World Health Organisation 2006
Focuses and gives guidelines for safe use of
wastewater.
JNNURM:
Under the sub mission directorate for basic
services to the urban poor and river
restoration and storm water treatment the
funds are being released for redevelopment and
restoration of naallas and deteriorating rivers
and streams.
PROPOSALS
EMERGENT MACROPHYTE TREATMENT SYSTEM WITH
HORIZONTAL SUBSURFACE FLOW
EMERGENT MACROPHYTE TREATMENT SYSTEM
WITH SURFACE FLOW
CREMATORIUM
UNION CARBIDE SITE
ADJACENT
COLONIES
ALIGNING THE SYSTEM
systemsrecharge
ACTIvATING OPEN SPACE IN AN
ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE MANNER
P
O
L
I
C
Y
F
R
A
M
E
W
O
R
K
87
CREATING URBAN
AGRICULTURAL
LANDS
l
o
n
g

t
e
r
m
m
i
d

t
e
r
m
s
h
o
r
t

t
e
r
m
home cluster community
COLLATING PLOTS
OF uRBAN
AGRICULTURAL
LANDS
PROPER
DISPOSAL OF
EXISTING WASTE
AWARENESS
PROGRAMS
BIOSWALES
LANDSCAPING
RECREATIONAL
OPPORTUNITIES
SOAP PITS AND BINS
INSTALLATION
CHANNELISATION
AND SUPPORTING
SYSTEMS OF
BIOLOGICAL
TREATMENT PLANTS/
FILTERS
(ROOT ZONE
TREATMENT)
short, medium and longterm
suggestions
ACTION PLAN MATRIX
88
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012 Section Title Goes Here // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
alternative housing solution
for madrasi colony
Although we found that the housing stock of
Kabadkhana generally good, and the community
was more in need of infrastructure upgrades and
community interventions, we took some time to
consider the neighbourhoods where wholesale
rebuilding might be the preferred option of both
Government and residents.
Whilst we researched some participatory design
methodologies and had invaluable guidance
from Chawanad Luansang about community
engagement through mapping, we didnt launch
into a participatory process directly relating to
a Government housing rebuild. We were wary
of giving the impression that there might be an
upcoming project that would so monumentally
disrupt their lives. We used the information
and impressions gathered from the community
through the research and engagement phases
of the three case studies and the analysis of
Madrasi, to develop an alternative typology for
these types of total rebuild programs.
OUR AIM:
TO challenge the frame work for
architecture for the urban poor quality
of the people living in MADRASI colony
housing
89
HOUSING TYPOLOGY
housing proposal
We wanted to go beyond the provision of
services in a Pukka structure and incorporate
some of the qualities of the neighbourhoods
we found around Kabadkhana. The units are
confgured to provide maximum properties with
a modest space where residents can conduct
livelihood activities with exposure to custom.
All the units are positioned to have good cross
ventilation, natural light and have an adjacent
covered space for incremental extensions to
meet whatever needs arise for the resident, be
that extra workspace, homespace or a renting
room. There are 26 units in each cluster, a
mirrored arrangement of 13 units with a more
public side facing outward and more private
or communal open patios facing inward. We
arranged the clusters across the Madrasi site
to create a hierarchy of spaces, from the larger
outdoor spaces for more public gatherings and
the streetscape of the outer faces, to the ground
plane courtyards and fne grain social spaces for
households within the smaller clusters. These
crucial shared areas are provided on the frst
foor in less traffcked zones than the ground
plane and arranged on the inward facing side
of the clusters where parents can watch over
children from the apartments above.
90
HOUSING TYPOLOGY
housing proposal
Tying our work and research on Madrasi Colony
and Kabadkhana back into a set of observations
that can relate to current policy within the
framework of Rajiv Awas Yojana (RAY) the
studio arrived at the following conclusions
through a catalogue of suggestions and a
schematic design investigation for larger scale
housing developments.
Our approach in understanding and improving
Kabadkhana was marked by understanding
the existing social and material fabric of the
community, and the guiding principle for any
intervention, we believe, should take its point of
departure from understanding the spatial and
social qualities of the community rather than its
defciencies. It is through building upon these
qualities that an inclusive and holistic upgrade
can be fostered which is inherently and widely
accepted and sustained, and which makes use of
the resourcefulness of the community involved.
RAY acknowledges a scaled approach to slum
upgrading from improving basic services, to
targeted in-fll, to larger scale new building
developments. In either of these cases the
spatial evidence and qualities of existing
neighbourhoods can serve as starting point to
(re)create a better living environment. Such an
approach can only be realised through active
involvement of the community.
91
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
Observing the shortcomings at Madrasi
Colony it seems pertinent to establish a list of
architectural and urban design development
guidelines that will facilitate an inclusive and
quality development. The following suggested
list may serve as an initial basis to further defne
a set of spatial, material and architectural
requirements for housing developed under RAY:
neighbourhood scale:
in-situ redevelopment should always take the
material, spatial and cultural status quo into
consideration; continuation of established socio-
spatial networks should always take priority
over eradication and redevelopment. (networks
of open and communal spaces, religious shrines,
cultural and educational institutions)
upgrading of existing buildings (kaccha,
semi-puccha or puccha) and infrastructures,
if possible, is always preferable to complete
rebuilding in regards to material resourcefulness
and social continuity.
if large scale new development is inevitable,
a considerate amount of resources in planning,
design and building should be allocated to
establishing spatial coherence in social and open
spaces, and in creating a healthy infrastructure
including waste water management. This
open space framework should be developed
in collaboration with the future inhabitants to
ensure acceptance and maintenance.
the surrounding street scape should be
considered for a lively urban environment.
building scale:
quality management during the construction
phase of new apartment blocks should be
ensured, possibly by involving the future tenants
in the building process. This may serve as a
model for employment and skill training, but
also as a means to ensure a stake of the builders
and future tenants in the quality control of the
physical structures.
a multi-dwelling building and a whole
settlement should ensure spatial and social
diversity. This requires adaptability and
differentiation of individual usage of space.
ground foor spaces should be usable to
ensure livelihood of the residents and to
encourage a vibrant urban street life.

individual dwelling scale:
basic requirements to spatial layouts that
are in sync with the geographic and climatic
realities should be mandatory for all individual
units; these should include cross ventilation and
suffcient daylighting.
incremental development should be
encouraged by providing spatial reserves for
each or for most individual dwellings; this will
ensure spatial diversity, sustained livelihood
and usability of the dwelling over generational
cycles.
A schematic design scheme was developed
as hypothetical alternative to the Madrasi
Colony on the same site and with the same
density parameters that were realised in the
new development to test the feasibility of
this approach. In the schematic study each
dwelling is based on a minimum module of 24
square meters with an additional 8 to 16 square
meters of incremental expansion. The layout is
conceived in clusters that allow for a layered
social fabric and a hierarchy of open spaces.
Ground foor spaces are primarily conceived
as spatial extensions to the apartments for
livelihoods and to activate the public spaces.
Existing structures, such as the Hindi shrine on
the south-western edge of the site are retained
and taken into spatial considerations.
While this exercise remains in the schematic
design phase, it illustrates the value and
potential of considerate architectural planning
within a set of predetermined requirements
to materialise a better and more inclusive
built environment in settlements developed to
alleviate urban poverty.
92
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
abhijit
datey
(M. Plan Housing)
Research Associate
India
adatey@gmail.com
j. jennifer
jyotsana
Student Urban Planner
India
jyothsna2412@gmail.
com
ALEXandra
McRobert
(B. Des. Arch)
Student Architect
Australia
alexmcrobert@
hotmail.com
layda
gongora
(phd cand)
Design Researcher
Canada
l.gongora@
lancs.ac.uk
amy
cropley
(B. Env. Des)
(B. arch hons)
Architect /
Urban Designer
Australia
amycropley@
gmail.com
matthias
neumann
(Dipl. Ing)
Principal normaldesign
New York
mneumann@
normaldesign.com
andrea
augsten
(Dipl. Des.)
Design Researcher
Germany
mail@andrea
augsten.com
melody
williams
(B. Va. Hons)
(B. Des. Arch)
Artist / Designer
Australia
ms.melwilliams@
gmail.com
benard
acellam
Student Architect
Uganda
acellambenard@
yahoo.com
chawanad
luansang
Community Architect
Thailand
chawanad@
hotmail.com
jeremy
vaz
Student Architet
India
jeremyvaz89@
gmail.com
nishant
maloo
(B. Plan)
Student Urban
Planning
MANIT Bhopal, India
nishant_maloo@yahoo.
com
GROUP MEMBERS
preeti
singh
(Phd arch and
planning)
Architect Planner
India
ompreeti2005@
yahoo.co.in
phoebe
goodwin
(M. Arch)
Student Architect
Australia
phoebeggoodwin@
gmail.com
rohit
singh chouhan
(B. Plan)
Student Urban
Planning
MANIT Bhopal, India
rohitsingh.manit@
gmail.com
varun
singh
(B. Arch)
Architect
India
varunme@gmail.com
shawna
ng
Graduate Landscape
Architect
Singapore
shn111@psu.edu
sumit
gothi
Architect
India
sumitgothi@yahoo.com
93
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
Self Employed Women's Association
(NGO for WETC)
Contact: Mr Ajay Singh Yadav
Phone: 0755-540443 / 0755-531387
Swami Vivekarand Shiksha
(NGO for WETC)
Phone: 09425373168 / 09425373169
National Centre for Human Settlement and
Environment (NGO for WETC)
Contact: Vivek Saran
Phone: 0755-563731 / 0755-565306
Alavik Seva Samiti (NGO for WETC)
Contact: Mr Vijay Shankar Dixit
Phone: 0755-563118
All Indian Women's Conference (NGO for
WETC)
Contact: Deepti Rani Acharya
Phone: 0755-463885
Nirmal Welfare Training Institute (stitching,
embroidery, agarbati, candle classes for WETC)
Phone: 09826310562
VETA (English Classes for WETC)
Phone: 0755-3203601 / 0755-4232286
Lalit Bhargan- SBI Life insurance
(Past School Sponsor)
Phone: 8878220786
Contacts
Lions Club (Past School Sponsor)
0755-6546296
Rajani Khane (Headmistress School Primary
School)
Phone: 09981533720
Kundhanlal Yadhav (Kabadkhana Temple
Garden)
Phone: 0755-2739894
Maya Yadhav (Madrasi Social Worker)
993173651
94
DRAFT / Housing Studio Kabadkhana: Inclusive City // Global Studio Bhopal 2012
Chawanad Luangsang
Simon Forbes
Nikhil Purohit
Rajani Khane (Headmistress School Primary School)
Rajarshi Rakesh Sahai
ACKNOwledgements REFERENCES
Community Architects in Asia (2010) Design by with for people. Asian
Coalition for Housing Rights: Bangkok, Thailand.
Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation (?) Rajiv Awas Yojana:
Guidelines for Slum-free City Planning. Ministry of Housing and Poverty
Alleviation, Government of India: New Delhi, India.
Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation (?) Draft Guidelines
for Preparation of a Slum Free City Plan of Action: Under the Rajiv Awas
Yojana. Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty, Government of India: New
Delhi, India.
Minstry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation (2011) Rajiv Awas
Yojana (RAY): Draft Guidelines on Community Participation. Ministry of
Housing and Urban Poverty, Government of India: New Delhi, India
Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation (2012) National Urban
Livelihood Mission: Draft Concept Note. Ministry of Housing and Urban
Poverty, Government of India: New Delhi, India.
Nodal Resource Centre on SJSRY (2011) Resource Material on Urban
Poverty Alleviation. Regional Centre for Urban and Environmental Studies
of All India Institute of Local Self-Government: Mumbai, India.