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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY
KANSAN
Volume 127 Issue 125 Monday, June 23, 2014
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Today’s
Weather
HI: 79
LO: 64
Partly cloudy with a chance of thunderstorms.
Winds N at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 40%.
Transfer credits counted
There are now 46 courses guaranteed to transfer
anywhere within Kansas’ public higher education
system, making it easier for students to earn as-
sociate degrees. Read more on
PAGE 3
Answering calls 24/7
Volunteers at Headquarters Counseling Center
work overnight shifts to be available to talk to sui-
cide prevention lifeline callers. Read their stories
on PAGE 5
Money for musicians
The Midwest Music Foundation, a Kansas City, Mo.,
non-profit organization, has provided $30,000 in
healthcare grants to uninsured musicians since
2008. Read more on PAGE 10
Strides to finish first
Junior hurdler Michael Stigler talks about what he
thought and felt during the NCAA Championship
race where he finished in second place. He plans to
return for his senior year. Read his story on
PAGE 14
PAGE 13
FREE
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STATE
FESTIVAL
DAILY KU INFO, 6-23-2014
This week, we expect two more KU freshman to be
selected in the NBA draft. That makes five freshmen in
our history, joining nine juniors and only two sopho-
mores.
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
University senior Patrick Clement will debut his
short film “Somewhere Between Freedom and Pro-
tection, Kansas” as part of the Free State Festival
in Lawrence this weekend.
Athletics will remove the track in Memorial Stadium.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 2
N
news
STAFF
Editor-in-chief
Emma LeGault
Managing editor
Tom DeHart
Multimedia editor
James Hoyt
Design Chief
Clayton Rohlman
Business Manager
Scott Weidner
Sales Manager
Alek Joyce
Sales & Marketing
Adviser
Jon Schlitt
Content Director
Brett Akagi
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WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
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Partly cloudy with a stray
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Partly cloudy, chance of a
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Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
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Road closings slow down local businesses
CONSTRUCTION
KELSIE JENNINGS
news@kansan.com
Te nine summer construction
projects in Lawrence have done more
than disrupt trafc — they’ve also
hurt local businesses by shutting
down roads that connect them with
customers.
On the corner of 31st Street and
Louisiana Street sits Steve’s Place, a
reception hall that’s rented out for
weddings, graduation parties and
other events. Guests could once easily
access the hall but now must go out of
their way to get to it.
Steve and Helen Meseraull opened
the reception hall in May 2003.
Tey’ve hosted countless weddings
and parties within the last 11 years.
Steve said that they wanted to pro-
vide a place for couples to get married
but not have to worry about spending
a lot of money, so they ofered aford-
able prices.
“I didn’t want them to go out and
spend that much money when they
didn’t have to and to have the same
amount of fun,” he said.
Business had been going well until
the announcement of the construc-
tion and road closure around Febru-
ary.
“Te phone has been dead for four
months,” Steve said.
Te road closure on 31st Street from
Louisiana Street to Ousdahl Road is
just one of nine construction projects
happening now.
“We try to time a lot of the projects
here in Lawrence in the summer, and
we start a lot of projects the day afer
graduation just because we have less
trafc and [fewer] students in town,”
Dave Cronin, a city engineer, said.
Te section on 31st Street is expect-
ed to open in spring 2015, according
to Cronin.
Te Meseraulls said that they’re
typically booked every weekend from
June to November, but they’ve had
three cancellations for June alone.
Tey only have two weddings booked
for July and one for August.
Te road closure has also afected
next year’s business, as engaged cou-
ples typically reserve their date a year
or more in advance.
“My reservations usually for next
year is at least a fourth to a half full by
now and I don’t have anybody,” Steve
said.
Steve said he’s lost about $25,000 in
business this year, which he estimates
to be about 70 percent of the annual
income.
“It’s going to [be] rough for a while,”
he said. “It might take us two years to
get out of it.”
Tey’re working to stay afoat de-
spite the loss. In an attempt to keep
business going and encourage people
to rent the hall they’ve recently of-
fered a 20 percent discount.
“We’re trying to get bookings started
up again, so we’ll have them for next
year, so we put that discount on our
website,” Helen said.
Just a few minutes away is another
major construction project at the in-
tersection of 23rd Street and Iowa
Street.
Tis project has slowed trafc and
caused long lines at the stoplight,
but it’s also slowed down business
for Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steak-
burgers, a restaurant stuck in the
middle of the construction zone.
Devon Lohrenz, a manager at
Freddy’s, said that at one point both
main entrances to their location were
closed and customers had to enter
down the block. Te restaurant has
had less dine-in customers as a result.
Te restaurant also lost business
when the drive-thru closed for two
days while the parking lot was resur-
faced. Lohrenz said that 50 percent of
their revenue comes from drive-thru
orders, and the two days without it
was a big loss.
Despite fewer people, the city still
experiences congested trafc of regu-
lar commuters and city transporta-
tion.
Cronin said that they try to give fair
notice of the construction projects
and asks that citizens be patient and
avoid the projects if possible.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
KELSIE JENNINGS/KANSAN
The intersection at 23rd Street and Iowa is one of nine locations that has seen heavy
construction lately. This construction has negatively affected Lawrence businesses.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 3
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Regents approve reverse transfer credit policy
KRISTA MONTGOMERY
news@kansan.com
When Briana Lewis transferred to
Washburn University from Johnson
County Community College, she
was only one credit short of earning
her associate degree. Tough she
completed her bachelor’s degree at
Washburn, she never received her
associate degree from JCCC.
According to Breeze Richardson,
Associate Director of Communi-
cations & Government Relations
for the Kansas Board of Regents
(KBOR), a quarter of a million
Kansans have received some college
education but no diploma. In fall
2012, at the University Lawrence
campus alone, there were 1,771
community college transfer students,
according to the KBOR Transfer
Feedback Report.
If Lewis had been able to transfer
one of her Washburn credit hours
to JCCC, she could have earned her
associate degree. In an efort to in-
crease diplomas among Kansans by 8
percent in the next six years, Kansas
will now implement a policy with
such an end goal; reverse transfer
policies will help students statewide
who are in the same situation Lewis
was to earn their associate degree.
In a Board meeting on June 18, all
32 public postsecondary institution
presidents signed a document imple-
menting reverse transfer, which will
coordinate the transfer of students
to universities and enable them to
better earn associate degrees.
Troughout the state, community
and technical colleges will now work
under the coordination of the Board
to make the higher education system
more seamless.
“A very big component of seam-
less transition is course transfer,”
Richardson said. “What’s so awesome
about it is the responsibility that the
university and the system as a whole
is taking on.”
Tere are now 46 courses guar-
anteed to transfer anywhere within
Kansas’ public higher education sys-
tem. Within a student’s frst semester
at a university, the university will
notify students if they are eligible to
be considered for reverse transferred
degree status, as well as what courses
they need to take to attain that
degree.
“Tat counseling now I think is re-
ally critical to helping the student see
just how close they might not even
realize they are to getting that associ-
ate degree,” Richardson said.
Two times a year, community
colleges, universities and technical
colleges will communicate under the
reverse transfer policy, making the
process automatic and less compli-
cated for students.
As part of Board policy, students
would have an opportunity to opt-
out.
“You never know what’s going to
happen in life, and if you’ve done
the work to earn that credit, then
why not have the piece of paper to
underscore that you’ve earned that
degree?” Richardson said.
He explained that fnishing an
associate degree isn’t only symbolic,
but follows research saying that earn-
ing such a milestone on your way to
earning a bachelor’s is psychologi-
cally encouraging.
“Tere may be a lot of students
who are a lot closer to getting that
associates degree than they realize,”
Richardson said. “More and more
transfer students are taking a signif-
cant amount of college credit, who
are still in college and high school…
More and more frst-time freshman
come in with transfer credits than
ever before.”
Te Board’s goal is to have 60
percent of Kansans earn some kind
of degree or certifcate by the year
2020. Currently, that number is at 52
percent.
Statewide reverse transfer policies
are now in efect in 20 states includ-
ing Kansas.

— Edited by Ashleigh Lee
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 4
O
opinion
Which NBA teams would you
like to see Embiid and Wiggins
play for?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just might
publish them.
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com/letters.
Emma LeGault, editor-in-chief
elegault@kansan.com
Tom DeHart, managing editor
tdehart@kansan.com
Scott Weidner, business manager
sweidener@kansan.com
Alek Joyce, sales manager
ajoyce@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategist
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial
Board are Emma LeGault, Tom De-
Hart, Scott Weidner and Alek Joyce
NASA funding necessary for advancement
SPACE
By Harrison Drake
opinion@kansan.com
KANSAN CARTOON
INTERESTED IN
SUBMITTING
YOUR OWN
CARTOON?
EMAIL:
EDITOR@KANSAN.COM
“Summer Orientation: Under
Construction”
by Jacob Hood
A
ccording to Space.com,
NASA’s 17.5 billion budget
for 2015 would fund new
science missions such as an asteroid
redirect mission and the James Webb
Space Telescope scheduled to launch
in 2018. Ultimately, NASA said it
would like to facilitate manned mis-
sions to travel 35 million miles to
Mars.
At the same time, a study published
in Science Magazine said scientists
have recently discovered massive
water reserves 400 miles beneath our
earth’s crust that could fll our oceans
three times over.
Te questions on the table from
skeptics and critics alike now are,
“Should space exploration be a prior-
ity with federal spending while we
don’t even fully understand what’s
under our own feet? And if we are
shooting for Mars, what future do
we have in space? Why should we let
NASA spend any money when we
have so many more pressing issues in
the country and the world?”
While the benefts from NASA
may not always be so obvious, their
research has made daily life easier,
and it’s worth the money to invest
in technological competition and
advancement.
In 1961, John F. Kennedy put
forward the audacious plan to do the
impossible: put a man on the moon.
Te goal was met eight years later
and inspired generations to come.
Te mission was only made possible
because of determined politicians
and billions of tax dollars.
But due to budget cuts and a lack
of ambition, recent space programs
have been compromised, and the
ambition that NASA once thrived on
to take us to new heights has been
lost.
In 1986, the world witnessed the
disentegration of the space shuttle
Challenger and experienced a similar
tragedy in 2003 when space shuttle
Columbia broke apart during its re-
entry into the atmosphere.
Risk has always been a factor in
manned missions, but imagine if we
were to aim past the moon. It could
inspire a generation of new engineers
and scientists to witness something
daring and successful. It could re-
kindle peoples’ imaginations.
While it’s never directly clear what
NASA uses its budget for, much of
the money is attributed to projects
on Earth rather than just space
projects. Some of these everyday
contributions from NASA include
medical applications, such as LED
for brain cancer surgery or the digital
imaging breast biopsy system. Also,
engineering applications such as the
infrared camera used by our military
and eco-friendly bio fuel for our jets
are among NASA’s contributions to
human life.
By making space exploration a
priority, it could help us solve envi-
ronmental issues and create tourism
and job development. Today, it takes
approximately $12 million to launch
a satellite into orbit. But with the rise
of privately owned space programs
such as Virgin Galactic, many of
these experimental aircraf will break
the atmosphere at a much lower cost,
driving down the costs to a feasible
level for consumers.
Why is space exploration funding
vital? Because we are human, and
reaching new heights, striving for
exploration and discovery are core
parts of who we are. It’s time for us
to revitalize our desire to reach for
the stars.
Harrison Drake is a senior from
Overland Park studying Journalism.
Find him on Twitter
@Harryson_Ford
@RadioDJMJ
@KansanOpinion #KUbball
counts as an NBA team,
right?
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 5
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tl?|I lI? 8lfl1tt
Hotline volunteers connect with callers
COMMUNITY
It’s the short sentences from callers
that crisis counselors at Headquarters
Counseling Center remember most.
“I want to die.”
Te counselors are trained to re-
spond calmly and empathetically,
but it doesn’t mean their heartbeat
doesn’t speed up.
“Even on crisis calls it can be really
nerve-wracking, but by the end of it,
if you know everything turned out
okay or you at least got them to be
okay for that night, it’s a really great
feeling,” said Zoe Morton, a recent
graduate from Wichita.
Te line enables callers experiencing
a psychological crisis or contemplat-
ing suicide from around Kansas and
the nation to speak with someone any
time of day.
“Even just being here to listen to
people in general is nice because I
know that there are some people who
don’t have that,” Morton said.
Headquarters restored its 24/7 ser-
vice hours earlier this month, which
means a volunteer is prepated to listen
between 12 and 8 a.m., which Direc-
tor Andy Brown said are the highest
risk hours. Te center will also begin
ofering support through an instant
messaging service on June 25.
“Tere’s no doubt in my mind more
call volume means more saving lives,”
Brown said.
Brown said the center receives
25,000 calls per year. Tough when
callers hang up, volunteers at Head-
quarters Counseling Center generally
don’t know what happens next to the
individual.
However, Amy, a 2013 graduate
from Lenexa, has been on both sides
of the hotline.
“I think it’s better to not know what
happens,” Amy said. “If you don’t
know you can choose the better reali-
ty, instead of having to know for sure.”
Nearly three years ago, Amy said
she attempted suicide. She was sent to
Osawatamie State Hospital for recov-
ery, but called the suicide prevention
lifeline during a night of depression
afer she was released.
“I basically just ranted about stuf
for an hour, but the counselor listened
and I was able to go to bed that night,”
she said.
She decided to volunteer because
she knew she could ofer a diferent
level of empathy having experienced
the same feelings as many callers who
have wanted to end their lives.
Brown said compassion and empa-
thy are important qualities in volun-
teers, but just listening is about 80
percent of most phone calls.
“Having people to talk to makes it a
lot better,” Amy said. “It’s scary feel-
ing [being] isolated and not feeling
like you have anyone you can talk to
or relate to.”
Volunteers said answering calls dur-
ing four-hour shifs becomes emo-
tionally draining, but Headquarters
ofers its own inner support system.
“It’s intimate because we’re all go-
ing through the same kind of things,”
said Matt Kostroske, a senior from
Lenexa. “We know what it’s like so it’s
easier to be supportive of that.”
Brown said he wants to double the
staf of 40 because volunteers are the
lifeblood of the agency and more help
means less emotional strain on the
current staf.
Tere are some shifs with a high
number of calls and other shifs vol-
unteers say are slow, but every shif is
guaranteed a call from a regular.
Tere are some regular callers who
have been using Headquarters’ ser-
vices for years, Morton said, and they
might just be feeling lonely or bored.
On her Wednesday night shif, she
spoke to one regular about her fa-
vorite foods, how to make guacamole
and the individual’s weekend plans.
“It’s nice because you get to build a
repertoire with them so you know a
lot more about them,” Amy said. “You
know what you’re getting into when
you pick up the phone which is nice.”
Counselors log every phone number
and take notes of the conversations
for safety’s sake, but the database is
kept confdential.
Some crisis phone calls end with the
launch of emergency dispatch to the
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
AMELIA ARVESEN/KANSAN
Volunteers at Headquarters Counseling Center like Kelsey McGonigle, a student from Leawood, are available to answer the suicide
prevention lifeline 24 hours each day. The Center receives the majoirty of its high-risk calls between 12 a.m. and 8 a.m.
caller based on phone number area
code, but others end with a “thank
you for listening.”
“It gives you that feeling like we’re
actually making a diference and
we’re actually helping people so it’s
nice to hear that,” Kotroske said.
For more information about volun-
teering or the services at Headquar-
ters Counseling Center, visit Head-
quarterscounselingcenter.org.
— Edited by Emma LeGault
Take a picture with your
answer for a chance to win
weekly prizes!
Send us your pictures to
Contest@kansan.com or
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY
KANSAN
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 7
A
arts & features
HOROSCOPES
Aries (March 21-April 19)
It's easy to get into a spiritual or philosophical
frame of mind. Read poetry, play music, and
appreciate art made by others.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Take extra care of yourself today and tomorrow.
Pamper yourself with rest and healthy food.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Make plans today for profits tomorrow. There's
plenty of work, and organization today helps
when things get chaotic.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Let your loved ones know how much you adore
them. Today and tomorrow your communication
skills are in rare form.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Share your heart out at home with Venus in
Gemini. Your attention and energy are wanted
and needed there.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
The Taurus Moon invites fun and play with
friends and family over the next two days. Take
some time off.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Breakdowns at work could get frustrating. Step
back and review the situation. Take a deep
breath.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You and a partner may disagree on priorities. Be
willing to compromise. Sit down and make an
action plan.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Handle financial and family matters today and
tomorrow. Tie up loose ends and update the
records. Love is the bottom line.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Study, research, and embark on an educational
journey today and tomorrow. It's easier to share
your passions.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
A rise in career status could be possible over the
next two days. Focus on what you love, and on
having more of that.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Friends help you surmount obstacles and block-
ages today. Things may not go as planned, but
your team's behind you.
CROSSWORD
Follow
@KansanNews
on Twitter
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THE ANSWERS
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 8
LOCAL NUMBER: 785-841-2345
NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION
LIFELINE: 800-273-8255
- Free, confidential, 24/7 Crisis Counseling
- Great Volunteer Opportunities
WE’RE HERE TO LISTEN
“CARING SUPPORT NOW. WE KNOW HOW TO HELP.”
LOCAL NUMBER: 785-841-2345
NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION AA
LIFELINE: 800-273-8255
- Free, confidential, 24/7 Crisis Counseling
- Great Volunteer Opportunities
“CARING SUPPORT NOW. WE KNOW HOW TO HELP.”
FILM
In Southwestern Kansas, inside an
old, dusty house with foral wallpaper
that’s curling at the seams, a girl sits
in a rocking chair. She’s faced with a
decision that will change her life.
It’s July 2013 and Patrick Clement
watches nearby as the scene unfolds.
He's directing the flm he wrote,
"Somewhere Between Freedom and
Protection, Kansas."
Along with other featured flms, the
20-minute short flm premieres in the
Free State Festival on Saturday at 12
p.m.
Clement, a 34-year-old flm stu-
dent at the University, said it’s about a
young girl who must choose between
staying with her ill grandmother and
following a scholarship that will take
her away from the small town her
family founded.
"Te exodus of young people is a
huge story and it afects everybody in
the whole region,” Clement said. “It's
kind of sad but it's also just the real-
ity.”
Te flm is a meditation on young
people’s desire for confict, to deter-
mine boundaries and overcome chal-
lenges, he said. Te thought came
to him while he was working as the
editor at the Kiowa County Signal in
the rural community of Greensburg,
where he witnessed the migration af-
fect the entire town.
Te young girl and main character
is performed by Brittnee Hill, a recent
graduate from Pratt High School.
“It really does show that struggle
from moving out of small-town Kan-
sas and moving on into something
bigger,” Hill said. “I would say he def-
nitely captures that in the flm.”
Clement, originally from Boston,
pursued flmmaking in Hollywood
and even worked as an extra on a few
shows such as Dexter and Ugly Betty.
He worked for Te Discovery
Channel on the documentary series
“Greensburg” afer the 2007 tornado
and met his girlfriend, Alanna Good-
man. In 2011, he moved to live with
her in Kansas. Troughout flming,
he drew from his experiences as an
outsider looking into rural life.
Te production of the flm has
taken Clement almost a year to com-
plete. He said he hasn’t stopped work-
ing since but it’s work he wants to be
doing for the rest of his life.
“When was the last time I was
bored? Like genuinely, I can’t think
of sitting around and being like ‘Oh,
I don’t have anything to do.,’” Clem-
ent said. “I wonder what that’s like. I’d
probably go crazy.”
He’s a self-described workaholic.
Right now, he’s producing another
short flm with Ryan ‘Doug’ Douglass
for the Wild West Film Fest, writing
a biography about a photographer
from Western Kansas, flming videos
Free State Festival features student-made film
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
KELSEY WEAVER/KANSAN
University film student Patrick Clement will be premiering his short film “Somewhere
Between Freedom and Protection, Kansas” at the Free State Festival on Saturday.
SEE FILM PAGE 9
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 9
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L I V E W H E R E E V E R Y T H I N G M A T T E R S
w w w . t o w e r p r o p e r t i e s . c o m
for Hawk Week and prepping for the
Free State Festival.
“No matter how much he has go-
ing on he always steps aside to make
time for people and solve the prob-
lems right in front of him while
keeping the other chaos organized
or at least in check,” said Douglass, a
nontraditional student from Wichita
majoring in flm.
Filmmaking, Clement said, is
where he fnds purpose in life and
he takes it seriously, paying careful
attention to details.
“Tere are people that I think foat
through the world and don’t really
care about how they afect the world
as a whole,” Clement said. “I’m not
that person.”
FILM FROM PAGE 8
FUTEBOL
His girlfriend, Goodman, also a
producer of the flm, calls him the
“courtesy police.” He said he always
uses his turn signal, and is willing
to pay $2 more for a cup of cofee
“because that’s how much it actually
costs.”
“Being aware of surroundings is
what makes a good creative person,”
he said.
If nothing else, he hopes at least a
few people in the audience appreci-
ate the flm. Te handful of viewers
who told him it’s thoughtful, he said,
is the biggest compliment.
“How do you communicate
thoughtfulness in a piece of art?”
he said. “It’s, like, intangible. It just
happens.”
An early cut of the flm won a spe-
cial mention for cinematography in
the Harvard College Film Festival in
April.
“It was easy to make beautiful be-
cause Greensburg is beautiful,” he
said.
— Edited by Ashleigh Lee
CHECK KANSAN.COM THIS WEEK FOR
WAYS TO NAVIGATE THE FREE STATE
FESTIVAL AND EXCLUSIVE WEB FEATURES
By air, taxi and subway, Jayhawk
alumni are making their way through
Brazil with a few eyebrow raising
details, but with more ease than ex-
pected.
Depending on who you talk to, the
ease of travel throughout the host na-
tion’s cities can land on either side of
the proverbial trafc spectrum.
Andrew Wiebe, a 2009 University
graduate is on assignment as a cur-
rent media editor for MLSsoccer.
com. He said he moves around Brazil
so far with little to no problem.
“For me, it’s actually been pretty
smooth,” Wiebe said. “I haven’t really
had any issues. We were told we were
going to need to get to the airports up
to three hours early, but that hasn’t
been the case at all.”
Tis convenience may be due to the
fact that Brazil’s airport security is not
nearly as strict as most American city
airports.
“Teir security is much diferent
than that of the U.S.,” Wiebe said.
“I’ve gotten water bottles in. We don’t
have to take shoes of. We don’t have
to put laptops in a separate container.
Tey get you right in, through and
then you’re out. You don’t get bogged
down in all of the security lines.”
Andrew Joseph, a 2012 University
graduate and current reporter for
Te Arizona Republic and Channel
12 News in Phoenix, took a 10-hour
fight from Atlanta to Rio de Janeiro
to kick-start his World Cup vacation
and excitement was brewing before
he even stepped foot on the plane.
“I will say that I've never seen a
fight in which the passengers were
so collectively excited to get on an
airplane,” Joseph said. “As soon as the
agent said, ‘we will start our board-
ing process with frst class,’ it was a
mad dash to the ticket scanner. Didn't
matter what zone you were in, every-
one wanted to get on that plane. I've
never seen that before.”
Joseph said it was an amazing sight
to see a fight with mostly Americans,
and a handful of Brazilian, Mexican
and Bosnian fans going to a location
Alumni navigate
World Cup country
ERIN ORRICK
news@kansan.com
SEE FUTEBOL PAGE 11
CONTRIBUTED BY ANDREW WIEBE
USA National Men’s Soccer Team fans walk to the American Outlaws pre-game party in
Natal, Brazil, before the U.S.-Ghana matchup on June 16. The U.S. defeated Ghana 2-1.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 10
Don’s Auto Center
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SUMMER
If you know a full-time musician
whose name is not Kanye West, it’s
more likely than not that individual is
making a huge — ofen monetary —
sacrifce in order to pursue personal
happiness and keep the community
satisfed.
“Music gives soul to the universe,
wings to the mind, fight to the imagi-
nation, and charm and gaiety to life
and to everything,” Plato once said.
If what the ancient Greek philoso-
pher said is anywhere close to the
truth, then it stands to reason that
humanity has a lot to be thankful for
in regard to its musicians and groups
like the Midwest Music Foundation
(MMF), a non-proft organization in
Kansas City, Mo., committed to sup-
porting musicians and their music.
Te MMF’s helpful hand reaches
across a wide range of areas, from
providing healthcare to uninsured
musicians, to sending bands to South
by Southwest (SXSW) as a part of its
Midcoast Takeover event, to ofering
discounts with recording studios.
Rhonda Lyne is a scientist by day
and account executive for MMF by
night.
“Our main mission is to pro-
mote Kansas City area musi-
cians and [provide] emer-
gency health care,” Lyne said.
Since 2008, the Foundation has pro-
vided 11 health care grants totaling
over $30,000.
Fortunately for Lawrence musicians,
the Kansas City area extends to Law-
rence and groups like Middle Twin,
OILS and the Josh Berwanger Band
who were all a part of the Midcoast
Takeover — a showcase that featured
close to 60 bands from the midwest at
SXSW 2014 in March.
“Te Midcoast Takeover was by
far our best show at SXSW,” Demi
Renault, Middle Twin vocalist, said.
“Te sound was so good and the
crowd was awesome. It felt like ev-
eryone was really listening. It was
also really nice to and see a bunch of
people and bands we knew in all of
the SXSW madness.”
Classically-trained Renault gradu-
ated from the University in 2013 with
a degree in vocal performance afer
studying under professor of voice
John Stephens.
Her band, which she describes as
“experimental pop,” is accruing a col-
lection of stellar reviews, including
one by blogger Fally Afani of Law-
rence’s I Heart Local Music.
"Tose Middle Twin kids are like an
enchanting breath of fresh air,” Afani
said. “In the midst of all the fantas-
tic rock and roll in this town, they’re
bringing electronic music back."
MMF collaborated with Afani and
I Heart Local Music to book some
of the Lawrence bands at Midcoast
Takeover.
Te Midcoast Takeover, however, is
just one of many events coordinated
by the MMF. Another is Apocalypse
Meow, a fundraiser that focuses spe-
cifcally on Kansas City, Mo., and
Lawrence bands. It was created in
2008 when Abigail Henderson, a
Kansas City musician and co-found-
er of the MMF, was diagnosed with
breast cancer.
Henderson passed away in August,
but the Apocalypse Meow beneft
show remains as a symbol of her re-
silience and continues its mission to
connect local musicians to healthcare
in the greater Kansas City area, espe-
cially in emergencies. All proceeds go
to helping musicians acquire health-
care.
“Basically if any musician gets sick,
or in some kind of accident, they fll
out a real simple application, and
we help them out with either a small
doctor bill, or maybe rent…we’ve also
been trying to sign people up with the
Afordable Care Act,” Lyne said. “Just
because you have some sort of acci-
dent doesn’t mean you have to be in
debt for the rest of your life.”
Tis year’s Apocalypse Meow event
will be held on November 2 at Knuck-
leheads Saloon in Kansas City, Mo.
— Edited by Amelia Arvesen
Foundation provides healthcare for musicians
LOCAL MUSIC
DYLAN GUTHRIE
news@kansan.com
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 11
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for the exact same reason: living out
their World Cup dreams.
Smooth traveling hasn’t turned up
roses for everyone. Wiebe said his co-
worker has had some issues with can-
celed fights and sleeping on airport
foors, but speaking for himself, he
said he hasn’t experienced any major
airport or trafc issues to date.
While some fans have had issues
arise with taxis, whether it was secur-
ing one or traveling in one in general,
Wiebe, being a New York City resi-
dent and used to hefy cab rides, taxis
throughout Brazil have been very rea-
sonable and easy to access.
Joseph agreed that, while in Rio, he
has had little to no problem making
his way through the city, but he did
notice a few alarming details while
out on the road.
“Te driving in Brazil is insane,” Jo-
seph said. “Tey don't enforce trafc
laws, so it's a free-for-all, basically.
Cab drivers have phones or iPads
mounted to their dash in order to
watch games while driving. Really
cool, yet kind of scary.”
Subways in Sao Paolo, where Brazil’s
opening match of the tournament
took place, were also easily accessible
and closely resembled the subways
he takes to work in New York City,
which made for less of a headache
getting around, Wiebe said.
A week and a half into the World
Cup and Wiebe has already traveled
quite a distance, making stops in
Sao Paolo, Natal and Manaus, where
the United States played their match
against Portugal on Sunday tying 2-2.
Te one thing that is potent in every
city he travels to is the contingency of
U.S. fans and an abundance of Ameri-
can support, Wiebe said.
“Certainly, it is as good of a U.S.
environment, pro-U.S. environment,
as I could’ve imagined for the World
Cup,” Wiebe said. “Granted this is my
frst, but I don’t remember in the past
things being quite like this.”
Te American Outlaws, the promi-
nent U.S. soccer supporter group, has
held its share of block parties while in
Brazil, painting the corners of match
cities in red, white and blue, while
chanting U-S-A at the top of their
lungs, Wiebe said.
Excitement and pandemonium
are nowhere near in short supply
throughout Brazil, no matter what
nation’s supporters one may stumble
upon.
Getting involved and somewhat im-
mersing yourself in the culture of not
only the event, but also of Brazil, was
incredible and defnitely lef a life-
long impression, Wiebe said.
“In Natal, the day before the [U.S.]
game we went down to the beach,
and I played about an hour of beach
soccer with a bunch of locals,” Wiebe
said. “In that environment, with that
backdrop and the connection of the
game for all of us was a really special
moment.”
Te U.S. will play Germany on
Tursday at 11 a.m. with the chance
to advance to the next round if they
secure either a draw or win.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
FUTEBOL FROM PAGE 9
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 12
S
sports
T
he kid from Cameroon can’t
catch a break.
It’s old news to some as we’ve
heard the former Kansas center Joel
Embiid sufered a stress fracture
in his right foot this past week. In
a matter of hours on Tursday the
news went from bad to worse for the
seven footer.
First reports announced it was a
possible foot injury, then a likely
stress fracture in his right foot, then
fnally a confrmed navicular bone
stress fracture. It requires surgery,
and possesses a recovery time of
four-to-six months. Not good news
at all.
Te Big 12 Defensive Player of
the Year struggled with back issues
during this past year’s regular season,
missing a game when TCU came to
Lawrence. He reinjured his back with
a lower back stress fracture in a game
against Oklahoma State in early
March, eventually ending his season.
When he decided to leave Kansas in
April, we saw clear blue skies and a
possible frst overall pick in the 2014
NBA Draf. Embiid was said to have
the most room to grow as a player.
He could be an all-star, they said. A
Hall of Famer.
No one expected a week before the
draf festivities began in Brooklyn,
N.Y. at Te Barclays Center that Em-
biid would be planning to not attend.
It’s a truly unfortunate story, but
has a chance to be even more tragic.
His injury is one that has a hor-
rid past among basketball players,
particularly big men. Te navicular
bone stress fracture has sidelined
numerous centers, derailing their
careers for the worst.
Yao Ming, the frst pick 2002 NBA
Draf by the Houston Rockets, sus-
tained the same injury in 2006; his
career was never same afer that. An-
other who sufered the same injury
is former Cleveland Cavaliers center
Zydrunas Ilgauskas. He endured the
injury in 2000, and ultimately ended
his season. However, Ilgauskas was
able to make a full recovery, and
played ten more seasons before retir-
ing in 2011.
Since Tursday, Embiid has
dropped signifcantly in draf
boards. Prior to the injury, he was a
consensus top three pick, with the
other two players being Duke’s Jabari
Parker, and fellow teammate Andrew
Wiggins.
Now Embiid sits out of the top fve
on most boards, and with little shot
of becoming the frst player taken in
this years draf.
Tere have been diferent endings
to this injury, and Joel Embiid’s story
has yet to pan out the way he’d like it
to. On Tursday he tweeted, “Disap-
pointment is inevitable. Discourage-
ment is a choice.” Te surgery was
successfully completed on Friday
morning, which began his rehabilita-
tion process.
Finally some good news for the kid
from Cameroon.
By GJ Melia
sports@kansan.com
Embiid’s injury unfortunate, upsetting
NBA DRAFT
Pros and Cons: Compensation for student-athletes
NCAA VS. ED O’BANNON
By Ben Felderstein
sports@kansan.com
By Sam Davis
sports@kansan.com
I
magine a business that
creates a very desirable
product. Tis business
can sell tickets, merchandise
and negotiate media deals
that earns itself close to $1
billion in proft each year.
Tis company has more than
400,000 employees feeding
the profts but they don’t
have to pay any one of them
a single dime.
Tis ingenious business
model is the very structure
of the NCAA: the so-called
“non-proft” association that
organizes college athletics in
the United States.
Many would say that stu-
dent-athletes are more than
fairly reimbursed for their
services to their schools. It’s
true that most college ath-
letes receive scholarships for
tuition, a place to stay and
eat, as well as a multitude of
other free services aimed at
fulflling their academic and
athletic needs. But is that
enough considering that all
of it can be taken away in an
instant upon injury or once
their talents are no longer
deemed necessary?
Being a college athlete is a
full-time job. With morning
workouts, class, practice,
homework and study time,
there’s no time for these
young players to do any-
thing else. Teir entire lives
for as long as they remain at
school, are centered around
their sport and making sure
they are good enough to stay
on the feld or on the court
so they can earn millions of
dollars in profts for their
school and the NCAA: prof-
its they can’t touch.
Amateurism in college
sports is dead. Tere is big
money being made, but it’s
not falling into the right
hands. We live in a coun-
try where if you possess a
unique talent or idea it can
be marketed and make mon-
ey overnight, but for some
reason if that talent or idea
comes from a college athlete
no payment is necessary.
Paying student-athletes
wouldn’t hurt the games we
know and love; we have seen
the competitive nature of
professional sports remain,
despite constant salary
increase. It is likely that fans
would even see increased
performance on the playing-
feld as players would work
harder and smarter in hopes
of staying on the payroll.
— Read the full column on
Kansan.com
T
he scholarships that
athletes receive already
give athletes opportuni-
ties that other college students
are not given. An athlete’s tal-
ent and skill might be enough
to earn them a scholarship
while a normal student needs
to rely on their academics
alone to earn scholarships.
Student athletes are treated like
celebrities on college campuses
— and deservedly so — but
that doesn’t mean that they
deserve better and more op-
portunities than their peers.
Te most important thing
for student athletes is having
something to fall back on afer
their collegiate sports careers
are over. Te overwhelming
majority of student-athletes
fnd a career outside of the
world of sports. Tat being
said, it is crucial that athletes
who do not go to the pros stay
in school to earn degrees.
Tey are still young men
and women; and just because
they are talented athletes, that
shouldn’t make them better
than any of the other students
at their university. A student
with a 4.0 GPA, participates in
Greek life and other various
university organizations does
not receive special treatment
like these athletes do.
Professionals get paid, and
collegiate athletes are simply
not professionals. Te student-
athlete to non-student athlete
gap is already getting further
and further apart with all of
the publicity and fame that
these athletes get.
If they do begin receiving f-
nancial compensation, the gap
between students and student-
athletes will continue to grow,
which will harm student
relationships and take away
from students’ opportunity to
interact with their peers.
Ten, there’s the issue of how
you go about paying the play-
ers. Will football players make
more money than basketball
players because football tends
to bring more money to a uni-
versity? Or will the amount be
determined by an individual’s
skill level? Will players receive
a bonus for winning Te Big 12
title? What about making the
NCAA tournament and then
each round afer that?
Paying collegiate athletes
could ruin the integrity and
the beauty of the college game.
Players play for their school
and for the name on the front
of their jersey. Tey don’t play
for a check in the mail.
— Read the full column on
Kansan.com
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 13
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Te University basketball team will
represent the USA as its national
team in the 2015 World University
Games in Gwangju, South Korea,
Craig Jonas, the head deputy of the
USA delegation for the World Uni-
versity Games announced June 17,
at a press conference.
“When you walk the halls here you
realize what a great tradition Kan-
sas has in the basketball world, and
we’re excited to have them there,“
Jonas said. “We went through a
strong and long process to fnd the
most appropriate team, and when
we went through the criteria, Kansas
was a great ft.”
Te team’s criteria to become the
national team was total wins in the
past fve years (Kansas was number
one with 150 wins), the 2014-15 pre-
season rankings (Kansas is ffh) and
the Ratings Percentage Index in the
2013-14 season (Kansas was third).
Jonas said Kansas was the number
one choice afer combining all fac-
tors.
“Te opportunity to have a top-
ranked program like Kansas repre-
senting USA on the global stage will
be historic,” Jonas said.
Coach Bill Self said the Games will
give players more national and in-
ternational exposure because they’ll
be seen by NBA and international
teams.
“I don’t think you do this for a re-
cruiting nugget, but it’s a by-product
of it,” Self said.
To be eligible, players must be be-
tween 18 and 25 years old and en-
rolled in at least one class. Former
players under 25 who haven’t gradu-
ated can participate in the games.
Ben McLemore, who’s currently tak-
ing summer classes at the Univer-
sity and will be 23 years old in 2015,
could be eligible.
Self said he told the current ros-
ter about the opportunity and all
of them were excited to live in an
Olympic-style village and compete
with former University players.
Junior forward Perry Ellis said he’d
be most excited to play with Tomas
Robinson.
“I never really played with him, so
that would be cool,” Ellis said.
Self said he saw one drawback
about the player criteria for the
Games: the players on the team have
to be American-born. Former play-
ers such as Andrew Wiggins and Joel
Embiid and future player Sviatoslav
Mykhailiuk won’t be able to suit up.
“If you were to look at one nega-
tive, the negative would be that we
couldn’t have our entire group of
guys together,” Self said.
— Edited by Tom DeHart
BASKETBALL MEMORIAL STADIUM
Team selected to represent USA
BLAIR SHEADE
sports@kansan.com
Athletics to remove
perimeter track
Te outdoor track surrounding
Kivisto Field in Memorial Stadium
will be removed this summer, Ath-
letics Director Sheahon Zenger said
Tursday.
Te project will begin on June 24.
“It is an intermediate phase of reno-
vation,” Zenger said. “First and fore-
most, the decision was made for play-
er safety. We also anticipate having
more practice space on the sidelines.”
Zenger predicted the frst phase
to be a six week process, and said
the conclusion of the frst phase will
bring a more conventional look to
Memorial Stadium.
“I think it will be best described
as a traditional stadium,” Zenger
said. “Historically, many universi-
ties housed multi-use facilities with
a track around the football feld. We
were the last BCS stadium with a
track around its football feld, so this
is about keeping up with the times.”
Coaches, players, recruits and fans
will notice the loss of the track, but
Zenger said this move is about re-
committing eforts to Kansas football.
“It’s not as much about recruiting,”
Zenger said. “I think it shows com-
mitment to our football program, to
its coaches, its players, alumni and
fans. Tis is now a football-only facil-
ity.”
Te frst phase of the renovation will
be completed before kickof on Sept.
6. Te rest of the advancements are
still up in the air.
“Tis is step 1A of four or fve,”
Zenger said. “We will be conducting
some design work on our stadium
and feshing it out with stakeholders
when the time comes.”
— Edited by Ashleigh Lee
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN FILE PHOTO
KU Athletics announced last Thursday that efforts to begin removing the perimeter track
around Kivisto Field in Memorial Stadium will begin this Tuesday.
DANIEL HARMSEN
sports@kansan.com
MICHAEL O’BRIEN/KANSAN
Junior forward Perry Ellis will be eligible to represent the USA in the 2015 World Uni-
versity Games in South Korea. Eligible players must be 18-25 years old and enrolled
in one class.

The opportunity to have a
top-ranked program like Kan-
sas representing USA on the
global stage will be historic.
CRAIG JONAS
World University Games
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2014 PAGE 14
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Junior track team member Michael
Stigler fnished in second place in
the 400-meter hurdle for the second
straight year last week in Eugene,
Ore. Although Stigler fell short of his
ultimate goal of frst place, the speed-
ster was able to accomplish a feat not
many Jayhawks have before.
Te second-place fnish during the
NCAA championships at Hayward
Field made Stigler an All-American
in the event for a third consecutive
year, which marks the frst time since
1980 a University male has earned
the honor in track on three diferent
occasions.
“It’s a humbling experience to say
that I’ve done that for the University
of Kansas and for myself,” Stigler
said. “For me, I’m just blessed and
thankful and this shows that my hard
work does pay of.”
Going into the fnal race last Friday,
Stigler, who is from Canyon, Texas,
said he had a lot of confdence still
built up from his semifnal race
where he clocked his season-best
time of 49:34 — nearly half a second
quicker than the rest of the feld.
During the fnal race, he found
himself racing against the only man
to beat him so far in 2014, Nebraska
senior Miles Ukaoma, who beat him
in the West Preliminary race just two
weeks before.
Te two got of to equal starts, run-
ning neck-and-neck for the frst 300
meters. It wasn’t until the fnal turn
when Ukaoma was able to create sep-
aration between the two and crossed
the fnish line just before Stigler.
Stigler said he was able to keep
calm and try to get himself back into
it, but the fnish line just happened to
come a little bit too early.
“Te race started and I’m in the
mix, tied with Miles Ukaoma,” Stigler
said. “Between hurdles nine and ten,
I kind of broke down a little bit and
I let him get away from me and it
pretty much cost me the race.”
Stigler said that it wasn’t the way
BEN CARROLL
sports@kansan.com
TRACK AND FIELD
Three-time All-American falls short, trains for first
he wanted it to end but was still
thankful for the opportunity. He said
he will continue to fght to improve
himself. Tough fnishing second
was phenomenal, he said it just made
him hungrier for next year, and he
can’t wait to get back to work.
“I can just say thank God, thank the
University of Kansas and my coach-
ing staf for all the support,” Stigler
said. “I really couldn’t have done it
without everybody.”
Stigler has worked hard in track
since the seventh grade. However,
it wasn’t until high school when he
realized he could have a career run-
ning track.
His coach, Adam Cummings, who
Stigler said acted as a dad outside of
his home, told him he had the ability
to run in college.
“He’s the one who actually got me
hurdling,” Stigler said. “He’s worked
with me and improved me to become
a better athlete. He’s stayed on top
of me, was a big motivator and a big
support system for me.”
Once Stigler got to college, he
learned quickly that the training
process is intense and that he has
to be ready to workout and practice
everyday. He clocks nearly 25 hours
a week in training and watching flm
to see where he can improve his time.
He plans to keep training with his
coaches and hopes to win the NCAA
championship race for his senior
season.
If the opportunity to run profes-
sionally comes to him, Stigler said
he’ll gladly accept it. He said he will
keep training and do everything in
his power to make that a reality.
“I plan on running and staying with
my same coaching staf,” Stigler said.
“It’s something I love to do and it’s
something I’d like to stick around
doing for a while.”
Michael will compete next week in
the USA Championships in Sacra-
mento, Calif.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
JEFF JACOBSEN/KU ATHLETICS
Junior hurdler Michael Stigler competes in
the 200-meter hurdle event at the 2014
NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Champion-
ships in Eugene, Ore.

It’s a humbling experience to
say that I’ve done that for the
University of Kansas and for
myself.
MICHAEL STIGLER
Junior
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