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Table of Contents

Welcome

Department Directory
EE Administrative Personnel

Research Opportunities
Faculty Research Areas
Department Research Centers

Getting Started
Axess (Registration and Enrollment)
Summary of Grading Policies
Advising Guidelines
The Stanford University Honor Code and Fundamental Standard
EE and Stanford Email Lists
Academic Calendar
Health Insurance

Degree Progress
General Description of Programs
Program Planning: M.S. Degree
Program Planning: Ph.D. Degree
Ph.D. Qualifying Examination
Program Planning: Ph.D. Minor
Leave of Absence (all degree programs)
Extension of Candidacy (all degree programs)
Conferral of Degrees (all degree programs)
Curricular Practical Training (EE290) (all degree programs)

Financial Support
Research Assistantships
Teaching Assistantships
Course Grader Appointments
Fellowships (Policies)
How to Get Paid
Taxes and Tax Reporting




Department and Campus Resources
Graduate Students in Electrical Engineering (GSEE)
Women in Electrical Engineering (WEE)
Stanford IEEE
Graduate Life Office (GLO)
Stanford Student Organizations
Office of Accessible Education (OAE)
Bechtel International Center (I-Center)
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Career Development Center (CDC)
Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL)
Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures (GAP)
Stanford Bulletin
Honors Cooperative Program and SCPD (HCP)
Non-Degree Option (NDO)
Computing Resources
Libraries
Treatment of Students Sustaining Injuries
Campus Emergency Information


Getting Started

Table of Contents
Axess (Registration and Enrollment)
Summary of Grading Policies
Advising Guidelines
The Stanford University Honor Code and Fundamental Standard
EE and Stanford Email Lists
Academic Calendar
Health Insurance
Axess (Registration and Enrollment)

Axess is a student information system available via the web. It is generally available 24
hours a day, 7 days a week. You will need your SUNetID and password to login to Axess.

Using Axess, you can:
1. File your quarterly registration commitments
2. File or adjust your study list and elect grading options
3. Review your grades
4. Request an official transcript
5. Print a history of your courses and grades (i.e., unofficial transcript)
6. Apply to graduate
7. Update your address (e.g., mailing, permanent, campus P.O. Box), and personal
email address.
8. Apply for housing
9. View financial aid information
10. Pay your university bill
11. View advisor information

Important Reminders:
Please make sure to carefully read the universitys policies regarding Registration,
Enrollment and Academic Progress on the Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures
(GAP) Handbook website.

Students are also strongly encouraged to bookmark or print a copy of Stanfords
Academic Calendar in order to meet the universitys enrollment deadlines (e.g., study
list deadline, change of grading basis deadline, withdrawal deadline, etc.)

EE and Stanford Email Lists
The Electrical Engineering Department maintains several email lists for the use of its
students, staff, and faculty. You can subscribe and unsubscribe from email lists at the
following website: mailman.stanford.edu/.

The primary list used by the department to contact the EE community (i.e.,
faculty, students and staff) is: ee@mailman.stanford.edu. The EE administrative
office is responsible for sending messages via this email list.

Students are also automatically added to the ee-
students@mailman.stanford.edu email list. Do not unsubscribe from this email
list or you will not receive critical information, such as deadlines/reminders
from the EE Student Services Office.

Stanford has a plethora of resources for its students, ranging from academic and job-
related services, to keeping your social lives active and your stress levels low.
Information on mailing lists in general can be found here:
https://itservices.stanford.edu/service/mailinglists. Some recommended mailing lists
are listed below:

The Stanford Computer Forum: The Computer Forum provides students with a
unique opportunity to meet potential employers in a relaxed and focused
environment through on-campus interviews, information sessions, Job Lunch,
company tours, and Career Fair. For additional information, please visit
http://forum.stanford.edu/careers/recruiting.php. Sign up here:
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/recruiting

Electrical Engineering Social Events: Want to get together with your peers to
relax, meet new people, or find a new setting to discuss your latest and greatest
ideas? Sign up to this list to get notifications about weekly social events
happening in the EE Department. Sign up here:
https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/ee-socialevents

The Free Food Alert List: This mailing list was created to serve a simple but very
important purpose: to help hungry Stanford students find free food on campus.
Remember that one persons leftovers are another persons lunch and dinner.
Sign up here: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/free-food-alert





Degree Progress

General Description of Programs
The profession of electrical engineering demands a strong foundation in physical science
and mathematics, a broad knowledge of engineering techniques, and an understanding
of the relation between technology and society. Curricula at Stanford are planned to
offer the breadth of education and depth of training necessary for leadership in the
profession. To engage in this profession with competence, four years of undergraduate
study and at least one year of postgraduate study are recommended. For those who
plan to work in highly technical development or fundamental research, additional
graduate study is desirable.

Master of Science
The masters degree program provides advanced preparation for professional practice
or for teaching at the junior college level. The Masters degree is offered as a full-time
and part-time program, and consists of 45 units. The average length of time it takes
students to complete the full-time program is 1.5 to 3 years. Students in the full-time
program must complete the degree within 3 years. The average length of time it takes
students to complete the part-time program is 3 to 5 years. Students in the part-time
program must complete the degree within 5 years. The department does not prescribe
specific courses to be taken but it does provide guidelines for acceptable programs.
Each student, with the help of a faculty advisor, prepares an individual program of
study. There is no thesis requirement. The masters degree is offered as a full-time and a
part-time program.

Doctor of Philosophy
The Ph.D. degree is designed to prepare students for careers in research and teaching at
the university level. The Ph.D. degree is offered exclusively as a full-time program,
consisting of 135 units. The candidacy for the Ph.D. program is 5 years. Exceptions may
be granted for candidacy extensions up to one year.
Students in the Ph.D. program must complete the following in order to meet the
requirements of the program: (1) a qualifying examination given by the faculty of the
Department of Electrical Engineering; (2) an approved program of study in Electrical
Engineering and allied subjects; (3) an approved topic of research and a written
dissertation, based on research, which must be a significant contribution to knowledge;
(4) and an oral examination that is a defense of dissertation research and is taken near
the completion of the doctoral program.

Program Planning: M.S. Degree

M.S. Academic Requirements
Milestones Timeline: M.S. Degree
Guidelines for Preparing the MS Program Proposal
Approved Depth and Breadth Area Courses
EE Related Courses
M.S. Academic Requirements
Every student in the MS degree program must submit a Program Proposal form prior to
the end of the first quarter of enrollment (second quarter for HCP students). Each
student, with the help of their faculty advisor, prepares a program of study that meets
his or her particular area(s) of interest. The Program Proposal Form must be approved
by the student's faculty advisor and be submitted to the EE Degree Progress Officer by
the stated deadline. Students who do not submit a Program Proposal on time will have
an enrollment hold placed on their record until they submit an acceptable proposal.
Milestones Timeline: M.S. Degree



Important Reminders:
Early in your final quarter, you must submit an approved revised Program Proposal to
the departments Degree Progress Officer if you enrolled in classes that are not listed on
your original program proposal form.

The Universitys minimum requirement for each master's degree is 45 unduplicated
units of coursework done at Stanford. Stanford does not accept transfer credit toward a
masters degree. However, students may apply up to 18 units of applicable Stanford
coursework taken via the Non-Degree Option (NDO) Program toward their EE degree.

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in order to maintain good
academic standing and graduate with the EE MS degree.

submit Program Proposal
Year 1:
end of first quarter
submit Revised Program Proposal
apply to graduate
Year 2:
final study list
deadline of final
quarter
Every student should be familiar with the Universitys requirements for minimal
progress as outlined in the Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures (GAP).

There is a three-year limit from the first quarter of enrollment in the masters
program to conferral of the degree (the university refers to this limit as the candidacy
period). The MS program is usually completed in five academic year quarters.
Students in the coterminal program: the three-year period begins in the first
quarter of graduate standing.
Students in the Honors Cooperative Program have a five-year limit for
completing the degree.

During your final quarter, you must submit an Application to Graduate for Advanced
Degrees through Axess.

Guidelines for Preparing the MS Program Proposal

The MS Program Proposal form is available here.

In order to meet the requirements of the EE-MS degree, you must meet the following
department guidelines:
1) Depth:
An approved sequence of at least 3 letter graded EE courses, to provide depth in
one area.
At least one course must be 300 level or above; the other courses must be 200
level or above (minimum of 9 units).

The list of approved depth sequences is available below. Depth sequences not
specifically listed in this handbook require special approval from the students faculty
advisor and the Associate Chair of Graduate Education.

2) Breadth:
3 letter graded EE courses from 3 different areas outside of the depth area
(minimum of 9 units).

The list of approved courses is available below. Two courses are not in different areas
if they are both listed under the same depth area or in more than one depth area (a
few courses appear in multiple depth areas).

3) Seminar:
The seminar requirement can be fulfilled by either:
(i) Enrolling in at least one seminar course in any Math, Science or Engineering
department for credit.

OR

(ii) Attending 8 research seminars (one-time events). Submit a list of these
seminars with a paragraph describing the content attached to your final
Program Proposal, signed by your advisor.

Students who attend 8 one-time seminars must submit a list of the seminars
attended with a paragraph describing their content, signed by their faculty advisor,
along with their final MS Program Proposal.
4) Unit Requirements:
Of the 45 units that are required to complete the requirements of the EE-MS degree:

1) At least 36 units must be letter-graded units (i.e., A,B,C,D,NP). These are fulfilled
through:

a) 21 units in EE-related courses: These are comprised of the 18 units of Depth
and Breadth as described above, plus an additional 3 units (excluding EE
278A). The list of approved depth sequences, approved breadth courses, and
approved related courses are in the Approved Depth and Breadth Area
Courses section below.
i) 9 units must be 300 level or higher
ii) 12 units must be 200 level or higher.

b) 15 units may be 100 level or higher technical courses in natural sciences and
engineering departments. You may include up to 6 units of EE 391 Special
Studies (independent study) in these 15 units.

2) 9 units may be taken Credit/No Credit or for letter grades. This includes the 1-
unit seminar requirement. These may be 100 level or higher technical courses in
natural sciences and engineering departments.

Important Reminders:
Because the M.S. degree is an advanced degree in electrical engineering awarded
entirely on the basis of course work, the program should contain a substantial amount
of advanced electrical engineering course work. Mezzanine (200 level) courses, suitable
for advanced undergraduates or beginning graduates, may be used in partial satisfaction
of this requirement, but at least part of the program should be in the more advanced
300 and 400 series courses.

All units must be at the 100 level or higher. No courses numbered below 100 count
toward a graduate degree. Please note: EFSLANG (English for Foreign Students) courses
do not count toward the 45-unit minimum. If the university requires you to take any of
these classes, they are additional units above the required 45 units.

Word of Advice:
New students are strongly advised not to undertake a heavy academic program in their
first quarter at Stanford, as they are adjusting to their new environment and the
demanding nature of graduate work. Three regular courses (8-10 units) provide a full-
time workload, particularly during the first quarter at Stanford. The student's advisor
should be consulted for further guidance on this and other course-enrollment questions.

5) Special Studies:
Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the opportunities for individual work
under the supervision of individual faculty members, under the heading of Special
Studies courses: EE 390 (satisfactory/no credit) or EE 391(letter grade). Possibilities
under this heading range from directed reading in an area of mutual interest to the
equivalent of an M.S. thesis. Students can pursue a thesis if they find a faculty thesis
advisor who is willing to work with them; if so they enroll in EE 300. However, please
note that because a thesis is not required there would be no notation of this on the
diploma. Students still need to complete all requirements for the MS degree in addition
to their thesis work. These courses cannot be applied toward the fulfillment of the
depth and breadth requirements.
6) Deviations:
Every attempt should be made to meet the guidelines listed above. Courses that deviate
from one or more of these guidelines must be approved by your faculty advisor and the
Associate Chair of Graduate Education. Students contemplating a special program
should submit a current Master's Program Proposal along with a Deviation Petition
form, describing their particular objectives and how the proposed program meets these
objectives. Submit the forms to the Degree Progress Officer for a final decision.

Approved Depth and Breadth Area Courses
The following lists satisfy the depth and breadth requirements for the different
specializations shown below.

A depth sequence consists of three courses taken from a single track and must
contain a minimum of one class at the 300 level or above.

The breadth requirement is satisfied by courses from three different areas (i.e., 1
class from 3 different tables, from different areas). You cannot select a class
from your depth area.

Two courses are not considered as being in distinct areas if they can be found
under a common depth area--some courses appear in multiple depth areas.

Any 200 level or higher EE Related Courses not listed below (excluding EE 278A)
may be taken as "additional EE courses", to satisfy the 21 units of EE courses
requirement.

Please note that not all courses are offered every year. These tables were last updated
October 2013.

1) Bio-Electrical Engineering
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 202 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 225 Bio-chips, Imaging and Nanomedicine 3
EE 264 or
EE 265
Digital Signal Processing or
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
3
3-4
EE 302 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 303 Autonomous Implantable Systems 3
EE 331 Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology 3
EE 369A Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 369B Medical Imaging Systems II 3
BIOE 301C Diagnostic Devices Lab 3
BIOE 311 Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and Amorphous
Computers
2-3
BIOE 332 Large-Scale Neural Modeling 3
RAD 233/BIOE 223 Physics and Engineering of X-Ray Computed
Tomography
3
RAD 225/BIOE 325 Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutic Applications 3
RAD 227/BIOPHYS
227
Functional MRI Methods 3
RAD 228 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Programming Topics 3


2) Computer Hardware
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 271 Introduction to VLSI Systems 3
EE 272 Not offered 2013-14 3-4
EE 273 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 282 Computer Systems Architecture 3
EE 382C Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 382E/CS 316 Advanced Multi-Core Systems 3
EE 386 Alternate years, given next year 3
CS 315A Not offered 2013-14 3



3) Computer Software Systems: Select three courses from a single table below
Computer Software Systems: Track 1
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 284
or
CS 144
Not offered 2013-14
OR
Introduction to Computer Networking
3
OR
3-4
CS 140 Operating Systems and Systems Programming 3
CS 240 Advanced Topics in Operating Systems 3-4
CS 242 Programming Languages 3
CS 243 (300 level) Program Analysis and Optimizations 3-4
CS 244 Advanced Topics in Networking 3-4
CS 245 (300 level) Database Systems Principles 3
CS 246 Mining Massive Data Sets 3-4


Computer Software Systems: Track 2
Course Number Course Title Units
CS 248 Interactive Computer Graphics 3
CS 348A Computer Graphics: Geometric Modeling 3-4
CS 348B Computer Graphics: Image Synthesis Techniques 3-4

Computer Software Systems: Track 3
Course Number Course Title Units
CS 143 Compilers 3-4
CS 242 Programming Languages 3
CS 243 (300 level) Program Analysis and Optimizations 3-4
CS 245 (300 level) Database Systems Principles 3
CS 246 Mining Massive Data Sets 3-4
CS 343 Advanced Topics in Compilers 3

4) Control and System Engineering
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 263 Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems 3
EE 365 Stochastic Decision Models 3
ENGR 205 Introduction to Control Design Techniques 3
ENGR 207B (300 level) Not offered 2013-14 3
ENGR 209A (300
level)
Analysis and Control of Nonlinear Systems 3


5) Communication Systems: Select three courses from a single table below
Communication Systems: Track 1
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 276 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 279 Introduction to Digital Communication 3
EE 359 Wireless Communications 3-4
EE 360 Multiuser Wireless Systems and Networks 3
EE 361 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 379 Not offered 2013-14 3

Communication Systems: Track 2
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 361 Principles of Cooperation in Wireless Networks 3
EE 375/STATS 375 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 376A Information Theory 3
EE 376B (formerly
476)
Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 376C (formerly
477)
Universal Schemes in Information Theory 3
EE 379 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 387 Algebraic Error Control Codes 3
EE 388 Modern Coding Theory 3

Communication Systems: Track 3
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 247 Introduction to Optical Fiber Communications 3
EE 279 Introduction to Digital Communication 3
EE 345 Alternate years, given next year 3
EE 348 Advanced Optical Fiber Communications 3
EE 379 Digital Communication 3

6) Dynamic Systems and Optimization
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 263 Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems 3
EE 364A Convex Optimization I (CME 364A, CS 334A) 3
EE 364B Convex Optimization II (CME 364B) 3
EE 365 Stochastic Decision Models 3
EE 464 Not offered 2013-14 3
MS&E 310 Linear Programming 3
MS&E 311 Optimization (Alternate years, not offered 2014-15) 3
MS&E 313 Not offered 2013-14 3
MS&E 321 Stochastic Systems 3
MS&E 322 Not offered 2013-14 3
MS&E 351 Alternate years, given next year 3

7) Electronic Circuits
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 214B Advanced Analog Integrated Circuit Design 3
EE 251 High-Frequency Circuit Design Laboratory 3
EE 271 Introduction to VLSI Systems 3
EE 272 Not offered 2013-14 3-4
EE 292J Power Electronics 3
EE 313 Digital MOS Integrated Circuits 3
EE 314A (formerly
314)
RF Integrated Circuit Design 3
EE 314B Advanced RF Integrated Circuit Design 3
EE 315A VLSI Signal Conditioning Circuits 3
EE 315B VLSI Data Conversion Circuits 3
EE 414 RF Transceiver Design Laboratory 3

8) Electronic Devices, Sensors and Technology

9) Fields, Waves and Radioscience
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 242 Electromagnetic Waves 3
EE 252 Antenna Theory 3
EE 256 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 262 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 303 Autonomous Implantable Systems 3
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 212 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes 3
EE 216 Principles and Models of Semiconductor Devices 3
EE 248 Fundamentals of Noise Processes 3
EE 292L Nanomanufacturing 3
EE 309 Semiconductor Memory Devices and Technology 3
EE 311 Advanced Integrated Circuits Technology 3
EE 316 Advanced VLSI Devices 3
EE 319 Advanced Nanoelectronic Devices and Technology 3
EE 320 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 410 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory 3-4
ENGR 240 Introduction to Micro and Nano Electromechanical
Systems
3
ENGR 341 Micro/Nano Systems Design and Fabrication 3-5
ENGR 342 MEMS Laboratory II 3-4
EE 346 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 355 Imaging Radar and Applications (GEOPHYS 265) 3
AA 244A Introduction to Plasma Physics and Engineering 3
AA 251 Introduction to the Space Environment 3

10) Image Systems: Select three courses from a single table below
Image Systems: Track 1
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 262 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 331 Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology 3
EE 368 Digital Image Processing (CS 232) 3
EE 369A Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 369B Medical Imaging Systems II 3
EE 369C Medical Image Reconstruction 3
EE 469B Not offered 2013-14 3

Image Systems: Track 2
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 368 Digital Image Processing 3
Psych 221 (300
level)
Applied Vision and Image Systems 3
CS 231A Introduction to Computer Vision 3-4
CS 248 Interactive Computer Graphics 3-4
CS 348A Computer Graphics: Geometric Modeling 3-4
CS 348B Computer Graphics: Image Synthesis Techniques 3-4


11) Lasers, Optoelectronics and Quantum Electronics
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 234 Photonics Laboratory 3
EE 236A (formerly 268) Introduction to Modern Optics 3
EE 236B (formerly 235) Guided Waves 3
EE 236C (formerly 231) Introduction to Lasers 3
EE 243 Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices 3
EE 332 (formerly 232) Laser Dynamics 3
EE 334 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 336 Nanophotonics (MATSCI 346) 3
EE 340 Optical Micro- and Nano-Cavities 3
EE 346 Not offered 2013-14 3
APPPHYS 304 Lasers Laboratory 4
APPPHYS 305 Advanced Nonlinear Optics Laboratory 4



12) Network Systems
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 284
OR
CS 144
Not offered 2013-14
OR
Introduction to Computer Networking
3
OR
3-4
EE 382C Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 384A Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 384C Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 384E/CS 244E Networked Wireless Systems 3
EE 384S Performance Engineering of Computer Systems &
Networks
3
EE 384X Not offered 2013-14 3
CS 244 Advanced Topics in Networking 3-4
CS 344 Not offered 2013-14 3
MS&E 336 Not offered 2013-14 3


13) Signal Processing: Select three courses from a single table below
Signal Processing: Track 1
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 278B Introduction to Statistical Signal Processing 3
EE 263 Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems 3
EE 373A Adaptive Signal Processing 3
EE 378A Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 378B Not offered 2013-14 3

Signal Processing: Track 2
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 264
OR
EE 265
OR
EE 278B
Digital Signal Processing
OR
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
OR
Introduction to Statistical Signal Processing
3
OR
3-4
OR
3
Music 420A Not offered 2013-14 3-4
Music 421A Audio Applications of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) 3-4
Music 422 Perceptual Audio Coding 3
Music 424 Signal Processing Techniques for Digital Audio Effects 3-4


Signal Processing: Track 3
Course Number Course Title Units
CS 221 Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques 3-4
CS 228 (300 level) Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques 3-4
CS 229 (300 level) Machine Learning 3-4
Stats 315A Modern Applied Statistics: Learning 2-3
Stats 315B Modern Applied Statistics: Data Mining 2-3


14) Solid State Materials and Devices
Course Number Course Title Units
EE 222 Applied Quantum Mechanics I 3
EE 223 Applied Quantum Mechanics II 3
EE 228 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 243 Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices 3
EE 292L Nanomanufacturing 3
EE 319 Advanced Nanoelectronic Devices and Technology 3
EE 320 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 327 Not offered 2013-14 3
EE 328 Physics of Advanced Semiconductor Devices 3
EE 329 The Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Interfaces 3
MATSCI 199/209 Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids 3-4
MATSCI 323 Not offered 2013-14 3
MATSCI 343 Organic Semiconductors for Electronics and Photonics 3
MATSCI 347 Introduction to Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures 3

15) General Breadth (each line is considered a separate area)
a. 293A, 293B
b. 204
c. 214A (counts as Electronic Circuits if Electronic Circuits is not the MS depth area)
d. 233 (counts as Electronic Circuits if Electronic Circuits is not the MS depth area)
e. CS 229A (counts as Signal Processing if Signal Processing is not the MS depth area)
f. EE 257/GP 258 (as long as the Depth area is not Image Systems or Signal Processing)
g. EE 261 (as long as the Depth area is not Control and Systems Engineering,
Communication Systems, Dynamic Systems and Optimization, Image Systems or Signal
Processing)

EE Related Courses
Updated Nov 2013

Some specialized courses are offered only in alternate years (and a few are offered less
frequently).

Course

Title

Equivalent EE Level

AA 244A Introduction to Plasma Physics and Engineering 200-299
AA 272C Global Positioning Systems 200-299
APPPHYS 202 Quantum Probability and Quantum
Information
200-299
APPPHYS 203 Atoms, Fields and Protons 200-299
APPPHYS 207 Laboratory Electronics 100-199
APPPHYS 208 Laboratory Electronics 100-199
APPPHYS 227 Quantum Device Physics of Atomic and
Semiconductor Systems
200-299
APPPHYS 272 Solid State Physics 200-299
APPPHYS 273 Solid State Physics II 200-299
APPPHYS 304 Lasers Laboratory 300-399
APPPHYS 305 Nonlinear Optics Laboratory 300-399
APPPHYS 387 Quantum Optics and Measurements 300-399
BIOE 301C Diagnostic Devices Lab 200-299
BIOE 311 Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and
Amorphous Computers
300-399
BIOE 332 Large-Scale Neural Modeling 300-399
BIOE 334 Engineering Principles in Molecular Biology 300-399
CS 107 Computer Organization and Systems 100-199
CS 108 Object-Oriented Systems Design 100-199
CS 110 Principles of Computer Systems 100-199
CS 140 Operating Systems and Systems Programming 200-299
CS 143 Compilers 200-299
CS 144 Introduction to Computer Networking 200-299
CS 148 Introduction to Computer Graphics and
Imaging
100-199
CS 194 Software Project 100-199
CS 205A Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision,
and Graphics
200-299
CS 221 Artificial Intelligence: Principles and
Techniques
200-299
CS 231A Introduction to Computer Vision 200-299
CS 228 Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and
Techniques
300-399
CS 229 Machine Learning 300-399
CS 229A Applied Machine Learning 200-299
CS 240 Advanced Topics in Operating Systems 200-299
CS 242 Programming Languages 200-299
CS 243 Program Analysis and Optimizations 300-399
CS 244 Advanced Topics in Networking 200-299
CS 244E Networked Wireless Systems 200-299
CS 245 Database Systems Principles 300-399
CS 246 Mining Massive Data Sets 200-299
CS 248 Interactive Computer Graphics 200-299
CS 255 Introduction to Cryptography 200-299
CS 315A Parallel Computer Architecture and
Programming
300-399
CS 315B Parallel Computing Research Project 300-399
CS 316 (same
as EE 382E)
Advanced Multi-Core Systems 300-399
CS 321 Information Processing for Sensor Networks 300-399
CS 343 Advanced Topics in Compilers 300-399
CS 344 Topics in Computer Networks 300-399
CS 347 Parallel and Distributed Data Management 300-399
CS 348A Computer Graphics: Geometric Modeling 300-399
CS 348B Computer Graphics: Image Synthesis
Techniques
300-399
CS 448B Data Visualization 300-399
ENGR 105 Feedback Control Design 100-199
ENGR 205 Introduction to Control Design Techniques 200-299
ENGR 206 Control System Design 200-299
ENGR 207B Linear Control Systems II 300-399
ENGR 209A Analysis and Control of Nonlinear Systems 300-399
ENGR 240 Introduction to Micro and Nano
Electromechanical Systems
200-299
ENGR 341 Micro/Nano Systems Design and Fabrication 300-399
MATSCI
199/MATSCI
209
Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids 200-299
MATSCI 316 Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and
Technology
300-399
MATSCI 323 Thin Film and Interface Microanalysis 200-299
MATSCI 343 Organic Semiconductors for Electronics and
Photonics
300-399
MATSCI 347 Introduction to Magnetism and Magnetic
Nanostructures
200-299
ME 358 Heat Transfer in Microdevices 200-299
MS&E 237 The Social Data Revolution: Data Mining and
Electronic Business
200-299
MS&E 251 Stochastic Decision Models 200-299
MS&E 310 Linear Programming 300-399
MS&E 311 Optimization 300-399
MS&E 313 Vector Space Optimization 300-399
MS&E 321 Stochastic Systems 300-399
MS&E 322 Stochastic Calculus and Control 300-399
MS&E 336 Topics in Game Theory with Engineering
Applications
300-399
MS&E 338 Advanced Topics in Information Science and
Technology
300-399
MS&E 351 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control 300-399
MUSIC 420A Signal Processing Models in Musical Acoustics 300-399
MUSIC 421A Audio Applications of the Fast Fourier
Transform (FFT)
300-399
MUSIC 422 Perceptual Audio Coding 300-399
MUSIC 424 Signal Processing Techniques for Digital Audio
Effects
300-399
OIT 673 Data-driven Decision Making in Healthcare 200-299
PSYCH 221 Applied Vision and Image Systems 300-399
RAD
223/BIOE
223
Physics and Engineering of X-Ray Computed
Tomography
200-299
RAD
225/BIOE
325
Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutic
Applications
200-299
RAD 226 In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and
Imaging
300-399
RAD
227/BIOPHYS
227
Functional MRI Methods 200-299
RAD 228 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Programming
Topics
300-399
STATS 315A Modern Applied Statistics: Learning 300-399
STATS 315B Modern Applied Statistics: Data Mining 300-399
STATS 375 Inference in Graphical Models 300-399

The following courses were previously approved as Related Courses but are no longer
offered:
AA 251 Introduction to the Space Environment
ENGR 207A Linear Control Systems I
ENGR 209B Advanced Nonlinear Control
ENGR 210B Advanced Topics in Computation for Control
GEOPHYS 265 Imaging Radar and Applications
MS&E 339 Approximate Dynamic Programming


Program Planning: Ph.D. Degree

Ph.D. Academic Requirements and Milestones
Milestones Timeline: Ph.D. Degree
Qualifying Exam
Applying for Doctoral Candidacy
Course Unit Requirements
Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR)
Oral Examination
Dissertation
Graduation Quarter Petition

Ph.D. Academic Requirements and Milestones
In order to meet the requirements of the Ph.D. program, every student must meet
department and university requirements:

Find a research topic and supervisor.
Pass the departments qualifying examination.
Complete the candidacy form (complete the courses listed).
Form a dissertation reading committee.
Pass the Oral Examination, in which dissertation results are presented and
defended.
Submit the dissertation to the university.




















Milestones Timeline: Ph.D. Degree


Important Reminders:
The universitys minimum requirement for the doctoral degree is 135 unduplicated
units of coursework done at Stanford. Please see below for information on course unit
requirements and transferring credits from another institution.

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in order to maintain good
academic standing in the program.

Every student should be familiar with the Universitys requirements for minimal
progress as outlined in the Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures GAP.

Students are required to be admitted to candidacy by the end of their second year in
the program. More information on candidacy can be found below.

Rotation Program/Find advisor
Take quals
Courses
MS degree or 21 units of PhD course work
Transfer previous MS units, if applicable
Year 1
Find advisor and second reader
Retake quals if necessary
Advance to Candidacy
Courses, as noted above
Research

Year 2
Courses
Complete MS degree course work and confer MS, if
applicable
Finish any remaining 21 units of PhD course work
Find third reader (formalize reading committee)
Research
Year 3
Research...
Oral exam (defend dissertation)
Year 4
Research...
Complete dissertation writing and submit dissertation to
Registrar
Graduate!
Year 5
If unable to graduate before 5 years of candidacy expire (year
7), department must approve extension of candidacy
Beyond Year 5
Candidacy is valid for five years from the date of approval by the department unless
terminated by the department (e.g., for unsatisfactory progress). The candidacy end
date is listed on the students record in Axess.

Students who are unable to graduate before their five years of candidacy expire may
request a maximum of one additional year of candidacy per extension. Extensions
require review of a dissertation progress report, a timetable for completion of the
dissertation, and any other factors regarded as relevant by the department. Students
must file a request for candidacy extension before the end of their program's time limit.
The department is not obligated to grant an extension. Please submit your request for
extension to the EE Degree Progress Officer. Extensions are subject to final approval by
the Associate Chair of Graduate Education.

During your final quarter in the program, you must submit an Application to Graduate
for Advanced Degrees through Axess.
Qualifying Exam
Students in the Ph.D. program wishing to advance to candidacy must first pass the
Electrical Engineering Qualifying Examination, which takes place once each year during
the winter quarter.

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination
Traditional Quals - Format
The examination consists of ten separate 10-minute oral exams given individually in one
day by the professors on the student's examination committee. The exams take place in
faculty offices and are scheduled with at least 12 minutes between each exam.
The professors who make up each student's examination committee are selected by a
scheduling program that is designed to ensure fairness based on the students' individual
ranking of potential examiners. Students list their desired faculty examiners on a
preference form. Each student must rank 20 professors in four groups of five. Professors
are grouped according to question areas (listed below). No more than six professors
from any one question area may be listed. The scheduling program constructs
committees, choosing more examiners from the higher ranked groups than from the
lower ranked groups. Typically, committees consist of four examiners from the first
group and respectively three, two and one from each of the three remaining groups.
The scheduling program also guarantees breadth of committees since no more than
four examiners can be in any one question area.

More information about the question areas, including relevant courses, texts, and
associated faculty, will be posted in the qualifying exam Web page
http://ee.stanford.edu/phd/quals . The link will go live by mid-autumn quarter each
year. Questions from previous years can be found on CCNET
at https://ccnet.stanford.edu/quals/. Please note the department does not release the
immediate previous year's quals questions.

Scoring and Results
Examiners score each session on a scale of 0 to 10. The scores are normalized to account
for faculty scoring variations, and the normalized scores are summed to arrive at the
candidates' final scores.
The results of the Qualifying Examination are determined at a meeting of the Electrical
Engineering Department faculty held shortly after the examination. The lowest passing
score will be determined by faculty vote. The number of students passed depends on an
estimate of the number of students the faculty are able to supervise in research.
Students will also be notified of the examination results by email.

Warnings
Students should rely on published information about faculty question areas; they should
not approach potential examiners with specific questions aimed at determining details
of what the examiners intend to ask. Faculty should not reply to individual inquiries
about question areas.
Students should not ask faculty examiners for an evaluation of performance, nor should
students argue their scores with examiners, either immediately after the exam or at a
later time. Except for clerical errors, no scores may be changed once the examiners have
submitted them to the Department.

Committee Quals - Format
Students who do not pass the traditional quals but want to remain in the Ph.D. program
will need to complete and pass the new Committee Format Quals exam, prior to the end
of winter quarter of their second year of study.

Procedures
The Committee Format Qualifying exam is a modified oral examination. It is intended to
provide you with a different exam format. Your presentation should be concise and
provide the committee with evidence of your research preparedness and capabilities.

Exam Committee:
Your Committee Format exam committee consists of the following 3 members (all
members must be on the Academic Council). Two members must be EE faculty and the
Committee Chair cannot be your research advisor:
a) The Chair
b) Your research advisor
c) Third faculty member
Your Committee Chair and third examiner will be assigned to you once the department
has approved your application for the Committee Format exam, which consists of a
completed faculty form and a completed student form. You will be responsible for
scheduling the exam date with the assistance of your committee. The exam should be
administrated within two months of the committee being formed. You must be
registered in the quarter you take the Committee Format exam.

Room Scheduling:
You are responsible for reserving a room for your exam. After you have located a room,
check with the person who schedules that room in order to reserve it. (Room list)
Examination Format:
The exam will consist of the following:
a) 15 minutes - you give presentation on your research results (strongly encouraged) or
proposed research (must show serious depth of scholarship and a clear plan). It is
encouraged that you rehearse your presentation with critical friends unit it fits
comfortably within the limit;
b) 15 minutes - faculty committee will question you about your research;
c) 30 minutes - faculty committee will broadly question you about the electrical
engineering areas you have chosen;
d) Faculty committee will deliberate;
e) Exam results will be sent to you via email within 1 week.

Final Reporting Procedures:
Complete parts I and II on the Committee Format Qualifying Examination Results form,
print the form and bring it to your exam. After the exam has concluded, your chair signs
the form and completes part III. Your chair or anyone on the committee must return the
form to Amy Duncan in Packard 177 promptly after the examination decision has been
determined.

Applying for Doctoral Candidacy
Students who have passed the departments qualifying examination may file the
Application for Candidacy form.

When to apply for candidacy: The Department recommends that the Application for
Candidacy be completed by the end of the spring quarter of the academic year in which
the student has passed the qualifying exam. The University requires that all Ph.D.
students file the Application for Candidacy by the end of the second year of their
doctoral study at Stanford. Thus, students in the Ph.D. program are strongly
encouraged to take the departments qualifying examination during their first year.
Students who need to complete the requirements of the Masters degree should file the
candidacy form by the end of their second year of Ph.D. study. On the form the student
will list courses that total 90 units beyond the M.S. program of study to be used for the
Ph.D. degree, including courses already completed and courses to be completed.

The Application for Candidacy must be signed by the students Program Advisor, the
Principal Dissertation Advisor and the Second Reader. Submit the form to the EE Degree
Progress Officer, who will obtain the Associate Chairs signature.

Finding a Dissertation Advisor and Second Reader: The dissertation advisor is the
primary faculty member who will supervise the student's research and fund the length
of his/her study until graduation. The second reader is an additional faculty member
who agrees to review and sign off on the student's dissertation. The dissertation advisor
must be a regular Stanford faculty member (not a Consulting faculty or a Senior
Research Associate). The dissertation advisor and/or second reader must have some
affiliation with the Electrical Engineering department, either as a full, joint or courtesy
appointment. The appointing of emeritus faculty to a student's committee is subject to
department approval. Please see the EE Degree Progress Officer for more information.


Important Reminder
Students should be aware of the Universitys policies regarding minimum progress
requirements for graduate students as spelled out in the Stanford Bulletin in the chapter
titled "Graduate Degrees." In the rare event that an advisor or student decide to
terminate their relationship, the student retains candidacy and remains in the Ph.D.
program. However, the department requires the student to actively seek and find a
new advisor within one year, to satisfy minimum progress requirements of the
department and the university and continue enrolling. Please see the EE Degree
Progress Officer immediately if you have any questions or concerns about this.
Course Unit Requirements
The Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering is a specialized degree, built on a broad base of
science, mathematics, and engineering skills. The course program must reflect
competency in Electrical Engineering and specialized study in other areas relevant to the
student's research focus. Students should discuss their course selection with their
dissertation advisor.

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to complete 135 units of unduplicated
coursework. The program must satisfy the following minimum unit guidelines:

Up to 45 units of a Master's degree earned at Stanford in a math, science or
engineering department may be counted toward the 135 units required for the
doctoral degree. Similarly, graduate work done at other institutions and
approved by the University Registrars Office (see information below on Transfer
of Credit) may be used to satisfy up to 45 units of credit toward the Ph.D.
program.

90 course units beyond the M.S. degree (for a total of 135 units). 21 units must
be letter-graded lecture courses in technical areas such as science, mathematics,
and engineering.

12 of the 21 units must be EE or approved Related (non-EE) lecture
courses numbered 200 level or above.
9 of the 21 units may be lecture courses in other science,
mathematics, and engineering departments numbered 100 level or
above.

Thesis, Special Studies (e.g. EE 391), research units (e.g. EE 400), non-
departmental units in nontechnical areas, seminar units, and courses taken
CR/NC do not count toward the minimum 21 letter-graded units in technical
areas. But they do count toward the 90 units beyond the MS degree needed to
fulfill the course unit requirement.

The proposed program of study must be listed on the "Application for Candidacy
for Doctoral Degree" form. Any deviations from these guidelines must be
accompanied with an explanation and the approval of the dissertation advisor.
All deviations must be approved by the Associate Chair (submit all requests for
program deviations to the Degree Progress Officer in Packard 177).

Transfer of Credit
After completing at least one full-time quarter of work at Stanford, students who have
completed graduate work at another institution may submit an Application for Graduate
Residency Credit form to the Student Services Center. The Student Services Center will
determine the admissibility of residency credit to be transferred. A maximum of 45 units
may be transferred in to count toward the 135-course unit requirement needed to
complete the Ph.D. program.

In order to transfer units to the Ph.D. program:
The course work must have been completed after the conferral of the Bachelor's
degree.
Courses must have a letter grade of B or better (or its equivalent) will be
considered.
One semester unit typically converts to 1.5-quarter units.


Word of Advice
New students are strongly advised not to undertake a heavy academic program in their
first quarter at Stanford, as they are adjusting to their new environment and the
demanding nature of graduate work. Three regular courses (8-10 units) provide a full-
time workload, particularly during the first quarter at Stanford. The student's advisor
should be consulted for further guidance on this and other course-enrollment questions.

Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR)
This is a reduced tuition rate available to advanced Ph.D. students who have completed
all 135 units of coursework and who now only need to work on their
dissertation. Students who are on TGR status must enroll in EE 802. To be eligible,
students must have complete the following:

Satisfactorily completed all courses listed on their Application for Candidacy
form. If your plans for meeting the course requirements change (i.e., you enroll
in classes that are not listed in your original candidacy form), a new Application
for Candidacy form must be approved by the department.
Completed 135 units of study at Stanford to fulfill the residency requirement.
Credit for work completed elsewhere (as described below) may be used to help
meet this requirement.
Filed the Doctoral Dissertation Reading Committee form.
Oral Examination
Near the completion of the doctoral program, students must present a 30-45 minute
public seminar on their dissertation research. Following the public presentation, the
student is examined in private by a faculty committee of at least five examiners
approved by the Electrical Engineering department. Details about the Oral Examination
are given here.

The Oral Examination is intended to verify that the students research represents his or
her own contribution to knowledge and understanding of the research. The oral
examination is a dissertation defense in which the candidate is expected to:

Demonstrate his or her ability to explain and defend the thesis and its
contribution to knowledge before experts in the field.
Present an understandable picture of the research and its setting to scholars
whose special areas of interest lie outside the candidate's area of research.
Answer satisfactorily any questions deemed pertinent by the examining
committee.

What to expect during the Oral Examination:
The examination begins with a public presentation of research results by the Ph.D.
candidate, during which clarifying questions may be asked by members of the audience.
This part of the examination is open to the public. After a brief recess, the examination
continues in a private session with only the candidate and members of the examining
committee in attendance. The examination, including the public portion, should not
exceed three hours in length.

Members of the Oral Examination Committee:
The Oral Examination committee consists of at least five members. All committee
members should be members of the Academic Council.

The chair of the Oral Examination committee is a faculty member who is not in
the research area of the candidate's dissertation advisor. Usually, the chair is a
member of the Electrical Engineering department, but faculty members from
other departments are permitted to serve as chair.
The other members of the Oral Examination committee will usually be the
members of the dissertation reading committee, including one additional
examiner (five total oral exam committee members).
The department requires that at least two members of the Oral Examination
committee be EE faculty members (this includes joint and courtesy faculty
members). In special circumstances it is possible to include an examiner who is
not an Academic Council member. Please see the EE Degree Progress Officer if a
member of your committee is not an Academic Council member.

How to schedule the Oral Examination:
For complete information and instructions about scheduling your oral examination,
please go to: http://ee.stanford.edu/phd/orals

Important Reminders:
Students must be registered for the quarter in which the oral examination is given.

The Doctoral Dissertation Reading Committee form must be on file with the EE
Degree Progress Officer prior to the examination.

Students are advised to pass the oral examination within one year of the date of
completion of the other requirements for the degree.

If the oral examination was passed more than one year prior to the date of
graduation, the examination is void and the candidate may be asked to repeat the Oral
Examination. The 12-month period of validity for the Oral Examination may be extended
by petition to the Degree Progress Officer.
Dissertation
The single most important part of a Ph.D. program is the research for and writing of a
doctoral dissertation, which must be approved by a reading committee. Students who
are in the Ph.D. program and need to complete the M.S. program requirements are
encouraged to form their dissertation reading committee by the end of the fourth year.
Students who enter the Ph.D. program with a completed M.S. degree are encouraged to
form their dissertation reading committee by the end of their third year.

Who can be on my dissertation reading committee?
A dissertation reading committee in the Electrical Engineering department consists of
three faculty members.
Your dissertation advisor. He or she must be a member of the Academic Council,
except in extremely rare cases and subject to department approval. The
University does not permit Consulting Professors to serve as principal
dissertation advisors (see Stanford University Faculty Handbook, Chapter 9:
Other Teaching Titles: Acting, Visiting, Consulting, By Courtesy, and Voluntary
Clinical Appointments,
The second reader.
The third reader.

Important Reminders about your dissertation reading committee:
Two of the three must belong to the EE faculty (full, joint, courtesy, research or
emeritus appointment), and at least two must be on the Academic Council.

The department does not allow consulting and visiting faculty to be a member of a
students reading committee.

A Senior Research Associate, or, in some cases, an outside scientist or engineer may
serve as the second or third reader. However, if any member of the proposed reading
committee is not on the Academic Council, you must obtain approval by the department
by filling out a "Petition for Non-Academic Doctoral Committee Members" form,
including the individuals curriculum vitae. This person must have a Ph.D. or equivalent.
Your dissertation will not be cleared through the EE Degree Progress Office unless it has
approval on record.


Dissertation Submission
Make sure to carefully read Directions for Preparing Doctoral Dissertations by the
Universitys Registrar for specific information on how to prepare your dissertation. The
pamphlet entitled Doctoral Dissertation Agreement Form from UMI Dissertation
Publishing ProQuest Information and Learning is also available in these offices and
should be reviewed as the dissertation nears completion. You can also print the Doctoral
Dissertation Agreement Form at: www.il.proquest.com/dissertationagree/ using: User
ID: Dissertations and Password:Publish
Students are not required to submit a copy of their dissertation to the department.

Graduation Quarter Petition
Students must be registered in the term in which they submit a dissertation or have a
degree conferred. Students who meet the following conditions are eligible to be
assessed a special tuition rate for the quarter in which they are graduating. In order to
be eligible for the reduced tuition rate, students must have:
Completed all course work, degree requirements, and residency
requirements.
Enrolled in the applicable EE 802 section during the Graduation Quarter.
Formally applied to graduate via Axess.
Enrolled in the term immediately preceding the term chosen as the
Graduation Quarter.
Passed the oral examination and successfully defended their dissertation.
Students on Graduation Quarter are registered at Stanford and, therefore,
have the rights and privileges of registered students.

Only one Graduation Quarter may be requested for each degree program. Students
who, for whatever reason, do not graduate during the Graduation Quarter will be
assessed a higher, standard tuition rate in subsequent terms.

The Graduation Quarter Petition form can be found
online: registrar.stanford.edu/pdf/grad_qtr.pdf

The form must be submitted to the Student Services Center by the first day of the
quarter.

There is a registration fee of $100 for the Graduation Quarter; students will be assessed
University health insurance (unless waived) and ASSU fees.


Program Planning: PhD Minor

A Ph.D. Minor is a program of study outside of the students major department (i.e., a
students home department). A minor is not a requirement for any degree but is
available when agreed on by the student and their home department and minor
department.

Acceptance of the minor as part of the total Ph.D. program is determined by the
students home department.

Application for the Ph.D. Minor candidacy must be approved by both the home
department and the minor department.

Ph.D. Minor application forms can be found online at:
http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/registrar/files/app_phd_minor.pdf
For a minor in Electrical Engineering, the student must fulfill:
The M.S. depth requirement as outlined in this handbook.
Complete a total of at least 20 units of lecture courses at the 200 level or above
in Electrical Engineering (15 of these units must be letter graded) and be approved by
the students home department and the Electrical Engineering department. Seminars do
not count toward the 20 units. Be sure to list the course number, title, units and grade
(if completed) of each course on your Ph.D. Minor form.
A grade point average of at least 3.35 on these courses is required.
Submit the form to the EE Degree Progress Officer when applying for Ph.D.
candidacy (in the students home department).

Additional Program Information
Leave of Absence
Students currently registered and wishing to take a leave from their degree program
during an academic quarter or longer must obtain a Leave of Absence form and approval
from the EE Degree Progress Officer.

You can print a Leave of Absence Form from the Registrar's Office website:
http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/registrar/files/leaveofabsence.pdf.

Extension of Candidacy
Students who are unable to graduate within the allotted candidacy period for their
degree program may request a maximum of one additional year of candidacy per
extension. The department is not obligated to grant an extension. Extensions require
advisor endorsement, and must include review of a progress report, a timetable for
completion of any remaining degree requirements, and any other factors regarded as
relevant by the department. Students must submit the Application for Extension of
Candidacy form to the EE Degree Progress Officer before the end of their program's
time limit, which is listed in the students record in Axess. Extensions are subject to final
approval by the Associate Chair of Graduate Education.
Conferral of Degrees
Students who have met the requirements of their degree program are eligible to confer
their degree. Students who intend to graduate must notify the University by filing an
Application to Graduate via Axess. Students can apply to graduate during autumn,
winter, spring or summer quarter.

Commencement ceremonies are held each June for students who have received
degrees in the previous summer, autumn, and winter quarters and for students who are
graduating in June. (spring quarter conferral).

Curricular Practical Training (EE290)
EE290 (A,B,C & D) offers course credit for EE graduate students currently on an F-1 visa
who would like to complete relevant work experience as part of their program of study.
This is done in a manner consistent with the USCIS regulations and the Bechtel
International Center. Such work must be relevant to the curricular program pursued by
the student.

If you are on a student visa, you will need to submit the PTA (Practical Training
Application) form in Axess and your CPT request to the Bechtel Center. Instructions on
how to submit your CPT application and current policy information are provided at
http://icenter.stanford.edu/students/current/curr_prac_train.html.

CPT Course Enrollment Policies

Sign up for the appropriate EE 290 course (A,B,C or D) on your study list in the
quarter during which you work.

MS students can take CPT for a maximum of two quarters (EE290A and EE290B).

PhD students can take CPT for three quarters (EE290A, B, C) and a fourth by permission
only (EE290D).

EE290A,B,C,D may each be taken only once.
If you receive an Incomplete (I) in any of these courses, you may not enroll in
any additional CPT courses until you clear the Incomplete. Example: if you
receive an I in EE290A, you may not enroll in EE290B until you have received a
Satisfactory (S) grade in EE290A.

If you receive a No Credit (NC) in any of these courses, you may not enroll in
any additional CPT courses. Example: if you receive an NC in EE290A, you may
not take any further CPT courses for credit.


Course Number Can be taken by...

EE290A EE MS and PhD students only.

EE290B EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory (S)
grade in EE290A.

EE290C EE PhD students only. MS students may not enroll.

EE290D EE PhD students only. Requires permission of the Associate Chair of
Graduate Education.

Send an email to eecptreports@lists.stanford.edu. You must
present strong reasons why a fourth quarter of internship is
essential to your program of study. TGR students are not eligible to
take CPT unless it is an essential part of the student's research.

Requirements for Completing the Course

1. The course is completed and a grade of "S" assigned following submission and
approval of a final report. The report should describe in competent English the work you
performed and how it relates to your academic program (NOT your research).

2. The report should be 3 to 5 pages, single spaced, and should not contain company
proprietary information.

3. The report cover page should include:

the student's name
Stanford ID number
the course number (EE290A, B, C or D)
the quarter during which the course is taken
the company you worked for

4. The report must have a section describing how your work improves your skills relating
to SPECIFIC Stanford class(es) that you have taken (NOT how your work improves your
research skills, and NOT how these classes help your work).

5. Papers resulting from the work can be added as an appendix, but do not alone fulfill
the requirement.

6. Upload the report as a PDF file to the CPT database
https://gradapps.stanford.edu/completeCPT/. Name the PDF file following this
example:

Course number_last name, first name (e.g., EE290A_Chan, Lisa)


CPT Database Workflow
Step 1 Sign up for the appropriate CPT course.
Step 2 At the beginning of the quarter, you will receive an email to
log-in and complete the training form. During this stage, you
only need to log-in to verify your basic information (i.e. email
address, SUNet ID, etc.).
Step 3 At the end of your CPT, submit your final report to the CPT
database. If your report is not submitted by the last day of
class, you will receive an Incomplete. *Please see note below.
Step 4 Reports will be routed for advisor approval. You are
responsible for ensuring that your faculty reviews and signs
your report.
Step 5 Reports will be routed to the Associate Chair for Graduate
Education for final approval.
Step 6 Final grades will be entered.

*An incomplete ("I") grade will be assigned if the report is not received by the last day
of classes. The report is due no later than the last day of classes of the following quarter.
If not submitted by that time, the EE Department will change the Incomplete to a final
grade of NC (No Credit). There is no petition process to change the grade after the NC
has been assigned. Failure to complete this course will result in violation of USCIS CPT
regulations.


Financial Support

Table of Contents
Research Assistantships
Teaching Assistantships
Course Grader Appointments
Fellowships
How to Obtain Payment
Cardinal Care
International Students
Taxes and Tax Reporting

Research Assistantships
Research assistantships are awarded by individual faculty members who have the
necessary research funding to support students. In most cases, students who have
successfully arranged for an RA appointment have secured it by contacting a faculty
member directly. Research assistants typically receive 8-10 units of tuition coverage and
a monthly salary in exchange for 20 hours of work per week.

Students who are hired as research assistants, work on a research project under the
supervision of a faculty member.

Important Reminders:
Please make sure to carefully read the section on Assistantships in Stanfords
Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures handbook online, to better
understand the universitys policies regarding assistantships.
All students holding assistantships must be enrolled in the quarter in which
the assistantship appointment is held. For autumn, winter and spring quarters
the student must be enrolled in 8, 9 or 10 units.
The typical assistantship appointment is for a maximum of 50% time (i.e.,
20hrs/week), to allow students to make progress toward their degree.
Students on a 50%-time assistantship may work only an additional 8 hours a
week. NOTE: International students on F or J visas may not work more than 50%
time.
Teaching Assistantships
Teaching assistantships (in the Electrical Engineering department) are available to
students who have been at Stanford for at least one quarter. TAships typically provide
recipients with tuition coverage of 8-10 units and a monthly salary, requiring 20 hours of
work per week (the number of hours a student can work as a TA is determined by the
number of students enrolled in a class). Information about becoming a teaching
assistant in the EE department can be found online.

Important Reminders:
In addition to reading the information on our website, please make sure to
carefully read the section on Assistantships in Stanfords Graduate Academic
Policies and Procedures handbook, to better understand the universitys policies
regarding assistantships.
All students holding assistantships must be enrolled in the quarter in which
the assistantship appointment is held. For autumn, winter and spring quarters
the student must be enrolled in 8, 9 or 10 units.
The typical assistantship appointment is for a maximum of 50% time (i.e.,
20hrs/week), to allow students to make progress toward their degree.
Students on a 50%-time assistantship may work only an additional 8 hours a
week. NOTE: International students on F or J visas may not work more than 50%
time.
Course Grader Appointments
Course grader appointments (in the Electrical Engineering department) are available to
students quarterly. Course graders are paid hourly and can work for up to 20 hours per
week (the number of hours a student can work as a grader is determined by the number
of students enrolled in a class). Information about becoming a course grader can be
found online.
Fellowships
Fellowships are a form of graduate student support that typically include a stipend to
pay for living expenses and tuition support. No employment is expected in return for a
fellowship (i.e., teaching or research work); it is awarded on a merit basis to assist a
student in the pursuit of a degree.
Incoming Students
The Electrical Engineering department selectively awards fellowships to
incoming students every year. Each award comes with a quarterly stipend and a
tuition allowance. The details of the fellowship will vary and be specified in the
award letter should you be selected to receive this type of funding. More
information on how to be considered for a fellowship can be found on our
website.
Current Students
Fellowship opportunities for continuing students are mostly available through
the office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education. Information on the details
of these fellowships can be found on their website.
The EE Department will make announcements via email should fellowship
opportunities become available to currently enrolled students.


Important Reminder:
All students holding a university or department fellowship must be enrolled in the
quarter in which the fellowship is awarded. For autumn, winter and spring quarters, the
student must be enrolled in 8, 9 or 10 units.
How to Get Paid
RAs and TAs receive a Stanford paycheck twice each month, on the same schedule as
other university employees, and are subject to withholding of employment taxes with
the exception of Social Security and Voluntary Disability Insurance.

Students on a fellowship receive a Stanford paycheck at the beginning of the quarter in
one lump sum. Payments will be made in time for students to pay their university bill.

Important Reminders:
All students holding assistantships or fellowships must be enrolled in the
quarter in which the appointment is held. For autumn, winter and spring
quarters, the student must be enrolled in 8, 9 or 10 units. You must be
registered for classes in order to receive payment.
Students who have an assistantship in summer quarter must also be enrolled
in units in order to receive payment (just like during the academic year). The
percentage of the assistantship determines the number of units you should
enroll in (e.g. a 90% RAship pays for 1-3 units of tuition).
TGR students must enroll in EE801 (for master's students) or EE802 (for
doctoral students) for zero units, in their advisors course section in order to
receive payment.
We encourage every student who is receiving a paycheck through Stanford to
enroll in direct deposit. Detailed information on how to set up direct deposit can
be found online.
Every student who works at Stanford should submit an I-9 form prior to the
start of their appointment. Please submit this form as soon as possible to the
departments Student Accounting Associate prior to the start of the quarter in
which you will begin employment.
Cardinal Care
Students who are enrolled in the Cardinal Care insurance program at Stanford, and who
receive a fellowship or an assistantship stipend of at least 25% time, are eligible for a
Cardinal Care subsidy. Please contact the departments Student Accounting Associate
for information on your fellowship or assistantships appointment subsidy level (e.g.,
students who receive an assistantship appointment of 50% will receive a subsidy of half
the cost of health insurance). More information regarding Cardinal Care can be found
online.
International Students
Students holding an F-1 or J-1 visa are subject to many immigration restrictions related
to employment. Working without proper authorization, even for one day, can have
serious consequences with regard to your legal status in the U.S.

Information on assistantship and fellowship policies as they relate to
international students can be found online via the Bechtel International Centers
website.

Information on how to obtain a Social Security Number can also be found online.
Taxes and Tax Reporting
Student employee pay is subject to federal and state income tax withholding and is
reported on Form W-2. Work performed in California is subject to withholding and
reporting to California, regardless of the residency status of the student. Registered
degree-seeking students do not pay FICA (Social Security and Medicare) taxes and
California Voluntary Disability Insurance.

Tuition Allowance associated with assistantships is not subject to tax.

For further guidance related to taxes, students should consult the Stanford Student
Services Centers Tax Information website.

International students should carefully read the information above as well as the
information provided on the Bechtel International website to ensure timely tax
reporting.



Department and Campus Resources
Graduate Students in Electrical Engineering (GSEE)
Women in Electrical Engineering (WEE)
Stanford IEEE
Graduate Life Office (GLO)
Stanford Student Organizations
Office of Accessible Education (OAE)
Bechtel International Center (I-Center)
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Career Development Center (CDC)
Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL)
Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures (GAP)
Stanford Bulletin
Honors Cooperative Program and SCPD (HCP)
Non-Degree Option (NDO)
Computing Resources
Libraries
Treatment of Students Sustaining Injuries
Campus Emergency Information



Honors Cooperative Program

Introduction
The Stanford Center for Professional Development connects professionals worldwide to
the research and teaching of Stanford University faculty in the School of Engineering and
related academic departments. Qualified individuals may study for a Master of Science
degree on a part-time basis, pursue graduate certificates and professional certificates,
take individual graduate courses and professional courses, participate in workshops,
view free online seminars and more. Courses are delivered online and on the Stanford
campus.

The Honors Cooperative Program (HCP) was set up in 1953 to enable qualified engineers
and scientists from nearby companies to pursue graduate degrees (e.g. MS in Electrical
Engineering) at Stanford on a part-time basis while maintaining full-time professional
employment.

Admission
See the Admissions section of the EE website for information on applying to a degree
program as an HCP student. HCP applicants are judged on the same basis as full-time
applicants for the part-time graduate programs in Electrical Engineering.

Students who are interested in the HCP program are encouraged to visit the Stanford
Center for Professional Developments website.

Academic Requirements
HCP students have the same privileges as any other Stanford student. In order to be
awarded a graduate degree, HCP students must meet the requirements of the MS
degree program as listed in this handbook. Please make sure to read the Program
Planning: M.S. Degree section.

All HCP students are encouraged to maintain an average course load of three units
(minimum) per quarter, including summer quarters, and in general to make steady
progress toward the degree. Faculty (academic) advisors are provided for participating
students. These advisors assist with program planning and any special problems that
may arise.

Non-Degree Option (NDO)
In accordance with requirements of the University Registrar, NDO students must
complete a registration form and submit official transcripts to the SCPD office.
Transcripts must include grades through the last date of attendance and must show any
degrees awarded. For admissions purposes, an official transcript, not a photocopied
version, should be submitted.

All NDO students are bound by Stanford University's Honor Code. A violation of the
Honor Code will result in the loss of NDO privileges.

Questions regarding admission may be addressed to admissions @ee.stanford.edu
Questions regarding company arrangements with the University should be addressed to
the Stanford Center for Professional Development.


Computing Resources
For a complete description of the University computing resources, visit the Computing
and Communication website https://itservices.stanford.edu/.

Terman Library
Meyer Library
Tresidder Union
Packard basement, Room 051

Assistance at all of these clusters is provided usually by student consultants. They can
help you use the various computer systems available. The machines in the various
clusters usually contain a variety of software ranging from spreadsheet programs to
word processors, to CAD-drawing packages, to numerical analysis packages. Ask the
consultants on duty what software you may need for certain applications, and where to
find it. Laser printing is usually available within these clusters. The price per print varies
from cluster to cluster between 5 to 15 cents per page.

Most research groups have their own computing facilities, which are reserved for the
use of those groups.

In recent years computer and network security have become extremely important to
protect our systems and data from external attack. For advice and information on
current security software and upgrades, see
http://www.stanford.edu/group/security/securecomputing/.


Treatment of Students Sustaining Injuries
Students sustaining the following injuries should be directed to, Stanford University
Hospital during all hours:
Cyanide poisoning
Ingestion of or skin contact with chemicals; inhalation of hazardous chemicals
Head injuries that affect vision
Significant burns, chemical or thermal (e.g., extensive, involving face)
Significant lacerations (e.g., if more than just skin deep; over joints; possibly
involving tendons)
Significant fractures (e.g., long bones; open fractures)
Significant dislocations (e.g., ankle, elbow, wrist, shoulder, hip)
Significant crush injuries to bones, musculature, or abdomen
Significant penetration injuries
Students sustaining most other work-related injuries should seek care at Vaden Student
Health Center.
Injuries for which care is available at Vaden include, but are not limited to:
Limited abrasions
Limited contusions
Superficial lacerations (skin only)
Limited thermal and chemical burns
Possible fracture

For occupational exposures to blood, body fluids, or other potentially infectious
material (resulting from needle sticks, lacerations, etc.) immediately consult the Vaden
Student Health Center or the Stanford University Hospital Emergency Department.

Stanford University Hospital Emergency Department is open 24 hours a day.

Campus Emergency Information
If there were a disaster or emergency affecting the Stanford community, you would be
able to obtain updates and important instructions through the Emergency Information
website at http://emergency.stanford.edu/.
If you need to report an accident or emergency situation on campus, dial 911. From a
campus phone, dial 9-911.