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Journal Critique on Dyspnea 1

Running Head: JOURNAL CRITIQUE ON DYSPNEA

Journal Critique on Dyspnea

[name of the writer]

[name of the institution ]

[name of the Professor]

[Course]

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Journal Critique on Dyspnea

What a Nurse Can Do without Doctor’s Help for a Patient Experiencing Dyspnea

Since the times of Florence Nightingale nurses have never received their due share of

applause and respect. Most of the patients do not even realize the difference a nurse makes in

his/her life. Similarly, lesser number of people are aware of the services a nurse can provide

in absence of a doctor. With increased knowledge and awareness, courtesy of media, now

people have not only started recognizing but also praising nurses for the work they have been

doing so selflessly for so many years. Nurse administered interventions now has come into

the limelight for the first time in the past few years. The article below is another attempt of

gauging the efficacy of one of such techniques.

Summary of the Article - Gosselink, R. (2003). Controlled Breathing and Dyspnea in Patients

with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Journal of Rehabilitation Research

and Development. Volume 40, Number 5, Supplement 2, p. 25-34.

According to World Health Organization/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

(2001), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is becoming a major health

problems posing threat to innumerable around the world. Patients with COPD have physical,

as well as, emotional impact compromising on self-esteem, independence, socioeconomic

status, and even jobs for some. On the other hand, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

(COPD) also creates the same pressure impact on the health care system. It has become a

leading cause of death in US in recent times. Caring for the patients requires time, money,

and manpower, of which we already face a shortage of.

The purpose of this article is to discuss the efficacy of controlled breathing aimed at

improving dyspnea. Evidence of the effectiveness of controlled breathing is given for pursed-

lip breathing, forward leaning position and inspiratory muscles training. The article has
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discussed the controlled-breathing techniques for to reduce hyperinflation and to improve

inspiratory muscle function, to optimize thoracoabdominal movements.

The results of the study were in favor of PLB, forward leaning position and

inspiratory muscle training. But no significant results for diaphragmatic breathing were

found. Patients with emphysema were notably benefited from PLB, as it improves dyspnea

and oxygen saturation and reduces diaphragm activation. Whereas forward leaning position

alleviates dyspnea because of improved diaphragm function and reduced ribcage muscle

activity. Lastly, inspiratory muscle training improves inspiratory muscle strength and

endurance and offcourse, not to forget dyspnea, thus improving the quality of the patients’

life as a whole.

Personal Views about the Article

Despite the proven effectiveness of controlled breathing, several problems still need

to be solved. The limited evidence of successful transfer of controlled breathing from resting

conditions to exercise conditions raises several questions. The extent of reliance on control

breathing and its adoption by COPD patients are the two most important issues that need

further investigation.

Similarly, use of abdominal muscle contraction during expiration seemed to be

beneficial to diaphragm function, but its effect on dyspnea were not studied.
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Reference

Gosselink, R. (2003). Controlled Breathing and Dyspnea in Patients with Chronic Obstructive

Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development.

Volume 40, Number 5, Supplement 2, p. 25-34.