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Guide to Starting a Restaurant Business

November 23, 2009 by Leo 287 Views
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Ask a restaurant consultant about opening a restaurant and you’re likely to
get a succinct answer: “Don’t!” The failure rate is high, the costs can soar out of control and the
hours are brutal.
If you remain convinced that you are really want to be successful with this kind of business, put
on your toque, brush up on your knife skills and forge ahead.
When you start your own restaurant business you will never be bored. There are constantly new
challenges to face, but they are usually good ones, like how to juggle a reception dinner while at
the same time feeding your regular Saturday night crowd.
Unlike being a chef, you do not have to go to school or take any specialized training to own a
restaurant. However, to ensure your restaurant is a success it helps to know as much as possible
about the industry.
People love to eat. We find the social environment of restaurants the perfect break from cooking,
and relish the adventure of tasting new menus. If you’re seeking the life of haute cuisine, and are
wondering how to start a restaurant, we’ve listed our resources and tools that will help you
effectively write a restaurant business plan and get your business cooking.
Consider the following list before starting:
1. Clarify your concept and put all the proposed details–from decor to dessert choices–in
writing. If you can’t write about them, they need more thought.
2. Investigate the regulatory requirements, both city and state. Prepare for a plethora of
paperwork, including byzantine building codes with regulations covering everything from
kitchen exhaust systems to interior finish requirements.
3. Find an ideal location. Do a demographic study of the surrounding area. Research the
amount of foot traffic and the availability of easy parking. Then negotiate a lease you can
afford.
4. Plan your menu early in the game. Kitchen layout and equipment purchases depend on it.
Reduce your equipment costs either by purchasing used equipment or leasing new.
5. Find the funds. Write a detailed business plan and consider forming a small private
corporation or starting a limited partnership. However much money you think you need,
raise more. Many restaurant consultants blame the high rate of new restaurant failures on
undercapitalization.
6. Allocate the available space. Remember that in addition to dining and kitchen areas
you’ll need room for dishwashing, storage, bathrooms and administrative work.
7. Plan the layout for the dining area. Remember to balance your desire for the maximum
number of seats with your future customers’ desire to shun tables crammed into awkward
corners. Also avoid locating tables in the middle of the room like woebegone little
islands. Nestle tables–particularly two-tops–against low divider walls or other
architectural features.
8. Keep the kitchen layout focused on efficient, safe food preparation. Ensure that there is
sufficient light and ventilation, as well as enough space so that cooks, servers and
dishwashers are not bumping into one another at the busiest times.
9. Don’t neglect the graphics. From the exterior signage to the look of the menus, graphic
design plays an important part in a restaurant’s overall look.
10. Pay attention to lighting design. Focus dramatic light onto the tables to highlight the food,
and complement it with glowing atmospheric light to make the customers look good.
11. Research and develop the menu. Taste-test the recipes repeatedly until the kitchen can
achieve consistency. Remember that the food also has to look good on the plate. Plot out
your menu pricing strategy. Have the final menu proofread before sending it to the
printer.
12. Decide whether to offer full bar service. Apply for a wine and/or liquor license.
13. Investigate insurance needs thoroughly. Restaurants are simmering stockpots of potential
accidents–from fires to floods to food poisoning and a hundred other potential horrors.
14. Select and train the staff. Look for enthusiasm as well as experience. Allow ample
training time before the restaurant opens. Remember that the person running the front of
the house is as important as the person running the kitchen, and great service is as
important a factor in winning customer loyalty as great food.
15. Set up a bookkeeping and accounting system. Establish control over the meal checks.
There are dozens of scams that dishonest servers and cashiers can pull; get some expert
advice on how to prevent them.
16. Designate a core of trusted employees to supervise storage areas carefully. Stress that
they must check in all deliveries and audit the food inventory frequently.
17. Pass your opening inspection by a food safety specialist with your local health
department, along with a plumbing inspection. You’ll receive a permit to operate, which
will be reviewed yearly.
18. Open your doors and welcome hungry diners.
Next read: How to Start a Restaurant Business
ehow.com, www.fabjob.com, photo from asianfoodfanatic.com

How to Make Lamayong Bangus
November 23, 2009 by Leo 214 Views
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Ingredients:
• 200-250 grams Bangus (split)
• 80° Salometer brine (composed of J57.W grams of salt per liter or water)
Pickling solution:
• 66 ml vinegar
• 33 ml water
• 25 grams sugar
• 1.5 cloves garlic
• 1.1 grams ground pepper
Garnishing:
• onions
• red pepper
• tomatoes
Procedure
1. Split down the dorsal side of the fish. Turn knife flat and cut from the tail to the head by
running the edge of the knife along the backbone
2. Lay fish open like a butterfly fillet. Then, remove gills and viscera.
3. Remove the backbone by holding the knife horizontally and cutting with the tip of the
blade along the backbone from head to tail.
4. Remove the cut backbone. Wash fish in running water.
5. With the aid of a forcep, pull out the rib bones which have not been cut away. Make a
superficial slit along the dent of the dorsal muscles and pull out the intermuscular spines
embedded between the muscles from the head to the tail.
6. Remove spines in the ventral side in the same manner. Remove filamentous Y-shaped
spines along the lateral lines, i.e., the junction of the dorsal and ventral muscles.
7. Wash deboned bangus in clean water. Drain
8. Soak in 80° Salometer brine for 12 hours Drain off and wash briefly.
9. Soak in pickling solution.
10. Remove from marinade, drain and pack in plastic bags.
11. Decorate with slices of onions and red pepper
12. To serve, fry and add tomatoes.
Click image to enlarge

source: DA, Agricultural Training Institute

How to Make Solid Perfume
November 23, 2009 by Leo 284 Views
2 Comments

Because it’s easy to make, solid perfume opens the door to experimentation,
creativity and individuality. Whether you’re looking to set yourself apart with a unique scent or
you’re not so fond of the alcoholic undertones in most liquid perfumes, these instructions will
show you how to create an inexpensive alternative.
Though cologne and body spray are the preferred forms of perfume in the country because of the
hot weather, producers of organic personal care products are now producing solid perfume in a
much lower price than the high-end brands’. Huang says the product has a lot of potential as long
as it is marketed well.

Solid perfume is light, does not spill, long-wearing and not greasy. It is also alcohol-free, which
makes it good for people who have sensitive skin. Plus, the sweet almond oil ingredient has
health benefits. It is known as an effective emollient which improves complexion and adds glow
to dull skin. Applying sweet almond oil also provides instant relief from muscle pain.
Entrepreneurs who are already into the business of personal care products or giveaways may add
this to their menu. Solid perfume may be packaged as wedding, birthday, debut or anniversary
giveaway.
Ingredients and Equipments:
• 1 tablespoon beeswax (available at most craft shops) or petroleum jelly
• 1 tablespoon almond oil (or jojoba oil or vitamin E – available at natural foods/health
stores)
• 8-15 drops essential oil (available from most health food stores.)
• 1 container (preferably glass, ceramic or stone but plastic is acceptable)
• 1 straw (or similar object)
• 1 small glass jar or Pyrex bowl for mixing
• 1 saucepan
Procedure
1. Measure out the wax and almond oil into the small glass jar or Pyrex bowl.
2. Melt the wax. Put about an inch of water in a small saucepan, then put the jar or bowl
(with the wax and oil in) in the water. Bring the water around it to a boil. The wax will
melt gradually.
3. Remove the wax from heat when the wax is 100% liquid.
4. Stir in the essential oil with something long and thin. A thin stirring stick is used because
the wax will start to form solid on whatever you do your stirring with — your goal should
be to find something that has as little surface area as possible so you lose less of the end
product, and also something disposable so you don’t have to clean it off. Mix thoroughly.
5. Pour the liquid wax into your final container. In about 30 minutes, it will be cooled, solid
and ready to use. Will yield about one half ounce (by volume) of solid perfume.
Tips
• The only ingredient that can be expensive is the essential oils, especially if you make a
complex scent blend requiring an initial investment in many different oils. Of course,
there’s nothing wrong with picking a single pleasant scent. One bottle of essential oil will
make lots and lots of perfume as you use only drops of essential oil at a time.
• Most stores that sell essential oils have sampler bottles that you can use to “preview” the
different scents. Open two or three at a time to get a combined whiff to find a good
combination. Pick a primary scent and use more of that one, then one or two
“background” scents, using less of each. Some nice essentials for background scents are:
○ clary sage, a slightly smoky herbal scent to help creativity and concentration
○ orange or ginger to provide a warming sensation
○ ilang-ilang – a floral that isn’t too sweet or girly for guys, but is a happy smell and
subtle enough for a backdrop
○ cedar to repel insects
• For an on-the-go applicator, clean out a Chapstick tube and fill it with the melted liquid
wax.
• For a cool gift, find an appealing container at your thrift store to make it special. For
fingers to access the solid perfume inside, the container must be bowl-like, not bottle-
like.
• Check out various aromatherapy sites for info on the psychological properties of various
scents.
• Candle factories have scented oils that mimic brand name perfumes and work well in
wax.
The 5 Easy Steps Recipe
One would roughly need P4,500 to P5,000 to buy the ingredients including the packaging.
This project could yield 15g of solid perfume or one 10g- and 5g-ring, and costs P35 including
the packaging and the overhead costs. Profit margins for this type of products are usually high,
around 100 to 150 percent. So a 10-g solid perfume may be sold for P60 to P150 depending on
the target market. Putting premium on solid perfume will give it a high-end perception, however,
the packaging must also be elegant or eye-catching.
Ingredients:
• 6g Beeswax, 40%
• 6g Sweet Almond Oil, 40%
• 3g Fragrance Oil, 20%
• 1pc 10g Polypropylene ring container
• 1pc 5g Polypropylene ring container
Procedure
• Melt the beeswax in a double boiler.
• Once the beeswax is 100 percent liquified, add the sweet almond oil.
• Mix well and add fragrance. To come up with different scents, either experiment or
research on good fragrance combinations. Continue stirring until well mixed.
• Remove from heat and pour in ring containers. Use either a10g-ring or 5g-ring container.
• Let it cool to solidify.
This project could yield 15g of solid perfume or one 10g- and 5g-ring, and costs P35 including
the packaging and the overhead costs. Profit margins for this type of products are usually high,
around 100 to 150 percent. So a 10-g solid perfume may be sold for P60 to P150 depending on
the target market. Putting premium on solid perfume will give it a high-end perception, however,
the packaging must also be elegant or eye-catching.
Tips:
• Use a double boiler in melting the beeswax to avoid scorching. Do not melt the beeswax
on direct fire.
• The melting point of beeswax is between 62°C to 64°C. Discoloration will occur if the
temperature rises to above 85°C.
• Acrylic jars may be used instead of polypropylene containers, but you have to let the
mixture cool off a bit before pouring it in acrylic jars.
• Make the packaging and label chic and elegant. Aside from ring-type containers, jars and
other shaped containers may also be used.
For training and supplies, contact:
The Grasse Fragrance Company
Telephone: (02) 890-8269; (02) 232-4071
E-mail: gfcmakati@gmail.com
Website: www.grassefragrance.com
sources: wikihow.com, entrepreneur.com.ph, photo from journal.illuminatedperfume.com

How to Make Burong Bangus (Milkfish)
November 14, 2009 by Leo 945 Views
4 Comments

Ingredients:
• 1 kg Bangus
• 75.2 g Salt
• 17 g Angkak
• 5 cup Rice
Procedure
1. Remove the scales of the fish. Debone.
2. Cut fish into butterfly fillets. Cut into serving pieces.
3. Add salt and allow to saturate for 1 hour.
4. Cook five cups of rice by boiling in water. Cool
5. Add angkak to cooked rice.
6. Mix 400 grams salted fish and 850 grams cooked rice.
7. Pack rice and fish alternately in sterilized glass jar.
8. Place the remaining rice on the upper layer of fish.
9. Cover with plastic film.
10. Ferment for 7 days at room temperature.
11. Saute in cooking oil, garlic and onions before serving.
Click image to enlarge

source: DA, Agricultural Training Institute, photo from flickr.com

How to Make Bangus Hamonado (Food
Business)
November 12, 2009 by Leo 1,540 Views
1 Comment

Ingredients:
• Bangus (259 grams in size or more)
Marinating solution:
• 80° Salometer brine (composed of 267.03 grams of salt per liter of water)
• 250 g Brown sugar
• 6 pcs Bay leaves
• Nutmeg
• Black pepper
• Prague powder
• Paprika

Procedure
1. Wash milkfish then split. Remove all internal organs and false kidney. Debone.
2. Simmer the marinating solution for one hour then cool. Bring the volume to one liter.
3. Soak the fish in the cool marinating solution for 30 minutes to one hour depending on
size.
4. Store in a chill room overnight for slow curing or at room temperature until flesh is
translucent.
5. Remove from the solution and wash surface to remove excess salt. Do not soak.
6. Spread on trays and surfs. In the meantime, kindle smoke house.
7. Smoke until golden brown.
8. Cool before packing in boxes.
9. Keep refrigerated if packed in plastic bags.
Click image to enlarge

source: DA, Agricultural Training Institute, photo from flickr.com
How to Make Pork Embutido (Food
Business)
November 8, 2009 by Leo 2,122 Views
5 Comments

Embutido is a Filipino recipe frequently served during special occasions.
The demand for this product as a daily fare on the Filipino dining table is increasing. Processing
and cooking embutido is easy and it has a long shelf life.
Meat Ingredients:
• 800 g Pork lean or pigue, ground finely
• 200 g Pork backfat, ground

Extenders :
• 1-4 cup TVP (used to substitute a portion of the lean meat)
• 1 tbsp Isolate
• 1/2 tsp Carageenan
• 1/2 cup Water (hydrate the ingrdients above for 3 minutes or until soft)
Seasoning:
• 1 tbsp Salt, refined
• 1 tsp Phosphate
• 1/2 tsp Curing salt
• 1/4 cup Water, chilled
• 6 tbsp Sugar, refined
• 1 1/4 tsp Black pepper, ground
• 2 tbsp Pickle relish
• 1/2 tsp MSG (optional)
• 1 1/4 tsp Onion, chopped finely
• 2 tbsp Raisings (1 small box)
• 3 tbsp Vienna sausage, chopped or slice for stuffing
• 2 tbsp Milk powder
• 2-4 tbsp Potato starch
• 2 tbsp Carrots, chopped finely
• 1 pc Egg, fresh
• 1 pc Chorizo de bilbao, chopped coarsely (optional)
• 1/4 c Cheese, grated (optional)
• 1 pc Egg, boiled, sliced into 4 for stuffing (chicken or quail)
• 2 tbsp Butter (spread in aluminum foil)
Procedure
1. Hydrate 1/4 cup TVP plus 1/2 cup water for 3 minutes or until soft.
2. Combine meat, salt, phosphate (dissolved in water) and curing salt and mix until tacky or
sticky. Add the rest of the ingredients and add 1 fresh egg and potato starch at the last
portion.
3. Spread butter in aluminum foil and spread meat mixture (1 cup per roll), allowing 1 inch
on each side. Line the boiled egg or sliced sausage in the middle. Roll the meat and twist
both ends. Be sure that the roll is tight.
4. Prick foil with pin and steam for 1 hour. Cool.
5. Chill in refrigerator. Unwrap and slice before serving.
6. Freeze the embutido if to be sold.
Yield: 1.5 kgs (6 rolls of 250 g per roll)
Meat processing ingredients are available at Spices & Foodmix (02) 411-1349, 742-0826 or
Chemag Food (02) 687-9077.
source: DA-ATI, ITCPH-Lipa, photo from topvotedrecipes.com

How to Make Corned Pork (Food Business)
November 4, 2009 by Leo 1,378 Views
2 Comments

Corned beef is more popular than Corned Pork. However, the curing
procedure and ingredients are similar. Small scale or home made corned beef or corned pork is
divided into two distinct steps: curing of the meat; and cooking of the cured meat.
Meat and Seasoning/Curing Ingredients:
• 1 kg Pork lean meat, cubed (1″ x 1/2″)
• 1 tbsp Salt, refined
• 1 tsp Curing salt
• 1 1/4 tbsp Sugar, refined
• 1 tsp Phosphate
• 1 1/4 tsp Vitamin C powder
• 1 cup Water, chilled

Cooking Ingredients:
• 1 tsp Nutmeg
• 1 tsp Corned beef seasoning
• 1 tsp Garlic powder
• 1/2 tsp MSG (add after flaking)
• 2 tbsp Trimix* (after cooking)
• 1 tsp Carageenan
• 2 cups Water, chilled
* For every 300 g broth, add 2 tbsp Trimix and 1 tsp carageenan previously dissolved in 1/4 cup
water and boil it until it thickens. Add it to 700 g flaked lean meat to make a 1 kg product.
Procedure
1. Select good quality materials.
2. Cube the meat into 1 x % inch
3. Prepare the cover pickle (40° salinity).
4. Immerse the raw materials into the cover pickle.
5. Cure at room temperature for 8 to 10 hours or refrigerate (34°-36°F) for 1 to 2 days.
6. Cook in pressure cooker for 45 to 60 minutes at 15 psi or in open fire for 4 to 6 hours.
Mix the cooking ingredients with 2 cups water.
7. Flake. Separate lean from stock (sabaw).
8. Pack in polyethylene bags and keep in freezer.
Meat processing ingredients are available at Spices & Foodmix (02) 411-1349, 742-0826 or
Chemag Food (02) 687-9077.
source: DA-ATI, ITCPH-Lipa, photo from tropicalpenpals.com

How to Make Smoked Bangus (Milkfish)
October 16, 2009 by Leo 2,381 Views
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Materials Needed:
• Bangus (whole)
• Brine solution (composed of 267.03 grams of salt per liter of water)
• Smoking trays
• Smokehouse
Procedure
1. Wash milkfish, remove gills and viscera. Wash well then drain.
2. Debone the milkfish.
3. Soak in saturated brine solution for 60 to 120 minutes depending on the size of the fish.
4. Precook in boiling 10 percent brine solution for 15 to 20 minutes.
5. Dry surface until pellicle is formed
6. Arrange in smoking trays and expose tc smoke for 30 minutes to one hour.
7. Smoke until golden brown
8. Cool then pack in containers
Click image to enlarge

source: Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Training Institute, photo from
pinaymtchef.blogspot.com, bulatlat.com, flickr.com, marketmanila.com

How To Make Pork Tapa (Food Business)
October 15, 2009 by Leo 2,514 Views
3 Comments
Tapa is ideally made from beef, however, this can also be prepared from
carabeef, horse meat, chevon and pork.
Lean meat with big muscles and with minimum fat are selected. Meat with muscles containing
many connective tissues is not ideal but may be used. Meat from round., chuck and loin are good
materials while meat with muscles from the neck and from the shank region is too tough. Tapa is
commonly sliced and seasoned, can be dried.
Meat:
• 1 kg Pork lean, sliced 1/4 inch thick

Extenders:
• In 1/2 cup water, add 1 tablespoon isolate and 1 teaspoon carageenan.
Curing Mix:
• 1 tbsp Salt, refined
• 1/2 tsp Curing salt
• 1 tsp Phosphate
• 1/4 tsp Vitamin C powder
• 1/4 cup Water, chilled
Seasoning:
• 6 tbsp Sugar, refined
• 1 tbsp Black pepper, ground
• 2 tbsp Garlic, chopped finely
• 2 tbsp Anisado wine
• 1/2 tsp Vetsin (MSG)
• 1/2 tsp Meat enhancer
• 1 tsp Paprika powder
Procedure
1. Select good quality raw materials. Trim and weigh.
2. Slice into 1/4 inch thick.
3. Mix meat with the curing ingredients until tacky or sticky.
4. Add extenders and mix again until the meat dries up.
5. Add seasonings. Mix thoroughly for even distribution of ingredients.
6. Place in white plastic container, loosen the cover and cure at room for 8 to 10 hours (or
refrigerate in the middle compartment with a temperature of 1 to 4°C overnight).
7. Mix again before packaging.
8. Store in freezer.
Yield: 1 kg of meat = 1.3 to 1.5 kgs of pork tapa
Packaging Materials:
• Polyethylene, plastic bag
• Styrophor with clingwrap on top
Meat processing ingredients are available from Spices and Foodmix House, tel: 411-1349; 742-
0826; 742-7866, www.spicesandfoodmix.com
source: Agricultural Training Institute Diliman, Quezon City, photo from flickr.com

How to Make Ube Halaya (Food Business)
October 7, 2009 by Leo 2,119 Views
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Halaya is a popular Filipino dessert recipe served on mostly every occasion,
especially during fiesta and Christmas. It’s one of the all-time-favorite desserts of Filipinos here
and abroad. Ingredients are very basic. The cooking part — continuously stirring from start to
finish — is the hardest and can be quite exhausting.
Recipe #1 Ingredients:
• 1 kilo ube, boiled and grated
• 2 cups coconut milk
• 2 cups evaporated milk
• 1 ¼ cups sugar
• butter for greasing
Procedure

1. In a thick-bottomed pan, combine grated ube, coconut milk, evaporated milk and sugar.
2. Cook over medium fire until very thick.
3. Stir constantly to prevent sticking.
4. Mold in greased pans. Cool.
Recipe #2 Ingredients:
• 2 lb ube (purple yam) (you can also buy powdered ube from Asian stores)
• 250 g sugar
• 1 cup sugar (or as desired)
• 1 can condensed milk
• 2 cups coconut milk
• butter
Procedure
Boil yam until tender and cut into cubes, then grind in a food processor with sugar and coconut
milk (if you have the powdered variety, mix ingredients). Transfer to a sauce pan, add the
condensed milk (if starting from fresh) and cook over a low fire, stirring continuously. Continue
stirring until the mixture turns into a thick paste and separates from the pan. Transfer to a
shallow platter or pan and allow to cool. Serve.
sources: asiarecipe.com, seasite.niu.edu, photo from moonaahmed.com,
pilipinofood.blogspot.com

Beef Morcon and Pork Hamonado Recipe
(Food Business)
September 14, 2009 by Leo 4,120 Views
2 Comments

Beef Morcon Recipe
Recipe #1 Ingredients:
• 1 kilo beef, sliced 1/4 inch thick (3 pcs.)
• 1/4 kilo ground beef liver
• 200 grams sliced sausages or ham
• 200 grams pork fat (cut is strips)
• 3 hard boiled eggs, sliced
• 100 grams Cheddar cheese in strips
• 100 grams grated Cheddar cheese
• 2 onions, chopped
• 5 bay leaf (laurel)
• 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper
• 1/2 cup vinegar
• 2 teaspoon salt
• 2 cups of water
• 2 meters thread or string (for tying)
Cooking Instructions:
1. Spread and stretch the sliced beef on your working table.
2. Arrange the filling on the sliced beef: sausage strips, cheese strips, sliced
eggs, pork fat and some ground liver.
3. Roll the sliced beef with all the filling inside and secure with a thread or
string.
4. Repeat the procedure for the two remaining beef slices.
5. On a pot, place the beef rolls and put the water, the remaining ground liver,
grated cheese, chopped onions, bay leaves, ground black pepper and salt.
6. Cover the pot and bring to a boil. Simmer for one hour.
7. Add the vinegar and continue to simmer of another hour or until beef is
tender.
8. Slice the beef morcon, arrange on a platter and top with the sauce/ gravy
poured on top.
Recipe #2 Ingredients:
• 1 kilo Beef Sirloin, cut morcon style
• 2 tbsp Calamansi juice, fresh
• ½ cup Soy sauce
• ½ tsp. Black pepper
• 1 pc Large pickle, sliced lengthwise into strips
• 1 pc Egg, hard-cooked then sliced into quarters
• 1 pc. Small carrot, sliced into strips
• 2 pc Hotdogs, sliced into strips
• 3 tbsp. Flour
• ¼ cup Cooking oil
• 1 cup Chopped white onions
• 1 cup Chopped red and green bell peppers
• Water to cover
• 1 pc. Bay leaf
• 2 tbsp. Tomato paste
• 1 can Liver spread
• Salt and pepper
• 2 pcs. Hard-cooked eggs, sliced
Procedure
Marinate Beef Sirloin in calamansi juice and soy sauce for at least 3 hours in the refrigerator.
Arrange strips of Hotdogs, pickles, eggs and carrots on the marinated Beef Sirloin. Roll neatly
then tie with a string. Reserve marinade for later use. Dredge in flour then brown in oil. Remove
from pan.
Using the same pan, saute garlic and onions. Add bell pepper, water, bay leaf and marinade.
Return meat and cook covered, stirring occasionally over low heat until Beef Sirloin becomes
tender. Add tomato paste and liver spread. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for another 5
minutes. Slice and serve with sauce.
Makes 6 servings.
Pork Hamonado
Recipe #1 Ingredients:
• 1 kilo pork pigue, sliced thinly to make 2 pieces (tapa style)
• 1 cup brown sugar (packed)
• 1-1/3 tsp. iodized salt
• 2 tsp. praque powder (for 1/8 tsp. salitre)
• 200 grams pork fat, sliced into 8 strips
• 1 can (439 grams) pineapple chunks, drained (reserve syrup)
• 1 can (35 cl) pineapple juice
Procedure:
Combine sugar, salt and praque powder or salitre. Rub mixture on pork. Spread pork and
alternately arrange slices of pork fat and pineapple chunks until all ingredients are used up. Roll
and tie firmly with crocheting thread.
Combine dripping from pork, pineapple chunks syrup and pineapple juice then marinate meat
overnight. Simmer meat in marinade for 1 hour. Remove thread from meat then chill if desired
for ease of cutting. Continue simmering the marinade for 5 minutes or until thick and serve as
sauce. Let cool before slicing the meat then arrange in a platter.
Recipe #2 Ingredients:
• 1 ½ kgs pork top round and cut into 1 whole sheet about ½ inch thick
Marinade:
• 1 can 1.36-liter pineapple juice
• 1 tbsp salt
• ½ tsp pepper
• 2 tbsps dark soy sauce
Stuffing:
• 1 kg hotdogs
• 4 hard boiled eggs, quartered lengthwise
Procedure:
1. Marinate pork sheets in marinade mixture for 2 days inside the fridge. Turn
once in a while.
2. Spread pork sheet and arrange hotdogs and hard boiled eggs in one end. Roll
from that end and tie with strings sealing the stuffings. Dust with flour.
3. Lightly fry the rolls on all sides.
4. Bring to a boil the marinade and add the pork rolls. Add more pineapple juice
if the liquid dries up. Simmer for 3 hours.
To serve: Remove strings from the rolls. Slice. Strain the remaining liquid and use as sauce.

How to Make Watermelon Jelly (Home
Business)
September 10, 2009 by Leo 3,455 Views
4 Comments

Fully ripe watermelons that have a soft red flesh should be used for making
jelly. The juice is extracted from the fruit and used to make a jelly, rather than a jam (jams
contain pieces of fruit pulp whereas jellies are made from fruit juice). Watermelons contain little
natural pectin so pectin has to be added to ensure the jelly will have a good set. Other fruits that
are high in pectin, for example apple, rind of passion fruit, can be mixed with the watermelon
juice if commercial pectin is not available.
Watermelon juice is not very acidic (pH above 5.0) which is too high to make a good jam or
jelly. Jams give a gel when there is the correct ratio of pectin to water and the pH is between 2.5
and 3.45 pH.The optimum pH to give a good gel is pH 3.0. Therefore citric acid or lemon juice
has to be added to the recipe to reduce the pH and increase the acidity of the juice. The yield of
usable fruit from the whole fruit is approximately 43%.
Equipments:
• Jar lifting tongs – helpful to pick up hot jars
• Lid lifter – to remove lids from the pot of hot water
• Lid – disposable – you may only use them once
• Ring – holds the lids on the jar until after the jars cool – then you don’t need them
• Canning jar funnel – to fill the jars
• 1 large pot
• Jelly strainer
• Large spoons and ladles
• Vegetable / fruit peeler
• Bottle Jars
Ingredients:
• 4 cups chopped up watermelon (without the seeds or rind)
• 3 1/2 cups sugar
• 3 tablespoons lemon juice
• 1 package of dry no-sugar pectin
Procedure
1. Select watermelons that are sweet and ripe, but nut overripe and mushy. Any color will
work. You can mix different colors, if you like.
2. Wash, cut and dice the watermelons. Then, Cut the watermelons open and start scooping
out the contents. Ideally, you make small 1 inch balls, cubes or chunks. If you do this on
a cutting board inside a baking tray, it will help you to collect the liquid to use. Remove
remaining seeds. You will need 4 cups of chopped up watermelon.
3. Place diced watermelon in a blender or food processor. Cover and blend or process until
smooth. It should reduce to approximately 2 cups of watermelon puree. That (2 cups after
the blender) is the amount you will need for the recipe.
4. Pour it into a large pot and add the 3 tablespoons of lemon juice to the pot.
5. In a small bowl, mix the dry pectin with about 1/4 cup of sugar. Keep this separate from
the rest of the sugar. You can add about 20% more pectin (just open another pack and add
a little) or else the jam is runnier than some people like. With a little practice, you’ll find
out exactly how much pectin to get the thickness you like.
6. Stir the pectin into the watermelon juice and put the mix in a big pot on the stove over
medium to high heat (stir often enough to prevent burning). It should take about 5 to 10
minutes to get it to a full boil (the kind that can not be stirred away).
7. When the berry-pectin mix has reached a full boil, add the rest of the sugar, and then
bring it back to a boil and boil hard for 1 minute. Depending upon which type of jam
you’re making (sugar, no-sugar, or fruit juice) you will need to use a different amount of
sugar and type of pectin.
8. Keep a metal tablespoon sitting in a glass of ice water, then take a half spoonful of the
mix and let it cool to room temperature on the spoon. If it thickens up to the consistency
you like, then you know the jam is ready. If not, mix in a little more pectin (about 1/4 to
1/2 of another package) and bring it to a boil again for 1 minute.
9. Fill them into the jar to within ¼-inch of the top, wipe any spilled jam off the top, seat the
lid and tighten the ring around them. Then put them into the boiling water canner or large
pot. This is where the jar tongs and lid lifter come in really handy.
10. Keep the jars covered with at least 2 inches of water. Keep the water boiling. In general,
boil them for 10 minutes, especially if you use larger jars, or if you did not sterilize the
jars and lids right before using them. Putting the jars in the boiling water bath REALLY
helps to reduce spoilage.
11. Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a
draft-free place (usually takes overnight). You can then remove the rings if you like.
Once the jars are cool, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been
sucked down. Just press in the center, gently, with your finger. If it pops up and down
(often making a popping sound), it is not sealed. If you put the jar in the refrigerator right
away, you can still use it.
12. Once cooled, they’re ready to store. They last up to 12 months. But after about 6 to 8
months, they get darker in color and start to get runny. They still are safe to eat, but the
flavor and texture aren’t as good.
For full illustration, download here.

How to Make Bread and Donut Made of Rice
Flour
September 4, 2009 by Leo 2,992 Views
4 Comments

Rice can be processed into various forms of pre-mixture to make breads and
cookies. The tastes and functions of rice products can be enhanced by adding natural coloring
materials. To promote rice consumption, various breads and donuts were made using a mixture
of wheat and rice flour. By measuring the level of acceptance in terms of appearance and taste,
standard recipes for proper mixing ratios were developed.
In this study, four colors of paprika powder (red, orange, yellow, and green) were used as
sources of natural colors. While high quality paprika of good commercial value is desirable, low
quality paprika can also be used for the purpose.
Preparation
The first step is to develop standard recipes for rice flour foods (bread, donut, cookie, etc.) using
paprika powder to come up with five different colors. Based on the results of a sensory test, the
optimal rice flour proportions as substitute for wheat flour are 15-30% for bread, 20-60% for
donut, and 20% for quick bread. In these mixtures, the final products (see below) proved to be
excellent in taste and quality.
The pre-mixture with the right combination of rice, wheat, and paprika powder can be prepared
in advance of making the final products (see pre-mixture preparation below). A suitable pre-
mixture can be selected for each product, and other flavoring materials such as milk, butter, etc.
can be added to make the breads and cookies more tasty and acceptable. When making a
leavened bread at home without using natural color pre-mixture, follow the recipe below.
Benefits
The addition of rice flour as substitute for wheat flour may increase the cost of breads and
cookies. However, the use of low-quality paprika can provide highly functional natural coloring
and essential nutrients. More importantly, the fundamental benefit of this technology is the
increase in rice consumption, and a decrease in wheat importation.
Preparation of Multi-Purpose Pre-Mixture with Natural Color

1. Prepare rice flour for each use (leavened bread, cookie, etc.) and define recipe for each
product.
2. Add natural color(Lyophilized powder 1-3%, juice 10-20%).
3. Multi-purpose premixture with natural color finished product.
When making a leavened bread at home without using natural color pre-mixture, follow the
recipe below:

Procedure
1. Sieve strong flour and rice flour with the use of sieve #3.
2. Add all ingredients (sugar, salt, yeast, dry milk, and egg) except butter to the sieved flour,
mix, add butter softened at normal temperature, and knead dough.
3. Leaven for 40 minutes (in a warm place).
4. Take out the dough, remove air, form donut and arrange on a tray with enough space, and
cover with wet cotton cloth for around 20 minutes to prevent powder quantity quantity
quantity drying and further leavening.
5. Fry in oil at 170 °C, turning it over until the surface color turns light brown, then put
sugar and cinnamon powder on the surface.
6. Put bean jam filling inside the donut for a better, more appetizing taste.
source: www.agnet.org

How to Make Fish Kikiam and Tilapia
Embutido
August 28, 2009 by Leo 2,973 Views
10 Comments

Tilapia Fish Kikiam
Raw Materials and Ingredients:
• 3/4 kilo tilapia meat
• 1 pc Egg, well beaten
• 1/2 cup chopped singkamas
• 1/2 cup chopped onion
• 1/2 cup chopped celery
• 1/2 cup chopped carrots
• 1/2 cup flour
• 1-1/2 tsp Nguyong powder
• 1/2 tsp Pepper
• 1-1/2 tsp Salt
• Taupee wrapper
Sweet and Sour Sauce:
• 3/4 cup water
• 1 tsp Cornstarch
• 1 tsp Vinegar
• 2 tbsp Soy sauce
• 3/4 cup sugar
• MSG to taste
Equipments/Utensils:
• Measuring cup
• Measuring spoon
• Chopping board
• Knife
• Mixing bowl
• Fryer
• Colander
• Burner
Procedure:
1. Separate fish meat from skin and bones. Wash fish meat.
2. Grind or chop fish meat and shrimp. Add salt until tacky.
3. Add all other ingredients and mix thoroughly.
4. Wrap mixture in taupee wrapper. If aluminum foil or plastic is used,
refrigerate for five minutes and remove from the wrapper.
5. Fry in hot cooking oil.
6. Serve with sweet and sour sauce.

Tilapia Embutido

Ingredients:
• 1 kg Tilapia meat
• 1 bulb garlic, chopped
• 1/4 kg Carrots, chopped
• 2 packs bread crumbs
• 1/4 kg Onion
• 1 tsp. Black pepper
• 5 pcs Red bell pepper, chopped
• 2 pcs Fresh eggs
• 1/4 kg Potatoes, chopped
• 3 pcs Hard-boiled eggs
• 4 tbsp White sugar
• 1 box Cheese
• 1 tsp Vetsin
• 1 box Raisin
• 1/2 tsp Curing salt
• 1/4 kg Hotdog
• 1 tsp Accord powder
• 2 tbsp Salt
• Aluminum foil
Procedure:
1. Wash fish meat.
2. Squeeze and chop meat.
3. Mix salt to fish meat until tacky.
4. Add other ingredients. Mix thoroughly.
5. Wrap in aluminum foil.
6. Steam for 45 minutes.
7. Allow to cool and store in freezer.
source: BFAR III, San Fernando City, Pampanga, photos from home-and-garden.webshots.com,
panlasangpinoy.com

Popular Filipino Merienda Recipes
(Homebased Business)
August 12, 2009 by Leo 11,958 Views
3 Comments

Merienda is a Spanish word that refers to a light meal usually taken in
between lunch and dinner. The Spaniards introduced this kind of repast to the Filipinos who
adopted the habit later on. From then on, the Filipino merienda became an equivalent of the
American coffee break or the English afternoon tea.
Although merienda appears to be a borrowed concept, eating and the fondness for food and
preparing the dishes have always been considered a part of the Filipino culture. We have our
own Filipino delicacies such as puto, bibingka, kutsinta, suman and many others that we usually
eat in between our regular daily meals. These Pinoy favorites are usually eaten together with tea
or any other beverage. (source: www.trc.dost.gov.ph)

• Fried Lumpia • Classic and Mocha Choco Polvoron
• Binignit
• Pancit Miki • Espasol
• Pancit Sotanghon • More Cuchinta s
• Pancit Canton • Champorado
• Molo Soup • Corn Maja
• How to Make Tamales • Bibingkang Malagkit
• Leche Flan • Bibingkang Galapong
• How to Make Buko Pie • Squash Cuchinta
• How to Make Bibingka • Baked Bilo-Bilo in Coconut Sauce
• Fruit Salad • Native Halo-Halo
• Chicken Empanada • Putong Puti with Cheese
• Pansit Molo • Binagol (or Binangol)
• Ube Halaya • Bocarillo
• Chicken Empanada • Binaki
• Molo Soup • Kalingking
• Tamales • Iraid
• Leche Flan • Ginataang Mungo
• Buko Pie • Pancit Malabon (Luglug)
• Bibingka • Pancit Palabok
• Baye-Baye • Pichi-Pichi
• Polvoron Ala Pinipig • Nilupak Saging and Cassava
• Turones Filipino Con Yema • Sapin-Sapin
• Ginataan Mais • Suman sa Lihiya, Ibos and Antala
• Mango Pie • Minatamis na Saging
• Sinocmane • Maja Maiz
• Tinutong Na Monggo • Ukoy or Okoy
• Maruyang Saging In Rum • Kutsinta or Cuchinta
• Sticky Turron Saba • Palitaw
• Pili Pulp Cassava Cake • Puto (Rice Cake)
• Kamote Pie (Sweet Potato Pie) • Leche Flan
• Umaalab Na Mangga (Flaming Mango ) • Maja Blanca
• Banana Pastillas • Ube Halaya
• Tupig • Siopao s
• Sapin-Sapin Palitaw Espesyal • Buko Pie
• Puto Caramba • Cassava s
• Puto Bumbong
• Masapan de Buko
• Pansit Molo
• Bukayo with Pandan
• Bibingka (Rice Cake)
• Tamales a la Vegetarian
• Empanadang Tinapa
• Binalay
• Sumpia (Fried Lumpia)
• Squash Maja
• Turon (Banana Fritters)
• Taldis
• Halo-Halo in Coconut Milk
• Pastillas De Mani or Pili
• Alpahor in Coconut Milk
• Masapan De Pili
• Camote Pastillas
• Tahada
• Camote Candy
• Puto Biñan Special
• Camote Burger
• Goto Arrozcaldo
• Camote Bola-Bola
• Karioka (Filipino Chewy Balls)
• Camote Afritada
• Biko
• Camote-Potato Rolls
• Buchi
• Camote-Pineapple Pudding
• Maruya (Banana Fritters)
• Camote Suman
• Bibingka Pinipig
• Camote Maja
• Espasol (Sweet Rice Flour Cake)
• Camote Kutchinta
• Pilipit (Palipit)
• Camote Halaya
• Ube Kalamay
• Suman Sa Moron
• Pansit Habhab
• Pastillas De Gabi

Basic Rules of Hygiene, Sanitation and Safety
in Food Processing
July 23, 2009 by Leo 2,961 Views
3 Comments

A high standard of hygiene is a prerequisite for safe food production, and the
foundation on which HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) and other safety
management systems depend.
A three-word definition of Food Sanitation is protection from contamination. With this in mind,
all functions and operations must be included in a sanitation program. All food products must be
protected from contamination from receiving (and before) through distribution. Sanitation is a
dynamic and ongoing function and cannot be sporadic or something that can be turned on once a
day, once a week, etc. Therefore, another definition could be: “sanitation is a way of life”.
Regardless of type of processing or food handling operation, the number one consideration in
food sanitation is people. It is people who set the rules, follow the rules, and also break the rules
of sanitation. A sanitation program is as good as the attitude, willingness, and efforts of people.
That is why the most important aspect of a sanitation program is ongoing personnel training.
It is essential that the full meaning of sanitation and its wide economic scope be accepted by
everyone concerned in the food system-including management. Personnel training should
include appropriate sanitation principles and food handling practices, manufacturing controls,
and personal hygiene practices.
Facilities required in the processing room:
• A changing room where clothing and shoes that are not worn for work can be stored.
• Separate hand-washing facilities for staff, with soap, clean water, nail brushes and clean
towels or hot-air hand dryers. Hand-washing facilities should not be used for washing
equipment.
• Toilets, which should be separated from the processing room by two doors or located in a
nearby building.
• First aid materials.
• Protective aprons or coats washed regularly, hats/hairnets, and if necessary, gloves and
shoes/boots.
• Cleaning chemicals, stored away from the processing room.
Hygiene and Sanitation
Personal hygiene:
• Wear a hat/hairnet that completely covers the hair. Do not comb your hair in a processing
room or storeroom.
• Cover all cuts, burns, sores and abrasions with a clean, waterproof dressing.
• Do not smoke or eat in any room where there is open food because bacteria can be
transferred from the mouth to the food.
• Do not spit in a processing room or storeroom.
• Wash hands and wrists thoroughly with soap after using the toilet, eating, smoking,
coughing, blowing your nose, combing your hair, handling waste food, rubbish or
cleaning chemicals. Dry them on a clean towel before handling food again.
• Keep finger nails cut short.
• Do not wear perfume or nail varnish as these can contaminate products.
• Do not handle any food if you have sores, boils, septic spots, a bad cold, chest infection,
sore throat or a stomach upset. Report any of these to the manager and do alternative
work.
• Do not cough or sneeze over food.
Cleaning:
• Clean the processing room, toilets and washing facilities, and storerooms every day.
• Use the correct chemicals to clean equipment, make sure there are no food residues and
rinse the equipment with clean water of drinking quality.
• Make sure all cleaning cloths are washed and boiled each day. Do not hang them on
equipment, products or window ledges to dry.
• Clean as you go -do not leave dirty equipment until the end of the day before cleaning it.
• Keep the outside area around the processing room clean and tidy, keep grass cut short.
Sanitation:
• Put all wastes into bins that are not used for anything else. Empty the bins periodically
during the day away from the processing site.
• Prevent all animals from entering the processing area or storerooms.
• Visitors should only enter the processing room wearing protective clothing and under
supervision.
• Keep food covered wherever possible.
• Keep all food, tools and equipment off the floor.
• Store ingredients in sealed containers.
• Do not use broken or dirty equipment.
• Report any signs of insects, rodents or birds to the manager.
Safe Working
Safe clothing and work practices:
• Wear shoes that protect your feet from falling objects.
• Do not wear any loose clothing or jewelry that could get caught in running machines.
Wear overalls.
• Prevent staff from running inside a building.
• Do not allow customers, children or animals into the processing room.
• Immediately clean up any water, oil or grease on the floor using sawdust, sand, husks etc.
• Cover burning electrical equipment with a damp cloth or sand. Never use water to put out
flames.
• Shield gas burners from direct sunlight because the flames can become invisible.
• Do not put cleaning chemicals into old food containers.
• Have a first aid box containing sterilized dressings, cotton wool, adhesive plasters and
bandages.
Operating machinery:
• Ensure that only trained staff enter the premises or operate machines.
• Do not allow staff to start a machine unless they know how to stop it. Only one person
should operate a machine at any one time.
• Make the layout of machinery logical, and leave sufficient space around it so that there
are few chances for operators to get in each others way.
• Do not try to attract operators’ attention by touching or calling them from behind if they
are using a machine. Always speak to them from the front, or wait until they have
finished what they are doing.
• Train staff to be familiar with potential hazards (e.g. potentially dangerous machines),
and what they should do in case of an accident. Use charts hung on the wall near to each
machine to show safety precautions.
• Ensure that guards are fitted and in place over any moving parts of a machine and alert
staff to machines that appear to be standing still when running at high speed.
• Never allow staff to clean, adjust or lean over moving machinery and do not allow them
to leave a running machine un-attended.
• Encourage operators to report any loose parts on a machine.
• Do not allow staff to work with equipment that is defective. Put a note on any machine
that is under repair saying ‘DO NOT TOUCH’.
• Do not allow anyone to touch inside electric equipment while it is connected.
• Regularly check the cords of electrical appliances to ensure that outside covers are not
broken and wires are not exposed.

Lomi Recipe for Your Food Business
July 10, 2009 by Leo 5,549 Views
6 Comments

Lomi or pancit lomi is a Chinese-Filipino dish made with a variety of thick
fresh egg noodles of about a quarter of an inch in diameter. Because of its popularity at least in
the eastern part of Batangas, there are as many styles of cooking lomi as there are eateries,
panciterias or restaurants offering the dish. Variations in recipes and quality are therefore very
common.
Magic meat or TVP is added in hydrated form to lessen the pork content and the addition of soy
protein increases the volume and nutritional value of the recipe.

Lomi is typically cooked using a deep wok, and bout 9-10 minutes is the cooking time for a
single serving of lomi. Lomi is best eaten while steaming hot.
Ingredients:
• 1/4 kilo Lomi noodles (flat)
• 1/2 cup Pork lean or chicken (sliced into cubes)
• 50 g Magic meat (TVP) hydrated in 300 g water
• 1/4 cup Shrimps, shelled
• 1 large Onion, chopped
• 3-4 cloves Garlic, crushed
• 1 1/2 cup Shredded cabbage
• 1 Carrot, sliced in strips
• 1/4 cup Cooking oil (non-cholesterol)
• 1/4 cup Cornstarch, dissolved in water
• 2 raw Eggs
• 2 tbsp Maggi magic sarap
• 2 tbsp Maggi savor classic
Procedure
1. Saute garlic and onion. When brown add pork or chicken, hydrated magic meat, and
shrimps; stir for 2 minutes.
2. Add 1/2 cup water, cover and simmer until water is almost dry.
3. Add broth. Cover and let boil for 10 minutes.
4. Drop in noodles, carrots, and shredded cabbage.
5. Let boil for 3 minutes and thicken with dissolved cornstarch then add the rest ingredients.
6. Beat eggs and stir in. Do not boil. Serve at once.
Number of Servings: 15
You can buy all food processing ingredients at:
Ultima Entrepinoy Forum Center
Nutrition Foundation of the Philippines Bldg.
#107 E. Rodriguez Sr. Ave., Quezon City
Tel: 411-1349; 742-0826; 742-7866
Email: lulu_sfmh@yahoo.com
Web: www.spicesandfoodmix.com

How to Make Pepperoni
June 27, 2009 by Leo 3,778 Views
5 Comments

Pepperoni is often recognized as an American counterpart of the Spanish
style chorizo. This is understandable because both are similar in color and flavor. It is a
descendant of the spicy salamis of southern Italy, a spicy dry sausage from Naples. Pepperoni is
a popular pizza topping in American style pizzerias, Italian translation of “peppers”.
Pepperoni sausage is sometimes referred to as a “stick” of pepperoni because that’s just about
what it resembles. Most of the red color in commercial pepperoni is from paprika. Indeed, if it
were from cayenne pepper you would need a fire extinguisher nearby when eating it. There are
many different varieties of pepperoni, some decidedly hotter than others, but most if not all rely
on a beef and pork combination. All are quite pungent.
Pepperoni come in different sizes, the most common being about an inch in diameter. Some
commercial packers put up what they call “pizza pepperoni” which is about twice the diameter of
regular pepperoni and is not as dry. This type is better able to withstand the high temperature of a
baking pizza without becoming a crispy critter. If you intend to use your pepperoni primarily as a
topping for pizza you might want to experiment with the drying time for best results.
1. The recipe is a revision of the original recipe adapted to Filipino style which can be consumed
for breakfast, used for toppings, sandwiches and pasta dishes.
Meat Ingredients:
• 300 g Pork lean, ground coarsely
• 300 g Pork backfat, ground coarsely
• 400 g Beef lean, ground coarsely
Curing Mix:
• 1 tbsp Salt
• 1 tsp Curing salt
• 1 tsp Phosphate
• 1/4 tsp Vitamin C powder
• 1/4 cup Chilled water (to dissolve ingredients above)
Extenders/Binders:
• 1/2 tsp Carageenan
• 1 tbsp Isolate
• 1/4 cup Chilled water (to dissolve ingredients above)
Seasonings:
• 1/2 tbsp Sugar
• 3/4 tbsp Black pepper
• 1 tbsp Crushed red pepper
• 1/2 tsp Allspice
• 2 tsp Anise seed
• 1/2 tsp Vetsin (MSG)
• 1/2 tsp Meat enhancer
• 1/2 tsp Beef aroma
• 1/2 tsp Meaty ginisa
• 1 tsp Turmeric
• 1 tsp Cayenne powder
• 1/4 tsp Cloves powder
• 1 tsp BF (binder filler) blend
Procedure
1. Select ground quality raw materials.
2. Measure and weight all ingredients.
3. Mix meat with curing mix, mix until tacky. Add extenders till well blended.
4. Combine seasonings, mix by hand or mixer until tacky.
5. Cure overnight in the refrigerator for 8-12 hours.
6. The following day, remix and stuff into casing (4″ long): link into 4″ long.
7. Smoke for 2-3 hours into a smoke house (if available) at a temperature of 160°F; or place
in a turbo broiler at 200°F for 20-30 minutes to allow for color development.
8. Keep in the freezer for keeping quality

How to Make Pepperoni
June 27, 2009 by Leo 3,779 Views
5 Comments
2. Another Style
Ingredients:
• 7 pounds pre-frozen or certified pork butt, cubed, fat included*
• 3 pounds lean beef chuck, round or shank, cubed
• 5 tablespoons salt
• 1 tablespoon sugar
• 2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
• 3 tablespoons sweet paprika
• 1 tablespoons crushed anise seed
• 1 teaspoon garlic, very finely minced
• 1 cup dry red wine
• 1/2 teaspoon ascorbic acid
• 1 teaspoon saltpeter
• 6 feet small (1/2-inch diameter) hog casings
Preparing the Casing
1. Snip off about four feet of casing. (Better too much than too little because any extra can
be repacked in salt and used later.) Rinse the casing under cool running water to remove
any salt clinging to it.
2. Place it in a bowl of cool water and let it soak for about half an hour. While you’re
waiting for the casing to soak, you can begin preparing the meat as detailed below.
3. After soaking, rinse the casing under cool running water. Slip one end of the casing over
the faucet nozzle. Hold the casing firmly on the nozzle, and then turn on the cold water,
gently at first, and then more forcefully. This procedure will flush out any salt in the
casing and pinpoint any breaks.
4. Should you find a break, simply snip out a small section of the casing. Place the casing in
a bowl of water and add a splash of white vinegar. A tablespoon of vinegar per cup of
water is sufficient. The vinegar softens the casing a bit more and makes it more
transparent, which in turn makes your sausage more pleasing to the eye.
5. Leave the casing in the water/vinegar solution until you are ready to use it.
6. Rinse it well and drain before stuffing.
Procedure
1. Grind the pork and beef through the coarse disk separately.
2. Mix the meats together with the remaining ingredients.
3. Spread the mixture out in a large pan, cover loosely with waxed paper, and cure in the
refrigerator for twenty-four hours.
4. Prepare the casings (see instructions below).
5. Stuff the sausage into the casings and twist off into then-inch links.
6. Using cotton twine, tie two separate knots between every other link, and one knot at the
beginning and another at the end of the stuffed casing.
7. Cut between the double knots. This results in pairs of ten-inch links. The pepperoni are
hung by a string tied to the center of each pair.
8. Hang the pepperoni to dry for six to eight weeks. Once dried, the pepperoni will keep,
wrapped, in the refrigerator for several months.
All above mentioned meat processing ingredients are available at:
Spices and Food Mix House
107 E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon City
Phone: 742-7866/0826, 411-1349
Web: www.spicesandfoodmixhouse.com

How To Make Sorbetes (Home-made Ice
Cream)
June 16, 2009 by Leo 9,189 Views
15 Comments
Sorbetes is a Filipino version for common ice cream usually peddled from carts that roam

streets in the Philippines. This should not be confused with the known sorbet. It is also
commonly called ‘dirty ice cream’ because it is sold along the streets exposing it to pollution and
that the factory where it comes from is usually unknown; though it is not really “dirty” as the
name implies. It is usually served with small wafer or sugar cones and recently, bread buns.
You can make ice cream in various recycled packaging materials, such as coffee cans, zip-lock
bags, and stainless steel containers. Whatever container and method you use though, it’s
important to take note of the temperature of the ice cream all throughout the process, particularly
during chilling and freezing.
There are five stages in making ice cream: preparation, scalding, chilling, first freezing, and final
freezing. In the preparation stage, you need to measure the required ingredients and put them in
individual containers.
Materials Needed:

• Bowls Casserole Grater
• Large whisk
• Measuring spoons and cups
• Pocket-type thermometer
• Steel paddle
• Sieve screen
• Stainless steel container
• Weighing scale
• Wooden bucket
• Wooden ladle
Ingredients (4 Gallons Yield):
• 1 kg White sugar
• 1/2 kg Skimmed milk
• 1/2 kg Butter milk powder
• 600 g Cassava flour
• 2 leaves Pandan
• 7 kg Table salt
• 4 pcs Egg yolks
• 2 cans 300ml Condensed milk
• 1 can 300g Cream
• 1/2 bar Cheese
• 1 kg Grated coconut
• 2 tbsp food color (egg yellow)
• 3 tbsp Vanilla
• 7 tsp or 34.5ml rhum or brandy
• 1/4 ice block
1. Preparation
1. Once all the ingredients are ready, extract coconut milk from the grated coconut using 4
cups of water. This will be your first extraction-a substance that’s called kakang gata in
Filipino. Set it aside.
2. Extract more coconut milk from the same grated coconut, this time using 8 cups of water.
To remove the coconut bits from it, don’t forget to filter the coconut milk after the
extraction. Set the second extraction aside likewise.
3. Get the eggs and separate the white from the yolk. Beat the egg yolks, then mix them
with the second extraction of coconut milk.
4. Once the mixture is blended well, slowly add the skimmed milk and the buttermilk
powder while mixing the mixture with a whisk. Some ice-cream makers use either
skimmed milk or buttermilk powder, but if you want to make your ice cream a bit more
special, you can mix the two powders. You just need to maintain the required 1-to-1
proportion.
5. After blending the mixture, set it aside. (Mixing milk and egg gives rise to custard.)
6. Get the cassava flour and dissolve it in 2 cups of water. Once the cassava flour is
completely dissolved, filter it using a sieve or cheesecloth. Also set aside.
7. Get the stainless steel container and prepare it to hold the cream mixture.
8. Spread 1/4 kg of white sugar at the bottom of the stainless steel container to avoid
unnecessary coagulation of the cream.
2. Scalding
1. Scalding helps dissolve the sugar, infuses the other flavors evenly, and improves the
texture; it makes the ice cream creamier and smoother.
2. Start the scalding process by boiling a gallon of water containing twisted pandan leaves
for 5 minutes.
3. Dissolve the food color in water.
4. After boiling the water, take out the pandan leaves and pour the water into the stainless
steel container.
5. Also pour in the cassava flour mixture and, using the steel paddle, continuously stir until
the sugar dissolves and the mixture achieves a viscous (thick) consistency.
6. Add the kakang gata as you continuously stir the mixture.
7. Also pour in the custard mixture and continuously stir until it attains a paste-like
viscosity. Then add the dissolved food color.
8. Once you achieve the right viscosity, you can start chilling your ice cream mixture.
3. Chilling
To chill the mixture, cover the stainless-steel container and put crushed ice in the wooden
bucket. The ice should surround the stainless-steel container and above the level of the mixture
inside the container. The chilling stage will only start when the temperature of the mixture
reaches 4°C to 0°C. Chill for 2 hours or overnight.
While waiting for the ice cream to be chilled, prepare the flavoring. For this project, we will
make mango marmalade.
1. Put 1 1/2 kg minced ripe mango in a casserole together with 1/2 cup white sugar and a
teaspoon of calamansi extract.
2. Simmer in medium to low fire until the mango mix becomes a thick syrup.
3. Stir the marmalade to avoid scorching.
4. After cooking, let the marmalade cool.
4. First Freezing
After chilling the ice cream overnight, you can now freeze it by putting more ice in the wooden
bucket. You need to put the crushed ice and the rock salt alternately. Using the paddle, compact
the ice and the salt each time you put in more ice. Compacting lessens the air gaps that cause the
ice to melt faster.
During the first freezing stage, the temperature should further drop to -18°C to -20°C. While
freezing the ice cream, paddle the outer part of the mixture to prevent the frozen mixture from
adhering to the sides before it can be stirred. The stirring process allows the cream mixture to
expand.
While still in the freezing stage, get the steel handbeater and start stirring the cream to let it
expand. Once it expands to half of the container, mix in the following while continuously stirring
the cream mixture:
1. 3/4 kg of white sugar together with the grated cheese, mango marmalade, condensed
milk, cream, and vanilla.
2. Add crushed ice and salt to the wooden bucket whenever necessary.
3. As you stir the cream mixture, you will notice that the consistency will become thicker
and creamier. You will also notice that it is expanding.
4. Once the cream expands up to the brim of the container, add the rhum or brandy.
5. Make sure to stir the mixture down to the bottom to distribute the flavor and the other
ingredients evenly.
6. Taste the cream.
5. Final Freezing
At this stage, you may now pack the ice cream in small containers like pint containers, small
cups, half-gallon or gallon containers, and freeze the cream in these containers. Or you may
simply put the ice cream in the stainless steel container for final freezing. During the final
freezing stage, you need to cover the container tightly and add more crushed ice and salt in the
bucket as well as on top of the container. Let it stay for 2 hours or until frozen.
Now your ice cream is ready for consumption. Keep it frozen until it is ready for serving. The
shelf life of this ice cream product is 7 to 10 days, depending on temperature fluctuations. If you
can maintain the temperature between -18°C and-25°C, the shelf life of the ice cream would be
longer and the quality would be better.
Cost and Return
From this basic process of making ice cream, try developing your own varieties to offer to your
target customers. You may actually sell this 4-gallon ice cream at around P1,500 wholesale for
children’s parties or small gatherings within your neighborhood. But if you pack it in small
containers, you may sell it at P250 per half-gallon or P8 per scoop. To draw repeat customers, it
is important to have a winning taste or flavor.
The production cost for these 4 gallons of ice cream is P869.50 that includes P569.50 for the
ingredients and P300 for the labor and other overhead costs. Roughly, then, your profit margin
would be 70 to 100 percent depending on how you want to sell it.
The total investment cost for this project would be around P16,000. This includes P14,000 for
the fabrication of the wooden bucket, the stainless steel container, the steel paddle, and the large
handbeater; P650 for the ingredients; and about P1,200 for other materials that might not be
available in your kitchen yet.
Commercial Production
If you want a no-sweat ice cream, though, you could buy an ice-cream machine that costs about
P100,000. With this amount, you can have a branded one-gallon ice-cream maker with a single
nozzle. Making ice cream with this machine will take only an hour or two, including the time for
the final freezing.
You won’t need the wooden bucket, stainless steel container, steel paddle, and large handbeater
anymore. You just need to put the cream mixture in the machine, turn it on, and wait for the soft-
serve ice cream to get ready. From there, you can serve the ice cream directly or put it in
containers for final freezing.
Food supplies:
American Food and Amusement Co.
10 Cabanatuan St. Philam Homes, Quezon City.
Phones: (02) 920-1359, 928-9358
Training:
GG Productions
10 Greenheights Ave., Greenheights Village
Sucat, Paranaque City
Phones: (02) 825-6654/6162

Cassava Processing Toolkit
June 4, 2009 by Leo 1,954 Views
3 Comments

The most important root crops in terms of production tonnage in developing
countries are cassava, potato and sweet potato.
Root crops are a cheap, readily available energy source for many people. They contain very little
protein or fat, but some (sweet potato and yam) are a good source of vitamins A and C. Roots are
tubers are not consumed raw as the starch is not digestible.
Therefore, they all require some form of primary processing to make them edible. There is also a
range of value-added products that can be made out of roots and tubers.
All root crops are bulky and perish relatively quickly. This means that they cannot be stored for
long periods or transported over long distances. Processing removes the water which reduces the
bulk and also increases the storage life.
The methods of processing and cooking range from simple boiling to elaborate fermentation,
drying and grinding to make flour, depending on the varieties of roots and tubers.

Primary Processing Of Root And Tubers
1. Preparation of raw material
Root crops are mainly composed of starch, but also contain minor components, some of which
are beneficial and others which are not.
Many roots contain small amounts of the enzyme polyphenyl-oxidase. This enzyme is
responsible for the darkening of fresh cut surfaces of the root when they are exposed to air. The
activity of the enzyme can be inhibited by blanching the roots prior to processing. This procedure
needs to be taken into consideration when processing roots and tubers.
Some root crops contain toxic substances. The most important one is cassava which contains
cyanide compounds. Some varieties of potato contain solanins. It is essential that these roots and
tubers are made safe to eat by processing.
Roots should be washed to remove soil and other dirt. Damaged or diseased roots should be
discarded.
Equipment is available for washing and peeling roots and tubers. However, it is sometimes too
expensive for small rural businesses.
Washing machines are usually made of a cylinder that is fitted with paddles and brushes that can
be rotated while a stream of water is passed over the crop as it passes through the washer.
2. Peeling
Roots and tubers are peeled to remove the inedible outer layers. Peeling is traditionally carried
out by hand, although mechanical peelers are available.
Lye peeling is an effective way of peeling roots and tubers.
The food is placed in a hot solution (at or near boiling point) of sodium hydroxide for a specified
time which varies, according to the type of vegetable. The loosened skin is removed by jets of
water. Care is needed as hot lye is very dangerous and corrosive to some metal equipment. Lye
peeling is often combined with blanching in one operation.
Mechanical peelers operate by rubbing the roots against a rotating abrasive surface. They are
best suited to raw materials of a regular shape. Irregular shaped materials have high peeling
losses or require hand peeling to finish them off.
The use of mechanical peelers is dependent on the throughput required and the cost of the
machine versus the wages for peeling by hand.
3. Slicing
The peeled roots are sliced or chipped before drying. This exposes more surface area to the air
and speeds up the drying process.
Slicing root crops prior to cooking is also important as it allows more rapid and even cooking.
Traditionally roots are sliced by hand. A range of mechanised chipping and slicing machines are
available.
4. Drying
Root crops have a high moisture content. Reducing the amount of water by drying is a simple
way of extending the storage life of roots and tubers.
There are two stages in the drying process:
1. Removing surface water
2. Removing internal moisture from within the material
The relative humidity of air decreases rapidly as its temperature is raised and at the same time its
water-absorbing capacity increases.
The rate of drying during the first stage is dependent on the ability of the air passing over the
material to absorb and remove moisture.
Air flow rate is more important than temperature. However, in areas of high humidity the air may
need heating to lower its humidity to a level that allows it to absorb significant amounts of water.
In general, air with a relative humidity of 75% or more is not effective at drying, except at the
earliest stages when the root is very wet.
The surface area of food exposed to the air is also very important. Slicing or chipping the root
crop will increase the surface area and thereby reduce the drying time.
Once the surface water is removed, the second stage of drying begins where water is removed
from the interior of the material.
The rate of drying in the second stage is dependent on the rate at which moisture can pass
through the tissue to the surface where it evaporates into the passing air.
The passage of water from the inside to the outside is a slow process so drying rates are lower
than in the first stage of drying. The drying rate is dependent on the moisture content and on
temperature rather than air flow.
A range of driers are available, ranging from solar driers through kiln driers and forced air driers.
The selection of drier depends on the cost of the drier and the value of the product being dried.
Traditionally, high-tech driers are not used for root crops. This is because root crops and their
products are fairly low value foods and the use of a drier would not be economically viable.
5. Grating
Grating the root into fine shreds is a common step in the processing of many root crop products.
It helps to facilitate later steps in the process, for example de-watering, drying, fermentation or
pulping.
Grating alters the texture of the raw material. It is an essential step during cassava processing as
it allows for fermentation of the material and the breakdown of cyanide containing compounds.
Grating is time consuming and hard work. A range of simple hand held and mechanical graters
are available. Many graters are based on a rotating horizontal disc or a vertical drum grating
surface against which the root crop is held.
Low-cost hand graters can be made from a sheet of tin or galvanised mild steel. The grating
surface is made by puncturing the surface with holes. The grater can be held horizontally in a
frame or downwards.
6. Boiling and steaming
Root crops are often cooked by boiling or steaming, either for direct consumption or as a step in
a processing system.
Boiling and steaming does not preserve the crop. It needs further processing for preservation.
Boiling and steaming are important in cassava processing to detoxify the material.
7. Fermentation
Fermentation is the most important step during the processing of cassava and high-alkaloid
varieties of potato. It results in a decrease in the level of toxic compounds.
In cassava processing, there are two methods of fermentation – wet and dry methods.
The dry method is used in the production of gari and is carried out in the presence of air. The
grated cassava passes through a two-stage fermentation.
During the first phase, starch is broken down and acids are produced. Enzymes contained in the
root start to break down the cyanide compounds and release hydrogen cyanide gas.
At the end of the first stage, the conditions are just right for the growth of a range of micro-
organisms that ferment the gari to give it the characteristic flavours.
Most of the cyanide is lost during the fermentation, but any remaining is driven off during the
subsequent roasting step.
The wet method of fermentation is sometimes referred to as retting. It takes place in the absence
of air. Cassava roots (either peeled or entire) are soaked under water for several days until they
have softened. The material is then broken up, sieved and the water squeezed out.
The wet fermentation of cassava makes a product with an unpleasant odour. It also produces a lot
of water that can be difficult to dispose of.
8. Pounding
Pounding changes the texture of the previously prepared root crop into a more paste-like
consistency. The root is first peeled and softened by boiling or soaking.
Traditionally material is ground using a large pestle and mortar.
Pounding of fufu from yams and cassava to make a gelatinous sticky product can take up to one
hour using a mortar and pestle.
Pounding machines are available, but hand pounding is often preferred as it gives the product a
superior taste.
9. De-watering
De-watering or pressing is a process that can remove up to 50% of the water present from the
root crop.
The process is most common in cassava processing where it is an important method or reducing
toxicity. Traditionally heavy weights are placed on the prepared crop to press out the liquid,
which drains away. There are several press designs available, ranging from the simple easily
constructed parallel press to the more sophisticated screw press or hydraulic press.
Screw presses can be made from a circular press cage that holds the pulp or a square press frame
into which sacks of pulp are placed. A heavy weight is lowered and raised by a screw thread to
press the pulp.
Some presses are made using hydraulic car jacks to apply pressure to the material that is being
pressed. Care is need to prevent leakage of poisonous hydraulic fluid from the jack.
10. Grinding, Milling, Sieving
After roots have been sliced and dried, most can be ground into a flour. Cassava is the most
commonly processed in this way, where it is used to prepare fufu.
Traditionally, dried pieces of root are ground in mortars and pestles.
For larger scale use, a range of manual or powered plate and disc mills are available.
Lumps often occur in gari if it is not heated evenly during roasting.
The lumps can be broken down into finer particles by passing the roasted cassava through a
hammer mill or plate mill.
After grinding the flour is sieved to remove large particles, which are returned to the mill for
further grinding. Sieving can be mechanized by using a vibrating or rotating sieve.
11. Frying and roasting
Many root crops are prepared by frying in hot oil or roasting. Both frying and roasting enhance
the flavour of the root crop and reduce the moisture content, thereby extending its shelf life.
Roasting is an important stage during the production of gari from cassava. The heat applied
burns off the cyanide gas. It also partially gelatinizes the starch.
Gari is traditionally heated in shallow cast iron pans over a fire while being pressed and stirred
against the hot surface to prevent burning.
Roasting can be mechanized by making a cylindrical drum roaster.
12. Starch extraction
Starch can be extracted from any root crop. However, the two most common are potato and
cassava. Industrially, starch is extracted by a combination of wet milling, sieving and settling.
Starch can also be extracted more simply, by collecting the liquid that drains off during pressing
and allowing the starch to settle out.
Cyanide in cassava
Most varieties of cassava contain compounds (glycosides) that contain cyanide. They must be
processed to remove the cyanide before consumption. A few ’sweet’ varieties contain no or very
low levels of the compounds and are sometimes eaten raw or with minimal processing.
Peeling the roots reduces the level of toxicity since many of the glycosides are contained within
the peel and outer layers of the root.
After peeling, the roots are grated which breaks down the internal cells and releases an ezyme
that breaks down the cyanide glycoside complex. This releases hydrogen cyanide gas. The grated
cassava is then fermented (using lactic acid bacteria).
The acidic conditions of the fermentation further break down the cyanide glycosides. When this
is complete, the cyanide gas is evaporated by heating the cassava, either by frying, roasting or
boiling.
The detoxified product can be dried and ground into a flour or used to make gari and other
products.
Tables and illustrations:
• Processing Unit: Small scale and Medium scale
• Operation: Preparation of raw material
• Suppliers
• Quality Control
Next: Cassava Starch, Flour, Bread Production
source: www.TRC.gov.ph, photo from bio.ilstu.edu, about.com

How to Make Rolled Ham (Food Business)

June 3, 2009 by Leo 3,518 Views
8 Comments

Ham is the thigh and rump of pork, cut from the haunch of a hog. Ham is
classified into various types as the following: Chinese style ham, quick cured ham, sweet or
pineapple ham, loin or belly ham, rolled ham, pear shaped ham.
Rolled ham has been cured with brine, either by immersion or injection. The curing solution
contains vacuum salt, sugar, nitrite, ascorbic acide, ham spice and wheat fibers what will enclose
the juice of the meat. Smoked flavor is also added. Normally, rolled ham comes from the pigue
or belly.
The meat material is soaked in 50°C salinity. Cover pickle for a period of 8 hours at refrigeration
temperature. Curing improves the flavor and the color of the ham. The material is being rolled
and cook, after cooking ham, net is removed, cooled and caramelized.
Three pieces rolled ham can be prepared per kilogram of meat.
Meat Material:
• 1 kg Pork pigue (hind leg)
Curing Mix:
• 1 tbsp Salt, refined
• 1 /2 tsp Curing salt
• 1 tsp Phosphate
• 1/4 tsp Vitamin C powder
• 1 tbsp Hamspice
• 1 cup Water
Cooking Ingredients:
• 1 cups Brown sugar
• 1 cup Pineapple juice
• 1/2 cup Anisado wine
• 1-2 pcs Bay leaf
• 3-5 pcs Clavo de comer
• 3-4 strands Oregano, dried
• 1 tsp Cinnamon powder
• 1 bottle 7-up
Procedure
1. Select good quality raw material.
2. Slice meat beginning on one long side across to within 1/2 of the other side.
3. Measure and weight all the ingredients.
4. Prepare the cover pickle.
5. Immerse the sliced meat into cover pickle.
6. Cure either at room temperature for 8-12 hours in the refrigerator.
7. Lay sliced meat flat in a platter. Roll meat carefully from one end to other end and tie
securely with a cotton cord. Insert pineapple slices inside the meat.
8. Cook with the recommended ingredients for 1 1/2 hours or until tender.
9. Cool. Remove strings and caramelize. Chill or freeze.
10. Slice meat crosswise and serve.
Caramelization process:
• Use of blow torch. Put brown sugar on fat portion and caramelize.
• Oven. Broiling temperature for 20 minutes with brown sugar on the fat portion of the
meat.
• Use of turbo with brown sugar on top of the fat. Temperature is 350°F for 20 minutes
until golden brown.
• Traditional hot syense (metal spatula) on top of the fat portion with brown sugar.
• Use of thick syrup* to be pored on top of the fat portion.
*Thick syrup is prepared by boiling 1 cup cooking solution, 2 cups brown sugar, and 1/4 cup
pineapple juice. Boil until thickens. Add 1/2 tsp carageenan, dissolved in 1/4 cup water.
All above mentioned meat processing ingredients are available at:
Spices and Food Mix House
107 E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon City

Phone: 742-7866/0826, 411-1349
Web: www.spicesandfoodmixhouse.com

How to Make Nata de Coco
May 13, 2006 by Leo 20,904 Views
48 Comments

Nata de coco is a chewy, translucent, jelly-like food
product produced by the bacterial fermentation of coconut water. Nata de coco is most
commonly sweetened as a candy or dessert, and can accompany many things including pickles,
drinks, ice cream, and fruit mixes. Nata de coco is highly regarded for its high dietary fiber, and
its zero fat and cholesterol content. No preservatives or other chemicals are added to Nata de
coco.
NATA DE COCO FROM COCONUT WATER
Materials:
• Coconut water
• Acetic acid
• Refined sugar
• Nata starter
• Ammonium phosphate
Equipments:
• Weighing scale
• Strainers
• Wide-mouthed glass jars or basins
• Kettles
Procedure:
1. The collected coconut water is filtered through a cheesecloth. One hundred (100 gms.)
refined sugar and 5 grams monobasic ammonium phosphate is mixed for every liter of
coconut water in a container. The container is covered and the mixture allowed to boil. It
is then allowed to cool after boiling and 6.9 ml. of glacial acetic acid is added.
2. 110-150 ml. of starter (available at ITDI) is added to the mixture. It is subsequently
transferred to big mouthed clean jars leaving ample space atop mixture and covered with
clean cheese cloth. The culture is allowed to grow at room temperature for 15 days or
more. Note: Do not move jars during growth period.
3. Harvest is ready after 15 days or more, making sure that all conditions are aseptic so as to
enable one to reuse the remaining liquid which serves as starter for succeeding
preparations.
4. Dessert Making. The “nata” is cut into cubes and is subjected to a series of boiling with
fresh water until acidity is totally removed. One kilo of refined sugar is added for every
kilo of nata and are mixed. It is brought to boiling until the “nata” cubes become
transparent.
NATA DE COCO FROM COCONUT MILK
Materials:
• 1 kilo Grated coconut
• 600 gms. Refined sugar
• 1/2 liter Coconut water 12 liters Ordinary water
• 2 liters Nata starter (available at ITDI)
• 325 c Glacial acetic acid (available in drugstores)
Procedure:
1. Extract the cream from the coconut, strain through a cheesecloth.
2. Mix all ingredients.
3. Transfer to big mouthed clean jars and allow around 2-3 inches in height of the liquid.
4. Cover with a clean cheesecloth. The culture is allowed to grow at room temperature for
15 days or more. Note: Do not move the jars during growth period.
5. Harvest is ready after 15 days or more, making sure that all conditions are aseptic so as to
enable one to reuse the remaining liquid which serves as starter for succeeding
preparations.
6. Dessert Making: The “nata” is cut into cubes and is subjected to a series of boiling with
fresh water until acidity is totally removed. One kilo of refined sugar is added for every
kilo of nata and are mixed. It is brought to boiling until the “nata” cubes become
transparent.
NATA DE KALABASA
Materials:
• Kalabasa peels and core Sugar
• Ammonium sulfate
• Glacial acetic acid
• Nata starter (available at ITDI)
Procedure:
1. Wash the peels and core of kalabasa, add 3 parts water for every part of peel/core. Boil
for 3 minutes.
2. Strain then for every 4 cups of strained liquid from boiled peels/core, and 2/3 cup sugar
and 1-1/4 tsp. ammonium sulfate.
3. Heat for 15 minutes, then cool. Add 1-1/4 tsp. acetic acid to adjust the acidity favorable
to the growth of the nata organism then add 2/3 cup of nata starter (available at ITDI) for
every 4 cups of kalabasa mixture.
4. Set aside for 10-15 days, then harvest the nata product.
5. Cook one kilo of nata in one of kilo sugar to come up with delightful dessert.
For more information, contact:
Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI)
DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan, Taguig City
Tel Nos.: (632) 8372071 to 82 locs 2182, 2218, 2180
Telefax Nos.: (632) 8373167, 8376150, 8376156
Web: www.itdibiz.com
source: elgu2.ncc.gov.ph

How To Make Chicken Relleno (Food
Business)
May 21, 2009 by Leo 4,576 Views
4 Comments

Chicken relleno or Stuffed chicken comes from the Spanish word “Rellenar”
which means “to stuff. The chicken is stuffed with ground pork, vegetables, hard boiled egg,
chorizo or ham, and then baked. Dressed chicken should weigh 1.4 kilograms to come up with a
chicken relleno of 2.0 kilograms cooked weight. Cooking can be done in an oven or turbo at 160
°F for 1 1/2 hours.
One piece of Chicken relleno costs Php8oo.oo. This special Spanish treat can surely liven up
your meals and a good give away for special occasions during holiday season.
Meat materials:
• 1 pc (1.2 to 1.5 kg) Chicken, whole dressed, cleaned
Marinate deboned chicken (8-12 hours) in the following:
• 1/2 cup Soy sauce
• 1/4 cup Calamansi juice
• 1 tsp Ground black pepper
• 1/4 tsp MSG
Filling (good for 1.2 to 1.5 kg)
• 500 g Pork lean, ground finely
• 1/2 tbsp Salt
• 4 tbsp Sugar, refined
• 1 tsp Ground black pepper
• 1/4 tsp MSG
• 1/2 cup (1 pc) Chorizo de bilbao, cubed
• 1/2 cup ( 2 pcs) Potato, cubed, sauteed
• 2 tbsp (2 pcs) Red bell pepper, cubed
• 1/2 cup (1 can) Green peas
• 4 tbsp (2 boxes) Raisins
• 2 pcs Egg boiled medium
• 2 pcs Fresh garlic, chopped finely, sauteed
• 1/2 cup Onion, chopped, sauteed
• 1/2 cup Cheese, grated
• 1 tbsp Pickle relish
• 1 tbsp Trimix (dissolved in 1/4 cup water)
Procedure
1. Marinate chicken overnight in the refrigerator.
2. Saute garlic, onion and potatoes till brown. Add ground pork, chorizo de bilbao and the
rest of the ingredients.
3. Fill inside the deboned chicken,then sew the cut/open side.Wrap chicken in aluminum
foil and tie.
4. Place the chicken inside the turbo broiler and cook for 2 hours at 350°F.
Sauce: Saute garlic and onion in butter, then add ground chicken liver, chicken broth knorr
seasoning and MSG (vetsin). Dissolve flour in small amount of water and add to the chicken
broth.Serve with sauce (extracted from the chicken when cooked in turbo, cornstarch ( 2 T,
dissolve in Va cup water) can be added to thicken sauce.
Note: Chicken relleno may be cooked in an oven at 350°F for one hour.
All ingredients above are available at:
Spices and Food Mix House
107 E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon City
Phone: 742-7866/0826, 411-1349
Web: www.spicesandfoodmixhouse.com

How To Make Chicken Relleno (Food
Business)
May 21, 2009 by Leo 4,576 Views
4 Comments

Chicken relleno or Stuffed chicken comes from the Spanish word “Rellenar”
which means “to stuff. The chicken is stuffed with ground pork, vegetables, hard boiled egg,
chorizo or ham, and then baked. Dressed chicken should weigh 1.4 kilograms to come up with a
chicken relleno of 2.0 kilograms cooked weight. Cooking can be done in an oven or turbo at 160
°F for 1 1/2 hours.
One piece of Chicken relleno costs Php8oo.oo. This special Spanish treat can surely liven up
your meals and a good give away for special occasions during holiday season.
Meat materials:
• 1 pc (1.2 to 1.5 kg) Chicken, whole dressed, cleaned
Marinate deboned chicken (8-12 hours) in the following:
• 1/2 cup Soy sauce
• 1/4 cup Calamansi juice
• 1 tsp Ground black pepper
• 1/4 tsp MSG
Filling (good for 1.2 to 1.5 kg)
• 500 g Pork lean, ground finely
• 1/2 tbsp Salt
• 4 tbsp Sugar, refined
• 1 tsp Ground black pepper
• 1/4 tsp MSG
• 1/2 cup (1 pc) Chorizo de bilbao, cubed
• 1/2 cup ( 2 pcs) Potato, cubed, sauteed
• 2 tbsp (2 pcs) Red bell pepper, cubed
• 1/2 cup (1 can) Green peas
• 4 tbsp (2 boxes) Raisins
• 2 pcs Egg boiled medium
• 2 pcs Fresh garlic, chopped finely, sauteed
• 1/2 cup Onion, chopped, sauteed
• 1/2 cup Cheese, grated
• 1 tbsp Pickle relish
• 1 tbsp Trimix (dissolved in 1/4 cup water)
Procedure
1. Marinate chicken overnight in the refrigerator.
2. Saute garlic, onion and potatoes till brown. Add ground pork, chorizo de bilbao and the
rest of the ingredients.
3. Fill inside the deboned chicken,then sew the cut/open side.Wrap chicken in aluminum
foil and tie.
4. Place the chicken inside the turbo broiler and cook for 2 hours at 350°F.
Sauce: Saute garlic and onion in butter, then add ground chicken liver, chicken broth knorr
seasoning and MSG (vetsin). Dissolve flour in small amount of water and add to the chicken
broth.Serve with sauce (extracted from the chicken when cooked in turbo, cornstarch ( 2 T,
dissolve in Va cup water) can be added to thicken sauce.
Note: Chicken relleno may be cooked in an oven at 350°F for one hour.
All ingredients above are available at:
Spices and Food Mix House
107 E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon City
Phone: 742-7866/0826, 411-1349
Web: www.spicesandfoodmixhouse.com

How to Make Coconut Syrup (Food
Business)
May 17, 2009 by Leo 2,025 Views
1 Comment
1. Coconut Syrup
Ingredients:
• grated coconut
• refined sugar
• di-sodium phosphate
Utensils:
• expeller or press
• stainless steel cooking vessel
• stainless steel spoon or ladle
• refractometer
• blender or colloid mill
• can sealer
Packaging Material: 2T cans or sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps
Procedure:
1. Mix grated coconut with water in the proportion of 1 part grated coconut to
1/2 part water.
2. Extract milk using an expeller or press.
3. Mix ’sapal’ with water (1 part ’sapal’ to 1/2 part water).
4. Collect coconut milk extracts.
5. Heat milk at 80-90°C (176-194°F) for 15 minutes and blend in a blender or
colloid mill to break coagulated proteins.
6. Add di-sodium phosphate in a concentration of 0.25% by volume of the milk.
7. Add sugar at a ratio of 1 part milk to 1 part sugar.
8. Mix well and cook to a total soluble solids content of 70% (use a
refractometer to determine end point). Pour hot in clean containers.
9. Seal completely.
10.Cool and label.

2. Coconut Honey-Like Syrup
Ingredients:
• coconut skim milk
• glucose
• sugar
• stabilizer (sodium alginate)
Utensils:
• expeller or press
• centrifuge (separator)
• blender or colloid mill
• stainless steel cooking vessel
• refractometer
• can sealer
Packaging Material: 2T cans or sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps
Procedure:
1. Extract coconut milk as described under coconut syrup (steps 1-4).
2. Store milk preferably in the cold to allow separation of cream from the water
portion (skim milk). Collect the skim milk. (Separation may also be
accomplished with the use of a centrifuge.)
3. To one (1) part of the skim milk, add 1/2 part sugar and 1/2 part corn syrup.
4. Blend with sodium alginate (stabilizer) in a concentration of 0.5% of the
mixture.
5. Heat the mixture over steam for 15 minutes, pass through a colloid mill and
cook with constant stirring on a steam jacketed kettle to a temperature of
104°C (220°F). At this temperature, total soluble solids reading is about 76-
77%.
6. Pour hot product into sterilized container and seal completely. Cool and label.

3. Coconut Whey Syrup
Ingredients:
• coco whey
• refined sugar
• hydrochloric acid
Utensils:
• expeller or press
• centrifuge (separator)
• pH meter
• stainless steel cooking vessel
• stainless steel spoon
• refractometer
• double boiler
• stove
Packaging Material: Sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps
Procedure:
A. Preparation of Whey
1. Prepare coconut skim milk as described in Coconut Honey (steps 1 & 2).
2. Adjust pH of skim milk to 4 with either 6N HCl or 25% citric acid solution.
Separate the coagulated proteins by centrifugation or by filtration.
3. Collect the coconut whey.
B. Cooking
1. Dissolve sugar in the whey (1 part sugar: 1 part whey).
2. Cook in a double boiler or steam jacketed kettle until the total soluble solids
content reaches 75%.
3. Pour hot in sterilized containers and seal completely.
4. Cool and label.
source: mis.dost.gov.ph, photo from bounteous-bites.blogspot.com

How to Make Coco Jam (Food Business)
May 15, 2009 by Leo 3,636 Views
4 Comments

1. High Fat Coco Jam Recipe 1
Ingredients:
• grated coconut
• brown sugar
• glucose (corn syrup)
Utensils:
• expeller or press
• stainless steel cooking vessel
• stainless steel spoon or ladle
• stove
Packaging Material: Sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps
Procedure:
1. Mix grated coconut with water in the proportion of 1 part grated coconut to
1/2 part water.
2. Extract milk using an expeller or press.
3. Mix ’sapal’ with water (1 part ’sapal’ to 1/2 part water).
4. Collect coconut milk extracts.
5. Boil extracts slowly until soft curds and oily streaks appear on top of the
boiling milk.
6. Add brown sugar (2 parts: 5 parts boiled milk) and boil for another 20
minutes.
7. Pour in glucose (1/2 the amount of sugar used) and continue boiling until
done over low fire, stirring frequently to prevent burning. End point is
reached when a drop of the cooked materials in cold water forms a soft ball.
8. Cool and pour in sterilized containers and seal completely. Cool and label.

1. High Fat Coco Jam (Matamis na Bao) Recipe 2
Ingredients: Pure coconut milk and “panucha” or brown sugar
Packaging Material: Sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps
Utensils:
• expeller or press
• stainless steel cooking vessel
• stainless steel spoon or ladle
• stove
Procedure:
1. Dissolve ‘panucha’ or brown sugar into the milk and boil.
2. Strain the mixture and boil again until thick.
3. Pour into sterilized containers and seal completely.

3. Low Fat Coco Jam (Matamis na Bao)
Ingredients:
• 20 kg coconut skim milk
• 3 ¾ kg brown sugar
• 1 ¼ kg glucose
• citric acid (.025% by wt. of formulation)
Utensils:
• expeller or press
• centrifuge (separator)
• blender or colloid mill
• stainless steel cooking vessel
• stainless steel spoon or ladle
• refractometer
Packaging Material: Sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps
Procedure:
1. Extract coconut milk as described under coco jam recipe 1 (steps 1-4).
2. Store milk preferably in the cold to allow separation of cream from the water
portion (skim milk). Collect the skim milk. (Separation may also be
accomplished with the use of a centrifuge.)
3. Add the sugar and stir well.
4. Pour in the glucose.
5. Mix well and boil mixture for 20 minutes.
6. Blend or pass the mixture through a colloid mill or homogenizer at 1000 to
1500 psi.
7. Strain thru a nylon mesh.
8. Boil again.
9. When almost done, add the citric acid previously dissolved in a small amount
of skim milk.
10.Continue boiling to an end point of 75 to 76% total soluble solid content. Use
the refractometer to determine the end point. An alternative method is the
cold water test in which a drop of the mixture forms a soft ball in cold water.
11.Pour hot mixture in sterilized container. Cool and label.
source: mis.dost.gov.ph, photo from thenomadgourmand.blogspot.com