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Create Tomorrow - in Food & Beverage Operations


The Food & Beverage Operations certificate teaches students how to use their combined
creative and business skills to manage the customer side of a restaurant or bar and other
foodservice establishments such as a high end retail store, caf or hospital.
Program details and next steps:
Overview

Course List

Requirements

Faculty Overview

Enhance Your Food & Beverage Operations Skills
Food and Beverage Managers are at the heart of the hospitality industry. At the end of
the day, a well fed customer is a happy customer. The well-trained food and beverage
manager is the one who uses their combined creative and business skills to manage the
customer side of a restaurant or bar and other foodservice establishments such as a high
end retail store, caf, hospital, or school foodservice.
If you are looking to advance your food and beverage management career or gain new
skills in this field, then the Certificate in Food & Beverage Operations Program at The Art
Institute of Pittsburgh Online Division might be perfect for you.
The well-trained student will be able to create menus and determine the service needs
and then lead the personnel to meet the customer needs. This is accomplished by having
an ability to spot foodservice trends, awareness of customer needs, and a grounding in
the technical aspects of managing a front of the house operation.
Career Portrait
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Employment of food service
managers is expected to decline 3 percent from 2010 to 2020, as the number of eating
and drinking establishments opening is expected to decline from the previous decade.
Despite these reductions, new employment opportunities for food service managers will
emerge in grocery stores and other retail and recreation industries to meet the growing
demand for quick food in a variety of settings.
Additionally, the BLS states, Those with a degree in hospitality, restaurant or food
service management should have the best job opportunities.
Source:http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/food-service-managers.htm
Accreditation
The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges
and Schools, Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE).



The History of Food Service Management thumbnail

Food service industry in action
From the street vendors and caterers of ancient Rome to the modern food service industry, food
service skills have traditionally been taught through apprenticeship. Many colleges offer food
service management programs, but 66 percent of people currently working as servers and
managers hold a high school diploma or less and were trained on the job. Sweeping changes in
how food is shipped, stored and prepared mean that food service managers need to use the
newest technological resources and to balance cost-cutting and effective food storage with the
public demand for fresher food with fewer additives and preservatives.
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What Is Food Service Management?
The History of Cloth Napkin Folding

Early History
In the Middle Ages, the cooks employed by nobles and religious orders served large numbers of
people every day, and medieval travelers ate at inns, taverns, monasteries and hostelries. The
earliest recorded guild for cooks was formed around 1311 to protect the cooks' secrets. The tricks
of the trade were only taught to guild members. West and Wood's Introduction to Foodservice
notes that "strict cost accounting was necessary, and here, perhaps, marks the beginning of the
present-day scientific foodservice cost accounting...."
The Industrial Revolution
During the thousands of years when most of the population lived in or very near farming
communities, food did not travel far to reach the people who ate it. The Industrial Revolution and
the mass migration of workers to cities meant there was increased demand to ship food longer
distances. Trains, automobiles and trucks provided transport, while new preservation treatments
and better storage devices such as refrigeration made it possible for the food to stay fresh longer.





Food Regulation
Scandals in the food processing industries brought demands for new laws. The public outcry that
arose when Upton Sinclair's novel, "The Jungle," exposed unsanitary conditions in the U.S.
meat-packing industry led to the 1906 passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat
Inspection Act.
World War II
Cooks employed by armies, hospitals and prisons have been serving up large quantities of foods
for hundreds of years. However, World War II brought the urgent need to feed troops all over the
globe and produced innovations in large-scale food transport, preservation and the packaging of
rations. Between 1943 and 1944, the Army purchases of food alone grew by 80 percent, and
1945 saw another 20 percent growth.
Nutritional Standards
When the troops came home after World War II, developing nutritional minimum standards led
to reform in institutional food service and efforts to educate the public about healthy foods. The
National School Lunch Program, begun in 1946, aimed to protect children from malnutrition.
Potential
Foodservice sales to restaurants and institutions are estimated to total about $400 billion per
year.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated that there were about 371,000 food service managers in
2004, with 40 percent being self-employed small business owners. Food service managers may
work in hotels and restaurants, hospitals and nursing care facilities, institutions, government
facilities or private businesses that provide food service on site to employees.
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_5661976_history-food-service-management.html








Basic Food Service Management
Basic food service management involves a lot of different career possibilities. There are skills
that all people in basic food service management should know, and others that are specific to
each individual position.
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Restaurant Policies & Procedures
How to Organize & Manage a Food Service Establishment
Cooking To Temperature
Practicing good food service management means cooking each different type of meat to the
proper temperature. When serving on a buffet, if a food falls below a holding temperature for
over an hour, it must be reheated or replaced.
Certification
The National Restaurant Association awards a certification for food service management. To
receive the certification, an applicant must complete coursework, a written test and demonstrate
the learned skills in the workplace.
Administrative Duties
Food service managers must handle administrative duties for their business including hiring
employees, training them, evaluating them and maintaining equipment for their business.
Legal Concerns
Food service managers must make sure their business is in compliance with all state and federal
laws. Some of these laws include licensing laws, Social Security requirements and paying into
unemployment funds.
Technology
Keeping up with the latest technology is important for food service management. This
technology can help food service management professionals with efficient service and avoiding
wasting money on discarded food.
Positions
Some of the positions involved in food service management include a general manager, lower-
level managers and executive chef positions.
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/facts_5005863_basic-food-service-management.html




Duties & Skill of Food Service Management
Food services managers must have excellent communication skills to train employees.

Food service managers, including assistant and general managers, are usually responsible for
increasing sales and profits in their units by focusing on hospitality, food quality, service and
cleanliness. Most food service management employees work long hours, which can include
evenings and weekends. Food service management employees have numerous duties, including
hiring and training staff, running shifts and completing paperwork. The food service manager
must possess numerous skills to be successful in her job.

Other People Are Reading
Assistant Manager Job Requirements
Basic Food Service Management
Interviewing and Hiring
Food service managers are responsible for interviewing, selecting and hiring hourly employees.
Once these employees are hired, food service managers must ensure that new hires fill out W-4
forms for payroll deductions as well as I-9 or "Employment Eligibility Verification" forms. The
latter forms verify that a particular employee can legally work in the United States.
Training
Food service management professionals must also train hourly workers on proper procedures
within the restaurant. The food service manager will often start the training by showing
employees how to clock in and out during their shifts, then introduce them to the various work
stations. The manager may demonstrate how to prepare certain food items, run the front register
and clean the dining area. Managers may also use video tapes for training.
Running Operations
Food service management employees are also responsible for running the daily operations of the
restaurant. Their duties can include organizing work schedules, ordering products and tracking
inventory, supervising shifts, and even calling repair people to fix equipment. Food service
managers must also monitor the sanitary practices of hourly employees, according to the Bureau
of Labor Statistics' "Occupational Outlook Handbook: 2010 To 2011 Edition" at bls.gov.
Depending on their shift, food service managers must also open and close the restaurant at the
start and end of each day, respectively.


Paperwork
Food service management employees are usually responsible for filling out cash and charge
receipts for daily sales and vendor purchases. Additionally, these managers may also fill out
deposit receipts for taking cash and credit card slips to the bank. Food service managers must
also run various reports like sales, food costs and even labor reports to help run their restaurant
more efficiently.
Leadership Skills
Food service managers must have leadership skills to determine how to assign workers to various
stations. They must also interact with customers and continuously strive to improve employee
performance. Restaurant managers must know how to lead by example, motivate employees and
empower hourly workers to take on more responsibility.
Problem-Solving Skills
Every day can bring new challenges in the restaurant industry. Food service managers must have
problem-solving skills to handle customer complaints, employee and customer injuries, product
shortages and broken drink dispensers. For example, a savvy food service manager may send an
hourly employee to the store for soft drinks if the soft drink machine breaks down during the
dinner rush.
Organizational Skills
The food service management profession requires excellent organizational skills. The manager
must know how to properly allocate her time to handle the multifarious tasks she performs each
day. In addition to restaurant operations, the food service manager will have certain duties to
perform for her area or market manager. Effective food service managers learn how to delegate
certain tasks to free up more time for completing important projects.
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6637663_duties-skill-food-service-management.html











Qualifications for Restaurant Managers

Success in restaurant management requires a varied skill set, including administration, leadership
and people skills. Although real-world restaurant experience is the primary qualification for
restaurant managers, some level of college education in food service or hospitality management
is helpful when applying for manager positions at many full-service restaurants or when
competing for advancement opportunities in large chains. As of 2006, about 350,000 people
worked as restaurant managers in the United States.
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What Makes a Good Restaurant Manager?
Requirements for Restaurant Management
Role
A restaurant manager is responsible for all the daily operations of his establishment--a role that
encompasses a broad range of duties. Among these are: supervising the inventory and ordering
of food and supplies; coordinating maintenance of the building and equipment; and hiring,
training, evaluating and firing employees. Restaurant managers complete administrative tasks
such as preparing the payroll, doing paperwork in compliance with wage and licensing laws,
paying suppliers and scheduling work shifts. They also do whatever is necessary to ensure
customers' satisfaction, from investigating and resolving complaints to clearing tables themselves
when the restaurant is especially busy.
Experience
Restaurant managers virtually always have experience in the food services industry, usually as a
cook, server or counter attendant. Restaurants, especially fast-food and self-service restaurants,
often fill manager positions by promoting from within, according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Different restaurants have different requirements, but across the board, demonstrated
experience, interest and skill in food services are the most important qualifications for restaurant
managers.
Education/Training
Restaurant managers (or trainees) are often recruited from two- and four-year hospitality
management undergraduate programs, which typically incorporate restaurant internships or
require restaurant work experience. However, more than 40 percent of restaurant managers have
no more education than a high school diploma, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Higher-end and large chain restaurants may prefer a bachelor's or graduate degree, though, and
usually require prospective managers to complete intensive training programs lasting at least six
months.





Certification
The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation offers the Foodservice
Management Professional (FMP) certification. Although this designation is not necessarily
required for restaurant managers to be hired or promoted, it can provide validation of
professional competence, "particularly for managers who acquired their skills largely on the job,"
according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This certification requires restaurant managers to
complete coursework covering topics in restaurant management, to have a certain amount of
experience working in the field and to pass a written exam.
Other Qualifications
Personal characteristics such as leadership, initiative and reliability are important in success as a
restaurant manager, as are problem-solving skills and a focus on details. Good health and energy
are helpful due to the physical demands and long hours of most restaurant management jobs, and
a neat appearance matters since managers can spend considerable time dealing with their
customers. Restaurant managers should be good communicators who are able to unite and
motivate their
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_5117083_qualifications-restaurant-managers.html


















Restaurant Manager Job Specifications
Restaurants are establishments where customers purchase food and beverages. A restaurant
manager is responsible for overseeing the entire day-to-day operations of a restaurant.
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What Makes a Good Restaurant Manager?
Restaurant Manager Position Description
Types of Duties
Restaurant managers perform duties related to personnel and business. Managers split their
attention between the kitchen and the dining room, performing roles in both areas.
Business Functions
Restaurant managers are responsible for running an establishment according to an established
budget. Managers frequently prepare bank deposits, authorize or complete ingredient and supply
orders and in some cases, handle advertising.
Features
Restaurant managers are responsible for hiring, training, supervising, evaluating and disciplining
servers, bussers, chefs, cooks and any other personnel that work in a restaurant. Managers also
ensure that the kitchen and dining room staff adhere to all safety regulations and handle customer
complaints when necessary.
Education
Many restaurants promote servers and other staff into the role of manager based upon experience
and performance. Some restaurant managers hold associate's or bachelor's degrees in restaurant
or food service management.
Compensation
In November 2009, the average annual salary for restaurant managers was $45,000, according to
Indeed.com.
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/facts_5707944_restaurant-manager-job-specifications.html






How to Manage a Restaurant
Training and motivating your staff is a fundamental responsibility for restaurant managers.
Being a restaurant manager can be both exciting and challenging. It takes effort, organization
and hard work to successfully run a restaurant. Knowing how to put every resource in place to
your advantage can help your business grow, bring in more customers and, hence, result in
bigger profits.
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A Restaurant Manager's Daily Job Duties
Increasing Restaurant Revenue
Instructions
1 Let the staff know your expectations. The job description for employees needs to be thoroughly
outlined at the time of hiring. Set strict requirements and guidelines about such things as the
menu, recipes, time management, assignment of tasks and code of employee conduct. Have
regular meetings with your head chef and all other department heads to discuss any problems,
suggestions and productivity concerns. Remember, you set the tone for the efficiency of your
restaurant, so it's important to establish your authority.
2 Build employee morale. If those who work with you feel disrespected or unappreciated, their
job performance can suffer. Avoid talking down to those who work under you and give them the
feeling that they are part of a team. Motivate them with training workshops and special activities.
Provide rewards, incentives and recognition for staff members who excel. Have a "suggestion
box" where employees can leave comments about their concerns or ideas for improvement.
3 Make sure your customers are happy. If patrons are pleased with the food quality, service and
prices at your restaurant, they are more likely to return and bring others with them. Creating a
relaxing environment, having employees treat them with respect, providing them with prompt
service and well-prepared meals, as ordered, all contribute to the satisfaction of those who come
to your restaurant. You may want to leave comment cards, so customers can let you know what
they liked or disliked about their visit.
4 Sit down with the head of each department and plan a budget. Find the best equipment, food
and beverage suppliers at the most cost-effective prices. Control fixed and variable expenses.
Make all employees conscious of how many resources they utilize that may cause you to exceed
monthly costs, such as wasting food and cleaning supplies.
5 Operate within the guidelines laid out by your budget. Monitor your ordering or handle it
personally, to ensure you aren't overspending. Adjust your labor costs and food inventory
regularly, to correspond with your projected sales. Make sure you know when your financial
commitments are due, so you have enough cash on hand to cover your payables and meet your
employee payroll.


6 Develop a good marketing strategy to get the word out to more potential customers about your
restaurant. Come up with creative and effective advertising, including ads in newspapers, and
distribute fliers in nearby areas. Offer customer incentives, such as a "Customer of the Month
Wall" with photos of patrons on display. Selected customers might receive a free meal or menu
item of their choice.

7 Make sure your restaurant meets the highest health standards. Cooking and dining areas, as
well as restrooms, should be thoroughly sanitized. It should be emphasized to employees that
they are required to wash their hands and make certain that utensils, dishes and glasses are clean
before customer use. Cooks and chefs must be careful to avoid cross-contamination of cooking
utensils and make sure that all surfaces are properly cleaned.

8 Ensure that your restaurant meets all safety regulations. Emergency exits should be clearly
marked in the event of a fire or other unexpected event, and doors should be easy to open. Make
sure you do not exceed the seating capacity for your restaurant.

9 Replace staff members who consistently fail to meet your standards. Those who are routinely
late, treat customers rudely, do not get along with fellow employees and who are unmotivated
can cause dissension. However, this should be done only after every effort has been made to
encourage them to improve their performance.

10 Consider using a restaurant consultant, if sales are continually down. A consultant can give an
objective evaluation of your restaurant and tell you about strengths and weaknesses. He can work
with you to design a strategy that will cut costs, improve sales, update the look and feel of your
establishment, draw more customers, conceive more appealing menus and create better
marketing.
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2314675_manage-restaurant.html










How to Manage Inventory in a Restaurant
Inventory control is crucial with perishable food.
Effective inventory management is crucial to any business's bottom line, but when you're
running a restaurant and trying to manage perishable food items, the importance of tracking your
inventory skyrockets. Each food item on your shelf represents potential profit that can either be
realized and used to pay for general operations, staff and other essentials or that can be wasted if
the food item spoils and must be thrown away. A simple system can be all it takes to ensure that
you're properly managing inventory in your restaurant.
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How to Take Food Inventory
Food Inventory Methods
Instructions
1 Study your usage patterns. The best way to manage inventory in a restaurant is to plan
properly, and that begins with knowing how much of each product you're using in a given time
period and how often you're replacing it. Some will be used and replaced daily, others weekly or
monthly. The key is to know the patterns so you can start to anticipate how much of what
product will need to be ordered at what time, greatly reducing the chance that you will run out of
a requested item or have to throw away spoiled merchandise.
2 Know your "turns." According to restaurant coach David Scott Peters, an inventory turn is
simply the process of emptying and replenishing your inventory. A "turn" in your restaurant
might consist of using and replacing $5,000 worth of inventory (or whatever other amount you
choose), with most restaurants experiencing an average of four to eight turns in a month. Once
you get to eight turns in a month, you'll find yourself emptying and replacing your inventory
about twice a week ... and running a highly efficient inventory management system.
3 Use items before they expire. While this may seem like a no-brainer, it is easier said than done.
Tracking food items can be a time-intensive and tricky process, but it can help to use specialized
software designed to track perishable items and alert you of upcoming expiration dates.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8698006_manage-inventory-restaurant.html






Kitchen Inventory Ideas for Restaurants
Kitchen Inventory Ideas for Restaurants
For many restaurant managers, the most dreaded part of their job is the weekly inventory.
Nitpickingly counting every single item in the building week after week in a seemingly endless
quest for cost control makes for a day that never seems to end. Inventory doesn't have to be a
weekly nightmare, and it needn't take the entire day to accomplish. Organization and planning is
the key to getting your inventory done correctly every single week.
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Food Inventory Checklist
How to Make an Inventory Spreadsheet
Stock in Inventory Order
Most large companies have a stock inventory form to be filled out each week. Organize your
store shelving and storage compartments in the order in which they're listed on the inventory
sheets. If paper goods come before seasonings on your list, shelve them in that manner. You
inventory won't require running back and forth through the store anymore. If you are an
independent store, organize your inventory form to reflect your storage situation.
Subpackaging
Most inventories have many small, numerous list items. If you have bags of cookies that come in
a case of 345, or jelly in boxes of 550, invest in smaller zip-top bags. Spend one afternoon
breaking down all of these smaller items into larger components. Jelly can be packaged into bags
of 50 or 100, cookies in packages of 25. Any of these larger containers can be counted much
quicker every week than individual items.
Know Your Store Heights
Become familiar with the storage sections for your paper goods and other similar items. If you
know that it takes exactly 30 cups to reach the top of a section and 50 plates can fit on a shelf, fill
each section and count the piles.
Know Your Mass Counts
Most paper products and many other items come packaged in subpackaging of their own.
Memorize how many cups are in a sleeve, how many plates in a stack, how many bags of mix in
a case. Knowing these numbers will cut down your counting time considerably.



Consistency
One of the reasons for inventory is to help control costs. Inventory has to be as accurate as
possible to do this. Take your inventory at the same time and on the same day every week for the
most accurate counts. Consistency can turn inventory actions into habits, which can cut the time
spent each week counting your product.
Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_5805121_kitchen-inventory-ideas-restaurants.html

























Food Inventory Methods
Whether in a restaurant or in the home, keeping track of food saves money, prevents spoilage
and can make the kitchen a cleaner and better stocked place to cook. Many people take stock of
their food by using a food inventory system. Several of these systems are currently in widespread
use, keeping food inventory organized at restaurants, stores and homes across the country.
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Inventory Control Basics
How to Take Food Inventory
Restaurant Management Software
For restaurants, hotels and other large entities looking to keep track of their comestible
inventory, software is often the most effective route. Software such as Windstar Restaurant
Management Software and Micros Restaurant Management Software keeps track of item
availability based on ordered quantity. As servers enter orders, quantities of food are subtracted
according to the quantities required to make the ordered dishes. Additionally, this software
creates a network of access allowing servers, chefs and shift managers to input shortages or
missing items. This way, exorbitant loss is caught and can be managed. For example, if a
bartender is over-pouring drinks, the system will mark the deficit between ordered drinks and
amount of alcohol used. Many of these systems can also generate ordering lists to be sent to food
wholesalers.
Money Conversion
Grocery and convenience stores cannot manage their food inventory using software designed for
restaurants. For those who need to manage their commercial food stock without the help of
computers, the money conversion system can come in handy. Use this method by counting the
dollar retail value of the stock category (e.g. dairy, candy, frozen foods etc.). Once the dollar
amount has been sold, it is time to order more. While this method is useful to determine when to
order new product, it is even more useful when used to determine your long-term inventory
trends. Finding out how quickly you sell out of one product can help you better supply your
customers with related items they might enjoy.
Home Inventory
Programs are also available to keep food in stock at home. Programs such as Home Data Deluxe
9.0 are free and keep track of all inventory in the house, including food. Programs such as
Epicurious, which allows the user to search from thousands of recipes, also include an inventory
management option in their mobile applications. Use Epicurious by selecting your dinner by
recipe. The data from the recipe you are following can then be converted to a shopping list,
giving you exactly what you will need to purchase for the meals you are planning.




Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_7176048_food-inventory-methods.html





























How to Create an Inventory Tracking System


By Jonathan McLelland, eHow Contributor














Share



Print this article






How to Create an Inventory Tracking System thumbnail

Tracking inventory ensures products are well-stocked and reduces product loss.

A retail store can use an inventory tracking system to keep track of the amount of inventory
currently in stock compared with the amount of inventory sold during a period of time. This type
of tracking system can help business owners understand what products sell the best and what
products stagnate on the shelves.



Other People Are Reading
How to Create a Basic Inventory Spreadsheet With Excel
How to Use Excel for Inventory







Things You'll Need


Spreadsheet



Labels



Printer





Show (1) More


Instructions

1


Write down the type of inventory currently within the store. Categorize the inventory by style,
manufacturer and price.

2


Assign a specific code for each piece of inventory. The code should be simple, such as a letter to
determine the type of product (example: computer paper = CP, candles = CS, etc.) and a number
to keep track of the individual product piece (example: CP1, CP2, CS 3, CS5, etc.).




3


Upload the product codes into a spreadsheet. Categorize the spreadsheet by manufacturer, and
create subheading underneath each manufacturer for the type of product (example: Marlboro --
Marlboro Lights, Marlboro Blend 27s, Marlboro Reds, etc.). Specify the number of each
individual item you currently have in inventory beside the product name.

4


Print small labels that can be placed directly onto the product. Write the inventory tracking code
onto the label and place on each product. Place the labels in discreet areas on the product.

5


At checkout, have the employee write down the inventory tracking number into a ledger, and if
possible have the employee remove the tracking label from the product and place the label beside
the entry.

6


Review the inventory ledger every night at closing and update the spreadsheet. This will inform
you how many particular items were sold throughout the day, thus when performing an inventory
check you can quickly see if there is an inconsistency in products sold versus products available
in the store.






Tips & Warnings


Keep the tracking code for each item as simple as possible so the cashier can easily, and
accurately, write down the information.



By not creating an inventory tracking system, you may not know if any items are missing or if
there are enough popular items in stock.



Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_7421869_create-inventory-tracking-system.html














How to Create an Inventory Tracking System


By Jonathan McLelland, eHow Contributor














Share



Print this article






How to Create an Inventory Tracking System thumbnail

Tracking inventory ensures products are well-stocked and reduces product loss.

A retail store can use an inventory tracking system to keep track of the amount of inventory
currently in stock compared with the amount of inventory sold during a period of time. This type
of tracking system can help business owners understand what products sell the best and what
products stagnate on the shelves.



Other People Are Reading
How to Create a Basic Inventory Spreadsheet With Excel
How to Use Excel for Inventory







Things You'll Need


Spreadsheet



Labels



Printer





Show (1) More


Instructions

1


Write down the type of inventory currently within the store. Categorize the inventory by style,
manufacturer and price.

2


Assign a specific code for each piece of inventory. The code should be simple, such as a letter to
determine the type of product (example: computer paper = CP, candles = CS, etc.) and a number
to keep track of the individual product piece (example: CP1, CP2, CS 3, CS5, etc.).




3


Upload the product codes into a spreadsheet. Categorize the spreadsheet by manufacturer, and
create subheading underneath each manufacturer for the type of product (example: Marlboro --
Marlboro Lights, Marlboro Blend 27s, Marlboro Reds, etc.). Specify the number of each
individual item you currently have in inventory beside the product name.

4


Print small labels that can be placed directly onto the product. Write the inventory tracking code
onto the label and place on each product. Place the labels in discreet areas on the product.

5


At checkout, have the employee write down the inventory tracking number into a ledger, and if
possible have the employee remove the tracking label from the product and place the label beside
the entry.

6


Review the inventory ledger every night at closing and update the spreadsheet. This will inform
you how many particular items were sold throughout the day, thus when performing an inventory
check you can quickly see if there is an inconsistency in products sold versus products available
in the store.






Tips & Warnings


Keep the tracking code for each item as simple as possible so the cashier can easily, and
accurately, write down the information.



By not creating an inventory tracking system, you may not know if any items are missing or if
there are enough popular items in stock.



Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_7421869_create-inventory-tracking-system.html















Food and Beverage Service Definition?
Food and beverage service refers to the provision of eatables and drinks in an
establishment such as restaurants and hotels or through deliveries. This service falls
under the hospitality industry where good food is complemented with good and timely
service.
Food and beverage service. Is the "food flow" (from the purchasing of the foods to
service to the customer) mainly concerned with the delivery and presentation of the food

Food & Beverage Service Training
By Falinia Adkins, eHow Contributor
X


Share

Intro
Food and beverage service training focuses on several areas inside
the food service industry.(Photo: Jacob Wackerhausen/iStock/Getty Images)
Food and beverage service training prepares workers to greet customers, take food and
drink orders, serve food and beverages, and explain menu items. Food and beverage
service workers are considered the front line of customer service in full-service
restaurants, casual dining eateries, and other food service establishments. Most food
and beverage service jobs do not require a great deal of education; training is generally
completed while on the job.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6663534_food-beverage-service-training.html


Requirements
There are few requirements needed to be hired as a food and
beverage service worker.(Photo: Szepy/iStock/Getty Images)
There are few requirements needed to be hired as a food and beverage service worker.
Most employers (but not all) seek individuals with a high school diploma to work as
waiters, waitresses, bartenders, host and hostesses. However, the completion of high
school is usually not a requirement for fast food workers, counter and dining room
attendants, dishwashers and bartender helpers, for which on-the-job training is
sufficient.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6663534_food-beverage-service-training.html













On-the-Job Training
Food and beverage service workers that are trained on the job by
their employers will acquire skills in safe food handling procedures and sanitation practices.(Photo:
Jupiterimages/BananaStock/Getty Images)
Food and beverage service workers that are trained on the job by their employers will
acquire skills in safe food handling procedures and sanitation practices. Additionally,
some employers will offer online and/or classroom training sessions in addition to on-
the-job work experience. Employer training for food and beverage service workers
addresses issues such as restaurant philosophy, formal serving techniques, team
attitudes and unpleasant or unruly patrons.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6663534_food-beverage-service-training.html


Additonal Training Options
Vocational Training(Photo: Jetta Productions/Digital Vision/Getty
Images)
Other options for those interested in additional food and beverage service training are
private or public vocational schools, restaurant associations, and large restaurant
chains. The type of training offered by such food and beverage service training
programs are state and local regulations and laws, proper attire and conduct, cocktail
recipes and stocking a bar. These programs generally teach the educational
requirements concerning the serving and handling of alcoholic beverages, which is
separate from basic food handling training.


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Qualifications
Most states have a minimum age requirement of 18 to serve alcohol
and a preference of 25 years of age or older for most bartender positions.(Photo: Steve Mason/Photodisc/Getty
Images)
Food and beverage service training programs have minimum and/or desired
qualifications concerning age, personal hygiene and customer service rapport. Most
states have a minimum age requirement of 18 to serve alcohol and a preference of 25
years of age or older for most bartender positions. Additionally, because of the
dependency upon customer relations and contact in the food service industry, a neat
appearance and good communication skills are highly desirable to most employers.


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Certification
There are several places to receive food and beverage service
training over the Internet that also offer a certification upon completion of training.(Photo:
Zoonar/N.Okhitin/Zoonar/Getty Images)
There are several places to receive food and beverage service training over the Internet
that also offer a certification upon completion of training. Food and beverage service
training that is completed by private or public training schools provide more flexibility
than if you complete on-the-job training only because it allows you to change jobs with
the security of having documentation of the type of training you have received.
Additionally, food and beverage service workers who are certified in their areas of
interest have a greater chance of advancement.


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Food Production Department


The food and beverage is one of the integral part and important operational department in a hotel
which is divided into food production and food and beverage service department. Food
production or kitchen department is responsible for the actual preparation of food items whereas
the F & B service department is responsible for the systematic service of food from the hot or
cold plates of kitchen to the customers tables as per their choices or order. The term kitchen is
derived from the French word Cuisine which literally means Art of cooking or food
preparation in the kitchen. But in the modern concept of catering the cuisine not only refers to
Art of cooking foods in the kitchen, it also indicates the style of service offered to serve the food.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_function_of_food_and_beverage_production_departme
nt_in_hotel?#slide=2
Makes the food more delicious and attractive by different styles of coo method and of course to
achieve the goal or profiting


What Is the Function of Food and Beverage
Production Department in Hotel?
The food and beverage department functions as a way to meet the food and drink needs
of guests. These guests can be at hotels, banquet halls, and other centers. They deliver
food, cook food, and prepare drinks. Makes the food more delicious and attractive by
different styles of cooking method and of course to achieve the goal or profit.
It's very important. People don't want to go into a hotel and feel like they're being served
cafeteria food from a middle school. People also don't want to go into a hotel and feel


































Organizational Structure of a Hotel
by Lucy Friend, Demand Media

Most hotels operate using a functional organizational structure.
hotel image by RAMON CAMI from Fotolia.com
Related Articles
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Hotel Front Office Organizational Structure
Organizational Structure & Effectiveness
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At least one hotel can be found in almost every city in the United States, and may consist of large chains, franchises or privately-
owned facilities. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports two-thirds of this industry's occupations are service-related. Although
each entity may have an overall organization structure at the corporate level, most individual facilities are based on a functional
organizational structure.
Description
A functional organizational structure provides a hierarchy with one or two executives overseeing the entire operation. The
organization is then broken down into functional groups. Examples of functional groups would include housekeeping, food and
beverage services, concierge and front desk services. Administrative groups would include sales, accounting and human
resources. Other services related to maintaining the hotel and its surrounding property would include engineering, security,
groundskeeping and general maintenance.
Executives
All operations and financial budgets of a hotel are often overseen by one executive with the job title of general manager. Many
hotels employ an assistant general manager who reports to the general manager. Because these organizations are typically a 24-
hour operation to accommodate guest, an evening shift supervisor is often required to successfully oversee all operations.
Related Reading: Problems Implementing an Organizational Structure
Oversight
Each functional group is overseen and directed by a supervisor, who reports to the general manager. The number of employees
required in each functional group determines how many workers each supervisor oversees. In a functional organizational
structure, there can be a determination as to how many supervisors oversee each functional area without interfering with business
operations of other functional areas. Depending on the size of the hotel, some functional areas may require a day and evening
supervisor. If a small staff is required during overnight shifts, those employees may be supervised by the assistant general
manager to control personnel costs.
Benefits
A functional organizational structure in a hotel allows each area to focus on specific tasks, which allows employees to increase
productivity. Coordinating efforts within one functional or specialized area is much easier than coordinating the efforts across the
organization. Each functional area can successfully accomplish its goals.
Disadvantages
The success of a hotel is based on the entire operation, so if one functional area is not operating successfully, it can affect the
entire operation. If guests feel their interactions with front desk services were superb, but their room was not properly cleaned, it
can bring down the overall satisfaction rating for the hotel. For this reason, the general manager must promote teamwork across
all functional areas and quickly improve any department's performance if it's not meeting the organization's standards for
performance.
References (5)
About the Author
This article was created by a professional writer and edited by experienced copy editors, both qualified members of the Demand
Media Studios community. All articles go through an editorial process that includes subject matter guidelines, plagiarism review,
fact-checking, and other steps in an effort to provide reliable information.












Different Types of Organizational Structure
by Alexis Writing, Demand Media
Organizations are set up in specific ways to accomplish different goals, and the structure of an organization can help or hinder its
progress toward accomplishing these goals. Organizations large and small can achieve higher sales and other profit by properly
matching their needs with the structure they use to operate. There are three main types of organizational structure: functional,
divisional and matrix structure.
Functional Structure
Functional structure is set up so that each portion of the organization is grouped according to its purpose. In this type of
organization, for example, there may be a marketing department, a sales department and a production department. The functional
structure works very well for small businesses in which each department can rely on the talent and knowledge of its workers and
support itself. However, one of the drawbacks to a functional structure is that the coordination and communication between
departments can be restricted by the organizational boundaries of having the various departments working separately.
Divisional Structure
Divisional structure typically is used in larger companies that operate in a wide geographic area or that have separate smaller
organizations within the umbrella group to cover different types of products or market areas. For example, the now-defunct
Tecumseh Products Company was organized divisionally--with a small engine division, a compressor division, a parts division
and divisions for each geographic area to handle specific needs.
The benefit of this structure is that needs can be met more rapidly and more specifically; however, communication is inhibited
because employees in different divisions are not working together. Divisional structure is costly because of its size and scope.
Small businesses can use a divisional structure on a smaller scale, having different offices in different parts of the city, for
example, or assigning different sales teams to handle different geographic areas.
Related Reading: What Are the Three Most Common Types of Organizational Structure?
Matrix
The third main type of organizational structure, called the matrix structure, is a hybrid of divisional and functional structure.
Typically used in large multinational companies, the matrix structure allows for the benefits of functional and divisional
structures to exist in one organization. This can create power struggles because most areas of the company will have a dual
management--a functional manager and a product or divisional manager working at the same level and covering some of the
same managerial territory.
References (3)
About the Author
Alexis Writing has many years of freelance writing experience. She has written for a variety of online destinations, including
Peternity.com. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication from the University of Rochester.







Hotel Front Office Organizational Structure
by KJ Henderson, Demand Media

A hotel's front office department interacts heavily with guests.
hotel image by muro from Fotolia.com
Related Articles
Types of Organizational Structure in Office Administration
Steps to Manage the Transition From the Old Organizational Structure to the New Structure
Organizational Structure of a Hotel
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Geographic Organizational Structure

The front office of a hotel is perhaps the most important area of the organization. The employees that make up his department are
the first and sometimes only representatives of the establishment with whom guests interact. Although the organizational
structure of the hotels front office varies depending upon whether the facility is a small business or a large resort, certain roles
are found within all organizations.
Front Desk Manager
The front office manger or front desk supervisor overseas all front office operations for the hotel. As staff manager, this
individual schedules employees to ensure that there is proper coverage and all times. She also implements any policies or
procedures that are administered by hotel management. When VIPs, such as celebrities or dignitaries, stay at the establishment,
she is often responsible for giving them the personal attention they require. In most instances, the front desk manager reports to
the hotels general manager.
Reservations
The reception and reservations employees of a hotel front office interact with guests the most. Reservation clerks communicate
with perspective the guests via the telephone and Internet, scheduling their stays and documenting any special needs they may
have. For example, if a guest requests a room on a nonsmoking floor, the reservation clerk will make special note of this, so that
an appropriate room will be ready when the guest arrives.
Related Reading: Organizational Structure & Effectiveness
Reception
When guests arrive, front desk clerks check them in, imputing their names into the facilities registry, assigning them to a room
and answering any basic questions or requests the guests may have throughout their stay. For example, a guest may call the front
desk to report a leaky bathroom faucet. The clerk would then contact the maintenance department so that the appropriate repairs
can be made. At the end of the guests stay, a front desk clerk checks them out. In addition, the clerk reports any concerns the
guest man had to management.
Porter Service
A hotel bellhop or porter greets guests once they checked into the establishment. This individual carries the guests luggage while
showing them to their room. Ensuring that everything in the room is in order and properly working, the porter checks room
equipment, such as lighting and ventilation. He may also instruct visitors in the operation of hotel systems, such as the television
remote control and telephones.
Concierge
The concierge of a hotel is a front office professional who coordinates guests entertainments, travel and other activities. Any
time guests have a question, such as directions to local attractions, she finds the answer as quickly as possible. In addition, she
makes restaurant reservations, orders car service and may even arrange personal shopping for the guests.
References (3)
About the Author
KJ Henderson has more than a decade of human resources experience, specifically within staffing and talent acquisition. Having
begun his career in CFO recruitment at a Fortune 100 investment bank, he has also held positions at a Fortune 100 media
conglomerate and at one of the largest executive staffing firms in New York City. He read literature at Oxford.














Types of Organizational Structure in Office Administration
by Sam Ashe-Edmunds, Demand Media

An organizational chart helps you determine who is responsible for what function.
Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images
Related Articles
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Different small businesses use varied organizational structures to perform office administration functions, often based on an
owners preference. Some business owners handle all of the executive functions. For a small business with more than one owner,
the office responsibilities might be divided by expertise or functional area. Regardless of how you choose to organize your office,
its important that you have written job descriptions so workers know whats expected of each employee and who has final say in
decisions.
Organizational Structure
An organizational structure is a grouping of a companys employees delineating each workers function, superior and
subordinate. An organizational chart starts by listing the chief executive officer at the top and then all of the people below him by
name and title. A CEO may have several executives who report directly to him listed underneath him on the chart, connected by
straight lines. These employees can include the chief financial officer, director of marketing and chief operating officer. While all
of the employees of the company work under the CEO, an org chart connects each employee only to his direct reports. Under the
CFO, for example, the chart might show the human resources director and accounting staff. In departments where several
employees perform the same function, such as sales or manufacturing, employees are listed by title or function, not name.
Flat
A very small business with fewer than 20 employees might use a flat organizational structure, with all management functions
reporting directly to the owner. An example would be a restaurant that has the chef, dining room manager, bookkeeper and
bartender reporting directly to the owner. Even though the dining manager has authority over the wait staff and the chef manages
other cooks, the owner often has direct contact with every staff member.
Related Reading: Different Types of Organizational Structure
Department
Some businesses organize their offices by department or function, and each department head might report directly to the owner of
the business. Departments can include sales, marketing, accounting, human resources, IT and production. A structure like this
might not have a layer of management, such as a COO and CFO, between the owner and the department heads. In small
businesses with several owners, the owners often split these duties based on their areas of expertise.
Geographic
If a business has several locations, the owner might decide to make each unit a freestanding business, sharing some services and
costs with the corporation. Each unit might be responsible for its own hiring and firing, bookkeeping, maintenance and other
functions. The units might share some costs, such as marketing and purchasing, or they can share employees, such as an
accountant who does the books for each unit.
Product
If a business has several distinct products or services, the office might be organized along those lines. A recreation facility may
have large tennis, swimming and golf programs, for example, so the office might be divided into those three divisions. Each
department is responsible for some of its administration, such as personnel and marketing, but shares other functions, such as
accounting and facility maintenance. A footwear company might have separate office administration for womens, mens and
childrens departments. A law firm can be divided by practice area, with each department led by a director who has the same
standing on the companys organization chart.
References (2)
Resources (1)
About the Author
Sam Ashe-Edmunds has been writing and lecturing for more than 25 years, covering small business, health, fitness, cooking,
nutrition and sports. He has worked in the corporate and nonprofit arenas as a C-Suite executive, serving on several nonprofit
boards. He in an internationally traveled sport science writer and lecturer.