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STAUNTON—Emmett Hanger is getting some-
thing he hasn’t had in seven years — a primary
challenger.
Marshall Pattie, Augusta County Supervisor
for the North River District, will seek the Repub-
lican nomination for the 24th Senate district seat
for the 2015 electionagainst Hanger, R-Mount So-
lon.
The last time Hanger faced a party challenger
was in June 2007, when he narrowly fended off a
challengebyLexingtonbusinessmanScott Sayre.
The 24th District encompasses
Augusta, Madison and Greene
counties, part of RockinghamCoun-
ty, the cities of Staunton, Waynes-
boro and part of Culpeper.
Pattie’s challenge come on the
heels of the recent debate in the
General Assembly over accepting
federal fundstoexpandMedicaidin
accordance with the Affordable
Care Act. The move is backed by
Gov. Terry McAuliffe and the Democrats, while
Hanger is one of only three Republicans in the
state senate who support the move, earning him
the wrath of conservatives within his own party.
Pattie, a management professor at James
Madison University who lives in Staunton with
his wife and two children, is known for his hard
stance against raising taxes in Augusta County,
somethinghe’s remainedfirmonfor his time as a
supervisor.
Pattie makes the formal announcement on his
candidacy at 12:30 p.m. Monday at the Reo Dis-
tribution Center in Waynesboro.
Pattie has held his county supervisor position
since 2012, winning it as an independent. The su-
pervisor was formerly chairman of the Augusta
County Democratic Committee.
“Marshall isadown-to-earthguyandheisreal-
lyeasyto talkto,” saidCole Trower, a representa-
tive of Pattie’s campaign.
Hanger and Pattie could not be reached for
comment on Sunday.
Pattie to
challenge
Hanger for
Senate seat
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
Pattie
STAUNTON—One wouldn’t thinkto finda small
gym inside Terry Court on Augusta Street in
Staunton.
It’shidden, but Curvesisthereandhasabigfol-
lowing among local women with 250 members.
Curves alsohas atransitionof ownershipcome
Tuesday.
Carol Houff hasbeentheownerof theStaunton
Curves for the past 12 years. Now, LeahRawleyis
takingoverafterworkingat Curvesfortwoyears.
Starting out as a member, Rawley loves the
comfortable atmosphere andall-womangymthat
Curves offers.
“Dayone, Ilovedit,”shesaid. “Ifell inlovewith
theladies, I fell inlovewiththeatmosphere, I just
loved it. Fromthen on, I was hooked.”
Even within a fewmonths of her membership,
she startedhelpingother members withtheir cir-
cuit training.
Curves features a 30-minute circuit workout,
having members moving from station to station
for a one-minute exercise to focus on specific
muscle groups. Each member is hooked up to a
computer to track their progress and each ma-
chine will get harder the stronger they get.
Rawley, 24, is one of the youngest owners at
Curves, taking away the stigma of being a place
for an older generation.
“It’s just what we’ve been known as ... the old
ladygym,” Rawleysaid. “We’vebeenrevitalizing,
changing and refreshing the workout so it works
for a crowd of all ages.”
Houff, who is retiring, has seen Curves
through many changes.
Being around for more than 20 years, a lot of
the women who’ve been members have seen
Curves progress.
“They’ve seen it growand seen it progress and
as that generation has seen that they are in that
chapter where they are ready to move on,” Raw-
leysaid.”There’s abigshift intheownershiproles
with Curves.”
When Curves was the new kid on the block,
they were basically just a women’s gym, Houff
said.
“We are a women’s gym, but we do more now,”
Leah Rawley leads a Zumba class at Curves on North Augusta Street in Staunton on June 18. Rawley is about to become the
new owner of the business. MIKE TRIPP/THE NEWS LEADER
Leah Rawley
leads a
Zumba class
at Curves on
North
Augusta
Street in
Staunton on
June 18.
Rawley is
about to
become the
new owner
of the
business. MIKE
TRIPP/THE NEWS
LEADER
“It’s just what we’ve been known as ... the old lady gym. We’ve been
revitalizing, changing and refreshing the workout so it works for a
crowd of all ages.”
LEAH RAWLEY, new Curves owner
New owner to move
and shake at Curves
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
See CURVES, Page A2
ONLINE
Visit newsleader.comfor a photo gallery
of Curves and new owner Leah Rawley.
WASHINGTON — Sen. Thad
Cochran’s GOP primary victory,
thanksinpart toblackMississip-
pians who turned out to vote for
him, exemplifies a new math
that politicians of all persua-
sions may be forced to learn as
this country’s voting population
slowly changes complexion.
POLITICS
Supporters of Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., cheer as
he is declared the winner in his primary runoff for
the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate on Tuesday in
Jackson, Miss. His victory was thanks in part to black
Mississippians who turned out to vote for him. AP
Minority voters
flexing muscle
WHAT’S
NEXT
Tests of African-
Americans’
voting power
are coming next
month in Ala-
bama and Geor-
gia, also South-
ern states with
large minority
populations and
open primaries. See VOTERS, Page A2
By Jesse J. Holland
Associated Press

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