SARP

June 16 2014
Randy Albertson
Airborne Science Program
Deputy Director
Airborne Science Program
Mission
The NASA Airborne Science Program exists to enable
scientists to achieve NASA Earth science objectives
and answer science questions that require the use of
airborne platforms and infrastructure. The Airborne
Science Program does this by providing the Earth
Science community access to a pre-eminent suite of
airborne capabilities.

– Science and platform agnostic
– Right tool for the job
2
Program Objectives
Satellite Calibration and Validation
Provide platforms to enable essential calibration
measurements for the Earth observing satellites, and the
validation of data retrieval algorithms.

Support New Sensor Development
Provide sub-orbital flight opportunities to test and refine new
instrument technologies/algorithms, and reduce risk prior to
committing sensors for launch into space.

Process Studies
Obtain high-resolution temporal and spatial measurements
of complex local processes, which can be coupled to global
satellite observations for a better understanding of the
complete Earth system.

Develop the Next-Generation of Scientists and
Engineers
Foster the development of our future workforce with the
hands-on involvement of graduate students, and young
scientists/engineers in all aspects of ongoing Earth science
investigations.

What does Airborne Science do?
• Facilitate access to airborne assets capable of
supporting NASA’s scientific measurements
– Core, Catalog, Cooperative and New technology
– Insures compliance with NPD 7900.4b, SMD, NASA and OMB
reporting requirements and NASA airworthiness authority and
liability.
• Provide capabilities to enhance/enable
scientific measurements
– Mission/Project Management and Logistics
– Science support systems
– Airborne networks
– Approvals for Laser and Radiation, dropsonde release, pressure
vessel safety, HAZMAT safety, EMI, foreign clearances, etc
• Optimize the use of resources
Science Requirement Measurements Platforms
Science Measurement Requirement Inputs
Altitude vs. Endurance for all missions
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350
time, hours
m
a
x

a
l
t
i
t
u
d
e
,

k
f
t
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
NASA Airborne Science Capable Aircraft
SIERRA
A
l
t
i
t
u
d
e

(
f
e
e
t
)

60000
70000
80000
0 5 10 15 20 25 30
Endurance (hours)
(2) WB-57
S-3B
P-3B
Lear 25
Twin Otter
Ikhana
(2) Global Hawk
(2) C-20/G-III
21km
15km
9km
3km
Sherpa
Falcon
DC-8
(2) ER-2
(4) B-200/UC12
Red indicates full Core funding
Blue indicates partial funding
GIII: one fully funded, one partial funded


C-130
Rigel
UH-1 Huey
Dragon Eye
Aircraft Support of Required Measurements
Summary of the National Science Objectives, established by the six focus areas, for
sustained suborbital Earth Science observation requirements, 50% covered by Manned
aircraft another 30% covered by our Unmanned vehicle and 20% still uncovered until
new vehicles become operational
9
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
(1) SIERRA
A
l
t
i
t
u
d
e

(
f
e
e
t
)

60000
70000
80000
0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 >6000
Range (nm)
(2) ER-2
(1) S-3B
(1) DC-8
(1) P-3B
(1) Lear 25
(1) Twin Otter
(1) Ikhana
(2) Global Hawk
(2) G-III
(3) B-200/UC12
NASA Airborne Science Aircraft
(1) Sherpa
(1) Falcon
(2) WB-57
10
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
A
l
t
i
t
u
d
e

(
f
e
e
t
)

60000
70000
80000
0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 >6000
Range (nm)
(1) DC-8
(1) P-3B
(1) Twin Otter
(1) Sherpa
NASA Manned Airborne Science Aircraft
(with nadir ports & room to work for 4 + people)
(1) Falcon
Other Factors for Science Platforms
• Range
• Speed
• Payload volume and capacity
• Power
• Perspectives
• Communications/network
• Operations cost/constraints
• Basing/airspace
Payload Perspectives
13
Experimenter Interface Panel –
science instrument to aircraft interface
NASA Airborne Science Data and Telemetry System (NASDAT) -
airborne network server and low bandwidth Iridium gateway which captures
navigational data as well as allows scientists to talk to their instruments
ASP Cross Cutting Infrastructure
Aircraft Access to Hurricane Forming Regions
• The Global Hawk adds considerable
surveillance capability
• Greater range and duration than
DC-8 or ER-2
• Allows for extended on-station time
in hurricane genesis regions
• Geosynchronous simulator
Blue line: DC-8 range for 12-h flight, 6 h on
station
Red lines: GH range for 30-h flight with 15 and
22.5 h on station
Light blue X: Genesis locations for 1940-2006
GRIP: (Hurricane)
Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes Field Experiment
Flight Requests
Completed:
• FY06 36 FRs for 1307 hours
• FY07 34 FRs for 996 hours
• FY08 44 FRs for 1667 hours
• FY09 70 FRs for 1877 hours
• FY10 90 FRs for 2694 hours
• FY11 77 FRs for 2605 hours
• FY12 80 FRs for 3888 hours
• FY13 78 FRs for 4392 hours

- Airborne Science Program (ASP) has investigators fill out flight
requests for each research activity.
- ASP analyzes for implementation (cost, schedule resources)
- HQ’s program scientists analyze for science merit and alignment
- Many times to minimize our flight costs for data collection we are able
to incorporate multiple flight requests into one mission.
Note: flight hours
include check-out,
transit and data



Supporting: stratospheric/tropospheric chemistry, cryospheric science, hurricane
observations, atmospheric physics/radiation, terrestrial biosphere studies, satellite
cal/val, and instrument development.
Outstanding examples of accomplishments in each area:

Process Study - Atmospheric chemistry - “smoking gun” for stratospheric chemistry
from AAOE demonstrates role of chlorine in destroying polar ozone

Environmental Characterizations - airborne lidar observations of the Greenland ice
sheet; and the effects of large-scale biomass burning in the Amazon & S. Africa

Satellite Validation - CRYSTAL/FACE: detailed in situ observations of clouds being
observed from satellites; SAFARI 2000: validating MODIS aerosol algorithms

Instrumentation R&D - initial tests of remote sensing technologies: Aquarius/sea
surface salinity sensor; ICESat/Lidars; TRMM/Doppler Radars; & many others
A Long History of Worldwide Science
Field Campaigns
Each badge represents a
major multi-platform
science campaign
Historical NASA
Deployment Sites

























Sal Island, Cape Verde
San Jose, Costa Rica
Vera Cruz, Mexico
Honolulu, HI
Anchorage, AK
Fairbanks, AK
Thule, Greenland
Portsmouth, NH
Warner Robins, GA
Houston, TX
Edwards, CA
Ponca City, OK
Mildenhall, England
Punta Arenas, Chile
Antarctica
Thailand
Svalbard, Norway
Iceland
Key West, FL
Barrow, AK

Saskatoon
Goose Bay
Wallops, VA
Papeete, French Polynesia
Yellowknife
Cold Lake



Ft. Lauderdale, FL




• •



•u


Kiruna, Sweden
Surprise Valley, NV
Palmdale, CA
Darwin, Australia

Kona, HI

Guam
Chil
e
Ja
pa
n
Ecu
ador
Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes
The GRIP experiment was a NASA Earth
science field experiment in 2010 that was
conducted to better understand how tropical
storms form and develop into major hurricanes.
The experiment was done in collaboration with
NOAA and USAF operational hurricane
missions.

NASA is using the DC-8 aircraft, the
WB-57 aircraft, and the Global
Hawk Unmanned Airborne System
(UAS) configured with a suite of in
situ and remote sensing instruments
that are observing and
characterizing the lifecycle of
hurricanes.
(http://grip.nsstc.nasa.gov/index.html)
"#$%%& #'()*$% +, -%'. /01% 20330+& 2+&0)+$ 34+50&6 )4%
7899 :; < 79"9 =.+>'. ?'5@A BCDA < EFGH 1'@0&6 '
#++$I0&')%I ('33 +J%$ ?*$$0#'&% K'$. %L%M 9 7899 NO P7899
:QR < S"9T CUOV 5%$% '.3+ 3'1(.0&6 )4% 3)+$1 ') )403 W1%M
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSm7pIKUiCM
9 #++$I0&')%I ('33 +J%$ )4% %L% +, 4*$$0#'&% K'$. 50)4 )4% 79"9 =.+>'. ?'5@ '&I
BCDA 50)4 ' &'$$+5 1033 >L )4% /-22 3')%..0)%M
GRIP and TRMM Satellite
Figure: John Paden/CReSIS
Figure: John Paden/CReSIS
ice surface
iceberg
ice/water interface
MCoRDS radar quick look image
Operation IceBridge
Snow Radar QC plot
Photo: M. Studinger
Coordinated Airborne Experiments to Measure CO2 column
densities in support of ASCENDS Mission Definition
GSFC Airborne CO2 lidar
instrument in NASA Lear-25
LaRC/ITT Acclaim lidar
instrument in NASA UC-12
JPL Airborne CO2 lidar
instrument in Twin Otter
• Objective: Measure & compare CO2 column densities over calibration sites with developmental lidar
candidates for the ASCENDS mission
• Approach: Simultaneous CO2 measurement flights at different altitudes over well calibrated areas:
• DOE SGP ARM site (Lamont, OK): 7/28 - 8/4/09
• North Carolina & Eastern Shore VA 8/17/09
• Collaborate with DOE/LBL & Caltech researchers for in-situ & ground-based FTS measurements
• LaRC & ITT instr. team, LaRC aircraft
• Ed Browell/LaRC, Team Leader
• Instrument development via ITT, Earth
Science AITT funding
• GSFC team, NASA Glenn aircraft
• Jim Abshire/GSFC, Team Leader
• Instrument development via ESTO
ACT & IIP programs, GSFC IRAD
• JPL team, Twin Otter aircraft
• Gary Spiers/JPL, Team Leader
• Instrument development via Coherent
Techn., ESTO ACT program, JPL IRAD
Technology Development Global Hawk Instruments
This task will Integrate the LVIS
capability onto the Global Hawk
and provide an automated, reliable
package for high altitude
measurements.
Land, Vegetation, & Ice
Sensor (LVIS)

GOLD will enable, for the first
time, Ozone LIDAR measurements
from a high-altitude aircraft that
support global atmospheric
composition and climate change
investigations.
Global Ozone Lidar
Demonstrator (GOLD)

UAVSAR
The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle –
Synthetic Aperture Radar
(UAVSAR) project will install two
existing UAVSAR pods on a UAV
for the first time. On Global Hawk,
UAVSAR will generate precise
topographic maps and single-pass
polarimetric interferograms of ice
and vegetation.
Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO)
Sensor Integration
6/30/14 Albertson 22
J.P. Mahoney, JPL,
overseeing Microwave
Temperature Profiler
integration.
Sensor integration
area next to Global
Hawks
New Ku-band
satcom antenna
on Global Hawk
during GloPac
integration
ER-2 flight tracks during Gulf
Oil Spill Response
Coherence image of Haiti’s Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault
– purple indicates low coherence, which may be due to
mudslide, water runoff, or vegetation change
Mosaic of MASTER flight lines
over Wallow fire June 16, 2011
Disaster Response
Unique NASA-only Heavy Lift High Altitude Fleet (50k+ feet)
WB-57F (2)
ER-2 (2)
Global Hawk (2)
Global Hawk Range/
Endurance Rings
Unique NASA-only Reconfigurable Large Flying Laboratories
- Internal Comm and Data
Networks
- Onboard satcom sensor web
networks
- Dropsonde Ejectors
- Specialized Racks for quick
payload reconfiguration
- Nadir and Zenith ports with
sensor attachment provision
- Wing hard points for sensor
mounting
- Specialized ports for probe
mounts with CFD Analysis
- Common Aircraft State data to
Sensor broadcast
Other Programs that make use of Airborne
Organizations outside of Earth Science
• Planetary Science: Astromaterials & Astrobiology, (Cosmic
Dust collections, SETI (Leonids/Aurids imagery & MSL
Descent Radar tests)
• Heliophysics Science: Radiation Measurements
• Space Operations: (WAVE imagery of Shuttle missions,
Columbia debris field imagery, telemetry and ESA-ATV
imagery)
• Aeronautics: (Alternative aviation fuel emissions study &
fiber optic wing shaping sensors)
• Other government agencies: DoD, NOAA, DOE, DHS
6/30/14 27
Using Airborne Science facilities scientists collect the data that lead to the
determination that CFC’s are the main contributor to ozone hole formation
How policy has
protected our
planet
How Can Airborne Data and Policymakers
Benefit Society
Summary
• ASP Objectives
– Satellite Cal/Val
– New Sensor and Algorithm development
– Process Studies
– Next Generation of Scientist and Engineers
• Science Aircraft
– Modified and capable
• ASP Provides the infrastructure and personnel to
conduct these investigations in accordance with NASA,
national and international policies and regulations
• Support National Science Objectives to provide the
policymakers with the information to benefit society

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful