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Marquez, Gabe

Prado, Angel
Milicevic, Pavle
Keulinde, Tobi
Tiffany Culver
CHEM 1315-077
16 October 2013

Heat Laws Systems Lab D-S: System 5

I. Introduction/Purpose

The purpose of the qualitative experiment is to use the temperature change
of water upon the addition of various metals in order to determine if the metal is
endothermic or exothermic. A quantitative determination will then be performed on
the heat produced by adding a known mass of brass, zinc, aluminum, lead, copper,
or iron to water using the temperature change of the water (T), the mass of the
water (m), and the specific heat of the water (Cs=4.18 J/gC). The heat produced (q)
will be found using the equation q=m Cs T and data will be collected for various
masses of each metal. The theoretical heat of the reaction and the specific heat
capacity of each metal should be able to be predicted by using the information found
from the change in temperature and the mass of each reactant metal.


II. Procedure/Experimental Setup

The goal of this experiment is to be able to distinguish the differences in each metal
by appearance, mass, density, specific heat, temperature change, and heat produced.

Materials

o 1 pair of goggles
o 1 ring stand
o 1 thermometer clamp
o 1 50 mL beaker
o 1 10 mL graduated cylinder
o 1 thermometer
o 1 polystyrene cup
o 1 stirring rod
o 1 pair of test tube tongs
o Various samples of brass, zinc, aluminum, lead, copper, and iron





Method

Put on safety goggles to ensure safety.

Obtain the various samples of lead, copper, and iron. Record and describe the
appearance of each metal.
Accurately weigh the samples of brass, zinc, aluminum, lead, copper, and iron on the
analytical balance. Record the exact mass.

Obtain about 5 mL of distilled water in a 10 mL graduated cylinder. Insert the metal
and record the volume displacement. Repeat this process for each metal.

Using the data from the mass (m) and volume of each metal, determine the density
of each metal.

Suspend a thermometer into a polystyrene cup so that it is about inch from the
bottom by using the ring stand and thermometer clamp. Using a volumetric cylinder,
add 50.0 mL of distilled water and record the initial temperature.

At a separate station, give your metal sample to the TA to heat in a beaker filled with
boiling water. After a few minutes, obtain the metal sample by using tongs and
placing the metal into an empty beaker. Place the metal into the polystyrene cup
filled with water. Record the final temperature of the system. Repeat this process for
each metal.

By using your data, determine the change in temperature (T) from the initial and
final temperatures of the water and metal. From this data, determine the amount of
heat (q) produced from the system by using the equation, q=m Cs T. (The specific
heat (Cs) of water is 4.18 J/gC).

Determine the specific heat (CS) of each metal by using the equation: q=m Cs T .

III. Data

See Table.

IV. Data Analysis

See Table and attached handwritten equations.

Density = mass/volume

Specific Heat of metal = (Mass of water * Specific Heat of water * Change in
Temperature of water) / (Mass of metal * Change in Temperature of metal)

% Error = (actual theoretical) / theoretical * 100%

V. Conclusion

By using the equation, q=m Cs T, we were able to determine the heat of the
reaction (q) and the specific heat capacity (Cs) of each metal.

The errors seen in the calculation of density may be due to water splashing out of
the graduated cylinders, causing a miscalculation in displacement. The error seen in
the calculation of specific heat may be due to the large mass of water used in the
experiment. The difference between the masses of the metal and water made it
more difficult to accurately calculate the change in temperature of the system.

Through this experiment, we were able to distinguish between the six metals by
using different forms of data such as appearance, mass, density, specific heat,
temperature change, and heat produced.

1. Brass
2. Copper
3. Lead
4. Zinc
5. Aluminum
6. Iron
















Work Cited

1. Metals Specific Heats. Metals Specific Heats. N.p., n.d, Web. 15 Oct 2013
<http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/specific-heat-metals-d_152.html>
2. Metal Alloys Specific Heats. Metal Alloys Specific Heats. N.p., n.d, Web. 15
Oct 2013 < http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/specific-heat-metal-alloys-
d_153.html>