Table of Contents

1. General Information
• • List of Ministers List of Eminent Persons and Observers

2. Provisional Agenda 3. Annotated Agenda
• • • • Annex A: Final Report of SEPD 5 (Bali 2007) Annex B: Agenda Item 1 - Global Issues Annex C: Agenda item 2 - Regional Issues Annex D: Agenda item 3 - Emerging Issues

Asia a-Pacific Sub-regional E c Environm mental P Policy D Dialogue (SE EPD 6) Bangkok, Thaila and 22 January 2009 General Informa G ation

1. Arriv val All partic cipants of S SEPD will arrive at Suv a varnabhum Internatio mi onal Airport in Bangkok. Participa ants will be received at the airp e port by off ficials from Thailand’s Ministry o s of Natural Resource and Environ a nment and/ UNEP. T /or Transportat tion for Ministers will b be d rival at Su uvarnabhum International Airpo by the Royal Tha mi ort ai provided upon arr Governm ment. Priva liaison and security officers a also assigned for Ministers b ate a are by the Roy Thai G yal Government The driv t. ving time f from the a airport to the hotel is approxim mately 30~4 minutes. 45 2. Visas vernment o Thailand and UNEP will proce visas fo all the pa of P ess or articipants o of The Gov the SEP Please ensure tha you carry the relevant invitation letters and supportin PD. at y n ng documents while checking in, from where ever you ar entering Thailand. A delegate re All es ised to che the valid of their passports (at least s months validity) an eck dity r s six nd are advi to obta ain latest informatio on on vis sa require ements fro om respec ctive Roya al Thai Em mbassies. 3. Daily Subsiste y ence Allowa ance pported par rticipants will be provid as per e ded existing UN regulation N ns DSA for UNEP-sup duration of the meeting An addit g. tional DSA (for 1 day) will be pro ovided in lie eu for the d of termin and mis nal scellaneous expenses DSA will be provided during the meeting in s s. d Bangkok Please retain your boarding passes and ticket stu k. r r ubs for ver rification. A copy of y your passp will also be require during disbursemen port o ed nt. 4. Acco ommodatio on eservations for particip pants have been mad at the A e de Amari Wate ergate Hote el. Hotel re The spe ecial room rate for SE EPD partic cipants as n negotiated with the H Hotel is Tha ai Baht 2,8 (approx US$80) p day. 800 x. per n n cipants are expected t to Please note that breakfast is included in the room rate. Partic clear all miscellane eous expen nses, such as telephone calls, la aundry, use of mini ba e ar, out e etc. during check-o from the hotel.

The 5-star Amari Watergate Hotel is situated in Pratunam, one of Bangkok's busiest shopping areas and enjoys a very central location close to Sukhumvit and Siam Square, Bangkok's most exciting shopping and commercial districts. The hotel offers supreme comfort and convenience with easy access to both Skytrain and the Airport expressway.

Amari Watergate Hotel 847 Petchburi Road, Bangkok 10100 Tel: +66 (0) 2255-3767 Fax: +66 (0) 2255-3718 Website: www.amari.com/bangkokhotels 5. Meals UNEP will host a luncheon for all SEPD delegates on 22nd January 2009. The Royal Thai Government will host a cocktail reception on the evening of 22nd January 2009, after the SEPD meeting. 6. Meeting Venue The SEPD meeting will be held in Meeting Room C, on the 7th Floor of the Amari Watergate Hotel. 7. Meeting Schedule, Thursday, 22 January 2009 0700-0745: Breakfast 0745-0815: Transfer to UN Conference Centre 0815-0830: VIP Room at UN Conference Centre 0830-1200: Participate in the Climate Game Change Conference http://www.climategamechange.org/index.html 1215-1245: Transfer to Amari Watergate Hotel 1245 - 1345: Luncheon hosted by UNEP, Thai@4 Restaurant, 4th Floor, 1400 - 1715: SEPD meeting 1730 – 1930: Cocktail Reception hosted by Royal Thai Government, Garden View, 8th Floor, Amari Watergate Hotel

8. Meeting Language English 9. Weather Thailand lies within the humid tropics and remains hot throughout the year. Weather in January is warm and humid. The average maximum temperature in Bangkok in January is 27°C and the average minimum temperature is 20° C. 10. Time Zone Thailand is +07:00 hours ahead of GMT. 11. Electricity The electric voltage in Thailand is 220 volts, 50 Hertz. 12. Currency The official currency of Thailand is the Thai Baht (THB). 1 US$ is roughly equal to THB 35. Assistance for exchanging currency will be provided by the organizers. Please note that the use of Credit Cards is widely acceptable in Bangkok. 13. Facts at a Glance Monarchy: Thailand is a constitutional monarchy with His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, or King Rama IX, the ninth king of the Chakri Dynasty, the present king. The King has reigned for more than sixty years, making him the longest reigning monarch in the world. Capital: Bangkok (Krung Thep, meaning "city of angels") is the capital city and centre of political, commercial, industrial and cultural activities. Geography: The Kingdom of Thailand, covering an area of 514,000 square kilometers, lies in the heart of Southeast Asia, roughly equidistant between India and China. It shares borders with Myanmar to the west and north, Lao P.D.R. to the north and northeast, Cambodia to the east and Malaysia to the south. The country comprises 76 provinces that are further divided into districts, sub-districts and villages. Topography: Thailand is divided into four distinct areas: the mountainous North, the fertile Central Plains, the semi-arid plateau of the Northeast, and the peninsular South, distinguished by its many beautiful tropical beaches and offshore islands. Population: Thailand has a population of about 60 million. Ethnic Thais form the majority, though the area has historically been a migratory crossroad, and thus strains of Mon, Khmer, Burmese, Lao, Malay, Indian, and most strongly, Chinese stock, have produced a degree of ethnic diversity. Integration is such, however, that culturally and socially there is enormous unity.

Language: Spoken and written Thai is largely incomprehensible to the casual visitor. However, English is widely understood, particularly in Bangkok where it is almost the major commercial language. English and some European languages are spoken in most hotels, shops and restaurants in major tourist destinations, and Thai-English road and street signs are found nationwide. Religion: Buddhism (95%), Muslim (4%), Others (1%) 14. Do’s and Don’ts in Thailand The Monarchy: Thai people have a deep, traditional reverence for the Royal Family, and visitors should be careful to show respect for the King, the Queen and the Royal Family. Religion: Visitors should dress neatly in all religious shrines. They should never go topless, or in shorts, hot pants or other unsuitable attires. It is acceptable to wear shoes while walking around the compound of Buddhist temples, but not inside the chapel where the principal Buddha image is kept. Each Buddha image, large or small, ruined or not, is regarded as a sacred object. Never climb onto one to take a photograph or do anything which might indicate a lack of respect. Buddhist monks are forbidden to touch or be touched by a woman, or to accept anything from the hand of one. If a woman has to give anything to a monk, she first hands it to a man, who then presents it. Social Norms: Thais don’t normally shake hands when they greet one another, but instead press the palms together in a prayer-like gesture called a wai. Generally a younger person wais elders, who then returns the wai. Thais regard the head as the highest part of the body, literally and figuratively. Therefore, avoid touching people on the head and try not to point your feet at people or an object. It is considered very rude. Shoes should be removed when entering a private Thai home. Public displays of affection between men and women are frowned upon. 15. Diplomatic missions The Embassy of the Federal Democratic of Nepal 189 Soi 71, Sukumvit Road, Prakanong, Bangkok 10110 Tel: 66 2391 7240, 66 2390 2280 Fax: 66 2381 2406 Email: nepembbk@asiaaccess.net.th The Embassy of the People’s Republic of China 57 Ratchadapisek Road, Dindaeng, Bangkok 10400 Tel: 66 2245 0088 Fax: 66 2246 8247 http://www.chinaembassy.or.th Email: chinaemb_th@mfa.gov.cn The Embassy of Republic of Uzbekistan 138/5 Thoglor Soi 11 Sukhumvit 55, Klongtan, Wattana, Bangkok 10110 Tel: 66 2712 8883, 66 2381 6116 Fax: 66 2391 3323 http://www.uzbinbkk.org Email: ankhor@uzbinbkk.org

16. Focal Points Should you need any clarification or have further inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact: UNEP Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Bangkok: Mr. Mahesh Pradhan Regional Environmental Affairs Officer United Nations Environment Programme Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific UN Building, 2nd floor, Block A Rajdamnern Avenue, Bangkok 10200 Tel: +66-2-288-1801 Email: pradhan@un.org Ms. Nonglak Kasemsant United Nations Environment Programme Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Rajdamnern Avenue, Bangkok 10200 Tel: +66-2-288-1899 Email: kasemsant@un.org Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Thailand: Ms Wantanee Petchampai Senior Environmental Specialist Office of Intl Cooperation on Natural Resources & Environment Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment 92 Soi Phahon Yothin 7, Sam Sen Nai, Bangkok 10400, Thailand Tel: +66-2 278 8627 Email: wantaneep@hotmail.com Mr. Pavich Kesavawong Environmental Official Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment 92 Soi Phahon Yothin 7, Sam Sen Nai, Bangkok 10400, Thailand Tel: +66-02 265 6236 Email: pavichk@gmail.com

Asia a-Pacific Sub-re c egional E Environm mental P Policy Dialogue D e (SE EPD 6) Bangko Thailand ok, 22 Jan nuary 20 009 List of Partici ipants - Ministers

Minister rs

S Subregion
C Central Asia

Backg ground

H.E. Mr. Bori A Alikhanov

Ch hairman St Committee for Nature Protec tate f ction 5 Mustakillik Squa Tashkent M are, UZ ZBEKISTAN Te +998 71 139 4195 el: 4 Fa +998 71 139 1494 ax: E-mail: info@uzna ature.uz, envcon nf@uzsci.net

• Maste Degree in Mechanical Engin ers neering • 1996-2001: Respons officer of the sible e • 2001-present: First D Deputy Chairman Acting n,
Chair rman and Chairm of the State man e Comm mittee for Nature Protection e President’s Office

Mr. Xia Yingxian

No ortheast Asia a

• MSc in Development Management fr rom

Sp pecial Representative of Vice-Miinister Dy Director, Intern y. national Organiz zations/Conventiions Miinistry of Environ nmental Protection, Beijing CH HINA Te +86 10 6655 6495 el: 6 Fa +86 10 6655 6494 / 6010 ax: Em xia.yingxian mail: n@sepa.gov.cn South Asia

Birmingham University • Regio Cooperation Division, Minis of onal n stry Envir ronmental Protec ction, 2006-08 • Chine Permanent M ese Mission to UNEP P Head dquarters, Nairob 2004-06 bi, • Princ cipal/Chief Progra amme Officer, S State Envir ronmental Protec ction Administrat tion, 1995-2004

H.E. Mr. Ganes Shah sh
Miinister of Environ nment, Science and Technology y Singha Durbar, Ka athmandu NE EPAL Te +977 1 421 17 Mobile: +97 9851 079522 el: 734; 77 Fa +977 1 421 1754 ax: E-mail: mingshah@ @most.gov.np

• 12 ye service in W Supply and Sewage ears Water d • Founder of Water Engineering and Training
Centr Pvt. Ltd., in 19 re 987 Union Federation n Corpo oration (Govt. En nterprise)

• Founder General Sec cretary of Nepal Trade • Depu Secretary Ge uty eneral, CPN (Uniited)
So outheast Asia a

H.E. Mr. Suwit Khunkitti t

Miinister of Natural Resources and Environment d 92 Soi Phahon Yo 2 othin 7, Phahon Yothin Road Y Sa Sen Nai, Ban am ngkok 10400 TH HAILAND Te +66 2 278 862 el: 27 Fa +66 2 265 6192 ax: E-mail: wantaneep p@hotmail.com S South Pacific c

• B.A. C Chemistry, University of Kentuck USA ky • Member of Parliamen (Khon Kaen P nt Province) • Depu Prime Ministe 1997-98, 2001 uty er 1-04 • Minis of Justice 19 1996 ster 992, • Minis of Education 2001 ster n, • Minis of ICT, 2005 ster • Minis of Natural Re ster esources and
Envir ronment 2004-05 2008-present 5,

H.E. Mr. Faum muina Tiatia L Liuga
Miinister of Natural Resources and Environment d Pr rivate Bag, Apia SA AMOA Te (685) 25257; Fax: (685) 2919 20964 el: 95, Pr rivate Tel: (685) 26032, Fax: (68 20964 85) Em emoni@les mail: samoa.net

• Member of Parliamen 2001 - 2006, 2006 – nt:

prese ent • 2001 - 2006: Minister of Works, Transport and r Infras structure (Inclusiive of Essential U Utility Services, Water and Electricity); • 2006 - present: Minis of Natural Re ster esources & Env vironment

As sia-Pacific Sub-re egional E Environm mental P Policy Dia alogue (SE EPD 6) Bangko Thaila ok, and 22 Jan nuary 200 08 List L of Pa articipant – Eminent Per ts rsons
Emin nent Perso ons
Dr. Kanat Baig garin Director, Climate C Change Coordin nation Centre Of 102, 20 Aba str, 010000 ffice ay As stana, Republic of Kazakhstan o Te +7-7172 717 170/ 69/ 73 el: Fa +7-7172 324 738 ax: Em mail: kbaigarin@ @global.kz Dr. Park Eun-K Kyung Director, Environm and Culture Institute ment e 4-1107, King’s Ga arden, 73 Naesoo o-dong, Jo ongrogu, Seoul, Korea Te +82-2-723-8112 el. Fa +82-2-395-36 ax. 655 Em ek_pj@yah mail: hoo.com

Subregion
Central Asia l

Background
• Ph.D. in Physics and Mathematics in 1989; • 1999-present: Focal point on C Climate Change issues e under UNFCC CC; • Key negotiator in the 5th, 6th, 6th-bis, 7th, 8th 9th, h, 10th, 11th and 12th UNFCCC COP; and d • 2001-present: Founder and Director of Public Foundation “C Climate Change Coordination Ce entre” (C4) • MA and PhD in Anthropology from University of Michigan and Ewha University y; • Member of Pre esidential Comm mission on SD ( 2 20022006) • Representativ Happy Wome Action , Seo ve, en’s oul Metropolitan G Government • Vice-Presiden of Korea Wate Forum nt er • Founder and D Director of Envir ronment and Cullture (2001-present t) • Director of Yonsei RCE, Yons University sei • PhD in Environmental Physics from Harvard a s and Masters in Na atural Sciences fr Cambridge; rom ; • Director of UN INFOTERRA in 1976-1982; NEP A • Founding Pres sident of Develo opment Alternativ ves; • Winner of UNE Sasakawa E EP Environment Priz in 2002 ze • Co-President, Club of Rome 2 2006-present; an nd • Elected IUCN President in 200 08

Northeas Asia st

Dr. Ashok Kho osla Ch hairman, Develo opment Alternativ Group ves 111/9-Z, Kishanga arh Va asant Kunj, New Delhi 110070 w Ind dia Te +91 11 2613 4103, 2689 0380 el: 4 0 Fa +91 11 2613 0817 ax: Em tara@deva mail: alt.org Th hanpuying D Suthawan Sathirathai Dr. n Ch Good Gove hair, ernance for Socia al De evelopment and the Environmen Foundation nt 47 Soi Amornp 4, Vipawadee-Rangsit 7/10 pan Ro Bangkok 10 oad, 0900, Thailand Te : (662) 941-0785-6 el Fa : (662) 941-07 ax 787 E-mail : suthawan@loxinfo.co.th

South Asia

Southeast Asia

• PhD from Cam mbridge University, and Masters in s Economics fro Tulane Unive om ersity; • Deputy Directo Centre for Ec or, cological Econom mics, Faculty of Eco onomics, Chulalo ongkorn Univers sity, Bangkok, 1995-99; • Committee on Policy and Stra n ategy for Resear of rch Mahidol Unive ersity, Bangkok; and • Goodwill Amb bassador for Man ngroves for the F Future • • • • • MA Honors fro Auckland Un om niversity; First Deputy D Director of the Fo orum Secretariat Fiji; t, 1980: NZ Com mmissioner for Environment; E 1984 – 86: Ch Adviser to M hief Minister of Environment; 19988 – 89: first Director of En nvironment Department at the World Ban and nk; • Senior Associate, Victoria Uniiversity of Wellin ngton; and • Regional Advisor, Collaborativ Action Netwo ve ork.

Mr. Ken Piddin ngton P.O. Box 12-592, Th horndon, Welling 6144 gton Ne Zealand ew Mo obile: +64-21-15 522947 Em kenpid@pa mail: aradise.net.nz

South P Pacific

Asia a-Pacific Sub-regional E c Environm mental P Policy D Dialogue Bangkok, Thaila and 22 January 2009 Provisio P onal Age enda
22 Jan nuary (Thursday)
1230-13 345 1400-14 415 Lunche eon hosted by UNEP d Inaugur ration and opening o the Meet of ting
Address by Cochair: HE Minister Suwit Khun : nkitti, Thailand Address by Cochair: Ms Angela Cropper, De : eputy Execu utive Director r, UNEP, Nairobi N Vote of T Thanks by D Saksit Trid Dr dech, Perma anent Secret tary, Ministry y of Natura Resources and Enviro al s onment, Tha ailand

1415-15 515

Agenda Item 1: G a Global Issu ues: Inputs for UNEP Governing s g Council
Chaired by HE Suwi Khunkitti it Presenta ation by Ms A Angela Crop pper, suppor rted by Mr S Surendra Shrestha Director of Resource Mobilization and Special Initiatives a, f M • 25th S Session of U UNEP’s Gov verning Coun ncil • UNE Medium T EP Term Strateg 2010-13 gy, • UNE Programm of Work, 2010-11 EP me Discussi ions

1515-16 615

Agenda Item 2: R a Regional St trategy for the Asia P r Pacific, 2008-11 1
Chaired by HE Minis Suwit Kh ster hunkitti Introduct tion by Ms A Angela Cropp per Presenta ation by Dr Y Young-Woo Park, Regional Director, UNEP , Discussi ions

1615-17 700

Agenda Item 3: E a Emerging E Environme ental Issues in the s Asia-Pa acific
Chaired by Ms Ange Cropper ela Statements by Minis sters and Em minent persons Discussi ions

1700-17 715 1715 1730-19 930

Conclus sions and Close of M Meeting Group P Photograp ph Cocktai Receptio hosted by Ministry of Natura il on b y al Resour rces and En nvironmen nt

Asia a-Pacific Sub-regional E c Environm mental P Policy D Dialogue Bangkok, Thaila and 22 January 2009 Annotat Agen A ted nda
BACKG GROUND ON POL D LICY DIAL LOGUE
One of t major o the outcomes o WSSD is the empha of s asis on reg gional impl lementatio on through partnerships betwee governm en ments and civil society. The political leade ership of th region v he voiced the need for the region to reach a n alogue. The Asia and the Pacific Region ha c as common position through a policy dia b-regional p political gro oupings: C Central Asia North E a, East Asia, South Asia a, five sub South E East Asia an the Sout Pacific. E nd th Each of the sub-region has eithe a proces e ns er ss or secre etariat for th environm he ment sector. . The out tcomes of the WSSD indicate t D the addition effort to integrate the eminen nal o nt persons and civil society gr roups in th consulta he ation proce ess. Consultations wit th ment, civil society a and partne ers have indicated a strong support fo or governm establish hment of th Policy D he Dialogue. A Sub-regio onal Enviro onment Poli Dialogu icy ue was esta ablished in 2003, in co onsultation with the po olitical leade ership and c society civil y. The ov verall objective of this Dialogue include provision of policy advice t es y to GC/GME and UN EF NEP’s Regio onal Progra amme of W Work and po ossible con nsolidation o of a common Asia-Pa acific view o an inform basis fo global en on mal or nvironmenta fora. al The firs Policy Dialogue was convene in Beijin in PR C st D ed ng China on 19 Septembe 9 er 2003. It was jointly organized by the St t d tate Environmental Pr rotection Ad dministratio on (SEPA) and UNEP and brou P, ught togethe the chairs/represen er ntatives of sub-regiona al mental fora from acros the Asiass -Pacific reg gion. environm The second Poli icy Dialog gue was c convened in Bangko in Thailand on 17 ok ber tly ed Ministry of N Natural Res sources an nd Novemb 2004. It was joint organize by the M Environm ment (MoNRE), Thaila and UN and NEP. The thir Policy Dialogue w convened in Thimphu, Bhuta on 29-30 Septembe rd D was an 0 er 2005. It was joint organize by the N I tly ed National En nvironment Commissi t ion of Roya al Governm ment of Bhu utan and UNEP. The fou urth Policy Dialogue was conv y e vened in A Ashgabad in Turkmen nistan on 2 25 Novemb 2006. It was jointly organ ber nized by th Ministry of Nature Protection he e n, Turkmen nistan and UNEP. The fifth Policy D h Dialogue was convene in Bali, Indonesia on 10 Dec ed cember 200 07 on the margins of the 10th Conferenc of Partie of the UNFCC. It was joint f ce es t tly ed ry e n, a organize by the State Ministr of Nature Protection Indonesia and UNEP. port Sub-regiona Environm al mental Polic Dialogue is attache cy e ed The Rep of the 2007 fifth S in Annex A. x

AGENDA ITEM 1: GLOBAL ISSUES
(Introduction and briefing by Ms Angela Cropper, supported by Mr Surendra Shrestha on the 25th session of UNEP’s Governing Council, UNEP Medium Term Strategy, 2010-2013 and Programme of Work 2010-11)

The twenty-fifth session of the Council/Forum will be held over five days, from 16 to 20 February 2009. The Council/Forum will be opened on Monday, 16 February 2009 at 10.00 a.m. and is expected to conclude on Friday, 20 February 2009 at 6.00 p.m. The main objectives of the Council/Forum are: (i) to facilitate ministerial-level discussions on important and emerging policy issues in the field of the environment, in particular Globalization and the Environment, and International Environmental Governance and U.N. Reform; (ii) to approve the programme of work and budget of UNEP for the biennium 2010-2011; and (iii) to provide guidance to UNEP on specific programmatic subjects, such as those related to International Environmental Governance, State of the Environment, Chemicals Management, Youth involvement in environmental issues, Environmental Law, and the establishment of an InterGovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. The Council/Forum will focus on two themes “Globalization and the Environment – ‘Global Crisis: National Chaos?’” and “International Environmental Governance and the United Nations Reform – ‘IEG: Help or Hindrance?’”. The Themes for the Ministerial Consultations are interrelated and will be dealt with collectively – enabling environmental governance issues to be addressed in the context of real life challenges and opportunities to meet multiple environment and development needs that are being confronted both at global and country level. A scenario note on G25/GMEF is attached in Annex B.1.1 UNEP Medium Term Strategy 2010-2011 (MTS) sets out the next phase in the evolution of UNEP as it becomes a more effective, efficient and results-focused entity meeting the expectations of its stakeholders in responding to global environmental challenges. A brief on UNEP MTS is attached in Annex B.1.2 Under the MTS, UNEP will focus its efforts on delivering on its mandate through exercising environmental leadership on six thematic priorities: Climate change; Ecosystem management; Environmental Governance; Hazardous substances; Environmental dimensions of conflicts and disasters; Resource efficiency. The growth in voluntary contributions to UNEP’s Environment Fund has been a clear expression of member states’ confidence in UNEP. In order for UNEP to deliver results in line with the increased availability of resources, the Executive Director has proposed a 2010-2011 Environment Fund budget amounting to $180.0 million. This is equivalent to an increase in the use of resources of $28.0 million over the approved budget for the 2008–2009 biennium. Of the total proposed Environment Fund budget, $162.0 million, or 90 per cent, relates to programme activities and $18.0 million, or 10 percent, to the support budget. An unedited Advance Copy of the UNEP Programme of Work 2009-10 is attached as Annex B.1.3. The Policy Dialogue is invited discuss and provide advice on UNEP’s Medium Term Strategy, 2010-2013 and Programme of Work, 2011-11 as well as preparations for UNEP Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum in Nairobi, February 2009.

AGENDA ITEM 2: REGIONAL STRATEGY FOR ASIA-PACIFIC, 2008-11
(Introduction by Ms Angela Cropper, followed by a presentation by Dr Young-Woo Park, UNEP’s Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific)

The Asia Pacific region is home to more than half the world population – 4.2 billion out of nearly 7 billion. The region accounts for over 40% of the global economy and has an estimated 70% of the global poor. Geographically it ranges from the fragile Small Island Developing States of the Pacific to populous and vast coastal/deltaic plains of South and Southeast Asia and the mountainous, landlocked countries of Central Asia. Rapidly growing populations and dynamic economies are exerting considerable pressures on environmental resources and services of the region. In a region as large and as diverse as Asia and the Pacific, UNEP recognizes the value of working at the subregional level where the commonalities of social, economic and the environment factors are strongest. There are five distinct subregions: Central Asia; Northeast Asia; South Asia; Southeast Asia; and South Pacific. All subregions have intergovernmental processes and/or institutions. The primary responsibility of the Regional Office is: ● Identification of regional and country priorities, trends and expertise; ● Linkages to regional political processes; ● Regional and country collaboration with partners/stakeholders, including identification of capacity and counterparts; ● Cooperative effort with individual countries and UNEP involvement in UN country processes. Regional delivery of communications and outreach; ● Identification of regional fundraising opportunities and implementation of regional fund raising strategies; ● Coherent regional delivery of the UNEP Programme of Work. Significant achievements have been made on the four strategic directions identified by earlier Subregional Environmental Policy Dialogue (SEPD). These strategic directions ensure decisions of the UNEP Governing Council are effectively implemented in the region, while fully taking into account regional concerns/priorities: • Promote Regional Cooperation; • Strengthen the Environment Community; • Identify and Respond to Emerging issues; and • Leadership by Example through Demonstration Projects. The regional strategy has been updated to include core functions (representation, intergovernmental fora, capacity building), and support for delivery of MTS priorities. The annual report of the Regional Office for 2008 is attached as Annex C.2.1. An updated Regional Strategy 2009-12 based on the guidance on the fifth SEPD meeting and UNEP’s MTS priorities is attached as Annex C.2.2. A brief description of 2009 activities is listed in Annex C.2.3. A presentation and paper on Moving Ahead with UNEP’s Strategic Presence in the Regions are attached as Annexes C.2.4 and C.2.5. The Meeting is requested to provide guidance on the regional strategy and its implementation.

AGENDA ITEM 3. EMERGING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
(Introduction by Ms Angela Cropper, followed by brief statements by SEPD participants)

The Asia Pacific region has the fastest growing economies and a burgeoning middle class. The region is expected to have over 600 million new middle class within the decade. Four to five decades of economic development achieved in America and Europe are compressed into one decade in the Asia and the Pacific region. Rapid economic growth is accompanied by urbanization, the changing consumption patterns, and population pressure and it is straining the environment. This rapid development is being achieved without adequate regulatory and safety measures to cope with the environmental disasters. The region has both the traditional as well as new emerging environmental issues. Traditional environmental issues include air pollution, water pollution, land degradation, and loss of biodiversity. Selected examples for new emerging environmental issues include: • Glacier Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF); • Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC); • Malé Declaration on Control and Prevention of Air Pollution and Its Likely Transboundary Effects for South Asia; and • Environment and Health. The political leadership is beginning to recognize the need for sustained growth. Sustained growth requires sustainable use of natural resources. In recent years, some governments in Asia have begun to integrate environmental and social concerns into the development process. Concepts such as Circular Economy, 3Rs (reduce, recycle, reuse), Self-sufficiency Economy, and Middle Path are gaining momentum. The environmental footprint of the region has an increasing impact on the whole planet. Asia has five active sub-regional groupings. These grouping over the years are active in the environment governance across countries of the sub-regions. Capacity for environment governance both at national and sub-regional levels will be increasingly necessary to urgently address both the traditional as well as new emerging issues. Some of the issues raised in consultations include: • • • Mainstream environment into national development planning; Promote zero waste; Address institutional (environmental institutions) strengthening issue to assure environment is on equal partner in sustainable development.

A draft strategy for Emerging Issues is enclosed in Annex D.3.1. Briefs on selected emerging issues raised is enclosed in Annex D.3.2 The Meeting is requested to take note of current issues and highlight key emerging issues to be addressed in the coming year.

NEXT MEETING
The SEPD may wish to consider dates and venue for the next Sub-regional Environmental Policy Dialogue Meeting in 2008/9.

Asia-Pacific Sub-reg c gional Environm mental Po olicy Dial logue (SEPD 6) Bangkok Thailan B k, nd 22 Janu uary 2009 Provisio onal Sea ating Arra angemen nt

12
M O N R E O f f i c i a l

1

2
Chairs

13

14
U N E P O f f i c i a l

South Pacific

South Asia

8 9

5 6 3 4

Central Asia

10 11

Northeast Asia

Southeast Asia

7

Podium

S Screen

Cha airs 1. H.E. Mr. Suwit Khunkitti, Thailand gela Cropper Deputy Ex r, xecutive 2. Ms. Ang Director, UNEP Na airobi Cen ntral Asia r. hanov, Uzbe ekistan 3. H.E . Mr Bori Alikh 4. Dr. Kana Baigarin, Kazakhstan at n Sou Asia uth hah, Nepal 5. H.E. Mr. Ganesh Sh India 6. Dr. Ashok Khosla, I Sou utheast Asia ying Dr. Sut thawan Sath hirathai, 7. Thanpuy Thailand d

South P Pacific 8. H.E. Mr. Fa aumuina Tiat Liuga, Sa tia amoa ddington, Ne Zealand ew 9. Mr. Ken Pid Northeast Asia ngxian, China 10. Mr. Xia Yin un-Kyung, Re epublic of K Korea 11. Dr. Park Eu M nd taff State Ministry an UNEP St 12. Dr. Saksit Tridech, , Permanent Secretary, Thailand Woo 13. Dr. Young-W Park, Regional Di irector, ROAP dra ha, r, 14. Mr. Surend Shresth Director Strategic R Resource M Mobilization, UNEP Nair robi

ANNEX A

SEPD5 Meeting Report
• Annex A.1:

Report of the Fifth Sub-regional Environmental Policy Dialogue, 10 December 2007, Bali, Indonesia.

D R A F T Asia-Pacific Sub-regional Environmental Policy Dialogue

D R A F T

10 December 2007 Bali, Indonesia

D R A F T Asia-Pacific Sub-regional Environmental Policy Dialogue
10 December 2007 Bali, Indonesia

1.0 Opening Session
H.E. Mr. Rachmat Witoelar, Minister of Environment, State Ministry of Environment, Indonesia, welcomed delegates to the Asia Pacific Sub-regional Environmental Policy Dialogue (SEPD) and extended the hospitality of his Ministry and the Indonesian people. In his statement, he stated that he had been closely involved with UNEP as President of the Governing Council, prior to his current role as President of the ongoing 13th Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) In his opening statement, Minister Witoelar referred to the following: • Importance of achieving sustainable development in the Asia Pacific, as a diverse and vast region rapidly developing; • Large environmental footprint of the Asia Pacific region, with planetary implications; • Focus should be on the emerging economies of the Asia Pacific region; • Need to strengthen political commitment in the region for sustainable development; • UNEP requested to take a lead role in facilitating consultations with governments, civil society and stakeholders of the region through policy dialogue platforms; • Through good communication, possibility to identify commonalities and further a common Asia Pacific view of global issues; and • UNEP’s strategic role was “Environment for Development” and that UNEP must ensure concrete support for the environment ministries and communities in the region. Minister Witoelar stated that it was opportune that SEPD was being held in conjunction with the 13th COP of the UNFCCC and the 3rd Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol. He mentioned that SEPD resulted in policy guidance for UNEP, and enabled Governments to better understand regional issues and guide the development of UNEP’s regional strategy and priorities. He also referred to enhanced partnership between Governments and Civil society organizations through the SEPD process, thereby bringing together a consolidated regional view of urgent and emerging regional priorities. Following Minister Witoelar, Dr Achim Steiner, Executive Director of UNEP, and co-chair of the meeting, delivered his opening remarks. He expressed his appreciation to Minister Witoelar, both as a friend of the environment and a friend of UNEP, to have found time to be at the SEPD in spite of his demanding role as President of the on-going COP13 of the UNFCCC. In his opening remarks, Dr. Steiner referred to the following: • Special convening power of Bali, as a place where differences were turned into constructive points of engagement. He referred to preparations for the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) as a specific example; • UNEP’s history was closely linked to Bali, with the adoption of the historic Bali Strategic Plan on Technology Support and Capacity Building; • The Nobel Peace Prize was being awarded on the same day as the SEPD - 10 December – in recognition of Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; • The world community coming together in Bali was an expression of hope and confidence that much of the future of the planet will be crafted in Bali; • Reference to the last SEPD held in Ashgabad, which was beyond any political alliance and group of nations and actors with the ability to influence decision-making for the future. This gave a higher sense of urgency; • UNEP was aspiring towards recognizing the necessity to catalyze, and to bring together all actors to meet the challenge of sustainable development; • Proud that despite limited resources, UNEP had found its place in the Asia Pacific region; • The many achievements of the Regional Office of Asia and Pacific (ROAP) could be consolidated further; and • Guidance of the SEPD was thus vital for UNEP’s enhanced regional delivery. In closing, Dr. Steiner thanked Minister Witoelar and all the Ministers and Eminent Persons participating in the SEPD.

D R A F T
2.0 Global Issues:
UNEP Medium Term Strategy 2010-2013
Dr. Achim Steiner stated that in preparations for the Governing Council and the Global Ministerial Environmental Forum (GMEF), UNEP had engaged in intensive dialogues with the Committee of the Permanent Representatives (CPR) in Nairobi, with the private sector and with the Multilateral Environmental Agreement Secretariats (MEAs) to formulate the Medium Term Strategy (MTS). Dr. Steiner stated that the MTS was meant to be a stepping stone for the future of UNEP. It did not conclude or preclude discussions of MEAs (a UNEP plus strategy), and a framework on how to make UNEP more effective. In addition, it looked at how to resource UNEP’s Bali Strategic Plan on Capacity Building and Technology Support (BSP). Dr Steiner mentioned that the UNEP Medium Term Strategy 2010-2013 set out the next phase in the evolution of UNEP as it becomes a more effective, efficient and results-focused entity in responding to global environmental challenges. This is subject to consideration and approval of the upcoming GMEF in February 2008. Another major thrust that underpins the MTS according to Dr Steiner was the BSP. The BSP focused on greater country and regional responsiveness from UNEP with focus both on the global priority process and priorities of member states. He stated that it was important for Ministers and Governments to continue to guide UNEP’s work in this context. In the area of adaptation, Dr Steiner briefed the meeting that the focus was on climate proofing the development sector. This included ecosystem resilience through a systems perspective and ecosystems management. He referred to Article 6 of the UNFCCC on public awareness and outreach, and stressed the importance of bringing forth the issues from science to local leaders and decision makers. In the area of mitigation, Dr Steiner referred to UNEP’s work on sustainable consumption and production with a focus on renewable energies and energy efficiency. UNEP, he mentioned, aimed to help countries track investment in renewable energy and lower thresholds of investment.

UNEP GMEF/Governing Council
Dr Steiner briefed the meeting that the focus of the next GMEF was on financing response to climate change. He mentioned that GMEF will assess options to leverage private sector responses and investment options. International environmental governance will also be on GMEF agenda, which relates to ongoing discussions on the UN Environmental Organization. Decisions related to UNEP’s GEO4 report, mercury, waste management, MTS, etc. will also be considered.

Discussions and Conclusion
• How UNEP delivers in the Pacific, as frontline states of Climate Change, will remain a priority, through institutions such as SPREP and USP; Recommendation to work closely with OECD and UNEP in linkages on empirical science; Need for stronger linkages between the economy and environment; Concern that UNEP’s focus on results may undermine processes involved; Challenge of providing guidance in fields such as sustainable/responsible mining etc. Importance of providing information to political and entrepreneurial leaders; Recognizing the nexus between knowledge, science and data; Multilateral organizations need interlocutors for village intelligence; UNEP has an immense opportunity for norm and standard setting.

• • • • • • • •

UNEP Thematic Priorities
Dr. Steiner highlighted six thematic priorities, as core areas of UNEP’s engagement on delivering its mandate through environmental leadership: • Climate change; • Ecosystem management; • Environmental Governance; • Hazardous substances; • Disasters and conflicts; and • Resource efficiency – sustainable consumption and production.

Climate Change
Dr Steiner mentioned that UNEP’s response to climate change differed from UNFCCC, as UNEP’s approach was based on the understanding that climate change was an environmental change, where science had brokered a political response. He explained that UNEP would continue taking science as the defining framework and help countries use the IPCC methodology in their national assessments and action plans.

Dr Steiner thanked participants for their valuable feedback. He stated that a right balance between global and regional issues was a challenge but through MTS, UNEP was committed to delivering results, best practices, guidelines and tools. He stated that UNEP was currently compiling guidance that UNEP had developed and compiling it for stakeholders to access.

D R A F T
3.0 Regional Strategy for Asia-Pacific, 2007-11 & Emerging Issues
Some of salient points of discussions included: Regional Cooperation • Key role of UNEP in providing capacity support to negotiators and application of scientific assessments using IPCCC methodology to national circumstances; • Importance of strengthening UNEP’s regional presence, so that the Regional Office can work more closely with countries to address national and sub-regional challenges; • UNEP should strengthen support to the Pacific Islands, focusing on marine life and land degradation, climate change and deforestation; • Additional inputs and stimulus for UNEP to work on the One UN (in Pakistan), whereby UNEP can be engaged in the inter-linkages between and across sectors; • Further support for mainstreaming the environment, through the UNEP and UNDP partnership; • UNEP’s engagement at regional and subregional policy dialogue fora (ECOASIA, APFED, etc) should continue; • Tremendous intellectual power through UNEP’s regional networks. The Regional Resource Centre Asia and the Pacific (RRC.AP) through its Collaborative Assessment Network (CAN) could be leveraged further, demonstrating effective capital utilization. Environment Community • UNEP should continue to prove guidelines and strengthen operationalization of the BSP; • Important role of UNEP in strengthening capacity, understanding assessment and providing technology; • To be responsive to countries and communities, the partnership between UNEP and UNDP was important and strategic; • UNEP is to be congratulated in being a leader with in engagement with Civil Society Organizations (CSO) at all levels; • UNEP should provide additional support to CSOs, and promote engagement with Govts.; • UNEP’s activities with youth in the region were appreciated and recognized as our important areas for consolidation; • Recommendation that UNEP work closely with the private sector;

Following Dr Steiner’s introduction, the Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific, Mr. Surendra Shrestha, made a presentation covering background, strategic directions, and challenges of UNEP’s activities in the Asia Pacific region. He reported on the progress the last SEPD, covering each of the four strategic directions. In a region as large and as diverse as Asia and the Pacific, Mr. Shrestha stated that UNEP recognized the value of working at the subregional level where the commonalities of social, economic and the environment factors were strongest. All subregions have intergovernmental processes and/or institutions. Mr. Shrestha highlighted the issues in each of the subregions along with priority areas. To implement the Regional Strategy over 200711, Mr Shrestha briefed the meeting on the four strategic directions, as endorsed earlier by SEPD: • Promote Regional Cooperation; • Strengthen the Environment Community; • Identify and Respond to Emerging issues; • Leadership by Example through Demonstration Projects. Four regional priority areas highlighted: • Climate Change; • Urbanization; • Mainstreaming; and • Atmospheric Brown Cloud. were also

Mr Shrestha also reiterated challenges of the Asia Pacific region, namely: Urbanization, Environment Security (Food, Water, and Energy), Environment and Development, and Delivery through Partnerships. Additional challenges outlined by Mr. Shrestha included aligning the priorities and focus of the Regional Office to UNEP’s MTS, Strategic Presence guidance and the Resource Mobilization frameworks. Another challenge and opportunity was working as One UNEP with a focus of delivery at the national, subregional and regional levels, together with UNEP’s partners in the region. Mr. Shrestha stated that there were many opportunities in the region, with new donors and alternative models for development. The challenge he stated is to forge a “Green Revolution”. Recognizing the global footprint of this region, there was a window of opportunity to make a difference, get cleaner technologies and support innovation. Mr Shrestha’s complete presentation is in Annex 1.

D R A F T
• • Include local people who are not literate and ensure that their knowledge is utilized and UNEP reaches out to them effectively; Scientific and indigenous knowledge be harmonized. • UNEP was a knowledge leader and need to document and disseminate information. Dr Steiner mentioned that UNEP’s organizational model cannot remain static. He mentioned that the organization could be restructured with better resourced regional hubs. This would apply not only to Regional Offices but also to UNEP’s global hubs, such as post conflict, disaster reduction, ecosystem services, etc. How UNEP’s global divisions can take issues to the national level and drive the agenda was a challenge, according to Dr Steiner. In this context, he referred to the successful experience with SAICM and other convention instruments. Dr Steiner recognized that Regional Offices were closer to UNEP‘s clients, and better able to manage environmental issues from the national/regional level to global level. This was based on the strong appreciation of the work carried out by ROAP, and the value of the Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific (RRC.AP). Dr Steiner mentioned that matrix management was a more intelligent way to allow regions to interface, while global divisions continue providing a knowledge base. One option was to strengthen and outpost staff from UNEP’s global divisions to Regional Resource Centres, as a cost effective means of delivery.

Emerging Issues • Risks from glacial lake outburst floods in the Hindu Kush Himalayas and looking forward to UNEP and ICIMOD’s engagement on this emerging issue; • Studies on resource efficiency and models, and the importance of economic instruments through taxation; • UNEP should continue to coordinate the efforts and assess gaps in environmental advocacy; • UNEP’s work on climate change in the region as an area of focus must continue, whereby information to political leaders can be disseminated; • No adaptation champions in the UN, provides an opportunity for UNEP especially in the context of the Asia Pacific region. Leadership by Demonstration • Appreciation for initiatives on eco-housing; • Education for Sustainable Development partnerships at Tongji University could provide model curriculum and pedagogies;

4.0

Conclusions and Close
• Strengthen SEPD, as it provides a valuable forum for inputs to UNEP’s GMEF and the delivery of the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

Minister Liuga from Samoa offered to host the next meeting of the SEPD, which was warmly welcomed by the Chair and all the participants. Some of the overall recommendations included: • Support for UNEP’s Medium Term Strategy and its priority areas; • As a leading organization, UNEP was the right place to study and discuss climate change issues; • The issue of resource efficiency was important for the Asia Pacific region given resource constraints and limited natural resources in the region; • Overall appreciation for the work of ROAP in the Asia Pacific region; • Demonstrated value of the work of the Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific (RRC.AP); • Recognition of the need to strengthen the Regional Office; • Prioritize operationalization of the Bali Strategic Plan with particular emphasis on technology transfer; • Strengthen regional CDM capacity building; • Strengthen public awareness and outreach; • Strengthen UNEP’s coordination role among the UN agencies in the environmental field;

On behalf of Dr Achim Steiner, Ms. Maryam Fuller expressed her appreciation to all delegates and also committed UNEP’s considerable interest in supporting the countries. She stated the importance of technology transfer, strengthening NGOs, and building capacity. Mr. Surendra Shrestha joined the UNEP Executive Director in expressing his appreciation for the valuable guidance, continued support in UNEP’s programme in the region. On behalf Minister Witoelar, Ibu Liana Bratasida, Assistant Minister for Global Environmental Affairs, State Ministry of Environment, Indonesia, thanked all participants for their valuable contributions, and declared the fifth meeting of the SEPD closed at 1130 hours.

ANNEX B

Agenda Item 1: Global Issues
• Annex B.1.1:

Scenario Note for 25th Session of Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum • Annex B.1.2: Proposed Biennial Programme and Support Budget for 2010-2011 • Annex B.1.3: Medium Term Strategy (MTS) 2010-2013

Scenario Note for the 25th Session of the Governing Council/ Global Ministerial Environment Forum Nairobi, 16-20 February 2009 19 December 2008 1. The present note is intended to assist delegates in preparing for the twenty-fifth session of the UNEP Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum (Council/Forum). It provides information on the objectives and expectations as regards the outcomes of the meetings and how the work of the Council/Forum is proposed to be conducted, subject to the formal approval of the Council. Detailed information on the Council/Forum is found on the website at the following address: http://www.unep.org/gc/gc25. I. 2. OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of the Council/Forum are: (i) to facilitate ministerial-level discussions on important and emerging policy issues in the field of the environment, in particular Globalization and the Environment, and International Environmental Governance and U.N. Reform; (ii) to approve the programme of work and budget of UNEP for the biennium 2010-2011; and (iii) to provide guidance to the Executive Director on specific programmatic subjects, such as those related to International Environmental Governance, State of the Environment, Chemicals Management, Youth involvement in environmental issues, Environmental Law, and the establishment of an Inter-Governmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. II. AGENDA

3.

The provisional agenda of the Council/Forum is set out in document UNEP/GC/25/1. The annotated agenda for the meeting (document UNEP/GC/25/1/Add.1) identifies the topics of discussion and the working and information documents prepared by the UNEP secretariat. The provisional draft agenda will be adopted by the Council/Forum at its first meeting on 16 February 2009, following the opening session. III. ORGANIZATION OF WORK

4.

5.

The twenty-fifth session of the Council/Forum will be held over five days, from 16 to 20 February 2009. The Council/Forum will be opened on Monday, 16 February 2009 at 10.00 a.m. and is expected to conclude on Friday, 20 February 2009 at 6.00 p.m. The work of the Council/Forum will be conducted through its Plenary, open to all delegates; Ministerial Consultation Plenary Sessions open to all delegates; ministerial-level roundtables attended by heads of delegation, each assisted by one member of delegation; and, if established, a Committee of the Whole open to all delegates and invited representatives of International Governmental Organizations and International NGOs. Meetings of the Council/Forum Plenary will be convened by the President and presided over by him/her and a member of the Bureau designated by him/her. The Council/Forum will meet in Plenary on 16 February 2009 for the ceremonial opening of the session, election of the Bureau, and adoption of the agenda. The Bureau will consist of a President, three VicePresidents and a Rapporteur from among its members. Those regional groups which have not yet provided the secretariat with the nominations for the Bureau are urged to do so as soon as possible. a. Ministerial Consultations

6.

7.

8.

The Council/Forum will focus on two themes “Globalization and the Environment – ‘Global Crisis: National Chaos?’” and “International Environmental Governance and the United Nations Reform – ‘IEG: Help or Hindrance?’”. The Themes for the Ministerial Consultations are interrelated and will be dealt with
Secretariat for Governing Bodies- P.O. Box 30552, Nairobi, Kenya Tel:(254-20) 7623411/7623431 Fax: (254-20) 7623929/7623748 E-mail: SGC.SGB @unep.org

-2-

collectively – enabling environmental governance issues to be addressed in the context of real life challenges and opportunities to meet multiple environment and development needs that are being confronted both at global and country level. 9. The consultations are expected to provide the world’s environment ministers with the opportunity to address in a comprehensive manner how to meet multiple environmental and development challenges at the country level, and to capture the opportunities that might arise to move towards a green economy; and how national and international environmental governance, including financing mechanisms, could better support such endeavours.

10. During the morning plenary meeting of the Council/Forum on Monday, 16 February 2009, the Executive Director of UNEP will make a policy statement. 11. The Council/Forum will thereafter consider the subjects of “Globalization and the Environment – ‘Global Crisis: National Chaos?’” and “International Environmental Governance and the United Nations Reform – ‘IEG: Help or Hindrance?’” through a number of plenary/panel sessions and roundtables to provide ministers and heads of delegation with opportunities for substantive debate and direct interaction. The outcome of the Ministerial Consultations is proposed to be a message from the world’s environment ministers to the international community and the UN system, of the central importance of meeting multiple environmental and development challenges and capturing opportunities to move towards a ‘green economy’. 12. The opening session of the Ministerial Consultations on Monday afternoon, 16 February 2009, will set the scene and will have the title “Global crisis: national chaos? -- The nature and scale of current environment and development challenges and opportunities”. 13. The plenary discussion will resume on Tuesday morning, 17 February 2009 on “Global crisis: national chaos? -- Towards a ‘Green Economy’”. On Wednesday morning, the Ministerial Consultation session will involve the panel discussion in the Plenary on “Global crisis: national chaos? – Coping with multiple challenges and capturing opportunities”. On Thursday morning, 19 February 2009, the panel discussion in the Plenary will focus on “IEG – Help or hindrance? – IEG from a country perspective”. 14. The Ministerial roundtables will take place on 17 and 19 February 2009. Three parallel ministerial roundtables will be supported by a facilitator and by three Ministers (two co-Chairs and one Rapporteur) for each session. The sessions will be closed and each delegation to the Ministerial roundtables will include the Head plus one member of each delegation. Environment Ministers will be joined by a small number of high-level invitees such as heads of United Nations agencies, Ministers from other sectors, and business and civil society leaders. Each roundtable report will be developed in the form of possible messages for inclusion in the President’s Summary to be relayed to the UN system, to governments, the business community, and civil society. 15. Rapporteurs from plenary/panels and respective roundtables will convene each day to synthesize messages coming from their discussions. The reports/messages from the plenary sessions and roundtables consolidated each day will be presented in the Synthesis Plenary Session on Thursday late afternoon, 19 February 2009, by 3 Rapporteurs to be chosen amongst the 6 Rapporteurs of the roundtables. 16. The consolidated report/messages will result in a Conference Room Paper (CRP), as developed by the Rapporteurs, and will form the basis for subsequent preparation of the draft report of the President on the Ministerial Consultations. The President’s summary will be formally presented to the plenary meeting on Friday, 20 February 2009, and will succinctly and faithfully reflect the main points/messages made by delegations. b. Sessional Committees 17. As in previous Council/Forum sessions, it is expected that the Council/Forum at the opening plenary meeting will establish sessional committees, including a Committee of the Whole and a Drafting Group. 18. The Committee of the Whole (COW), if established, will commence its work in the afternoon of Monday, 16 February 2009. The COW will consider UNEP’s Programme of Work and Budget for 2010-2011. The COW will also address substantive topics, in accordance with the Provisional Agenda of the Council/Forum. A detailed calendar of the COW work will be agreed during its first session and made immediately available as a Conference-Room Paper. The COW may establish working group(s) to address

-3-

specific issues of concern to delegates. As in previous sessions, it is envisaged that the COW may establish a working group on the Programme of Work and Budget for 2010-2011 and a working group on Chemicals/Mercury. 19. The Drafting Group is expected to begin its work on Tuesday morning, 17 February 2009 to consider draft decisions, prepared by the CPR and those which may be submitted by members of the Council. 20. The report of the COW and any draft decisions will be adopted by the Plenary meeting on Friday, 20 February 2009. IV. PRE-SESSION EVENTS

21. Informal consultations with the Regional Groups will be held on Sunday, 15 February 2009, i.e. the day before the opening of the session. 22. The Council/Forum will be preceded by the tenth Global Civil Society Forum, attended by representatives of non-governmental and civil society organizations, on 14 and 15 February 2009. Held regularly since 2000, the Forum serves to enable Major Groups and Civil Society Organizations to interact with Governments on the issues on the agenda of the Council/Forum. A limited number of Forum representatives will also participate in the intergovernmental deliberations at the Council/Forum. 23. Another pre–session event on Sunday 15 February will be the meeting of the Network of Women Ministers and Leaders for the Environment (NWMLE). The meeting will discuss the themes under consideration of the 25th GC/GMEF from a gender point of view and decide on a list of concrete priority actions that the international community and individual governments need to address in order to improve the lives of women and men. V. SPECIAL EVENTS, EXHIBITIONS AND EXCURSION

24. The UNEP secretariat has organized special events in collaborations with partners on key topical issues related to the themes of the Ministerial consultations. These events will be held during the lunch hours every day from Monday, 16 February, to Friday, 20 February 2009. Details of these events are available on the website and on the Provisional Timetable, as well as in the Journal on a daily basis. 25. Several environmentally-focused exhibitions in form of audio visual materials and posters will be ongoing throughout the duration of the Council/Forum. 26. A field excursion has been organized for interested delegates to visit Olkaria geothermal plant in the Rift Valley.

UNITED NATIONS

EP
UNEP/GC/25/X Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme
Distr.: General XX December 2008 Original: English

Twenty-fifth session of the Governing Council/ Global Ministerial Environment Forum Nairobi, X–X February 2009 Item X of the provisional agenda∗ Programme, the Environment Fund and administrative and other budgetary matters

Proposed biennial programme and support budgets for 2010–2011
Report of the Executive Director

Summary
The present report reviews the likely availability of resources in the Environment Fund in the biennium 2010–2011, in the light of which the biennial programme and support budgets are proposed for 2010–2011.

* UNEP/GC.25/1.

Contents: Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... I II SUGGESTED ACTION BY THE GOVERNING COUNCIL.................................................. RESOURCE FRAMEWORK..................................................................................................... A. Executive summary.............................................................................................................. 1. Financial overview........................................................................................................ 2. Changes in posts ........................................................................................................... B. Environment Fund – Budget proposals ............................................................................... 1. Voluntary contributions to the Environment Fund ...................................................... 2. Use of Environment Fund resources ............................................................................ 3. Financial reserve ........................................................................................................... III PROPOSED SUPPORT BUDGET ............................................................................................ IV PROPOSED PROGRAMME OF WORK & BUDGET ............................................................ A. Overview of UNEP activities............................................................................................... B. Overall orientation .............................................................................................................. C. Proposed Programme Budget .............................................................................................. D. Subprogramme narratives .................................................................................................... 1. Climate change ................................................................................................................ 2. Disasters and conflicts .................................................................................................... 3. Ecosystems management ................................................................................................ 4. Environmental governance ............................................................................................. 5. Harmful substances and hazardous waste ....................................................................... 6. Resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and production ............................... V OPERATIONAL STRUCTURE ................................................................................................

Page 1 2 4 4 4 7 8 8 9 11 12 16 16 16 20 23 23 31 35 40 47 53 59

ANNEXES Annexes referred to in the document Annex I Estimated distribution of Environment Fund resources by expenditure category ............................................................................................................... Annex II Estimated distribution of support budget posts by source of funds and organizational unit............................................................................................... Annex III Legislative mandates ........................................................................................... Additional budget related annexes Annex IV Trust fund estimates by organizational unit and expenditure category.............. Annex V 2010–2011 projected expenditure by subprogramme for trust funds directly supporting the UNEP programme of work ......................................................... Annex VI Earmarked contributions by expenditure category and subprogramme............. Annex VII Trust fund support estimates by organizational unit and expenditure category ............................................................................................................... Annex VIII Proposed trust fund support budget and staffing table for 2010–2011 .............. Annex IX United Nations regular budget estimates by organizational unit and expenditure category ........................................................................................... Other Annexes

66 67 70 76

77 82 83 84 85

ii

Annex X Annex XI Annex XII

Terms ................................................................................................................... Methodology for preparation of the biennial support budget............................. Implementation of the comments and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) on the proposed programme and support budget of UNEP for the biennium 2010–2011...........................................................................................

86 88

90

FIGURES I Use of total resources, 2010–2011....................................................................................... II Environment Fund estimates for 2010–2011 ...................................................................... TABLES 1. Resource plan - approved 2008–2009 and proposed 2010–2011 ....................................... 2. Regular Budget, Environment Fund, Trust Fund trust fund support and Counterpart contribution : estimated biennial programme and support budget...................................... 3. Staffing by source of fund and category.............................................................................. 4. Estimated distribution of Support Budget posts by source of funds and category............ 5. The Environment Fund: Support budget estimate by organizational unit .......................... 6. Estimated programme resources by source of funds, sub programme and expenditure category ................................................................................................................................ 7. Estimated distribution of programme posts by source of funds..........................................

4 6 5 10 11 13 14 21 22

iii

Abbreviations
ABS ADB AfDB AIACC APEC APN AU CARE CBD CCI CDM CEB CGIAR CIFOR CITES CMS DDT DevTV DHI DTIE EA EMG ENB ESCO EU FAO GC GCOS GCSS GEF GEO GEOS GMO GOOS GRID GTOS IADB IAI IAS ICIMOD ICMM ICRAF ICTP IEA IGO ILO ILTER IMO IOMC IPBES IPCC IPM ISDR Access and Benefit Sharing Asian Development Bank African Development Bank Assessments of Impacts and Adaptation to Climate Change Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research African Union CARE International Convention on Biological Diversity Canadian Conservation Institute Clean Development Mechanism Chief Executive Board Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research Center for International Forestry Research Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and flora Convention on Migratory Species Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethane Producer of news items and documentaries about development issues Danish Hydraulic Institute Division of Technology, Industry and Economics Expected Accomplishments Environmental Management Group Earth Negotiations Bulletin Energy Service Companies European Union Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Governing Council Global Climate Observing System Governing Council Special Session Global Environment Facility Global Environment Outlook Global Earth Observing Systems Genetically Modified Organisms Global Ocean Observing System Global Resource Information Database Global Terrestrial Observing System Inter-American Development Bank Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research Invasive Alien Species International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development International Council on Mining and Metals The International Centre for Research in Agroforestry International Centre for Theoretical Physics International Energy Agency Inter-Governmental Organizations International Labour Organization International Long-Term Ecosystem Research Network International Maritime Organization Inter-organization Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals Inter-Governmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystems Services Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Integrated Pest Management International Strategy for Disaster Reduction

iv

IUCN IUPAC IW:LEARN IWRM KM:LAND LADA LDC LULUCF MEA MTS NCAR NCPC NEPAD NGO NIP OECD POP PoW QSP R&D RAMSAR REDD SAICM SCOPE SCP SEI SETAC SIDS SME START TEMATEA TERI TerrAfrica TVE TWAS UCC Water UNCCA UNCCD UNCG UNCT UN Habitat UNDAF UNDESA UNDG UNDP UNEP UNESCO UNFCCC UNHCR UNICEF UNIDO UNITAR UNOCHA UNODC UNU

World Conservation Union International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry International Waters: Learning Exchange and Resource Network Integrated Water Resources Management Knowledge Management: Land Initiative Land Degradation Assessment in the Drylands Least Developed Countries Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry Multilateral Environmental Agreement Medium Term Strategy National Center for Atmospheric Research National Cleaner Production Centre New Partnership for Africa’s Development Non-governmental Organizations National Implementation Plan Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Persistent Organic Pollutant Programme of Work Quick Start Programme Research and Development Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment Sustainable Consumption and Production Stockholm Environment Institute Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Small Island Developing States Small and Medium Sized Enterprise global change System for Analysis, Research and Training Issue-Based Modules for Coherent Implementation of Biodiversity Related Conventions The Energy Research Institute A partnership that aims to address land degradation in Sub-Saharan Africa Television Trust for the Environment The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World UNEP Collaborating Center on Water and Environment United Nations Common Country Assessment United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification UN Communications Group United Nations Country Team United Nations Human Settlements Programme United Nations Development Assistance Framework United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs United Nations Development Group United Nations Development Programme United Nations Environment Programme United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change United Nations High Commission for Refugees United Nations Children’s Fund United Nations Industrial Development Organization United Nations Institute for Training and Research United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime United Nations University

v

UNWTO WCMC WHO WMO WTO WWF

United Nations World Tourism Organization World Conservation Monitoring Centre World Health Organization World Meteorological Organization World Trade Organization World Wide Fund for Nature

vi

Introduction

The UNEP Governing Council in its decision SS.X/3 authorized the Executive Director to use the Medium-term Strategy 2010-2013 (MTS) in formulating this programme of work and budget document. Consequently, Section IV introduces six new subprogrammes in line with the six cross-cutting thematic priorities of the MTS. This programme of work and budget contributes towards realizing the UNEP vision, as articulated in the MTS, to be the leading global environmental authority that sets the global environmental agenda, that promotes the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of sustainable development with in the United Nations system, and that serves as an authoritative advocate for the global environment. This document constitutes a major step forward in: delivering on the Bali Strategic Plan; further embracing UNEP’s role as the environment programme of the United Nations; ensuring UNEP’s interventions are founded on sound science; and making the transition to becoming a fully results-based organization, through the programmatic realignment in line with the MTS. As a knowledge organisation, it is essential for UNEP to provide credible thematic leadership in each of the six new subprogrammes. While the organisation builds on its current expertise, this shift requires a significant change management effort, in addition to a number of new programme posts. UNEP is also strengthening its line management functions based on recommendations of oversight bodies. In this context it is recalled that UNEP has management responsibility for the secretariats of 7 multilateral environmental agreements and 6 regional seas conventions. In accordance with rules 210.1–210.5 of the Financial Rules of the Fund of the United Nations Environment Programme, the Executive Director submits herewith the proposed biennial programme and support budget for the biennium 2010–2011. [The proposal was submitted to the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions for examination and comments and the Advisory Committee’s report is contained in document UNEP/GC/25/XX/XX.] [The proposed budget has been prepared in line with the harmonized budget format, as recommended by the Advisory Committee in its report (UNEP/GC.21/6/Add.1) and as requested by the Governing Council in its decision 21/31.] The present budget document follows the formats endorsed by the Governing Council in decisions 21/31 and 22/20. Accordingly, the financial framework of UNEP is broken down by all sources of funding, that is, the United Nations regular budget, the Environment Fund, trust funds, trust fund support and earmarked contributions. Annex X to the present document contains a list of terms and their definitions developed in line with the harmonized format. Annex XI contains an explanation of the methodology applied in calculation of the budget estimates, which was also prepared in accordance with the harmonized format. [Annex XII] provides details of implementation by UNEP of the comments and recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions on the budget for 2010–2011.

1

I.

SUGGESTED ACTION BY THE GOVERNING COUNCIL
The Governing Council may wish to adopt a decision along the following lines: The Governing Council, Having considered the proposed biennial programme and support budgets for 2010–2011 and the related report of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, 1. Approves the programme of work for the biennium 2010–2011 taking into account the relevant decisions of the Governing Council; 2. Approves appropriations for the Environment Fund in the amount of 180 million United States dollars for the purposes indicated below:

2010 – 2011 biennial programme and support budgets (in thousands of United States dollars)

Programme of work & Thematic Sub Programme Climate Change Disaster and Conflicts Ecosystem management Environmental Governance Harmful Substances and Hazardous waste Resource Efficiency Fund Programme Activities Fund programme reserve Total Programme Resources Support budget Grand total

Proposed Budget 28,767 10,087 33,987 40,229 17,985 24,945 156,000 6,000 162,000 18,000 180,000

3. Welcomes the extensive consultations between the Executive Director and the Committee of Permanent Representatives in preparing the draft budget and programme of work for the biennium 2010–2011 and requests the Executive Director to continue such consultations for the preparation of each biennial budget and programme of work; 4. Approves the proposed staffing tables under the Environment Fund biennial support budget for 2010–2011 as set forth in Section III; 5. Authorizes the Executive Director, with a view to ensuring better conformity with the practices in other United Nations bodies, to reallocate resources between budget lines up to a maximum of 10 per cent of the appropriation to which the resources are reallocated; 6. Requests that, should the Executive Director need to reallocate funds in excess of 10 per cent and up to 20 per cent of an appropriation, he does so in consultation with the Committee of Permanent Representatives; 7. Authorizes the Executive Director to enter into forward commitments not exceeding 20 million United States dollars for Fund programme activities for the biennium 2010–2011; 8. Requests the Executive Director to keep Governments specifically informed, through the Committee of Permanent Representatives on a half-yearly basis and the Governing Council at its regular and special sessions, of the execution of the budget of the Environment Fund, including

2

voluntary contributions and expenditures, and reallocations of the appropriations or adjustments of the allocations; 9. Also requests the Executive Director to ensure that earmarked contributions to the United Nations Environment Programme, apart from those for which the United Nations Environment Programme merely acts as treasurer, are used to fund activities which are in line with the programme of work; 10. Calls for an allocation of an appropriate share of the United Nations regular budget to the United Nations Environment Programme; 11. Notes that an increase in funding from the United Nations regular budget for the United Nations Environment Programme in the biennium 2010–2011 would decrease the requirement under the Environment Fund biennial support budget, thereby releasing resources which should be reallocated for the programme activities or the Environment Fund financial reserve; 12. Reiterates the need for stable, adequate and predictable financial resources for the United Nations Environment Programme and, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 2997 (XXVII) of 15 December 1972, which underlined the need to consider the adequate reflection of all the administrative and management costs of the Environment Programme in the context of the United Nations regular budget, looks forward to the implementation of the requests of the General Assembly to the United Nations Secretary-General to keep the resource needs of the United Nations Environment Programme and the United Nations Office at Nairobi under review, so as to permit the delivery, in an effective manner, of necessary services to the United Nations Environment Programme and the other United Nations organs and organizations in Nairobi;

3

II.
A.

RESOURCE FRAMEWORK
Executive summary
1. Financial Overview

1. Table 1 shows the resources available and their proposed uses for the biennial programme of work and support budget, which have been prepared on estimated resources of $476.4 million (which excludes $17.5 million for reimbursement of services), of which $61.2 million is projected as the opening balance as at 1 January 2010. The estimated resources represent $13.8 million in United Nations regular budget resources (including $1.3 million for UNSCEAR), $184 million in Environment Fund resources, $188.7 million in trust funds, $13.2 million in trust fund support and $76.7 million in earmarked contributions. 2. The projected use of total resources for the 2010–2011 biennium of $434.1 million (which excludes $16.8 million for reimbursement of services) represents a net increase of $143.2 million over the approved 2008–2009 budget. The change in the use of resources is attributable to a projected increase in expenditure from the Environment Fund of $28.0 million; $86.5 million from the Trust Funds; $2.7 million from Trust fund Support and $26.0 million from Earmarked Contributions The largest portion of the total budget, $397.8 million or 91.7per cent, is expended on programme activities. The remaining $36.3million or 8.3per cent is expended on the Executive function, which includes support to the policy-making organs, and the overall management & administration of the organisation (see Figure 1). Figure I: Use of total resources 2010–2011

Support budget $36.3 million 8.3% Executive Function $10.9 million 2.5% Management and Administration $25.4 million 5.8%

Fund Programme reserve $6 million 1.4%

Programme resources $397.8 million 91.7%

Programme activities $391.8 million 90.3%

4

Table 1. Resource plan - approved 2008-2009 and proposed 2010-2011 (in millions of USD) Budget for 2008-2009 as approved by the Governing Council at its 24th session UN regular budget 4 Amount 13.8 13.8 13.8 Environment Fund 1 Amount 3.3 152.0 2.0 157.3 157.3 Trust fund support 3 Amount 7.8 7.9 0.5 16.2 12.8 29.0 UN regular budget 4 Amount 13.8 13.8 13.8 Environment Fund 1 Amount 4.0 180.0 184.0 184.0

Proposed budget for 2010-2011 Trust fund support 3 Amount 1.8 10.9 0.5 13.2 17.5 30.7

Resources available Opening balance Income Contributions Other Subtotal Reimbursement for services Total resources Use of total resources Programme resources

Trust funds 2 Amount 36.2 65.0 1.4 102.6 102.6

Earmarked contributions2 Amount 21.7 38.0 59.7 59.7

Total resources Amount 69.0 276.7 3.9 349.6 12.8 362.4

%

Trust funds 2 Amount 44.7 144.0 188.7 188.7

Earmarked contributions2 Amount 10.7 66.0 76.7 76.7

Total resources Amount 61.2 414.7 0.5 476.4 17.5 493.9

%

Programme of Work 7.8 130.0 75.3 40.0 253.1 87.0 7.8 156.0 162.0 66.0 391.8 90.3 Fund programme reserve 6.0 6.0 2.1 6.0 6.0 1.4 Total programme resources 7.8 136.0 75.3 40.0 259.1 89.2 7.8 162.0 162.0 66.0 397.8 91.7 Support budget Executive Function 4.4 6.3 10.8 3.7 4.4 6.5 10.9 2.5 Management and adm. 1.6 9.7 0.4 9.4 21.0 7.2 1.6 11.5 0.2 12.1 25.4 5.8 Total support budget 6.0 16.0 0.4 9.4 31.8 10.9 6.0 18.0 0.2 12.1 36.3 8.3 Subtotal 13.8 152.0 75.7 9.4 40.0 290.9 100.0 13.8 180.0 162.2 12.1 66.0 434.1 100.0 Reimbursement for services 15.8 15.8 16.8 16.8 Total use of resources 13.8 152.0 75.7 25.2 40.0 306.7 13.8 180.0 162.2 28.8 66.0 450.8 Estimated closing balance 5.3 26.9 3.8 19.7 55.7 4.0 26.5 1.9 10.7 43.1 Notes: 1: The Environment Fund represents the regular resources of UNEP. 2: Trust funds and earmarked contributions exclude Multilateral Environment Agreements (MEAs) including the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol and GEF. 3: Under "Trust Fund Support": "support budget'' refers to direct support, "Management and administration" refers to resources for administrative support to trust funds supporting UNEP's programme of work , and `Reimbursement for services refer to administrative and programme support provided to trust funds related to MEAs including Multilateral Fund. 4: 2008-2009 regular budget has been adjusted to reflect what has been approved & allocated by UN headquarters. .

5

3. United Nations regular budget: During the biennium 2008-2009 the United Nations regular budget contribution to UNEP stands at $13.8 million - including $1.3 million for the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), leaving $12.5 million for UNEP. However, the United Nations regular budget funding of $1.3 million to cover meetings of the UNEP Governing Council is provided under section 2, “General Assembly affairs and conference”, and is thus not included in the UNEP financial framework. 4. UNEP will submit to United Nations Headquarters a proposal for increased United Nations regular budget funding for 2010-2011. However, since the United Nations regular budget is subject to the approval of the General Assembly at its sixty fourth session, the 2010-2011 amounts are provisional. No cost adjustments have been applied to this part of the resource plan for 2010-2011, as this will be done at United Nations Headquarters at the time of the adoption of the budget by the Assembly. 5. Environment Fund: In its decision 24/9, the Governing Council requested the Executive Director to prepare an Environment Fund Programme Activities budget for 2010-2011 amounting to $140.0 million excluding the Fund Programme Reserve and the Support Budget. Since then voluntary contributions to the Environment Fund have significantly increased, and available funds for the biennium 2008-2009 are expected to exceed the total appropriation for 2008-2009 of $152.0 million. As of 1 August 2008, UNEP anticipates contributions of $167.0 million for the biennium 2008-2009. 6. The growth in voluntary contributions to the Environment Fund is a clear expression of member states’ confidence in UNEP. In order for UNEP to deliver results in line with the increased availability of resources, the Executive Director therefore proposes a 2010-2011 Environment Fund budget amounting to $180.0 million for the biennium. This will include an Environment Fund Programme Activities budget costed at $156.0 million, the Environment Fund Programme Reserve of $6.0 million, and the Environment Fund Support Budget of $18.0 million. This is equivalent to an increase in the use of resources of $28.0 million over the approved budget for the 2008–2009 biennium. Of the total proposed Environment Fund budget, $162.0 million, or 90 per cent, relates to programme activities and $18.0 million, or 10 percent, to the support budget (see figure II). 7. By decision 24/9, the Governing Council approved an appropriation of $6.0 million for the Fund Programme Reserve for the biennium 2008–2009. UNEP suggests that this be maintained at the same level for the biennium 2010-2011. Figure II. Environment Fund estimates for 2010–2011

Support budget $18 million 10%

Management and administration $11.5 million 6.4%

Executive Function $6.5 million 3.6%

Fund Programme reserve, $6.0 million 3.3%

Programme resources $162.0 million 90%

Programmes Activities, $156.0 million 86.7%

8. Implementation of the Environment Fund budget requires voluntary contributions of $180.0 million for the period 2010-2011 (see Table 1), which represents an increase of $28.0 million, or 18 per cent, over the originally estimated 2008–2009 voluntary contributions of $152.0 million. However due to a higher trend noted

6

in contributions for the period 2008-2009 the Executive Director is confident of realising the 180.0 million in voluntary contributions for the biennium 2010-2011. 9. The Executive Director releases funding based on updated contribution projections, and adjusts actual allocations to subprogrammes, in consultation with the Committee of Permanent Representatives, if funding levels change. 10. Trust funds and earmarked contributions: These are sources of funds that directly support the UNEP programme of work. Trust funds and earmarked contributions related to multilateral environmental agreements, including the Multilateral Fund for the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, and the Global Environment Facility are not included in this resource plan. However, Section IV presents the complementarity of GEF-funded outputs with those of the UNEP programme of work. In 2010– 2011, the projected use of Trust Fund resources will increase to $162.2 million from $75.7 million and the earmarked contributions will increase to $66.0 million from $40.0 million as shown in Table 1. 11. The projected increase of $86.5million in trust fund resources are combined with accumulated surpluses in these funds, and are progressively aligned with the six subprogrammes. The increase in the earmarked contributions is a result of the expected normal growth in that area of support. The utilization of these resources during the biennium is based on an improved programme implementation rate. 12. A considerable amount of the 2010–2011 estimated resources is not covered by long-term agreements or confirmed pledges thus making it difficult at the time of formulation of the programme budget to estimate the volume of trust funds and earmarked contributions. The Committee of Permanent Representatives is continuously kept abreast, however, on the status of trust funds and earmarked budget estimates through its regular reports and meetings. 13. Trust fund support budget: In accordance with the United Nations Financial Regulations and Rules, UNEP generally charges a 13 percent programme support cost on actual expenditures of trust funds and earmarked contributions. There are exceptions when a programme support cost is charged at a lower level. Such exceptions include the Technical Cooperation Trust Fund for UNEP Implementation of Activities Funded by the United Nations Foundation through the United Nations Fund for International Partnerships (UNFIP); the Technical Cooperation Trust Fund for UNEP Implementation of the Multilateral Fund Activities; and trust funds for projects supported by the European Commission. UNEP closely monitors inter-agency discussions that strive to harmonize programme support cost policies and rates across the United Nations System. 14. For 2010–2011, UNEP expects that total trust fund support resources of $13.2 million (including a projected opening balance of $1.8 million as at 1 January 2010) will be available. Trust fund support costs charged to trust funds for other activities, such as those related to multilateral environmental agreements, are shown under “Reimbursement for services”. As to the use of trust fund support resources for 2010–2011, $12.1 million is allocated to the administration of trust funds directly supporting the UNEP programme of work. This includes $4.5 million under administrative support directly allocated to offices away from UNEP headquarters in Nairobi (except for the two UNEP partnerships administration officers and one local level post located at UNEP headquarters) which administer some of the trust fund resources as follows: the Division of Technology, Industry and Economics offices in Paris, Geneva and Osaka, and the Post-Conflict and Disaster Management Branch in Geneva. The remaining $7.6 million is allocated to the financial management and administration services costs which have been moved back to UNEP, into the Corporate Services Section in Nairobi and the Administrative Service Centre in Geneva, which were previously located in the United Nations Office at Nairobi. 2. Changes in posts

15. Since the approval of the 2008-2009 budget in February 2007, UNEP has undertaken, in close cooperation with the Human Resources Management Section (HRMS/UNON) and UNEP Divisions and Offices, a thorough review of divisional staffing tables and staff posts as contained in the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) which among other purposes serves as the tool used by the UN Secretariat, including UNEP to track established staff posts within the organization. The overall purpose of the review exercise is to ensure that the staff post information contained in IMIS tallies with the actual number of programme posts under the Environment Fund as reflected in the documents presented to the Governing Council and against which UNEP’s performance on human resources is being measured by the SecretaryGeneral. 16. Table 3 shows an estimated total staffing requirement of 652 core posts (under the 100 series) for the biennium 2010 – 2011 under the Support Budget and Programme Budget. The requirement represents an overall increase of 55 posts (5 professional and 50 Local Level posts) compared to the biennium 2008 - 2009. This is reflected by an increase of 88 posts (58 professional and 30 Local Level) under the Environment Fund,

7

a decrease of 38 posts under Trust Funds due to realignment of contract types with funding sources, an increase of 2 posts under Earmarked Contributions and an increase of 3 posts under the Trust Fund Support. 17. The increase of 88 posts under the Environment Fund is reflected by an increase of 66 posts under the Programme Budget and 22 posts under the Support Budget for the Executive Function and Management & Administration. 18. These increases in Environment Fund posts during the biennium 2008 – 2009 are primarily due to the following reasons: Programme of Work a) an upwards adjustment of the actual number of Environment Fund posts based on the above-mentioned review of IMIS with a view to regularizing appointments made in previous biennia. b) a series of organisational restructurings in response to the UNEP reform process, including the MTS and the transition to becoming a fully results-based organization. c) the strengthening of UNEP’s programmatic capacity to begin addressing the six cross-cutting thematic priorities as identified in the MTS (within the context of the approved programme of work for 2008-2009). d) the strengthening of UNEP’s presence in the regions Executive Function and Management and Administration a) strengthening of UNEP’s operational and management capacities, through 4 professional posts in linemanagement functions, particularly in corporate services, quality assurance, and resource mobilization. b) the return of corporate financial management functions to UNEP from UNON in January 2008 and the subsequent strengthening of UNEP’s corporate services resulted in a total of 18 posts (7 professional and 11 local level) with funding reflected under the Environment Fund. The transfer of posts from UNON to UNEP has also resulted in a reduction of contributions to UNON as highlighted under Table 4 and is therefore budget neutral. 19. The primary changes in posts under other sources of funding are as a result of improved programme support provided to projects funded by these sources of funds, particularly with the increasing responsiveness of UNEP to country needs, and UNEP’s cooperation with country-based agencies such as UNDP. 20. In addition to the above-mentioned core posts, UNEP employs staff against project posts (under 200 series) with contracts of fixed duration and linked to the length of a given project. Staff recruited against project posts implement technical cooperation activities and are not engaged in the implementation of the core activities of the organization. The number of project staff fluctuates depending on the number of projects under implementation at any given time. Appointments against project posts are made without any expectation of extension or renewal beyond the duration of the project for which the staff member is employed. As at 1 August 2008, UNEP had 115 staff employed against project posts.

B.

Environment fund – budget proposals

1.

Voluntary contributions to the Environment Fund

21. Maintaining the liquidity of the Environment Fund is of paramount importance. Timely pledging and payment of voluntary contributions by Governments is critical for sound strategic planning, efficient and effective programme delivery. 22. Considering the current voluntary contributions trends in 2008, UNEP is confident that total voluntary contributions can be raised to meet or exceed the budgetary requirements for 2010-2011, which constitute a eight percent increase over projected voluntary contributions for 2008-2009 of $167.0 million (as of 1 August 2008). 23. In decision 24/9, the Governing Council requested Governments to make pledges of their future voluntary contributions to the Environment Fund at least one year in advance of the year to which they relate and, if possible, on a multi-year basis. Furthermore, the Council urged Governments to pay their voluntary contributions before the year to which they relate or at the latest at the beginning of the year to which they relate. 24. As has been the practice in past years, and with support from the UN Board of Auditors, it is proposed to write off voluntary contributions outstanding for more than four years (prior to February 2009). As at 31

8

July 2008 despite the extensive follow-up efforts, the pledged voluntary contributions remaining outstanding for 2003 and 2004 amounted to $ 31,544. 2. Use of Environment Fund resources

25. The Environment Fund provides for core executive, management & administration, and operational functions of the organisation, statutory requirements as well as for the core programmatic expertise and implementation of the activities for the six subprogrammes. This is augmented by resources from regular budget, trust funds, earmarked contributions and trust funds support. 26.. The total proposed Environment Fund budget for 2010–2011 amounts to $180.0 million, consisting of $156.0 million for Fund programme activities, $6.0 million for the Fund programme reserve, $6.5 million for the Executive Function and $11.5 million for Management and Administration of the organization. A summary of the Environment Fund budget by appropriation line prepared in accordance with the harmonised budget is contained in Table 2 below. 27. Of the Environment Fund resources, $116.3 million (64.6 per cent) is allocated to posts and other staff costs as shown in Annex I. The remaining $63.7 million (35.4 per cent) is allocated to non-post items, mainly the delivery of results through implementation and contractual services, consultants, meeting support and travel, general operating expenses (e.g., telecommunications, rental, supplies, etc.), reimbursements to the United Nations Office at Nairobi, and other expenditures.

9

Table 2. Regular Budget, Environment Fund, Trust Fund, Trust fund support and Earmarked Contribution : estimated biennial programme and support budget (In thousands of US Dollars) 2010-2011 Regular Budget Programme of Work Estimates 1) Climate Change 2) Disaster and Conflicts 3) Ecosystem management 4) Environmental Governance 5) Harmful Substances and Hazardous waste 6) Resource Efficiency Total Programme of Work Fund programme reserve Total programme resources Support budget Executive Function Management and administration Total support budget 7,788 1,108 439 2,126 3,265 440 410 7,788 % 8.0 3.2 15.3 23.7 3.2 3.0 56.4 56.4 Proposed estimates 28,767 10,087 33,987 40,229 17,985 24,945 156,000 6,000 162,000 % 16.0 5.6 18.9 22.3 10.0 13.9 86.7 3.3 90.0 Estimates 27,919 32,981 23,700 27,834 27,666 21,900 162,000 162,000 % 17.2 20.3 14.6 17.2 17.1 13.5 99.9 99.9 Estimates % Environment Fund Trust Fund Trust fund supportt Earmarked Contribution % 30.3 6.1 4.5 13.6 15.2 30.3 100.0 100.0 Total Grand total estimates 77,794 47,507 62,813 80,328 56,091 67,255 391,788 6,000 397,788.0

Estimates 20,000 4,000 3,000 9,000 10,000 20,000 66,000 66,000

% 17.9 11.0 14.5 18.5 12.9 15.5 90.3 1.4 91.7

4,449 1,560 6,009

32.2 11.3 43.6

6,456 11,544 18,000

3.6 6.4 10.0

200 200

0.1 0.1

12,058 12,058

100.0 100.0

-

-

10,905 25,362 36,267 434,055

2.5 5.8 8.3

Total by organisational units Established posts Management, administrative and support posts Programme-related posts Non-post items Total by expenditure category

13,797

100.0

180,000

100.00

162,200

100.0

12,058

100.0

66,000

100.0

100.0

5,308 7,294 1,195 13,797

38.5 52.9 8.7 100.0

10,235 104,602 65,163 180,000

5.7 58.1 36.2 100.0

200 6,662 155,338 162,200

0.1 4.1 95.8 100.0

6,900

57.2 -

8,994 57,006 66,000

13.6 86.4 100.0

22,643 127,552 283,860 434,055

5.2 29.4 65.4 100.0

5,158 12,058

42.8 100.0

10

Table 3 : Total staffing by sources of fund and category 2008-2009
UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked Contributions Trust fund support related to programme Total

USG/ ASG
1 1 2

D-2
3 3 6

D-1
1 26 1 28

P-5
8 36 8 1 53

P-4
10 74 10 1 2 97

P-3
5 61 13 8 5 92

P-2/1
2 23 21 16 2 64

Total
30 224 52 27 9 342

L-L
17 203 12 9 14 255

Total
47 427 64 36 23 597

2010-2011
UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked Contributions Trust fund support related to programme Total

USG/ ASG
1 1 2

D-2
3 5 8

D-1
1 33 2 36

P-5
8 57 2 2 69

P-4
10 86 4 1 1 102

P-3
5 71 2 7 7 92

P-2/1
2 29 2 3 2 38

Total
30 282 10 15 10 347

L-L
17 233 16 23 16 305

Grand Total
47 515 26 38 26 652

Change
UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked Contributions Trust fund support related to programme Total

USG/ ASG
-

D-2
2 2

D-1
7 1 8

P-5
21 (6) 1 16

P-4
12 (6)

P-3
10 (11) (1)

P-2/1
6 (19) (13) (26)

Total
58 (42) (12) 1 5

L-L
30 4 14 2 50

Grand Total
88 (38) 2 3 55

(1) 5

2

3.

Financial reserve

28. In accordance with rule 209.2 of the Financial Rules, a financial reserve has been established to guarantee the financial liquidity and integrity of the Fund, to compensate for uneven cash flows and to meet such other similar requirements as may be decided upon by the Governing Council. 28. At the end of 2006-2007 the Executive Director increased the level of financial reserve from $10.0 million to $15.0 million in order to balance member states’ expectations regarding the increased delivery of results with principles of prudent financial management.

11

III.

PROPOSED SUPPORT BUDGET

30. The total UNEP support budget for the biennium 2010–2011 amounts to $36.3 million, of which it is estimated that $6.0 million will be provided from the regular budget of the United Nations, $12.1 million will relate to trust fund support resources and $0.2 million from trust funds. The support budget portion of the Environment Fund of $18.0 million constitutes the major share (49.6 per cent) of the overall biennial support budget. 31. Table 1 shows the changes in resource requirements between the proposed 2010–2011 and the approved 2008–2009 biennial support budgets. The proposed changes in the staffing table between the proposed 2010–2011 budget and the budget for 2008–2009 are shown in Table 4 below. A detailed breakdown of the changes in staffing by organizational unit is shown in Annex II.

12

Table 4 : Estimated distribution of Support Budget posts by source of funds and Category 2008-2009 Changes USG / ASG 2010-2011

USG/ ASG Executive Function 1 UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust Funds Trust Fund support Total Executive Function Management & Administration UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust Funds Trust Fund support Total Management & Administration Total support budget UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust Funds Trust Fund support GRAND TOTAL 1 1 2 1 1 2

D2

D1

P5

P4

P3

P2/1

Total

LL

Tota l

Prof .

L-L.

Tota l

D2

D1

P5

P4

P3

P2/1

Total

LL

Tota l

-

1 2 3

-

3 2 5

3 3

1 1 2

9 6 15

6 18 24

15 24 39

(2) (2)

-

(2) (2)

1 1 2

-

1 2 3

1 1

3 3

3 3

1 1

9 4 13

6 18 24

15 22 37

-

-

1 1

3 1 4

1 4 2 7

3 5 8

2 2 4

4 9 2 9 24

1 9 14 24

5 18 2 23 48

10 (1) 1 10

14 2 16

24 (1) 3 26

-

1 1

3 3

3 5 8

1 4 1 6

4 7 11

2 1 2 5

4 19 1 10 34

1 23 16 40

5 42 1 26 74

-

1 3 4

3 1 4

4 6 2 12

3 3 5 11

1 1 2 2 6

13 15 2 9 39

7 27 14 48

20 42 2 23 87

8 (1) 1 8

14 2 16

22 (1) 3 24

1 1 2

1 1

1 5 6

3 6 9

4 4 1 9

3 4 7 14

1 2 1 2 6

13 23 1 10 47

7 41 16 64

20 64 1 26 111

1: UN Regular budget posts under Executive Function include 1 D-1 and 2 LL posts approved for UNSCEAR.

13

32. Upon his appointment, the Executive Director immediately embarked on undertaking measures which would make the organization more effective in delivering its programme of work. External and internal studies and reviews provided the direction and highlighted the need to strengthen and reorganise line-management functions in order for UNEP to become a fully results-based organization. 33. The MTS in Section 5 highlighted the requirement to strengthen institutional mechanisms in the areas of planning for results, institutional knowledge management, gender responsiveness, human resource management, and resource management. In addition, Section 6 called for increased emphasis on monitoring and evaluation of the programme of work. 34. In response, the Executive Director is strengthening line-management and advisory functions funded from the support budget of the Environment Fund as part of the change management process foreseen in the MTS. These reforms are articulated in the paragraph that follows Table 5. This table reflects the changes in resources from the previous biennium corresponding to these reforms by organizational units and expenditure categories.

Table 5. The Environment Fund: budget estimates by organizational unit (In thousands of US Dollars) 2008-2009 Support budget approved appropriations Change 2010-2011 Proposed estimates

Organizational unit Executive Function Executive Office Sec. of the Governing Bodies Total Executive Function Management and administration Director of operations Corporate Services Section Quality Assurance Section Resource Mobilization Section Evaluation Section Administrative services to OAHs Reimbursements to UNON and other UN offices Total Management and Administration Total Biennial Support Budget Expenditure category Posts Non-post items Reimbursements to UNON and other UN offices Total Biennial Support Budget 7,094.0 3,641.0 5,265.0 16,000.0 3,141.0 1,124.0 (2,265.0) 2,000.0 10,235.0 4,765.0 3,000.0 18,000.0 1,285.9 600.3 784.2 1,730.5 5,264.8 9,665.7 16,000.0 755.0 2,288.0 2,081.1 687.7 61.8 (1,730.5) (2,264.8) 1,878.3 2,000.0 755.0 2,288.0 3,367.0 1,288.0 846.0 3,000.0 11,544.0 18,000.0 4,533.8 1,800.5 6,334.3 522.2 (400.5) 121.7 5,056.0 1,400.0 6,456.0

Executive Function 35. A consolidated Executive Office has been created by combining the Offices of the Executive Director and the Deputy Executive Director in order to reinforce the team approach and increase synergies and efficiency in the operation of the office. 36. The Executive Office also includes strengthened functions for following up on accountability for both programme delivery and the management of resources, human as well as financial. The Executive Director has delegated considerable authority to division directors and heads of offices for the implementing the programme of work within a clear accountability framework in order to manage the system of delegations of authority in line

14

with UNEP’s accountability framework, an upgrade of a P-4 post to P-5 is suggested in the Executive Office, while 2 professional positions are moved out due to the decentralization of decision making. 37 The Secretariat of Governing Bodies remains unchanged, and will continue to serve as the interface between the UNEP Secretariat in Nairobi and New York-based governing bodies of UNEP.

Management & Administration 38. The core management and policy functions of the organisations are being consolidated under a newly created Office of Operations, headed at D-2 level, which will oversee the Corporate Services Section, Quality Assurance Section, Evaluation Section, and the Resource Mobilization Section. This is largely achieved through consolidation and rationalization of existing offices, as well as the return of finance and administrative positions from UNON to UNEP. 39. Other notable changes under the management & administration function are:

(a) Creation of a Corporate Services Section to manage fund and treasury functions, human resource programming and planning, information and technology, governance and other programme delivery support services. This section is made up of the 15 positions which were transferred from UNON to UNEP effective January 2008 and new positions created, such as the Chief, Corporate Services Section, at D-1 level, a P5 for ICT governance and a P-3 for HR programming and planning, working in close cooperation and coordination with UNON. In addition this section includes 5 posts funded from Trust Fund support related to the management of trust funds administered by UNEP. (b) Reorganization of the former Programme Coordination and Management Unit into a new Quality Assurance Section to oversee strategic planning and management policy development, resource and programme analysis and performance monitoring, as well as programme quality, including the approval of projects and legal instruments. The office is also responsible for audit coordination previously vested with the Evaluation section. The office has also been strengthened by the creation of a P-5 Senior Advisor on Gender, a P5 Senior Programme Officer for strategic planning, a P-4 Programme Officer for analysis & performance, while 2 professional and local posts dealing with donor relations and partnerships are being moved to the Resource Mobilization Section. (c) Strengthening of the Resource Mobilization Section with a view of increasing the funding available in line with the six subprogrammes, in particular for the Environment Fund and non-traditional sources of funding, as well as enabling other offices to successfully raise funds by providing standard tools and donor information. To this end a new director at the D-1 is proposed and two professional and 1 local posts dealing with donor relations and partnerships will be moved from the former Programme Coordination and Management Unit. (d) The Evaluation Section is refocused in line with the requirements of the MTS to provide improved knowledge and lessons learned to the organisation at large. Previous functions on audit coordination and follow-up are reorganized into the Quality Assurance Section. (e) Realign programme support services provided by UNEP Regional Offices with the six subprogrammes. These 5 professional posts provide implementation support to the programme and projects in each region, and therefore have been consolidated as part of the subprogrammes, and the corresponding budget provisions have been moved out of the management and administration part of the support budget and into the programme budget. The remaining 5 professional and 13 local posts relate to administrative support directly allocated to offices away from UNEP headquarters in Nairobi which administer some of the trust fund resources as follows: the Division of Technology, Industry and Economics offices in Paris, Geneva and Osaka, and the PostConflict and Disaster Management Branch in Geneva. 40. There may be further reductions in uses of both the Environment Fund and trust fund support contributions resulting from the reimbursement for the services provided by the United Nations Office at Nairobi. This however, is subject to the approval of the regular budget of the United Nations at the sixtyfourth session of the General Assembly, where additional regular budget funding will be sought for the United Nations Office at Nairobi.

15

IV
A.

PROPOSED PROGRAMME OF WORK AND BUDGET
Overview of UNEP activities

41. This section describes the overall orientation and strategy of the UNEP programme of work for the biennium 2010–2011. It also describes the projected work programmes of the six new subprogrammes, including their anticipated expected accomplishments and resource requirements in line with the MTS. 42. The current environmental challenges and opportunities have caused the environment to move from often being considered as a marginal issue at the intergovernmental and national levels to the centre of political and economic decision-making. In order to secure the environmental conditions for prosperity, stability and equity, the United Nations system needs to respond to current challenges in a manner that is commensurate with their scale and the nature of the opportunities. As the environmental programme of the United Nations, UNEP is mandated to serve as a lead authority in articulating, facilitating and supporting a response to these environmental challenges and opportunities. 43. A number of recent directional shifts are affecting the United Nations system itself. There is renewed emphasis on the future evolution of international environmental governance, including calls for greater coherence within the United Nations system, for harmonization of aid under a new architecture, for increased focus on the role of the private sector, for national ownership of development programmes and for results-based management. The 2010–2011 programme of work is a direct response to these external and internal shifts, and should be understood in the context of the current United Nations reform process, aimed at making the United Nations system more coherent and relevant, as well as the renewed efforts to focus UNEP on achieving results. To this end UNEP also proposes to significantly strengthen its programmatic functions, particularly through the proposed upgrade of the Director, Division for Communication and Public Information, from D-1 to D-2 level, with additional responsibility for knowledge management and outreach, as well as 6 additional D-1 posts in the subprogrammes. 44. In the 2010–2011 biennium, UNEP will continue to discharge its assessment and normative functions, as mandated by many Governing Council and General Assembly resolutions, and serve as an effective advocate and guardian of the global environment. This programme also reflects the full integration of the Bali Strategic Plan across and its delivery through all six subprogrammes. Annex III outlines the General Assembly resolutions and Governing Council decisions which establish the legislative basis for UNEP to respond to the environmental challenges and opportunities as the principle body in the field of environment within the United Nations system. 45. In line with the new programme architecture, UNEP is preparing for a new approach to evaluation, both at the level of subprogrammmes and for selected expected accomplishments. The evaluations will attempt to address several key questions and issues that are critical to the extent to which UNEP will have delivered the Programme of Work 2010-2011, and which have been alluded to in the MTS. A budgetary provision of $300,000 has been made, split equally between all subprogrammes, for that purpose. UNEP will continue to refine the approach to evaluation in the lead-up to the biennium.

B.

Overall orientation

46. The principal responsibility for the environment within the United Nations system is vested with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). 47. The mandate for UNEP derives from General Assembly resolution 2997 (XXVII) of 15 December 1972, by which the General Assembly established the Governing Council of UNEP, the Environment Secretariat and the Environment Fund. The Governing Council, in its decision 19/1 of 7 February 1997, clarified the role and mandate of UNEP in the Nairobi Declaration on the Role and Mandate of UNEP, which the Assembly subsequently endorsed in the annex to its resolution S/19-2 of 28 June 1997. The Assembly elaborated further on the role of UNEP in its resolution 53/242 of 28 July 1999. The Governing Council, in its decision SS.VII/1 of 15 February 2002 on international environmental governance, reiterated the need for a strengthened UNEP with a stronger science base and, among other things, called for increased capacity-building and technology support by UNEP to developing countries and countries with economies in transition, improved coordination of multilateral environmental agreements and enhanced United Nations system-wide coordination and cooperation. The Assembly, most recently in its resolution 62/195 of 19 December 2007, reaffirmed the role of UNEP as the principal body within the United Nations system in the field of environment, and recognized the need to accelerate implementation of the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity-building, including through the provision of additional financial resources for that purpose.

16

48. The Governing Council in its decision 24/9 requested the preparation of a medium-term strategy for 2010-2013 with a clearly defined vision, objectives, priorities, impact measures and a robust mechanism for review by Governments. Guided by the scientific evidence, including findings in Global Environment Outlook (GEO) 4 and priorities emerging from global and regional forums, six cross-cutting thematic priorities were identified in formulating the UNEP medium-term strategy 2010-2013, in order to provide greater results orientation and strategic direction to the work of UNEP in the future. Following an extensive consultative process with the UNEP Committee of Permanent Representatives, the UNEP Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum, at its tenth special session in February 2008, adopted decision SS.X/3, in which it welcomed the medium-term strategy 2010-2013 and authorized the Executive Director to use it in formulating the UNEP biennial programme plan. The biennial programme plan 2010-2011 is therefore consistent with the UNEP medium-term strategy 2010-2013, along the same six thematic cross-cutting priorities, which will constitute the six subprogrammes proposed. 49. In line with lessons learned, the programme will continue to be implemented during the biennium 20102011 through the existing UNEP divisions, which will provide cohesion and mutual support to cross-cutting professional practices, such as those in the areas of science, law, economics and communication. As there are many interlinkages and positive synergies between the six thematic cross-cutting priorities, a matrix approach has been adopted, and achieving co-benefits will be pursued where appropriate. The approach is foreseen to strengthen results-based management and increase management accountability for programme delivery and resource utilization, while at the same time ensuring that relevant sector expertise benefits all subprogrammes. 50. The broader international policy environment is of significant relevance to the work of UNEP. In that regard, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, other outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the Mauritius Strategy for the further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, provide a clear direction for the programme. 51. The world faces unprecedented environmental change, which presents both challenges and opportunities. Mounting scientific evidence shows that ecosystems are under unprecedented pressure and that prospects for sustainable development are consequently under serious threat. While those challenges may seem insurmountable, they also create opportunities for local communities, business and international corporations to innovate. To secure the environmental conditions for prosperity, stability and equity, responses that are timely and proportionate with the scale of the environmental challenges will be required. In creating such responses, Governments, the international community, the private sector, civil society and the general public all have an important role to play. As the environmental programme of the United Nations, UNEP will strive to fulfil its role in articulating, facilitating and supporting appropriate responses to those environmental challenges and opportunities. 52. Within the framework of the medium-term strategy 2010-2013, UNEP will focus its efforts during the biennium 2010-2011 on six cross-cutting thematic priorities, namely climate change, disasters and conflicts, ecosystem management, environmental governance, harmful substances and hazardous waste, and resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and production as defined below in paragraphs 54 to 59. 53. Consistent with its mandate and its comparative advantage, UNEP will exercise its distinctive role in environmental leadership within the preceding cross-cutting thematic priority areas by catalysing and promoting international cooperation and action; providing early warning and policy advice based on sound science; facilitating the development, implementation and evolution of norms and standards and developing coherent interlinkages among international environmental conventions; and delivering technology support and capacitybuilding services in line with country priorities. Paragraphs 60 to 62 below further elaborate key elements of the UNEP strategy in implementing the programme. 54. Climate change. Within the framework of the United Nations approach for addressing climate change, UNEP will complement other processes and the work of other institutions, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, including its Kyoto Protocol, in creating enabling environments at the national level for responding to climate change, including through the promotion of national legislative, economic and institutional frameworks. In doing so, UNEP will emphasize the synergies between development and climate policies as well as the co-benefits of climate change actions and their contribution to environmental sustainability. UNEP will assist countries in adapting to the impacts of climate change by reducing vulnerabilities and building resilience in sectors of national priority. It will also contribute to mitigating climate change by supporting a transition towards cleaner and renewable sources of energy and energy efficiency, and by addressing deforestation and land degradation. 55. Disasters and conflicts. UNEP will build national capacities to minimize threats to human well-being from the environmental causes and consequences of existing and potential natural and man-made disasters and raise awareness of conflict-related risks in the context of Resolution 58/209 by adopting an integrated approach spanning three key operational pillars, namely vulnerabilities and risk reduction; emergency response and 17

recovery; and mainstreaming environment. Within those pillars, UNEP will emphasize the importance of addressing environmental risks and vulnerabilities as a prerequisite to sustainable development and will seek to integrate environmental management needs within recovery plans of the relevant United Nations actors. 56. Ecosystem management. UNEP will facilitate a cross-sectoral, integrated approach to ecosystem management to reverse the decline in ecosystem services and improve ecosystem resilience with respect to such external impacts as habitat degradation, invasive species, climate change, pollution and overexploitation. UNEP will continue to catalyse integrated approaches for the assessment and management of freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal and marine systems. In facilitating a more integrated approach, UNEP will draw upon its knowledge base and on integrated environmental assessments for more effective management of natural systems at multiple scales and across sectors through technical and institutional capacity-building. UNEP will promote adaptive management, participatory decision-making and sustainable financing through payments or investments for ecosystem services to address the drivers of ecosystem change that reverse degradation and increase ecosystem resilience. 57. Environmental governance. The work of UNEP in this area will be particularly guided by Governing Council decision SS.VII/1 on international environmental governance. At the global level, the UNEP secretariat will support the Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum in exercising its central role in international decision-making processes for environmental governance and in setting the global environmental agenda. UNEP will continue to support United Nations system-wide coherence and cooperation in the field of the environment, including through policy inputs on environmental governance in the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination and other inter-agency forums and through the full use of the Environmental Management Group. UNEP will cooperate with multilateral environmental agreements, and support collaboration between them to facilitate their effective implementation, and will partner with the governing bodies and secretariats of other intergovernmental processes to enhance mutually supportive regimes between the environment and other related fields. UNEP will continue to promote international cooperation and action based on sound science and to support science-based policymaking; catalyse international efforts to pursue the implementation of internationally agreed objectives by providing support to Governments for strengthening policies, laws and institutions; support regional and subregional ministerial and other intergovernmental processes in the field of the environment; and strengthen support for the engagement of non-governmental stakeholders and civil society in environmental governance at all levels. At the national level, UNEP will support Governments in establishing, implementing and strengthening the relevant processes, institutions, laws, policies and programmes to enhance environmental governance for achieving sustainable development, including through mainstreaming of the environment into other sectoral policies and making full use of the United Nations Development Group platform. 58. Harmful substances and hazardous waste. As part of wider United Nations efforts to lessen the environmental and health impacts of harmful substances and hazardous waste, UNEP will focus its efforts on enhancing strategic alliances with all stakeholders to promote chemical safety within a coherent life cycle approach and in accordance with the objectives of the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management adopted in Dubai in February 2006, including through supporting the development and evolution of internationally agreed chemical management regimes. UNEP will service the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management process and implement its environmental component and will assist countries in increasing their capacities for sound management of chemicals and hazardous waste. It will also support initiatives related to the management of specific chemicals of global concern such as mercury, ozone depleting and other substances covered by multilateral environmental agreements, and will address emerging issues related to chemicals and hazardous waste. UNEP will continue to participate in initiatives such as the Partnership for Clean Fuels and Vehicles aimed at reducing the emissions of harmful substances. 59. Resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and production. UNEP will promote reforms in government policies, changes in private sector management practices and decisions, and increased consumer awareness as means to reduce the impact of economic growth and development on resource depletion and environmental degradation. UNEP will strengthen the scientific base for public and private decision-making and will advise Governments and the private sector on policies and actions to increase resource efficiency and reduce pollution based on a product life cycle approach. It will promote the application of environmentally sound technologies, integrated waste management and public-private partnerships to create more sustainable product life cycles and supply chains. In addition, UNEP will increase consumer awareness of sustainable consumption and production to influence their choices of goods and services. UNEP will support the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable production and consumption under the Marrakesh Process and will work with its network of partners to monitor progress and to implement collaborative initiatives on resource efficiency and sustainable production and consumption. 60. The strategy in implementing the programme will be consistent with the UNEP mandate and comparative advantage. Scientifically credible environmental monitoring and assessments will continue to

18

provide the foundation upon which UNEP will deliver on the cross-cutting thematic priorities. That approach will promote the role of science in priority setting and informed decision-making. UNEP will inspire and promote environmental action and innovation between Governments, United Nations partner agencies, the private sector and civil society, including scientific communities and marginalized groups. It will facilitate international cooperation and the provision of broad policy guidance in the field of the environment including through the Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum process at the global level and by supporting the regional and subregional ministerial and other intergovernmental processes. 61. Furthermore, UNEP will continue to strengthen the role of the national environmental authorities in development and economic planning processes and will facilitate the integration of environmental considerations in national sectoral policies, planning processes and development programmes. It will catalyse multi-stakeholder processes to bring Governments, business and civil society together to develop and improve the implementation of legislative and voluntary measures and economic incentives relevant to the environment and corporate practices. UNEP will work to enhance access by developing countries and countries with economies in transition to equitable and sustainable financing for environmental action from both public and private sources, including market-based mechanisms. 62. The biennium will see an increased impetus to deliver on the Bali Strategic Plan. Capacity-building and technology support will run through the implementation of all cross-cutting thematic priority areas and will thus constitute an integral part of all subprogrammes. The delivery of the Bali Strategic Plan at the national and regional levels will be coordinated through UNEP regional offices, and UNEP will build strategic alliances with partners from within the United Nations family and increasingly from civil society and the private sector to extend its reach at national and regional level and to catalyse action. Furthermore, UNEP will strongly promote and facilitate South-South cooperation as one of the key mechanisms for implementing the Bali Strategic Plan. 63. The programme will be implemented through the UNEP institutional structure, consisting of the six existing divisions and a network of six regional offices, by drawing on their areas of specialization, strategic presence and capacity to deliver at the regional level. The Division of Technology, Industry and Economics is leading subprogramme 1, subprogramme 5 and subprogramme 6. The Division of Environmental Policy Implementation is leading subprogrammes 2 and 3. The Division of Environmental Law and Conventions is leading subprogramme 4. The Division of Early Warning and Assessment is responsible for the provision of a sound science base across all subprogrammes and provides the Chief Scientist function. The Division of Regional Coordination is responsible for coordinated implementation at the regional and country levels across all subprogrammes. The Division of Communications and Public Information is responsible for outreach and the production of publications for all subprogrammes. 64. UNEP will pursue the enhanced delivery of the programme through a number of processes and partnerships. It will work with a full range of stakeholders and partners, including civil society, private sector and bilateral aid agencies, building on their respective resources, expertise and comparative advantages. UNEP will participate in the common country programming and implementation processes as appropriate and work with and through the resident coordinator system, United Nations country teams and relevant inter-agency groups. It will pursue closer cooperation between UNEP regional offices, country offices of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and other centres. UNEP will seek to strengthen its involvement in the United Nations Development Group and endeavour to strengthen the environmental sustainability component of the United Nations Development Assistance Framework process. UNEP will closely follow and incorporate the outcomes of United Nations reform processes as they unfold. 65. UNEP will continue to integrate gender equality and equity into all its policies, programmes and projects with special attention given to the role of women in environmental policymaking, environmental management and early warning and disaster management. The UNEP commitment to mainstream gender equality and equity in its programmes will be extended to its work with partners and other agencies, funds and programmes of the United Nations System. 66. As an implementing agency of the Global Environment Facility, UNEP will continue to provide assistance to eligible countries to develop and implement projects in the six focal areas of the Facility, in accordance with the guidance from the governing bodies of the multilateral environmental agreements for which the Global Environment Facility serves as a funding mechanism. UNEP will primarily focus on the areas of its comparative advantage, and special attention will be given to the needs of African countries, least developed countries and Small Island Developing States. UNEP will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to the Facility on its policies and programmes and will continue servicing the Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel of the Global Environment Facility. The Division of Global Environment Facility Coordination will embark on joint programming with the other UNEP divisions to complement the UNEP programme of work.

19

C.

Proposed Programme Budget

67. The total UNEP programme of work budget for the biennium 2010-2011 amounts to $397.8million, of which it is estimated that $7.8 million will be provided from the regular budget of the United Nations, $156.0 million from the Environment Fund, $162.0 million from trust funds and $66.0 million from earmarked contributions. 68. Table 6 shows the estimated resources for the programme by sources of funds for the six thematic subprogrammes and broken down in terms of those providing for established posts and non-post items. The estimates provided for non-post items comprise all costs of output delivery, such as consultants, implementation and contractual services, travel, meetings, workshops, training and publications, as well as operational expenses such as rent, communications, supplies, materials, equipment and furniture. Table 7 shows the distribution of the programme posts by sources of funds during the biennium 2010-2011, the previous biennium 2008-2009 and the change of 31 posts between the two biennia.

20

Table 6: Estimated programme resources by source of funds, sub programme and expenditure category (in thousands of United States dollars)
Subprogramme Source of funds 1. Climate Change United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked contributions Subtotal 2. Disaster and Conflicts United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked contributions Subtotal 3. Ecosystems Management United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked contributions Subtotal 4. Environmental Governance United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked contributions Subtotal 5. Harmful substances and Hazardous waste United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked contributions Subtotal 6. Resource efficiency United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked contributions Subtotal Fund Programme Reserve Total for programmes United Nations regular budget Environment Fund Fund Programme Reserve Trust funds Earmarked contributions GRAND TOTAL 2010–2011 Established posts Non-post items

1,108 28,767 27,919 20,000 77,794

1,039 19,319 276 2,520 23,154

69 9,448 27,643 17,480 54,640

439 10,087 32,981 4,000 47,507 2,126 33,987 23,700 3,000 62,813

413 6,590 650 686 8,339 1,998 22,876 3,558 350 28,782

26 3,497 32,331 3,314 39,168 128 11,111 20,142 2,650 34,031

3,265 40,229 27,834 9,000 80,328

3,046 27,130 144 1,334 31,654

219 13,099 27,690 7,666 48,674

440 17,985 27,666 10,000 56,091 410 24,945 21,900 20,000 67,255 6,000 7,788 156,000 6,000 162,000 66,000 397,788

413 11,972 276 1,370 14,031

27 6,013 27,390 8,630 42,060

385 16,715 1,758 2,734 21,592

25 8,230 20,142 17,266 45,663 6,000

7,294 104,602 6,662 8,994 127,552

494 51,398 6,000 155,338 57,006 270,236

21

Table 7: Estimated distribution of programme posts by source of funds

2008-2009
UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked Contributions Total

USG/ ASG
-

D-2
3 3 6

D-1
23

P-5
5 35 8 1 49

P-4
6 68 10 1 85

P-3
2 58 13 8 81

P-2/1
1 22 19 16 58

Total
17 209 50 27 303

L-L
10 176 12 9 207

Total
27 385 62 36 510

1 24

2010-2011

USG/ ASG
-

D-2
3 4 7

D-1
28 2 30

P-5
5 51 2 2 60

P-4
6 82 4 1 93

P-3
2 67 2 7 78

P-2/1
1 27 1 3 32

Total
17 259 9 15 300

L-L
10 192 16 23 241

Grand Total
27 451 25 38 541

UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked Contributions Total

Changes

USG/ ASG
-

D-2
1 1

D-1
5

P-5
16 (6)

P-4
14 (6)

P-3
9 (11) (1)

P-2/1
5 (18) (13) (26)

Total
50 (41) (12) (3)

L-L
16 4 14 34

Grand Total
66 (37) 2 31

UN Regular Budget Environment Fund Trust funds Earmarked Contributions

1 6

1 11 8

(3)

22

United Nations Environment Programme

The Medium-term Strategy (MTS) 2010-2013
Strategic Implementation Team
April 2008

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

Why was MTS developed?
GC Decision 24/9/13 of 2007 requested the ED to prepare:
• “in consultation with” the CPR; • a medium-term strategy for 2010-2013; with “clearly defined vision, objectives, priorities, impact measures and a robust mechanism for review”; • for “approval” by GC at its 25th Regular Session in 2009.

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

Delivering on GC decision
The ED prepared:
A medium-term strategy for 2010-2013; in consultation with the CPR; for approval by the GC at its 10th Special Session in 2008.

MTS completed 12 months ahead of schedule to guide the formulation of the Strategic Framework and Programme of Work 20102011.

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

How was the MTS developed?
Extensive process of consultation

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

How was MTS developed?
Consultation with the CPR
CPR approved ‘road map’ 27 June 2007 CPR Subcommittees I and II established MTS Working Group
MTS WG Meeting 3 25 October ____________

MTS WG Meeting 1 21 August ___________

MTS WG Meeting 2 21 September ___________

MTS Informal Meeting 5 October ____________

MTS WG Meeting 4 20 November ____________

Discussed a consultation paper and identified major directional shifts

Discussed proposed draft structure of the MTS

Further discussed draft structure and draft Executive Summary

Discussed first full draft of the MTS

Discussed the second full draft of the MTS

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

How was MTS developed?
Working with the UNEP Secretariat
UNEP Divisional Retreats
• • • Retreats – March-June Global and regional perspectives Divisional priorities suggested

The MTS
Senior Management Team
• • • SMT Retreat – July Reviewed Divisional priorities Drafted organization-wide priorities

was developed in full collaboration with Secretariat staff.

UNEP Staff
• • Participated in drafting process through Directors Provided access to all documents on UNEP Intranet

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

How was MTS developed?
MEA Secretariats, civil society and the private sector
In agreement with CPR, UNEP Secretariat consulted with UNEP administered MEA Secretariats, civil society and the private sector.
• • Consultation with MEA Secretariats - September. Consultation with civil society and the private sector - September and October. Briefing sessions as part of regional meetings of Major Groups - October to November - in preparation for Global Civil Society Forum/GC/GMEF.

Outcomes of all consultations were provided to CPR MTS Working Group

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

MTS Content
A brief overview
Sets out a vision and 6 thematic cross-cutting priorities as the focus of UNEP’s efforts for 2010-2013, and the basis for UNEP subprogrammes. Identifies the means to implement the priorities; the institutional mechanisms required to deliver results; and a review mechanism. Cross-cutting thematic priorities identified drawing upon:
• • • • the scientific evidence, especially GEO 4; the UNEP mandate and its comparative advantage; priorities emerging from global and regional fora; and an assessment of where UNEP can make a transformative difference.

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

MTS Content
Vision
The MTS defines a medium-term vision for UNEP to be:
The leading global environmental authority that sets the global environmental agenda, that promotes the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of sustainable development within the United Nations system and that serves as an authoritative advocate for the global environment.
Vision drawn directly from the ‘Nairobi Declaration’ – approved by the UNEP GC 1997. .
T T H H E E M M E E D D I I U U M M – – T T E E R R M M S S T T R R A A T T E E G G Y Y 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 – – 2 2 0 0 1 1 3 3

MTS Content
Cross-cutting thematic priorities
The 6 cross-cutting thematic priorities are:
• • • • • • Climate change Disasters and conflict Ecosystems management Environmental governance Harmful substances and hazardous waste Resource efficiency – sustainable consumption and production
T T H H E E M M E E D D I I U U M M – – T T E E R R M M S S T T R R A A T T E E G G Y Y 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 – – 2 2 0 0 1 1 3 3

MTS Content
Renewed emphasis

The MTS places emphasis on:
• Significantly enhancing UNEP’s capacity to deliver on the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity-Building. Further embracing UNEP’s role as the environment programme of the United Nations. Ensuring UNEP’s interventions are founded on sound science. Fully implementing results-based management.

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

Content of the MTS
An overarching results framework for UNEP
In order to become a more effective, efficient results focused organization

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

Next Steps
POW 2010-2011 and 2012-2013
The 6 cross-cutting thematic priorities include: • Objectives
• Impact indicators for each objective • Expected accomplishments

Subsequent Programmes of Work - to be approved by the GC in 2009 and 2011 - will include: • Specific outputs
• Impact indicators for each output • Budget Capacity-building and technology support to run through the implementation of all cross-cutting thematic priorities and constitute an integral part of the Programmes of Work.
T T H H E E M M E E D D I I U U M M – – T T E E R R M M S S T T R R A A T T E E G G Y Y 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 – – 2 2 0 0 1 1 3 3

Example of cross-cutting priorities Environmental governance
Objective: Environmental governance at country, regional and global levels is strengthened to address agreed environmental priorities. Expected Accomplishments • The United Nations system demonstrates increasing coherence in international decision-making processes related to the environment, including those under multilateral environmental agreements States increasingly implement their environmental obligations and achieve their environmental priority goals, targets and objectives through strengthened laws and institutions National development processes and United Nations common country programming processes increasingly mainstream environmental sustainability in their implementation National and international stakeholders have access to sound science and policy advice for decision making.
T T H H E E M M E E D D I I U U M M – – T T E E R R M M S S T T R R A A T T E E G G Y Y 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 – – 2 2 0 0 1 1 3 3

UNEP reform

The GC approved a decision on the MTS at the 10th Special Session in Monaco. The GC decision is central to the reform of UNEP and the Executive Director’s efforts to: • make UNEP a more focused and results-based organization; • generate greater confidence in UNEP - and thereby attract further investment into our Programme; and • deliver on the Bali Strategic Plan. Thereby enabling UNEP to meet the expectations of, and be fully accountable to, governments and stakeholders.

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

An open, inclusive and transparent process

T T

H H

E E

M M

E E

D D

I I

U U

M M

– –

T T

E E

R R

M M

S S

T T

R R

A A

T T

E E

G G

Y Y

2 2

0 0

1 1

0 0

– –

2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

ANNEX C

Agenda Item 2: Regional Issues
• Annex C.2.1:

ROAP Annual Report 2008 Regional Strategy for Asia and the Pacific, 2009-2012 ROAP 2009 Activities CPR-UNEP Strategic Presence (PPT Presentation) CPR-UNEP Strategic Presence (Main Document)

• Annex C.2.2:

• Annex C.2.3: • Annex C.2.4: • Annex C.2.5:

UNEP in Asia and the Pacific 2008 Annual Report

The Asia and the Pacific region is home to 60% of the global population, accounts for over 40% of the global economy and has nearly 70% of the world’s poor. Geographically, it ranges from fragile Small Island Developing States in the Pacific to populous and vast coastal and deltaic plains of South and Southeast Asia, and the mountainous, landlocked countries of Central Asia. The growing population and dynamic economies are exerting considerable strain on the region’s environmental resources.

The Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
In Asia Pacific, UNEP operates through its Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific and works in 46 countries in the region. The regional office is located in Bangkok and is made up of staff from the Division of Regional Cooperation, a Regional Information Officer who works closely with the Division of Communication and Public Information and specialist officers from UNEP’s Division of Early Warning and Assessment, Division Policy Implementation, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, Division of Global Environment Facility and the Division of Environmental Law and Conventions. The regional office also houses the Secretariats of Regional Seas Programme - the East Asian Seas Action Plan, the Asia Pacific Forum for Environment and Development, the Indian Ocean – South-East Asia Marine Turtle Memorandum of Understanding and the Division of Global Environment Facility GEF South China Seas project.

UNEP in Asia and the Pacific
In Asia Pacific, UNEP works with governments, local authorities, civil society, other UN entities, regional and international institutions as well as industry to develop and implement cleaner and safer policies and strategies that engenders efficient use of the region’s natural assets and reduces risks for humans and the environment. The regional office works at the regional, sub-regional and national levels. There are five sub-regions: Central Asia, Northeast Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Pacific.

Regional
At the regional level, UNEP supports the Asia Pacific Ministerial Conference on Environment and Development held every five years. This is a collaborative effort between the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), UNDP, ADB and UNEP. UNEP co-chairs the Thematic Working Group on Environment and Disaster Management with ESCAP and OCHA jointly. The Thematic Working Group is part of the Regional Coordination Mechanism. The Regional Director is also a member of the UNDP Regional Directors Team. UNEP established the Subregional Environmental Policy Dialogue, comprising chairs of each of the five subregional groups and five civil society leaders. The SEPD meets annually to discuss emerging issues and provide guidance to UNEP’s programmes in the region. It advises UNEP on enhanced global and regional delivery, as well as identifies emerging environmental issues at the regional level.

Subregional
At the subregional level, UNEP works to forge strong partnerships for collaborative and effective environmental management that is mutually beneficial. It works with intergovernmental bodies, environment ministries and agencies and civil society to identify and address common and

1

transboundary issues. The following is a brief description of countries and institutions UNEP works with in each subregion. Central Asia Central Asia comprises Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Key intergovernmental institutions in Central Asia include: the International Fund for Aral Sea, Interstate Sustainable Development Commission (ISDC), and the Scientific Information Centre of the ISDC (SIC/ISDC) and the Economic Cooperation Organization. Northeast Asia The Northeast Asia subregion covers five countries: the Peoples Republic of China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Japan, Mongolia and Republic of Korea. Northeast Asia has the following major intergovernmental fora: the Tripartite Environment Ministers Meeting, the North East Asian Sub-regional Programme on Environmental Cooperation, the Northeast Asian Conference on Environmental Cooperation and Northwest Pacific Action Plan. Southeast Asia Southeast Asia subregion consists of eleven countries: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, TimorLeste, and Vietnam. There are two intergovernmental organisations, the Association of Southeast Asian Association and Mekong River Commission. It also has an important cooperative programme called the Greater Mekong Sub-region Economic Cooperative Programme. South Asia The South Asia subregion consists of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. There are three intergovernmental organisations: the South Asia Association for Regional Cooperation, South Asia Cooperative Environment Programme and the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development. UNEP has signed agreements with all three institutions and works actively in the subregion. Pacific The Pacific subregion consists of 21 Pacific Island Countries and Territories and has a number of regional agencies, including intergovernmental organizations. The Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme covers environment and sustainable development issues, whereas the South Pacific Applied Geosciences Commission focuses on non-living resources, ocean management, hazard assessment and geosciences. The Council of Regional Organizations of the Pacific facilitates coordination amongst the ten regional organizations. UNEP works closely with SPREP.

National
At the national level, UNEP works closely with partners under the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity Building to provide systematic and targeted capacity building for integrated environmental assessments and action plans on current and emerging issues.

Regional Progress and Achievements
Efforts are focused on UNEP’s six cross-cutting thematic priorities: ● ● ● ● ● Climate change, to strengthen the ability of countries to integrate climate change responses into national development processes. Disasters and conflicts, to minimize environmental threats to human well-being arising from environmental causes and arising from conflicts and disasters. Ecosystem management, to ensure that countries utilize the ecosystem approach to enhance human well-being. Environmental governance, to strengthen environmental governance at country, regional and global levels to address agreed environmental priorities. Harmful substances and hazardous waste; to minimize the impact of harmful substances and hazardous waste on the environment and human beings.

2

Resource efficiency – sustainable consumption and production, to ensure that natural resources are produced, processed and consumed in a more environmentally sustainable way.

Climate Change
Strengthening Philippines’ Institutional Capacity to Adapt to Climate Change
UNEP is one of the main executing agencies of the MDG Achievement Fund’s Joint Programme, “Strengthening the Philippines Institutional Capacity to Adapt to Climate Change”, 2008 to 20011. The programme brings together UN Agencies working on environmental sustainability and adaptation to climate change in the Philippines. The programme aims to mainstream climate risk reduction into key national and selected local development plans and processes; enhance national and local capacity to develop, manage and administer plans, programmes and projects addressing climate change risks; and improve coping mechanisms through pilot demonstration adaptation projects.

Preliminary design, UN House, Bhutan

Participating UN agencies are working together on inter-agency planning and management systems with national and local partners. In 2008, the Joint Programme was approved in by the National Steering Committee. At the inception workshop in September 2008, the programme management arrangements, flow of funds, and reporting structure for both technical and financial matters were redefined, and the Annual Work Plan for the first year was consolidated. In addition to the technical support, UNEP will be providing additional human resources to support UNEP initiatives in the Philippines. The recruitment of a UNEP National Officer who will function as representative of respective UNEP Divisions and projects and contribute to the operational functioning of UNEP initiatives in the Philippines is in process.

ASEAN (+6) Mayors Forum on Climate Change
Mayors and delegates from Bangkok, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Albay, Phnom Penh, Vientiane, Luang Prabang, Beijing, Delhi and Fukuoka participated in the ASEAN+6 City Forum on Climate Change which took place 26-27 June 2008 in Bangkok, Thailand. The forum was organized by the Bangkok Metropolitan Authority, UNEP and the Thai media group, The Nation. Climate change impacts and best practices for adaptation and mitigation were discussed during the forum. The delegates discussed and agreed upon the Bangkok Declaration for ASEAN+6 City Forum on Climate Change and committed themselves to action against Climate Change through resource mobilization, introduction of innovative policies and measures, partnership building, regional cooperation and exchange of expertise, public awareness raising and environmental education.

Promoting Climate Neutrality
The UNEP regional office is working with DTIE’s Sustainable United Action programme to assist UN and government agencies in the region to move towards climate neutrality and sustainable operations. Through this programme, support is provided for resource mobilization, emission inventory preparation, energy audits, green building design, sustainable transport options, and sustainable procurement. Work has started with UN agencies in Viet Nam, Thailand, and Bhutan and the Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment (MoNRE), Viet Nam.

3

In Viet Nam, retrofit and expansion of the UN Apartment Building in Hanoi, which will house all UN agencies in the country, has begun. In 2008, the preliminary retrofit design was completed and resource mobilization was done. MoNRE Vietnam has also expressed interest in moving towards climate neutrality and sustainable operations and plans to introduce green building concepts in its new office building in Hanoi with support from UNEP. UNESCAP, Bangkok, is initiating an energy audit and taking measures to improve their performance. In Bhutan, a preliminary design of a new green UN House was completed. A project is being implemented within AIT/UNEP RRC.AP, Bangkok, on making its operations climate neutral, starting with the retrofit of the office building. In 2008, the energy audit, and indoor air quality studies before retrofitting were completed and the retrofits have started.

Mangroves for the Future (MFF)
Mangroves for the Future is a regional initiative to strengthen the environmental sustainability of coastal development and promote sound investment and action in coastal ecosystem management. The initiative is led by IUCN and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in partnership with UNEP, CARE International, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and Wetlands International. From 2007-2011, MFF focuses on India, Indonesia, Maldives, Seychelles, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. (http://mangrovesforthefuture.org/). Integrating climate change and climate variability in MFF interventions and national plans UNEP assists MFF to integrate climate change and climate variability in its interventions and mainstreaming climate change into countries’ national and sectoral development planning processes. UNEP, in collaboration with UNDP, is providing technical guidance to the MFF Secretariat and the National Coordinating Bodies (NCB), through the preparation of an ad-hoc integrative climate proofing method. An “Approach to Mainstream Adaptation to Climate Change into MFF” was prepared and shared during the MFF Regional Forum (Sri Lanka, 21-24 April 2008). Experts in each MFF NCBs are being consulted for finalization of the methodology. Incorporating criteria and considerations of climate change adaptation and undertaking relevant measures towards an enhanced adaptive capacity of coastal communities was recognized as crucial for the long term sustainability of MFF projects. As a consequence, climate change was also considered one of the crucial subjects to be delivered at the MFF Regional Training course “Applying Project Cycle Tools to Support Integrated Coastal Management” (27-31 Oct 2008, Samarang, Indonesia). UNEP, in collaboration with ADPC, IUCN and UNDP, took the lead in delivering climate change science, impacts for coastal areas, adaptation measures, and integration of climate change into project cycle management. Integrating Climate Change Adaptation Measures into Coastal Zone Planning In parallel to the development of the integrative climate proofing method, UNEP/ COBSEA Secretariat (Coordinating Body on the Seas of East Asia) in collaboration with the Indonesian Ministry of Environment (MoE) is conducting the ‘Integrating Climate Change Adaptation Measures into Coastal Zone Planning’ pilot project. The project is trialing CC adaptation integration into coastal zone planning in one Indonesian district (Indramayu, West Java) through spatial planning process and will provide experience from learning by doing for the above cited climate proofing method, helping refining it according to ground results. The project will run until mid-2009 and will support the preparation of a revised spatial area planning for Indramayu, which will include considerations of climate change adaptation. Lessons learnt and developed methodologies will be shared with local, national and international stakeholders upon conclusion of the project.

Public Awareness and Outreach
A number of activities were undertaken in 2008.

4

The Thai ‘Plant for the Planet, Plant for the Future’ was launched during the opening ceremony of the Sirindhorn International Environment Park. Nearly 300,000 tree species, including beach, mangrove, lowland, wetland and highland forest species are expected to be planted at the 1800 rai (288 hectares) Sirindhorn International Environment Park (SIEP). The ‘Plant for the Planet, Plant for the Future’ campaign aims to preserve forests for future generations and promote public awareness of the importance of trees among schools, communities, civil groups and businesses. It is jointly organized by the Sirindhorn International Environmental Park Foundation under the patronage of HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, the Japan-based Foundation for Global Peace and Environment (FGPE), the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment - Department of Environmental Quality Promotion and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The campaign is being held under the auspices of the UNEP Billion Tree Campaign, which began in January 2007. Together with the Millennium Development Campaign, UNEP and the Art of Living Foundation, a humanitarian and spiritual organization, launched ‘Mission Green Earth Stand Up Take Action’ in July 2008 aimed at planting 100 million trees around the world by July 2009. To date, nearly 9.6 million trees have been planted and 55 million pledged. Around 57 countries and 28 Indian states are participating. UNEP participated in the Asia Journalists Forum on Climate Change which took place 7-10 October, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. Print, broadcast and e-media representatives from 60 countries participated in the forum which resulted in the adoption of a Declaration on Climate Change by participants. Climate change was also the topic of focus at the Pacific Media Workshop on Climate Change, organized by SPREP and UNESCO in Apia, Samoa. Nearly 25 journalists participated in the workshop. In 2008, UNEP partnered with Nickelodeon, the world’s most widely distributed kids’ network, to launch The Big Green Help, a global pro-social campaign that empowers young children between the ages of 2 to 14 years old to join efforts to tackle climate change. The Big Green Help campaign introduces a series of environmentally-themed programmes and activities with local campaign partners to nurture earth-friendly and energy-saving lifestyles among children, their families and friends. The campaign which began in Singapore and Malaysia will be expanded to more Asian countries in 2009. A similar partnership with MTV Asia, with the aim of reach youth, is underway. Asia Pacific entries for the UNEP International Children’s Painting Competition have been steadily increasing from 4000 in 2006 to 8000 in 2007. In 2008, nearly 12000 entries were received from Asia Pacific for the UNEP International Children’s Painting Competition, on the theme ‘Climate Change: Actions We can Take Now’.

Disasters and Conflicts
Capacity Building to Integrate Disaster Risk Reduction into Coastal Zone Management
Coastal ecosystems and associated watersheds provide a wide range of services to coastal communities, which are fundamental to building community resilience to coastal hazards; yet these services are under threat from a variety of sources and global climate change is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of climate related hazards. While there are many coastal zone managers in Indian Ocean countries (especially MFF countries), there is still a limited understanding of the principles of reducing underlying risk factors and limited engagement with national disaster reduction mechanisms and resources. The ‘Capacity building to integrate disaster risk reduction into coastal zone management’ project, led by UNEP Post Conflict Disaster Management Branch, PCDMB and UNEP aims at integrating disaster risk reduction into coastal zone management through developing guidance material in ecosystems management for and providing training to coastal zone managers at regional level and in the target countries (India, Indonesia and Sri Lanka). The project also aims at strengthening the role of existing technical institutions to provide risk reduction training and other services to coastal zone managers. With these considerations in mind, the collaboration between national environmental learning centers and national disaster management organization is crucial for the delivery of a high quality service to the countries and for ensuring the sustainability of the activities.

5

At regional level, the first guidance manual for disaster risk reduction in coastal zone management was drafted in collaboration with ADPC and delivered during the MFF Regional Training Course on 27-31 October, Samarang, Indonesia. The regional manual and training module will be refined through consultations and collaboration with the three target countries in the first half of 2009. At national level, efforts have started to plan, draft and deliver country-tailored manuals in India, Indonesia and Sri Lanka, where training are expected to be delivered during the first half of 2009.

Ecosystem Management
The East Asian Seas Action Plan
The “New Strategic Direction of COBSEA (2008-2012): A White Paper” was finalized at the Special Intergovernmental Session of COBSEA, 5-6 September 2007, Putrajaya, Malaysia. It was adopted by member countries of COBSEA at the 19th Meeting of COBSEA on 22-23 January 2008, in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Three thematic areas were identified as priority for COBSEA, namely marine and landbased pollution; coastal and marine habitat conservation; and management and response to coastal disasters. These areas will be addressed through four inter-linked strategies on information management, national capacity building, strategic and emerging issues and regional cooperation. Green Fins Programme The Green Fins Programme established a network of dive operators and divers that practice environmentally-friendly diving and snorkeling for the conservation of coral reefs. In 2007, this programme, which was initiated in the Phillipines and Thailand, was expanded to Indonesia and Malaysia. To ensure that the data collected by Green Fins members become useful information for synthesis, the establishment of a Green Fins Online Database was also initiated. This was further supported by the establishment of a Green Fins Web-page and Online Assessment System that will provide access to the network and provide online updating of information and also enable the dissemination of the results of the assessment through the website. Marine litter and its impact on the marine environment is a major concern in the region. To address the problem, the COBSEA Regional Action Plan on Marine Litter was adopted by the 19th Meeting of COBSEA in January 2008. The Second COBSEA Marine Litter Workshop and Cleanup Campaign were held on 18-20 September 2008 in Pattaya, in collaboration with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Thailand as part of awareness raising.

Environmental Governance
In Central Asia, UNEP supported the formulation of the Framework Convention on Environmental Protection for Sustainable Development in Central Asia that was signed by Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan in November 2006. Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are expected to sign the Convention. UNEP will continue its support to the Interim Secretariat for the Convention with the aim of establishing a permanent secretariat. UNEP is also helping to establish the Regional Mountain Centre for Central Asia and supporting the Regional Environmental Action Plan. In Northeast Asia, the Eco Peace Leadership Centre located in South Korea plays an important role in strengthening civil society in the region. The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (Japan) is a key partner in promoting sub-regional cooperation in Northeast Asia and the Asia-Pacific region, through the Asia Pacific Forum on Environment for Development (APFED); the UNEP-Tongji University Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development plays a significant role in capacity building and promoting awareness in Northeast Asia and the Asia-Pacific region. Key programmes include the annual Leadership Programme, the Masters Degree programme and sponsored research programmes.

6

Atmospheric Brown Haze
UNEP has brought together an international science team to study the impacts of aerosols on regional climate, the hydrological cycle, agriculture and human health. The Atmospheric Brown Cloud Project aims to address concerns around regional scale plumes of air pollution that consist of copious amounts of tiny particles of soot, sulphates, nitrates, fly ash and many other pollutants. Large fraction of the aerosol particles that make up ABCs originate from emissions at the Earth’s surface caused by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels. Initial scientific results suggest that the brown haze is reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the earth’s surface by as much as 10 to 15 percent. It may also be affecting monsoon weather patterns, triggering droughts in Western parts of the Asian Continent and increasing flooding in parts of Bangladesh and India. There are also indications that the haze may be reducing winter rice harvests in India by as much as 10 per cent. A UNEP commission report suggests that pollution from the haze could be leading to "several hundreds of thousands" of premature deaths from respiratory diseases. A preliminary assessment using the INDOEX research was completed. The potential impacts caused by aerosols and particulates on human health, food security and the water were disseminated. In 2005, capacity building activities were implemented through establishment of observatory stations and training programmes for Asian scientists. By 2006, ABC observatories were operational in India, Japan, Republic of Korea, Maldives, Nepal, and Thailand. Impact study groups for detailed impact assessment studies were also established. The team is conducting assessments of ABC impacts on agriculture, water budget and public health. The first impact assessment report with focus on Asia was published in 2008. The first assessment report is available www.rrcap.unep.org/abc.

Environment and Health
This project aims to promote a coordinated intervention at national to regional levels for reduction of adverse impacts of environmental deterioration on human health in Asia. In 2004, UNEP in collaboration with the WHO convened the first High-Level meeting on environment and health in Southeast and East Asian countries. The meeting requested UNEP and WHO to assist with the development and implementation of a Regional Charter for environment and health. The activities so far have resulted in the following major achievements: ● Ministerial Forum: Convened First Ministerial Regional Forum on Environment and Health in August 2007 in Bangkok. Regional Charter: Devised a Regional Charter on environment and health in South East and East Asia Declaration: Ministerial level declaration (Bangkok Declaration) on Environment and Health. Expert Networks: Thematic Working Groups are established and corresponding work plans have been completed for 6 priority areas: (i) Air quality; (ii) Water supply, hygiene and sanitation; (iii) Solid and hazardous waste; (iv) Toxic chemicals and hazardous substances; (v) Climate change, ozone depletion and ecosystem changes; (vi) Contingency planning, preparedness and response in environmental health emergencies. Progress in the implementation of the Thematic Working Group Activities are available at http://www.environment-health.asia/

● ●

Regional Air Pollution
Increasing energy use along with increasing urbanisation, industrialisation and motorization has increased the emissions of air pollutants. Some of the pollutants have long lifespans and travel thousands of kilometers away from the source and cause damage to our environment. Air pollution and its Transboundary effects are emerging environmental issue in the region. This project facilitates intergovernmental cooperation and development of science and capacity to address the issue.

7

Currently UNEP is actively assisting with Secretariat for two intergovernmental networks on transboundary air pollution at the sub-regional level: (i) (ii) Malé Declaration on Control and Prevention of Air Pollution and Its Likely Transboundary Effects for South Asia (Malé Declaration) ; and Acid Deposition Monitoring Network for East Asia (EANET)

Implementation of the Malé Declaration have completed establishment of eight regional air pollution monitoring networks and assessment of the impacts of air pollution on human health, crop, and corrosion of materials by 2008. EANET, which operates more than 50 acid deposition monitoring network, published high quality data report in 2008. EANET has also negotiated an instrument to provide sound basis for addressing acid deposition issues in the 13 member countries of EANET. The project also achieved the following results at the regional level: ● Developed a handbook “Multilateral Cooperation on Air Pollution: Science, Policy and Negotiations for Agreements/Instruments” and conducted one capacity building workshop for policy makers on multilateral negotiations. ● Devised a long term vision for urban air quality in Asia. The long term vision document was agreed by the member countries during the 2nd Governmental meeting held in November 2008 in Bangkok.

Environmental Law
With an aim to strengthen environmental governance at country and regional levels, ROAP in 2008 continued to provide legal advice and support to the development of national framework environmental law in Mongolia and Maldives. The new framework environmental law of Maldives has been drafted with UNEP’s assistance and support, and the same will be done for Mongolia. To support national environmental governance processes to address climate change issues, UNEP has undertaken four country studies (China, India, Japan and the Philippines) on strengthening the legal and policy frameworks to address climate change and to achieve low a carbon economy. These studies identified and assessed the legal, regulatory, institutional measures that are available in these countries to reduce GHG mitigation and to address climate change, and discussed how to improve these countries legislative and policy frameworks to achieve a low-carbon economy/society and sustainable development. ROAP also organized four national workshops on climate change law and policy in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam. UNEP also provided support to sub-regional intergovernmental forums to enhance cooperation for better environmental management and promoting sustainable development in the sub-regions. Efforts have been made to the promotion of the Central Asian Framework Convention on Environment and Sustainable Development, and the development of the Medium-Term Environment and Sustainable Development of Central Asia. Legal advice was also provided to the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia in negotiating an instrument for regional cooperation on acid deposition and air pollution control.

Poverty Environment Initiative
Effective environmental management is a key ingredient for poverty reduction in Asia-Pacific. In spite of rapid economic growth, 641 million people in the region – two thirds of world’s poor – still live on less than $1 a day. The majorities of the poor live in rural areas and depend on natural resources for a livelihood. In rapidly growing urban areas, the poor are most susceptible to health impacts of pollution. Climate change will compound existing vulnerabilities of the poor. Nevertheless, environment remains a low priority for most countries. Many countries face difficulty in measuring the real value of ecosystem services and understanding the linkages between poverty and environment. As a result environment is treated as an externality, and investment in environmental management is often less than 1% of GDP. Mainstreaming pro-poor environmental concerns into development processes is vital for effective poverty reduction. The Asia-Pacific Poverty and Environment (PEI) programme commenced in 2007 as part of the scaleup of the global PEI programme. The PEI in Asia-Pacific aims to simultaneously reduce poverty and

8

protect the environment by integrating poverty-environment issues into key policy and planning processes and their implementation – including national plans, sectoral strategies, and economic decision making. At the country-level, PEI adopts a phased approach starting with scoping to evaluate and stimulate the country demand for a PEI program and to analyze key institutions and planning processes. It then evolves into a two-phased country-led programme. At present PEI has commenced scoping activities in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste. In Bangladesh and Bhutan the programme has evolved to Phase 1. The first PEI country programme in the region was launched in Bhutan. Guidelines are being developed for mainstreaming poverty-environment issues in national and local plans. Participatory assessment of livelihood options is underway in 10 targeted villages. Socio-economic data are being collected and analyzed to assess how poverty environment indicators are monitored and reported. PEI in Bangladesh has completed the design of the country programme to integrate poverty and climate issues into Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper 2, local level planning and budgeting. Local demonstration projects on climate mitigation and adaptation are also planned in three 3 eco-regions. In Lao PDR, national and sub-national consultation workshops were held to identify existing environmental gaps in poverty reduction plans and strategies. A delegation of senior government officials undertook a study tour to Viet Nam where the UNDP has implemented a Poverty Environment Programme since 2005. The PEI team also reviewed the Viet Nam programme to draw lessons learned and explore potential for follow on support. Regional workshops were held in Thimphu and Bangkok to enhance south-south cooperation and joint learning on poverty-environment mainstreaming and the environmental economics analysis for pro-poor growth.

The Asia Pacific Forum for Environment and Development
The Asia Pacific Forum for Environment and Development (APFED) is a regional group of eminent experts that aims to address critical issues facing Asia and the Pacific region and to propose new models for sustainable development. The APFED Showcase Programme is one of APFED’s main activities to promote sustainable development in the region. This Programme is supported by the Ministry of Environment Japan. It aims to support projects that promote innovative policies, measures, and actions for sustainable development in the Asia-Pacific region. The Programme is administered by the APFED Secretariat (Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, IGES) in coordination with the APFED Showcase Facility established that is serviced by UNEP/ROAP. The APFED Showcase Programme grants up to US$30,000 to Asia Pacific projects that demonstrate innovative approaches to address environmental problems. Every year we invite proposal submissions and 12 projects are selected as APFED Showcase projects. These innovative activities supported under the Showcase Programme will be shared among various stakeholders in the region through the APFED Good Practice Database. Winning projects include rainwater harvesting for sustainable water resource development and climate change adaptation in Iran in 2008. The 2006 Showcase project on green consumer initiatives in the Republic of Korea has been completed. The number of proposals received increased significantly, both in quantity and quality and with wider geographical coverage. Since 2006, UNEP received 748 proposals from 47 countries. Thirty-seven project proposals were selected and featured as the APFED Showcase Programme. Most proposals addressed the issues of land management, agriculture and forest, following the issue of waste and chemical and climate-related issues. Website link: www.apfedshowcase.net

9

Harmful Substances and Hazardous Waste
Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer: The Compliance Assistance Programme under the Montreal Protocol
The Compliance Assistance Programme (CAP), funded by the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol, enables UNEP DTIE’s OzonAction Programme, as one of the implementing agencies of the Protocol to provide compliance assistance to developing countries in the region. UNEP’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific has a CAP team that assists 37 developing countries in the Asia and Pacific region meet their targets to phase-out the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleting substances (ODS). The Asia-Pacific region is the largest producer and consumer of ODS. Despite progress to date, countries in the region still face some challenges to completely phase out CFCs and other ODSs by 2010. There is still significant demand for CFC to manufacture Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs) for asthma patients. Airlines and military are still using ODS as there are no suitable alternatives. Another challenge is how to handle contaminated ODSs and ODS in banks of equipment. Countries in the region also face new and significant challenge to reduce fast-growing consumption of Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) in line with the adjustments for accelerated schedule agreed by the 19th Meeting of Parties held in September 2007. UNEP CAP in cooperation with Ozone Secretariat, Multilateral Fund Secretariat and other Implementing Agencies, namely UNDP, UNIDO, and World Bank and bilateral agencies like Japan, Germany, Sweden and Australia is working towards assisting countries in addressing these challenges. Greater coordination is also envisaged with other international environmental conventions primarily UNFCCC and Conventions addressing Hazardous Chemicals for addressing the ODS phaseout challenges highlighted above, especially relating to transportation, storage and safe disposal of ODS to gain climate benefit. Some innovative approaches taken in the region are:

Data reporting assistance
In Asia Pacific, assistance was provide to countries in data reporting for Article 7 to the Ozone Secretariat and CP progress report to the Multilateral Fund Secretariat. Guidance was provided during the network meetings in 2007-2008 and through regular coordination with the countries on the new CP progress data reporting format and web-based data reporting for CP progress report with support from Multilateral Fund Secretariat.

Special assistance to countries in actual or potential non-compliance
Special assistance was provided through informal advisory group discussions during network meetings and through compliance missions to countries and regular email advice. Besides inputs from CAP, inputs from implementing agencies, the Ozone Secretariat, Multilateral Fund Secretariat and other implementation partners are provided to the countries on achieving compliance targets. In 2008, focus was on potential compliance issues relating to CFCs including CFC MDIs and CFCs where 3 countries in the region were implementing an action plan. Potential compliance issues are appropriately highlighted to the respective countries so that they can take timely corrective measures to achieve compliance. This is done in close cooperation with other implementing agencies. (e.g., with UNDP for Bangladesh on MDI issues; with UNDP for Fiji on methyl bromide phase out; with UNIDO for Pakistan on CFC issues). During inter-agency meetings, assistance is provided to the countries in understanding compliance issues confronting them and actions needed to ensure that such issues are address (e.g., Iran on CFC issues). A regular input through country compliance sheets was provided to the two Implementation Committee meetings in 2007-2008.

Other Assistance Modalities, such as South-South Cooperation
● Training and other inputs provided through south-south cooperation (e.g., Maldives with assistance from Sri Lanka for NOU capacity building in March 2008, Laos through Philippines

10

● ●

customs in June 2008, Bhutan with assistance from India on servicing and retrofit issues in December 2007) Cooperation on information sharing through informal PIC that results in controlling illegal trade thus facilitating compliance (information on import-export is shared between all network countries) Country level capacity building projects conducted back-to-back with other missions/programmes (e.g., Capacity building in Maldives back-to-back with CFC MDI phase out workshop in March 2008).

Facilitation of Communication with the Implementation Committee
CAP ROAP assisted Bangladesh, Iran, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Pacific Island countries in communicating with Implementation Committee, particularly follow-up on 38th and 39th Implementation Committee recommendations. Special assistance was offered to Bangladesh relating to their CFC consumption in MDIs and Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning (RAC) sector.

Assistance in Policy and Legislation Development and Implementation
UNEP assisted countries in the Region to establish/ improve appropriate legislation and regulations including an import and export licensing system, with focus on Iran and PIC. One of the highlights of the assistance is the formulation of general policy advice and suggestions for improvement of policies and legislation, specifically with regard to CFCs, Halon, methyl bromide and HCFCs. Improvement of reporting to Ozone Secretariat on implementation of licensing systems to conform to Article 4B paragraph 3 and 4 of the Montreal Protocol. The information on licensing with the latest status of the licensing systems in all countries in the Region, for information and use by countries, Ozone Secretariat, Multilateral Fund Secretariat (MFS) and Implementing Agencies, is provided in an Excel database. Improved implementation of the licensing systems through the voluntary application of the informal Prior Informed Consent system, in cooperation with the European Commission. In 2008, 17 requests for confirmation of an import by the importing country were made by exporting countries, for them to take a decision on whether or not to give an export license. Of the 17 queries, ten export licenses were not given because the importer was not registered in the importing country, and five were given after conformance response by the importing country. The two remaining queries are still under scrutiny.

Assistance in ratification of the Amendments and the Montreal Protocol
UNEP team is following up closely with Timor Leste on its ratification of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments. Country representatives also participated as observers during the Lankawi Network Meeting held in March 2008. In June 2008, the country has indicated its firm intent to ratify the Montreal Protocol. A country mission is planned for September/ October 2008 in view of facilitating and expediting ratification of the country through high level consultations.

Support to new Parties
Continuous assistance is being provided to Afghanistan and Bhutan in the implementation of National Phase out Plan and RMP/TPMP, respectively. Both countries have been able to comply with all their obligations under the Montreal Protocol. Plans for similar assistance are also being prepared for Timor Leste once they ratify Montreal Protocol and its amendments. Special support provided to Afghanistan and Bhutan to sustain their targets. The new Bhutan National Ozone Officer was given special assistance on Montreal Protocol implementation in the country and TPMPO implementation.

Combating illegal trade in ODS
CAP is encouraging the creation of institutionalized cooperation between key stakeholders involved in the fight against illegal trade in ODS. As per MOP decision XII/16 Para 7, CAP facilitates ‘networking

11

and twinning activities in the framework of regional networks aimed at the exchange of information and experience on trade in controlled ODS between the Parties, including enforcement agencies’.

Information Clearinghouse
UNEP, in cooperation with TVE Japan produced “My Ozone Wish” public service announcements featuring well-known celebrities and personalities in Asia-Pacific. The TV spots were launched during the 28th Open Ended Working Group (OEWG) of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, 7 July 2008 in Bangkok, and screened during the Meeting of South Asia Network of ODS Officers in Tokyo, Japan, 21 September 2008 and the Meeting of SEAP Networks of ODS Officers in Pattaya, Thailand, 22 September 2008. UNEP has the initiative to distribute them to the National Ozone Units in the region for their use in the countries to raise awareness on Ozone Layer Depletion and the need for Ozone Layer Protection. Public Awareness: ● Ozzy Ozone Animated film was translated into Nepali ● Ozzy Ozone Comic Book: Ozzy Goes Island Hopping was launched during the 28th OEWG meeting held in Bangkok, 7 July 2008. This event was joined by many national ozone officers from across the world, media people including representatives from the National Scout Organization of Thailand, UNESCO and Sony BMG. ● OzonAction Education Pack for Secondary Schools was launched at the International Ozone Day Celebration Event organized by UNEP ROAP in collaboration with NOU of Thailand on 13 September 2008 at the Mall Bangkapi Department Store, Bangkok. UNEP in cooperation with the International Federation of Environmental Journalists (IFEJ), a worldwide network, which was formed in Dresden, Germany, in 1993 organized UNEP Ozone and Climate Change Media Workshop, 21-23 April 2008 in Singapore.

MEA Regional Enforcement Network
The aim of the Swedish funded Multilateral Environmental Agreements Regional Enforcement Network (MEA-REN) is to enable participating countries in Northeast, South and Southeast Asia to combat illegal trade and gain better control of transboundary movements of harmful chemicals and hazardous waste. The project covers four treaties: the Montreal Protocol and the Stockholm, Rotterdam and Basel Conventions. The network is an extension of the previously established Ozone Depleting Substances - Customs Network in 2002. The MEA-REN project started in 2007 and will end in 2010.

Resource Efficiency Sustainable Consumption and Production
Think Green Campaign with Mall Group, Thailand
UNEP partnered with the Bangkok Metropolitan Authority and the Thai Mall Group for ‘Think Green’, a public awareness campaign that began in August 2008 and goes through to 2009. The campaign is aimed at raising awareness of climate change and its impacts to the 500,000 customers who patronize Mall Group’s chain of stores daily, and inform them of actions that they can take. At the request of the Mall Group, UNEP conducted a half-day seminar for senior level managers aimed at sharing knowledge on linkages between retailing business and sustainable development, and options and practices for improving the sustainability performance of the retailing sector. Forty top-level executives from the Mall Group participated in the seminar.

12

DRAFT

DRAFT
1.0 BACKGROUND
Capacity Building), MEAs, and regional forums including the AsiaPacific Ministerial Conference on Environment and Development; and Coordinating Body for the Seas of East Asia. Subregions: In a region as large and as diverse (46 sovereign states), UNEP recognizes the value of working at the subregional level where the commonalities of social, economic and the environment factors are strongest. There are five distinct sub-regions: Central Asia, Northeast Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and the South Pacific. Subregional Policy Forum: UNEP established the Subregional Environmental Policy Dialogue (SEPD), with membership comprising of five Ministers who serve as Chairs of respective sub-regional Environment Ministerial fora, and five civil society leaders. This forum meets on an annual basis to discuss emerging environmental issues and provide guidance to UNEP’s programmes at the global and regional levels. Strategic directions: New directions in environmental paradigm are:
• • •

Asia and the Pacific: The region is home to more than half the world population – 4.2 billion out of nearly 7 billion. The region accounts for over 40% of the global economy (GDP PPP) and has the challenges of estimated 70% of the global poor. Geographically it ranges from the fragile Small Island Developing States of the Pacific to the populous and vast coastal and deltaic plains of South and Southeast Asia and the mountainous, landlocked countries of Central Asia. The region experiences high rate of industrialization and urbanization. Almost 40% of the population now lives in the cities. By 2025 urban areas will be home to more than half of the region’s population. With the increasing industrialization and urbanization, the number of motor vehicles in the region is doubling every 5 to 7 years. The energy consumption has increased by 50% between 1996 and 2006. Rapidly growing populations and dynamic economies are exerting considerable pressures on the environmental resources and services of the region. UNEP in the region: UNEP is the environmental conscience and anchor institution of the UN system. UNEP’s mission is to provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations. UNEP’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ROAP) is located in Bangkok, Thailand. The office comprises core staff working alongside specialist officers. Specialist officers are outposted from the Divisions of Early Warning and Assessment (DEWA), Policy Implementation (DEPI), Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE), Global Environment Facility (DGEF), Regional Seas Programme - the East Asian Seas Action Plan and its Secretariat. ROAP is provided substantive directions by relevant HQ Divisions, and regional delivery following agreed UNEP strategies and policies. UNEP’s Programme of Work draws from global and regional mandates which includes (e.g. General Assembly resolutions, UNEP Governing Council Decisions, MDGs, Agenda 21, Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, the Bali Strategic Plan on Technology Support and

from growth to sustained growth, and towards well-being and happiness; from traditional environmental management (reactive) to proactive and prevention based approaches; from primarily global focus to regional, sub-regional, bilateral cooperation.

Core functions under UNEP’s strategic presence ensure decisions of the UNEP Governing Council are effectively implemented in the region, while taking into account regional concerns/priorities.
• • • • Regional representation (process); Support for intergovernmental fora (process) ; Address needs of developing countries within the framework of the Bali Strategic Plan; Identify and Respond to Emerging Environmental issues (content).

Priorities: ROAP will support implementation of the six thematic areas identified under UNEP’s Medium Term Strategy (MTS) 2010-13, which is elaborated in the next sections of this strategy document. This regional strategy document is supported by a separate biennial implementation plan, as well as five sub-regional strategy documents.

2.0

ACHIEVEMENTS
capacities, increase public awareness and facilitate development of legal and fiscal instruments and technological tools. Leadership by Example UNEP has worked closely with international organizations with mandates in relevant sectors to pilot demonstration projects that promote preventive policies. These demonstration projects are applied in scope and have the potential of replication. Some projects currently in development include Sustainable Urbanization, Security, Waste Management, Energy and Sustainable Development Pathways. In addition, an environment Knowledge Hub (ekH) was developed to collate and disseminate information related to these priority areas, and as a collaborative effort with partner institutions in the region. Major Regional Projects: • Integrated Environmental Assessment and Reporting • National Sustainable Development Strategy (NSDS) • Atmospheric Brown Clouds • Compliance Assistance Programme (CAP), Montreal Protocol • Dust and Sand Storms • Environment and Health • Waste Management • Glacial Lake Outburst Flood • Prevention Approach – Urban Environment • Capacity Building for the Environmental Damage Assessment and Rehabilitation in the Areas Affected by the Tsunami in Indonesia • Biodiversity Conservation in the Asia Pacific Region • Leadership Programmes on Environment for SD • One UN Initiative • International Collaboration for Conserving Flyway Wetlands for the Siberian Crane and Other Migratory Waterbirds • Tunza Youth • Civil Society Engagement

Promoting Regional Cooperation At the subregional level, UNEP has worked with intergovernmental bodies, environment ministries/agencies, and civil society organizations to identify priorities and address common and transboundary issues. UNEP has supported subregional ministerial fora, subregional and national assessments for emerging issues and State of the Environment reports, help build capacity for early warning, environment management tools, comparative environment indicators and support subregional Strategies for Sustainable Development. Strengthening Environment Community Under the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and CapacityBuilding, UNEP provided systematic and targeted capacity building measures that take into account international agreements and national, subregional and regional priorities and needs. At the national level, UNEP focused on capacity building of the environment community in close consultation with UN Resident Coordinators. This included capacity building for science and assessment, policy development and implementation as well as technology and industry. UNEP forged strategic partnerships with national environment agencies, helped establish and strengthen civil society networks and assisted Governments to build mechanisms for civil society participation in decision-making processes. Identifying and Addressing Emerging Issues Rapid economic and population growth, increased urbanization and industrialization, and spiraling consumption patterns has brought many environmental challenges to the fore in the Asia Pacific region. The region needs the capacity to respond timely and effectively to these emerging environmental issues, which may have thresholds beyond which impacts are irreversible. To address these issues, UNEP has worked with governments, partner agencies, donors, and institutions to develop partnerships and networks, build regional and national

3.0

CORE FUNCTIONS
At the national level and in response to identified national needs and priorities, UNEP will focus on the capacity building of the environmental community, in close consultation with UN Resident Coordinators and the UN Country Teams under the One UN process. One UN Process: UNEP will work with UN Country Teams (UNCT), under the One UN Framework, and other development partners in delivering capacity building services under guidance of UN Resident Coordinators. Emerging Issues: An emerging environmental issue may be defined as an issue that is not yet generally recognized but which may have significant impact on the environment. In Asia Pacific region, the past 15 years has been characterized by rapid population and economic growth; increasing urbanization and industrialization; and spiralling consumption patterns. This has brought many challenging environmental issues to the forefront. The region needs the capacity to respond timely and effectively to emerging environmental issues related to the MTS priorities. Initiatives under Implementation: • Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) • Transboundary air pollution • Environment and Health Initiatives at Project Development Stage: • Glacier melt and Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF) • Dust and Sandstorms (DSS) • Eco-housing and eco-transport Initiatives at Conceptual Stage • Sustainable development pathways • Environment security

Representation: Countries and local partners in the Asia Pacific will have a single point of entry into UNEP through the Regional Office. Representing UNEP as “One UNEP”, the Regional Office will be the eyes, ears and face of UNEP in the region. This will ensure better access to UNEP’s technical expertise and resources by governments, civil society and other partners across the Asia Pacific region. Likewise, UNEP will be closer to national governments in the identification and addressing of national environmental priorities. Intergovernmental processes: The focus of UNEP’s regional delivery for Asia and the Pacific will be at the subregional level. There are over a dozen institutions in the five subregions providing political oversight and agreements to address priority transboundary and common environmental concerns. At the subregional level, UNEP will assist intergovernmental agencies, and environment ministries/agencies. A strong partnership with intergovernmental bodies will be forged to strengthen collective environmental management. This partnership will focus on assisting, facilitating and enabling institutions to identify priorities and address common and trans-boundary issues at the subregional level. UNEP will consolidate its annual Asia-Pacific Sub-regional Environmental Policy Dialogue. SEPD brings together the Chairs of the sub-regional Ministerial groupings and eminent regional personalities representing all five sub-regions. The SEPD will advise UNEP on enhanced global and regional delivery, as well as identify emerging environmental issues at the regional level. Capacity Building: The Bali Strategic Plan (BSP) for Technology Support and Capacity-building was adopted in December 2004 to provide systematic, targeted, long and short-term capacity building measures, taking into account international agreements and based on national, subregional or regional priorities. Support for LDCs includes environmental policy development and implementation based on assessed national priorities.

4.0

DELIVERY OF MTS PRIORITIES
Some regional initiatives include: Climate Change: Preparation of national papers on Climate Change with a long term outlook of 50-70 years. These papers will translate global science on climate change in the national context. These will articulate possible climate change impacts for different countries. Based on the impacts, the papers will identify areas for intervention on mitigation and adaptation. A set of concepts notes and proposals will be developed to address these identified areas. UNEP will work with selected cities for similar reports at the city level. Sustainable Urbanization: The 21st century is considered “The Urban Millennium”. Statistics now show that by 2007 over 50% of all humanity will be living in urban areas. As the Asia and the Pacific region becomes increasingly urbanized, environmental sustainability of countries will depend largely on how successfully cities tackle urban environmental issues.: • Assessments: Baseline studies and assessments will be conducted with focus on housing, public transport and governance; • Partnerships: This project will work with partners and build upon existing initiatives by partners; • Pilot demonstration: Through a participatory process with national and development partners identify and implement pilot demonstrations in areas of eco-housing, eco-transport; • Knowledge Base: Document outcomes and benefits of best practices and pilot projects in the region and package the information for distribution to a wide range of stakeholders through the environment knowledge hub (eKH) ; and • Policy guidance: Through documentation of experiences of the pilot demonstrations develop generic policy guidelines to replicate/upscale wider implementation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, minimize waste generation and pollution, and promote energy efficiency and water conservation in 6 selected cities.

Global Priorities: UNEP’s Governing Council approves programmes that build on the mandates of forums such as the Millennium Summit, Monterrey, and Johannesburg. UNEP has a key role in coordinating and supporting the work of the Multilateral Environment Agreements (MEAs). At its tenth special session in February 2008, UNEP’s Governing Council (GC) adopted a decision that: "Welcomes the United Nations Environment Programme Medium-term Strategy 2010-2013 (MTS) and authorizes the Executive Director to use the Medium-term Strategy 2010-2013 in formulating the Strategic Frameworks and Programmes of Work". This decision represents a major milestone in moving UNEP towards a more focussed and results-based organization. The six thematic priority areas within UNEP’s MTS include: • Climate Change • Disasters and Conflicts; • Ecosystem Management; • Environmental Governance; • Harmful Substances and Hazardous Waste; • Resource efficiency – sustainable consumption and production. It was endorsed that the implementation of these thematic priorities will be delivered through: • Sound science for decision makers; • Awareness raising, outreach and communications; • Capacity building and technology support • Co-operation, coordination and partnerships • Sustainable financing ROAP will support the implementation of the six MTS areas through intelligence gathering/assessments, partnerships, generation of knowledge base, pilot projects and capacity building at the sub-regional and national levels.

5.0

IMPLEMENTATION
Budget: The funds for the operation of ROAP will come from UNEP;s Environment Fund, and through counterpart and in-kind contributions from external donors and partners. The table below summarizes the estimated funding required for the implementation of the regional strategy in the region. A detailed implementation plan will be developed as a separate document to supplement this regional strategy. 2009 Staffing Operations Programme Activities • Representation • Ministerial fora • BSP • MTS Areas • Emerging Issues TOTAL ROAP will adopt a Results Based Management approach in the formulation and delivery of its biennial Programme of Work. This will be based on the MTS thematic areas and the Strategic Framework, endorsed by the Special Session of UNEP’s Governing Council. ROAP will seek to enhance contributions from governments in the region to UNEP’s Environment Fund (EF). Currently, this is around US$4.3 Million per annum, and target will be double this by 2010. In addition, ROAP will set a target to mobilize three times the annual EF allocation from external sources, such as bilateral donors, multilateral development banks, foundations and other partners, for enhanced engagement and strategic presence in the Asia Pacific region. 2010 %

Partnerships: Recent Summits at the global and regional levels have articulated needs as well as desired mechanisms for implementation. Needs expressed include: focus on priorities in environment for sustainable development; assistance for strategies for sustainable development; focus on implementation of priorities through partnerships at the national, subregional and regional levels. The regional strategy calls for partnerships with ADB, UNESCAP, IUCN, UNDP, World Bank and bilateral donors, such as the Hanns Seidel Foundation, SIDA, NORAD and others. At the national level, UNEP will work under the leadership of the UN Resident Coordinator. UNEP will strengthen its delivery through both increased strategic presence and focused programme leadership. UNEP will establish offices co-located with sub-regional intergovernmental bodies. Staffing: UNEP’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ROAP) is located in Bangkok, Thailand. The office comprises core staff, comprising subregional officers, working alongside specialist officers. Specialist officers are outposted from the Divisions of Early Warning and Assessment (DEWA), Law and Conventions (DELCI), Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE), Global Environment Facility (DGEF), Regional Seas Programme - the East Asian Seas Action Plan and its Secretariat. ROAP is provided substantive directions by relevant HQ Divisions, and facilitates regional delivery following agreed UNEP strategies and policies. UNEP staff in the region will have a mix of knowledge and skills, which cover thematic issues (MTS areas) and geographic/sub-regional coverage. A matrix approach will be in place whereby UNEP staff possess a mix of expertise and networks relevant to needs and priorities of the region.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF 2009 ROAP ACTIVITIES
1. The activities for the UNEP Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific are in line with the approved programme and budget support for the biennium 2008–2009 and the approved costed workplan for the biennium 2008-2009. 2. Subprogramme 5, Regional cooperation and representation Objective: To ensure the coherent delivery of UNEP programmes in the regions and to catalyse and strengthen regional cooperation with all partners in response to challenges and priorities identified by national Governments and regional and subregional bodies, including mainstreaming environment into national development plans. Strategy: The Division of Regional Cooperation is responsible for the implementation of this subprogramme. The strategy in the biennium 2008–2009, in collaboration with Governments, subregional and regional bodies, and through inter-agency cooperation, will be: (a) To identify, assess and monitor relevant needs, priorities, trends, developments and policies at the national, subregional, and regional levels, bearing in mind a gender equality perspective, in order to incorporate them into UNEP policy and programme development, in order to improve consistency with the regional needs and priorities; (b) To communicate, advocate and secure support for UNEP policies and programmes in the regions; (c) To act as a catalyst for national, subregional and regional cooperation by: (i) Facilitating and supporting regional, subregional, and national policy dialogue and partnerships on environment and development; (ii) Contributing to national, subregional and regional policy and programme development; (iii) Working with relevant United Nations agencies, in particular those within the United Nations Development Group, in order to benefit from synergies and comparative advantages, thus promoting system-wide coherence; (iv) Collaborating with the private sector, major groups and civil society at large to mobilize support for sound environmental action, and to ensure the meaningful involvement and participation of those actors in the development and implementation of UNEP policies and programmes; (d) To provide opportunities for interaction through partnerships to mainstream environment into the development processes of Member States at all levels; (e) To coordinate the delivery at regional level of the Bali Strategic Plan and contribute to the related development of coherent and targeted capacity-building and technology support activities by: (i) Recognizing the diversity within countries and regions as identified through concerted needs assessment; (ii) Relying on collaboration with existing regional initiatives; (iii) Relying on collaboration with United Nations system and other partners; (iv) Taking into account deliberations of relevant ministerial forums providing policy guidance and reviewing the needs for the delivery of capacity-building and technology support; (v) Assisting in identifying and addressing capacity-building needs for mainstreaming environment into national development processes; (vi) Promoting South-South cooperation as a means to build capacity and transfer technologies; (vii) Working in concert with individual donors, the Global Environment Facility and other funding mechanisms.

1

External factors:
The subprogramme is expected to achieve its objective and expected accomplishments on the assumption that there will be, first, willingness and commitment by governments, United Nations agencies in particular UNDP and regional commissions, and other subregional and regional organizations to collaborate with UNEP in addressing environmental issues of both global and regional concern; and, second, no major shortfalls in the level of contributions to the Environment Fund and other external funding to implement their programme of work. 3. Asia and the Pacific region: Specific outputs for the Asia Pacific Region. Servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies Substantive servicing of intergovernmental meetings (a) Support to intergovernmental and other ministerial processes in Asia and the Pacific to enhance the capacity of key decision-makers and stakeholders and reinforce mechanisms to develop and implement appropriate policies and programmes in the region, including: the annual Subregional Environmental Policy Dialogue (SEPD); the Asia-Pacific Ministerial Meeting on Environment and Development (2010); the ASEAN-4 Ministerial Meeting on Health and the Environment; subregional environmental ministerial forums; institutional strengthening activities and implementation of regional and subregional environmental action plans in Asia and the Pacific (16 meetings and processes), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Asian Development Bank, UNDP, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, WHO, UNESCO, ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP, as well as SEPD host Governments) Parliamentary documentation (b) Documents and reports for meetings of the Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum and other environment-related ministerial processes to facilitate the full integration of priority issues of the Asia and the Pacific region into the deliberations and outcomes of these forums and bodies (2 documents), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP, Eco-Peace Leadership Centre) Expert groups Technical cooperation (according to the Bali Strategic Plan, including responding to the priority needs expressed by countries and in full coordination with the regional offices) Advisory services (a) Advisory services to intergovernmental regional and subregional processes to enhance the capacity of key decision-makers, senior officials, civil society and other stakeholders and to strengthen mechanisms to develop and implement appropriate policies and programmes in the Asia and the Pacific region (20 missions), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP, Regional University Consortium, IESD, youth networks)
Output to be delivered in the biennium 2008-2009 Expected Accomplishment (a) Process of policy deliberations and consensus-building globally and in the regions facilitated and supported Indicators of Achievement Increased amount of positive feedback from ministerial regional and subregional consultations and policy forums on the substantive and organizational support provided by UNEP Increased number of major groups and relevant stakeholders collaborating with UNEP Increased numbers of major groups’ and relevant stakeholders’ organizations with balanced geographical coverage that participate in UNEP regional and global civil society forums

2

Output No A A1

Output Title Servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies Quantity per biennium Responsible Unit Priority Area: MTS BSP relevance (yes/no) Start Date End Date

1

2

3

2009 Substantive servicing of intergovernmental meetings (a)Support to intergovernmental and other ministerial processes in Asia and the Pacific to enhance the capacity of key decision-makers and stakeholders and reinforce mechanisms to develop and implement appropriate policies and programmes in the region, including: the annual Subregional Environmental Policy Dialogue (SEPD); the Asia-Pacific Ministerial Meeting on Environment and Development (2010); the ASEAN-4 Ministerial Meeting on Health and the Environment; subregional environmental ministerial forums; institutional strengthening activities and implementation of regional and subregional environmental action plans in Asia and the Pacific (16 meetings and processes), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Asian Development Bank, UNDP, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, WHO, UNESCO, ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP, as well as SEPD host Governments) February 2009 Annual Sub-regional Environmental Policy 2 1 ROAP Climate yes January Dialogue (Meeting Reports) Change(CC), 22nd Environmental Governance (EG) 13 5 ROAP All yes 01-Jan December 2009 Support and Participation in Sub-regional 2009 Ministerial Processes, such as ASEAN, SACEP, SAARC, SPREP, TEMM, ISDC, etc (Mission Reports) Preparations for 2010 Asia Pacific Ministerial 1 1 ROAP All no 01-Jan December 2009 Conference on Environment and Development 2009

3

A2

Parliamentary documentation

1 2 3 B B1

1 2

2009 (b)Documents and reports for meetings of the Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum and other environment-related ministerial processes to facilitate the full integration of priority issues of the Asia and the Pacific region into the deliberations and outcomes of these forums and bodies (2 documents), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP, Eco-Peace Leadership Centre) Asia Pacific Regional Civil Society Statement, for inputs to 2 1 ROAP EG yes 01-Jan End Dec 2009 the Global Civil Society Forum and the GMEF Regional Strategy for Asia and the Pacific, with biennial 2 1 ROAP all yes 01-Jan End Dec 2009 implementation plans and calendars Sub-regional strategies for Central Asia, South Asia, 10 5 ROAP all yes 01-Jan End Dec 2009 Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Pacific, with biennial implementation plans and calendars Technical cooperation Advisory services (a)Advisory services to intergovernmental regional and subregional processes to enhance the capacity of key decision-makers, senior officials, civil society and other stakeholders and to strengthen mechanisms to develop and implement appropriate policies and programmes in the Asia and the Pacific region (20 missions), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP, Regional University Consortium, IESD, youth networks) Advisory services and policy guidance to developing 16 8 ROAP all yes 01-Jan End Dec 2009 countries (missions) Advisory services and support for partner organizations from 4 2 ROAP EG yes 01-Jan End Dec 2009 the environmental community and civil society

Quantity per biennium

Responsible Unit

Priority Area: MTS

BSP relevance (yes/no)

Start Date

End Date

4

BSP Start End Date relevance Date 2009 (yes/no) Increased cooperation with Governments and intergovernmental, non-governmental and United Nations partners in the delivery of programmes and projects at the regional, subregional and national levels, addressing environmental priorities identified by the UNEP Governing Council and by the regional institutions Indicators of Achievement A A3 Increased number of regional and subregional cooperative activities agreed with partners to deliver programmes at the regional, subregional and national levels Servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies Expert Groups (a)Expert group processes to guide and support: the effective implementation of the Atmospheric Brown Cloud project (impact assessment on health, agriculture and water budget; the Asia Pacific climate model and policy linkages), the Glacial Lake Outburst Flooding project, and integrated waste management activities; and the establishment and operation of a regional environmental knowledge hub to facilitate access to information, expertise, technologies and practices in environment and sustainable development fields in the Asia Pacific region (4 processes), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Centre for Clouds, Chemistry and Climate (United States), Max Planck Institute, Stockholm University, SIDA, ICIMOD, KTRMC) ABC Project Reports 2 1 ROAP CC no 01-Jan End Dec 2009 GLOF Reports 2 1 ROAP CC no 01-Jan End Dec 2009 no 01-Jan End Dec 2009 Integrated Waste reports through the APFED 2 1 ROAP Harmful Process Substances and hazardous waste (HZ), Resource Efficiency (RE) Environment Knowledge Hub 1 ROAP All yes 01-Jan End Dec 2009 (b)Servicing of annual meetings of the regional Collaborative Assessment Network (2 meetings), (GC.22/21), (external partners: ASEAN, BCAS, Development Alternatives, SACEP, SPREP, TEI, CEE, IGES, Asian Development Bank, IUCN, ADORC) Annual meetings of the Collaborative Assessment 2 1 ROAP EG yes March End April 2009 Network 2009

Expected Accomplishment (b)

Quantity per biennium

Responsible Unit

Priority Area: MTS

1 2 3

4

1

5

B B1

Technical Cooperation Quantity Responsible Priority BSP Start End Date per Unit Area: MTS relevance Date biennium 2009 (yes/no) (a)Technical assistance to Governments and national, subregional and regional processes, to enhance their capacity to develop and implement programmes and projects especially in relation to the formulation of subregional environmental treaties related to Millennium Development Goal 7, the preparation and implementation of framework agreements with focus on the Bali Strategic Plan, in areas such as environmental assessment, vulnerability and risk assessment, environmental emergencies, cleaner production, ecotourism, sustainable production and consumption, economics and trade, chemicals and ozone as well as biodiversity conservation, environmental law, water, and marine and coastal areas (31 countries and processes), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: ASEAN, SACEP, SPREP, ISDC, TEMM, ICIMOD, SAARC) Technical Assistance on environmental assessment and early warning Technical Assistance on Regional Seas, through COBSEA Technical Assistance on Industry and Environment Issues, such as cleaner production, chemicals (b)Support for the establishment and functioning of environmental education and youth networks (e.g., regional University Consortium on Environment for Sustainable Development, Central Asia Youth and Environment Network (CAYEN), South Asia Youth and Environment Network (SAYEN), South East Asia Youth and Environment Network (SEAYEN), North East Asia Youth and Environment Network (NEAPEN), Pacific Youth and Environment Network (PYEN) (7 processes), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Regional University Consortium, including Tongji University, University of the South Pacific, UNEP National Committee for the Republic of Korea, CEE,) Functional Asia Pacific Regional University Network 2 1 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 10 Functional youth and environment networks for Central Asia 5 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 Youth and Environment Network (CAYEN), South Asia Youth and Environment Network (SAYEN), South East Asia Youth and Environment Network (SEAYEN), North East Asia Youth and Environment Network (NEAYEN), Pacific Youth and Environment Network (PYEN) Training courses, workshops, seminars, etc (c)Training courses and seminars for parliamentarians, and in the frame of the annual leadership programmes on environment for sustainable development at the UNEP Tongji Institute in Shanghai (4 courses), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Tongji University and the Regional University Consortium) Leadership Programme at IESD, Tongji University 2 1 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 Regional Training Programmes on Environmental Law 2 1 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 Fellowships (d)Masters scholarships at AIT and Tongji University, in line 2 1 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 with Bali Strategic Plan (20 scholarships), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: AIT, Tongji University) Masters Scholarships at Tongji University 2 1 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 Masters Scholarships at AIT 2 1 ROAP EG Yes 01 Jan Dec 209 Advisory Services

1 2 3

1 2

B2

1 2 B3

1 2

6

B4

Field projects

1 2 3 4 5 C C3

1 C5

1 C6

C7

200 9 (e)Assessment studies (dust and sandstorms), development of concept papers/proposals and implementation of pilot projects on eco-city, mobility, and energy within the framework of the sustainable cities project and pilot demonstration projects on eco-housing, organic farming, renewable energy and other areas (5 projects), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Asian Development Bank, Convention to Combat Desertification, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, AIT, Chulalongkorn University, TERI, University of New South Wales) yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Asessment Study on Dust and Sandstorms 1 ROAP Ecosystem Management (EM) Concept propoals on eco-house/eco-city 1 ROAP CC yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Concept proposal on climate change 1 ROAP CC yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Concept proposal on renewable energy 1 ROAP CC yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Concept proposal on organic farming 1 ROAP EM yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Other substantive activities Booklets, information kits, fact-sheets, etc. (a)Outreach, information and communication in electronic and print formats for the purpose of disseminating information and reaching out to stakeholders in the region (2 annual cycles of product releases), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: media networks in the region) Regional Publications 2 1 ROAP All yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Promotion of legal instruments (b)Technical and advisory inputs to promote implementation of global environmental agreements in Asia and the Pacific, including regional conventions (1 mission), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: multilateral environmental agreement secretariats) Advisory missions for MEA implementation 2 1 ROAP CC yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Fact finding and other special missions 2 1 ROAP All yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 (c)Ad hoc field missions at the request of Governments for the purpose of addressing issues of specific concern to them, including provision of advice for the formulation of projects funded by GEF and other sources (2 missions), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: national Governments) Special events (d)Media and outreach events, as well as international 5 3 ROAP All yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 campaigns, awards and competitions (5 events), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: media networks in the region)

Quantity per biennium

Responsi ble Unit

Priority Area: MTS

BSP relevance (yes/no)

Start Date

End Date

7

C8

1 C1 1

Press releases and press conferences (e)Briefings, interviews, press conferences, press releases, press articles, and opinion editorials (20 press items), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: media networks in the region) Press Releases Exhibits, guided tours and lectures

200 9 (f)Guided tours and lectures for government delegations, donors, civil society groups, students, industry associations and others (4 tours), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific) Seminars for outsiders (g)Preparatory regional meetings for the Global Civil Society Forum to enhance their contribution to the Governing Council/Global Ministerial Environment Forum and engagement in the work of UNEP, servicing of other network meetings of regional and subregional private sector and major groups to support their work (2 meetings), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Eco Peace Leadership Centre) International Environmental Governance - Asia Pacific 1 1 ROAP EG yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Regional Consultations Asia Pacific Civil Society Meetings 2 1 ROAP EG yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Organization of inter-agency meetings Participation/contribution to initiatives in the region with other United Nations bodies including the heads of agencies and the meetings of the regional Thematic Working Group on Environment and Development (TWGED) (2 meetings), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: Economic Commission for Asia and the Pacific, UNESCO, WHO, UNDP, UNIDO) UN Interagency meetings UNDESD Interagency meetings, with UNSECO 2 2 ROAP ROAP EG EG yes yes 01 Jan 01 Jan Dec 2009 Dec 2009

20 Quantity per biennium

10

ROAP Responsi ble Unit

All Priority Area: MTS

yes BSP relevance (yes/no)

01 Jan Start Date

Dec 2009 End Date

C12

1 2 C13

1 2

8

Expected Accomplishment (c)

Quantity per biennium

Responsi ble Unit 2009

Priority Area: MTS

BSP relevance (yes/no)

Start Date

End Date

Enhanced coherence in the delivery of UNEP programmes and projects at the regional, subregional and national levels in responding to needs and priorities expressed at the same levels Indicators of Achievement Increased number of agreed and coordinated capacity building and technology transfer programmes and projects under implementation in the regions and countries

A A1 1 2 B B1

Servicing of intergovernmental and expert bodies Substantive servicing of intergovernmental meetings (a) Consultative meetings between Asian and Pacific countries and development partners to develop and implement the Bali Strategic Plan in the region in cooperation with UNDP and other relevant programmes (4 meetings), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: UNDP, IUCN, ADB, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, national Governments) National and sub-regional consultations 2 1 ROAP All yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 UNEP Consolidated Mission to countries with Framework 2 1 ROAP All yes 01 Jan Dec 2009 Agreements

Technical cooperation Advisory services (a) Advisory services to Governments and other stakeholders to support the implementation of the Bali Strategic Plan and to ensure coherent development and delivery of UNEP programmes and projects which respond to the identified priorities and also build synergies with the ongoing initiatives at national, subregional regional levels (10 missions), (GC.22/21, GC.20/39), (external partners: UNDP, ASEAN, SACEP, ISDC, TEMM, SPREP)

1

2

A consultation meeting in Asia and the Pacific with key stakeholders to formulate a strategic agreement and key elements of a rational progtramme to address priority capacity building and technology support needs of the Region through South-South cooperation modalities An expert group meeting in Asia and the Pacific to formulate a comprehensive South-South cooperation implementation programme to address priority capacity building and technology support needs in the Asia and the Pacific region. (b) Participation in and contribution to major events organized by Governments and other environment and development interest groups in Asia and the Pacific through invited key note addresses, technical presentations, substantive discussions and other inputs and contributions (external partners: China Council, ECOASIA, APFED)

4

2

ROAP

All

yes

01 Jan

Dec 2009

1

1

ROAP

All

yes

01 Jan

Dec 2009

30

15

ROAP

All

yes

01 Jan

Dec 2009

9

Briefing for UNEP Committee of Permanent Representatives p

Moving forward with UNEP s UNEP’s Strategic Presence
Principal Advisor to the Executive Director
January 2009

1

Guiding Objectives and Principles 2010 – 2013

Drawing from the Medium-term Strategy 2010-2013 (MTS), UNEP seeks to, inter alia:

• • • • •

Become a more effective, efficient, and results-focussed entity, which delivers as ‘One UNEP’ Significantly enhance its capacity to deliver on the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity Building Provide UNEP-wide integrated support to regions and countries Involve strategic partners within United Nations system, multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and their secretariats civil society secretariats, and the private sector in delivering the MTS, as appropriate Fully implement results-based management
2

Guiding Objectives and Principles 2010 – 2013

Guiding objective – to deliver on one UNEP-wide Programme of Work (PoW) in a coherent, coordinated and integrated manner by all components of the Secretariat, in the most efficient and cost effective manner – with the following principles forming the basis for the transition:

• • • •

Strengthen UNEP’s global thematic competence and expertise, including scientific expertise, through its Divisions Strengthen UNEP s regional capacity to deliver the PoW, including UNEP’s PoW considerations for enhanced physical presence at regional/country level Present a consistent and coherent regional and country image as ‘One UNEP UNEP’, and not as a collection of Divisions and offices Ensure that both global and regional initiatives and activities are developed and take place in the regions as a result of close coordination and consultation between the Divisions and Regional Offices
3

Strategic presence - key issues 2010 - 2013
Three key issues have been addressed by the SMT:

• • •

What will be the role and function of UNEP’s presence in the regions in relation to Headquarters? What will be the reporting relationship between staff across UNEP offices? Where, how and when will UNEP strengthen its presence i selected, Wh h d h ill t th it in l t d strategic locations?

Existing mechanisms – enhanced as necessary – will be utilized for moving forward with UNEP’s strategic presence e.g. PoW
“UNEP will seek to realize its vision through focusing its efforts for 2010-2013 on the six cross-cutting thematic priorities…utilizing the capacity and expertise of UNEP f divisions and regional offices.” MTS 2010-2013 4

1. What will be the role and function of UNEP’s presence in the regions in relation to Headquarters?

Achieving clarity in the relationship between global roles and functions, led by Headquarters, and regional, sub-regional and county roles and functions, led by Regional Offices, is critical At transition period f iti i d from now until th end of 2009 is required t build til the d f i i d to b ild capacity both in the Divisions and in the regions for executing their respective functions, including facilitating the regional delivery of UNEP’s PoW 2010-2011 (and subsequent programmes) through the Regional Offi R i l Offices Transition to include putting in place necessary business processes and procedures and HR realignment including realignment, reassigning existing staff, recruiting additional staff, and providing targeted training opportunities for staff in Divisions and in the regions in line with PoW 2010-11

5

Primary responsibility of Headquarters

• •

Governance and global outreach Strategic and coherent development of the PoW and projects ensure the coherent development of the PoW, Costed Work Plans and projects, including appropriate linkages to the Global Environment F ilit (GEF) and MEAs E i t Facility d MEA Management and oversight Regional and country support - provide thematic expertise to the regions and ensure proper liaison between Regional Offices and thematic coordinators Fundraising

• • •

Headquarters includes the Executive Office, SGB, Evaluation, central units (QAS, CSS and RMS) and all Divisions 6

Primary responsibility of Regional Offices
• •
Representation and regional outreach Informed development and coherent delivery of the PoW and projects - lead the delivery of the PoW in the region in accordance with the approved PoW Costed Work Plans and projects including regional PoW, projects, activities agreed with MEAs through the PoW Capacity building and technology support - facilitate capacity building and technology support in the regions Fundraising g

• •

Regional Offices includes Regional Office core staff plus out posted staff from other Divisions

7

Primary responsibility of Country Offices

• •

Provide information and inputs towards the identification of national p priorities, trends, expertise and needs Lead capacity building and technology support at the national level in accordance with the approved PoW, Costed Work Plans and projects, including joint projects with the host country Cooperate with the country and engage in UN Common Country Programming Processes, including the CCA and UNDAF

Services one country in a region

8

Primary responsibility of Liaison Offices

Represent UNEP i th various i t R t in the i inter-governmental f t l fora, such as th h the UNGA and CSD as well as vis-à-vis key partners and donors, such as African Union (AU) and European Union (EU) Provide advice and information on, and substantive support to, political processes to promote UNEP and the mainstreaming of environment and sustainable development Follow-up and participate in various UN processes including the CEB, HLCP and HLCM, and UNDG

Specific focus and functions depending on the location and nature of the liaison office

9

Primary responsibility of Project offices

• •

Deliver the expected outputs and outcomes of a specific project(s) Engage with national stakeholders as p of the CCA and UNDAF g g part process – project staff

Established when justified for the duration of a specific project(s), and co-located with other UNEP offices or with UNDP wherever possible

10

Moving Forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence 2010 – 2013 Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009
Introduction
On 17 June 2008 the Senior Management Team (SMT) discussed an internal SMT discussion paper on ‘Moving Forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence’. A revised paper was presented to the SMT on 8 July that incorporated the views expressed during the meeting on 17 June, as summarised by the Executive Director, with a final draft paper being distributed to the SMT for comment on 2 September. Each paper took an incremental and pragmatic approach to implementing UNEP’s move towards a strategic presence model, including in relation to its physical presence. The development of the draft Programme of Work 2010-2011 and Budgets (PoW 20102011) took place in parallel with the SMT discussions on UNEP’s Strategic Presence. On 24 July, the UNEP Budget Committee recommended that in light of budget restrictions and the importance of successfully delivering on the PoW 2010-2011, that: “funds set aside for strengthening UNEP’s strategic presence should first be allocated to strengthening existing Regional Offices and their thematic capacity to deliver on the PoW (as out-posted staff from Divisions)”, a recommendation that found favour with the SMT and with thematic coordinators. The Executive Director has expressed the need to provide certainty in overall direction and a policy framework for accountability, while also allowing for flexibility. The decisions and directions included in this final approved policy paper will be given effect through the various delivery mechanisms described below and will be used to provide direction and guidance to the SMT and all staff. There are several elements to moving forward with UNEP’s strategic presence: the roles and responsibilities of UNEP’s presence in the regions and at Headquarters; UNEP’s physical presence in the regions; and leveraging additional regional and country capacity through various UNEP initiatives and projects (see page 11).

Guiding Objectives and Principles 2010 – 2013
Drawing from the Medium-term Strategy 2010-2013 (MTS), UNEP seeks to: Become a more effective, efficient, and results-focussed entity, which delivers as ‘One UNEP’. Significantly enhance its capacity to deliver on the Bali Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity Building. Further embrace its role as the environment programme of the United Nations that promotes the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of sustainable development. Facilitate greater coherence and collaboration among multi-lateral environmental agreements (MEAs) in addressing environmental issues, including at the regional and country levels.1

-

1

Recognizing the authority and autonomy of the relevant governing bodies.

-

Ensure its interventions are founded on sound science. Provide UNEP-wide integrated support to regions and countries. Involve strategic partners within United Nations system, multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and their secretariats, civil society and the private sector in delivering the MTS, as appropriate. Fully implement results-based management.

-

UNEP’s move towards a strategic presence model will be guided by the objective to deliver on one UNEP-wide Programme of Work (PoW) in a coherent, coordinated and integrated manner by all components of the Secretariat, in the most efficient and cost effective manner. The following principles form the basis for the transition: Strengthen UNEP’s global thematic competence and expertise, including scientific expertise, through its Divisions. Strengthen UNEP’s regional capacity to deliver the PoW, including considerations for enhanced physical presence at the regional and country level. Present a consistent and coherent regional and country image as ‘One UNEP’, and not as a collection of Divisions and offices. Ensure that both global and regional initiatives and activities are developed and take place in the regions as a result of close coordination and consultation between the Divisions and Regional Offices.2

Delivery Mechanisms 2010 - 2013
UNEP will utilize existing mechanisms for moving forward with its strategic presence, both in relation to its physical presence and in addressing issues regarding the roles and functions of different offices. Five key delivery mechanisms will be used to implement the decisions and directions contained in this policy paper, namely: PoW; annual Costed Work Plans3; projects approved by the Project Approval Group (PAG);4 internal reporting arrangements; and the electronic Performance Appraisal System (ePAS).

Through the use of these delivery mechanisms UNEP will ensure that the responsibilities of Divisions and Regional Offices are clearly spelt out and that appropriate activities are developed and implemented to deliver on the outputs contained in the PoW.

Key issues 2010 - 2013
The ‘Dalberg Report’5 and the MTS raised a number of issues regarding UNEP’s strategic presence. Three key issues have been addressed by the SMT:
2 The format for implementing the activities remains flexible and can be lead either by the Divisions or Regional Offices or, ideally, as a combination of the two. Some global interventions may continue to be coordinated globally and delivered regionally and at country level through partners but with the active engagement of the Regional Office. In these cases, Regional Offices will be consulted and engaged. If interventions require contacts with governments, this will be coordinated through the Regional Offices. 3 The form and content of Costed Work Plans is currently under review to align it with the PoW and UNEP’s Strategic Presence 2010-2013. 4 Issues such as the financial, management and reporting relationships between Divisions and Regional Offices in implementing projects will be determined through projects as approved by the PAG.

2 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

1. What will be the role and function of UNEP’s presence in the regions in relation to Headquarters6? 2. What will be the reporting relationship between staff across UNEP offices? 3. Where, how and when will UNEP strengthen its presence in selected, strategic locations?

‘Moving UNEP towards a strategic presence model’, Dalberg, 15 February, 2008. Headquarters includes the Executive Office, SGB, Evaluation, central units (QAS, CSS and RMS) and Divisions.
6

5

3 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

1. What will be the role and function of UNEP’s presence in the regions in relation to Headquarters? It is agreed that achieving clarity in the relationship between global roles and functions, led by Headquarters, and regional, sub-regional and county roles and functions, led by Regional Offices, is critical. It is also agreed that a transition period from now until the end of 2009 is required to build capacity both in the Divisions and in the regions for executing their respective functions, including facilitating the regional delivery of UNEP’s PoW 2010-2011 (and subsequent programmes) through the Regional Offices. This transition will include, amongst other things, putting in place necessary business processes and procedures and HR realignment, including reassigning existing staff, recruiting additional staff, and providing targeted training opportunities for staff in Divisions and in the regions in line with PoW 2010-11.7 The programmatic relationship between Headquarters and Regional Offices in the delivery of the PoW is: Primary responsibility of Headquarters8: Governance and global outreach: • Lead and coordinate relations with UNEP governing and oversight bodies and facilitate reporting on the implementation of decisions and resolutions of the UNEP Governing Council and UN General Assembly (UNGA) respectively. Provide substantive support and linkages to global political processes. Lead and coordinate global normative interventions as well as communications and outreach at the global level. Facilitate and coordinate global collaboration with partners and stakeholders, including identification and harnessing of global capacity and counterparts, including scientific expertise.

• • •

Strategic and coherent development of the PoW and projects: • • • Identify and articulate global priorities and trends. Ensure the coherent development of the PoW, Costed Work Plans and projects, including appropriate linkages to the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and MEAs. Create and maintain global thematic competence and expertise, including scientific expertise.

The recommendations of the UNEP Budget Committee that “the accountability framework for delegations is further amended to require the filling of new posts to align with the programmatic needs for the 2010-2011 PoW; and the period from now to 2010 is used to address the issue of matching demand for skills in sub-programmatic thematic areas and availability of staff with the necessary skills in Divisions, including in relation to any future recruitments” have been accepted by the ED/DED. 8 Headquarters includes the Executive Office, SGB, Evaluation, central units (QAS, CSS and RMS) and all Divisions. 4 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

7

Management and oversight: • Provide institutional support and guidance for consistent and coherent management of resources, data and information, and results across all UNEP offices, including oversight.

Regional and country support: • • • • • Provide guidance and inputs into the development of regional strategies for normative work, communications, outreach, and fundraising. Provide thematic expertise to the regions and ensure proper liaison between Regional Offices and thematic coordinators. Develop generic technical tools and guidelines that can be adapted and applied to different regions. Engage with Regional Offices on the development of project concepts and the collaborative implementation of projects in the regions. Facilitate capacity building and technology support through North-South and SouthSouth cooperation.

Fundraising: • Lead global fundraising and development of global fundraising strategies.

Primary responsibility of UNEP’s presence in the regions in support of UNEP’s global role and responsibilities: Regional Offices – includes Regional Office core staff plus out-posted staff from other Divisions: Representation and regional outreach: • • • • Represent the Executive Director in the regions9 through the Regional Director. Interact with governments within the region. Provide substantive support and linkages to the regional and sub-regional political processes. Identify and collaborate with partners and stakeholders in the regions10, such as the regional offices of UN agencies, intergovernmental organizations, and international financial institutions, including harnessing regional capacity and scientific expertise. Deliver communication, awareness raising and outreach in the regions.

• •

Informed development and coherent delivery of the PoW and projects: Identify regional, sub-regional and national priorities, trends and expertise to contribute to the development of UNEP’s global and regional interventions within the PoW. Identify regional, sub-regional and national challenges and opportunities as well as priorities and needs as a basis for the development and coherent delivery of the PoW and projects, including facilitating delivery of global interventions in the regions.

9

10

Which includes all countries in the region. This may include global partners in some cases such as with RONA and its relationship with institutions in the region i.e. the World Bank. 5 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

Lead delivery of the PoW in the region11 in accordance with the approved PoW, Costed Work Plans and projects, including regional activities agreed with MEAs through the PoW. Provide management and administrative services for UNEP’s presence in the region including HR, financial management, procurement and logistical services.

Capacity building and technology support: • • Facilitate capacity building and technology support in the regions. Cooperate with individual countries and engage in UN Common Country Programming Processes, including Common Country Assessments (CCAs) and UN Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs), and support countries in the implementation of programmes resulting from regional and sub-regional processes in line with the PoW. Provide recommendations and rationale on the need for additional sub-regional or country offices.

Fundraising: • Identify fundraising opportunities in the region and develop and implement regional fund raising strategies as part of UNEP’s global fund raising efforts.

Country Offices12 – services one country in a region: • • Provide information and inputs towards the identification of national priorities, trends, expertise and needs. Lead capacity building and technology support at the national level in accordance with the approved PoW, Costed Work Plans and projects, including joint projects with the host country. Cooperate with the country and engage in UN Common Country Programming Processes, including the CCA and UNDAF.

Liaison Offices13 – perform the following functions to various degrees and with specific focus depending on the location and nature of the liaison office. • Represent UNEP in the various inter-governmental fora, such as the UNGA and CSD as well as vis-à-vis key partners and donors, such as African Union (AU) and European Union (EU). Provide advice and information on, and substantive support to, political processes in order to promote UNEP and the mainstreaming of environment and sustainable development. Follow-up and participate in various UN processes including the Chief Executives Board, High Level Committees on Programmes and Management (HLCP and HLCM), and UN Development Group (UNDG) and others to strengthen the mainstreaming of the environment in different processes. Raise public awareness of UNEP through organizing events and meetings.


11 12

The work programme within a region is not a separate regional PoW but part of the overall UNEP PoW. Permanent presence. These are not representative offices, which is a function fulfilled by Regional Directors. See also footnote 14. A rationale for the costing of country offices is being developed jointly by DRC, QAS and SIT. 13 With the exception of the NY Office, all offices report to the respective Regional Office. The widest range of inter agency work is carried out by the NY Office. 6 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

Facilitate and support visits of senior officials to various meetings and fora to ensure that the UNEP Secretariat is kept abreast of the developments related to their specific areas of responsibilities.

Project offices – established for the duration of a specific project(s), and co-located with other UNEP offices where possible or with UNDP. • • Deliver the expected outputs and outcomes of a specific project(s). Engage with national stakeholders as part of the CCA and UNDAF process.

The role and function of DRC Headquarters: DRC Headquarters plays a specific role in supporting the relationship between the other Divisions and the Regional Offices, and also leads some global activities with a strong crosscutting focus. This role will evolve in support of the strengthened role of the Regional Offices in ensuring the coherent delivery of UNEP’s Programme in the regions and their more direct relationship with other Divisions. Specifically, DRC Headquarters will: • • • • • • • • • • Supervise and support the Regional Offices in developing the means to deliver the PoW at the regional and country level. Coordinate the provision of contributions from the regions into the development of PoW in consultation with QAS and CSS as well as into global policies and strategies. Oversee and report on the coherent implementation of the PoW within the regions. Provide advice, facilitate and coordinate UNEP’s engagement in the UN Common Country Programming Processes. Coordinate and oversee UNEP’s engagement in, and support to, the regional and sub-regional political processes. Coordinate and oversee preparation of briefs to the SMT on regional, sub-regional and country activities. Coordinate and oversee engagement of relevant skills, expertise and experience for the execution of the core functions in the regions. Coordinate the outreach activities in the regions in consultation with the Division of Communications and Public Information (DCPI). Facilitate and coordinate south-south and north-south cooperation across regions. In consultation with the Corporate Services Section (CSS), Quality Assurance Section (QAS), UNON and other administrative service providers, coordinate and oversee the provision of administrative services in the regions (HR, financial management, logistics, procurement etc).

Provide a coordinating platform for Global activities with a strong cross-cutting focus, as determined on a case by case basis, which currently includes:14 • • Manage the Poverty and Environment Initiative (PEI) and the Poverty and Environment Facility together with UNDP. Coordinate UNEP's work to strengthen the ability of Major Groups to engage in decision making processes at global, regional, national level and UNEP level.

14

At the Senior Management Team Retreat held on 9-10 July 2007 it was agreed that the host Division for some of these activities would be reviewed after 12 months. The review is yet to be finalized. 7 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

Coordinate the UNDP-UNEP collaboration.

The roles and functions described above describe the “primary responsibility” of various offices. Reference to primary responsibility assumes the involvement of staff from other offices as necessary and appropriate. For example, knowledge of regional and country issues resides throughout UNEP, as does thematic expertise on particular issues. The “primary responsibility” role includes drawing upon knowledge and expertise of UNEP staff wherever it is located. The role and function of out-posted staff. The role and responsibilities of out posted staff for sub-programmes (see pages 9-10) may vary according to each region. The role will however include support to the delivery of the PoW for the relevant sub-programme(s).

8 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

2. What will be the reporting relationship between staff across UNEP Offices? Regional teams (Regional Offices and their sub-regional/country and liaison offices) will comprise regional core staff and out-posted staff from Divisions. In order to strengthen the delivery as ‘one UNEP’ as well as the coherent delivery of the PoW at the regional and country level, and to enable effective and efficient execution of the respective roles and functions as described above, the reporting lines must be clearly defined. By 1 January 2010 the reporting lines will be as follows: • Staff out-posted by Divisions to Regional Offices will have the Regional Director15 as their first reporting officer and the Chief of respective Section/Unit16/Deputy Director or Director of the Division as the second reporting officer.17 In order to further enhance coordination with the relevant Division, and in particular the development of the annual work plan contained in the PAS, an “additional supervisor” may also be nominated by the Division Director from the relevant Division. Depending on the structure of the Office, the core staff of the regional offices will report to the Regional Director either directly or through a senior core staff. Subregional offices, Country offices (including project offices, as appropriate), and Liaison offices will report to the relevant Regional Office. This does not apply to the New York Office. The Regional Directors will report to the Director, DRC as first reporting officer and to the Deputy Executive Director (DED) as the second reporting officer. In assessing the performance of Regional Directors, the Director of DRC will take into account the delivery of the PoW at the regional level. In doing so, the Director of DRC will appraise the performance of the Regional Directors in consultation with the Directors of the other Divisions, who may also take into account any feedback from the thematic coordinators on the regional delivery of the PoW through the Costed Work Plans and projects. In assessing the performance of Division Directors, the DED will take into account the delivery of the PoW at the regional level. In doing so the DED may solicit inputs from the Regional Directors on the delivery of the PoW from a regional perspective. The reporting relationship of staff of the DGEF will be determined in consultation with the Division Director of DGEF to ensure there is proper separation of UNEP’s implementation agency and project execution functions. The reporting relationship of project offices requires case-by-case consideration. Efforts will be made to draw upon project office presence to enhance regional initiatives and relationships. The reporting relationship of a project office will be discussed and agreed between the Division Director and the relevant Regional Director, in consultation with the Director DRC, prior to the establishment of the office. The reporting relationship of project staff will be determined through projects as approved by the PAG.

15 16

Or through a senior core staff following consultation with the relevant Division Director. Usually at D1 level. 17 An exception is provided in the case of DGEF in recognition of UNEP’s role as both an implementing and executing agency – see bullet point 5 on page 9. 9 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

In order to further encourage collaboration between Divisions and Regional Offices, the ePAS for Division Directors and Regional Directors will include clear reference to UNEPwide collaborative delivery of the PoW at the regional level, details of which shall be determined by the Executive Office in consultation with Directors. Other reporting relationships • • The Chief of the NY Office will report to the Executive Director/Deputy Executive Director with administrative support being provided by DRC. The Brussels Office will continue to report to ROE. It will retain its existing functions and positions but the office will be reviewed in 2010-2011. There will be closer linkages to the Resource Mobilization Section. The Director or ROE will continue to report to DRC. There will be closer linkages to international organizations including major UN agencies based in Geneva. The Director of RONA will continue to report to DRC. There will be closer linkages to international organizations based in Washington DC.

• •

Measures will be taken to achieve closer linkages between the Executive Office and specific Regional/Liaison Offices. In particular: • There will be closer closer policy linkages between the Executive Office and offices located in Addis Ababa (AU), Brussels (EU), Washington DC (US) and New York (UN) through the Principal Advisor to the Executive Director on Policy and Programme.

10 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

3. Where and how will UNEP strengthen its presence in selected, strategic locations in 2010 – 2013? Staff will be out-posted from Divisions to Regional Offices in accordance with the PoW. A number of scenarios were put forward to the SMT in the discussion paper of 17 June and various options were further discussed by the SMT on 8 July. The development of the draft PoW 2010-2011 took place in parallel with the discussions on UNEP’s Strategic Presence. On 24 July the UNEP Budget Committee recommended that in light of budget restrictions and the importance of successfully delivering on the PoW, that: “funds set aside for strengthening UNEP’s strategic presence should first be allocated to strengthening existing Regional Offices and their thematic capacity to deliver on the PoW (as out-posted staff from Divisions)”, a recommendation that found favour with the SMT and with thematic coordinators. The Executive Director has proposed to set aside USD4 million of the proposed budget appropriation for 2010-2011 to enhance its strategic presence. The majority of these funds will be allocated to subprogrammes to enhance thematic capacity at the regional level to deliver on the PoW for this period.18 Staff will be out-posted from Divisions to relevant Regional Offices. The necessary staff and most appropriate region will be determined in consultation with Division Directors19 and Regional Directors but will in the first instance be allocated in proportion to the staff allocated against subprogrammes. UNEP will use its core Environment Funded staff to leverage further extra-budgetary resources to supplement its regional and country capacity, and in particular through its Poverty and Environment Initiative, efforts to further engage in the UNDAF process, and support for the implementation of MEAs in the regions. UNEP will continue to establish project offices to deliver the expected outputs and outcomes of a specific project(s). UNEP will also increase the number of project staff at the country level, as appropriate, to serve as advisors20 for a limited duration. They will be co-located within UNDP offices, whenever possible, as a cost effective means of strengthening UNEP’s involvement at the country level; in particular in the UNDAF process. The establishment of project offices, and the appointment of project based staff, will be subject to the availability of financial resources, and criteria such as: the level of political support for UNEP involvement in the country; national priorities and preparedness; environmental vulnerability affecting the country’s development; and the potential impact of UNEP’s assistance.21 Through the Dalberg Report, and internal initiatives, UNEP has reviewed its existing presence and options to further enhance its presence. As a first priority Environment Funds will be used to strengthen its Regional Offices. Extra-budgetary resources should be sought to further enhance its physical presence in the regions over the period 2010-2013 through: 1. Establishing a sub-regional presence in Central Asia and strengthening its presence in the South Pacific to cover the sub-region.

DRC advises that USD4 million would result in 9 additional professional staff and several support staff for Regional Offices. DRC recommends that the capacity of the Brazil and South Africa offices be enhanced at a cost of approximately USD1 million. If this approach was adopted, the remaining USD3 million would result in an additional 7 professional staff plus support staff. 19 Working with thematic coordinators as appropriate. 20 The specific role and function of such project staff will be determined on a case by case basis. 21 The criteria will be further refined through a consultative process being led by DRC. 11 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

18

2. Strengthening its country presence in Brazil, China, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa (and reviewing options to expand some offices to sub-regional offices). 3. Strengthening its liaison offices in Belgium, Ethiopia, and New York (UN). The strengthening of UNEP’s country presence in Brazil, China, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa will necessitate discussions with the host countries in terms of their financial and in-kind support towards these offices.22 Based upon the experience gained in these countries, available resources, and demonstrated need, UNEP will explore further expanding its country presence.

22

Establishing a sub-regional presence will require similar discussions with host countries and others. 12 Moving forward with UNEP’s Strategic Presence Final Approved SMT Policy Paper – January 2009

ANNEX D

Agenda Item 3: Emerging Issues
● Annex D.3.1:

Emerging Environmental Issues Strategy, 2009-2012

● Annex D.3.2: ● ● ● ●

Briefs on Emerging Issues

D3.2.1 Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC) D3.2.2 ABC Status Report D3.2.3 Environment and Health D3.2.4 Malé Declaration

Draft January 2009

UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME EMERGING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES STRATEGY 2009 - 2012

ACRONYMS
3Rs ABC DSS GEO GLOF EANET E-waste INDOEX SEPD UNEP Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Atmospheric Brown Cloud Dust and Sandstorms Global Environment Outlook Glacial Lake Outburst Floods International high altitude research project Electronic waste Indian Ocean Experiment Sub-regional Environment Policy Dialogue United Nations Environment Programme

2

CONTENTS
1. Background ........................................................................... 4

Asia and the Pacific Region

2. Process .................................................................................. 6

44

3. Emerging Environmental Issues .......................................... 8 3.1 Initiatives under implementation 3.2 Initiatives at project development stage
GMS

Two-thirds of world population 50 million peoples being added annually World’s fastest growing economy( > 6 pecent year) Emerging middle class (middle class households in China is expected to be increased from 50 m in 2002 to 100 m in 2010) Emerging Environmental Issues

Initiatives under implementation
Atmospheric Brown Clouds Transboundary air pollution Environment and Health

Initiatives at project development stage
Waste, including Electronic Waste Glacial Melting and Glacial Lake Outburst Floods Eco-housing and Eco-Transport

3

1.

BACKGROUND To this end, UNEP’s regional strategy identifies emerging environmental issues as one of the 5 core functions for regional delivery in the Asia-Pacific: (i) Representation; (ii) Intergovernmental process; (iii) Capacity building; (iv) One UN process; and (v) Identify and respond to emerging issues. An emerging environmental issue may be defined as an issue that is not yet generally recognized but which may have a significant impact on the environment. Several emerging environmental issues are key causes for concern, because they may have thresholds beyond which change may be irreversible. An emerging issue is not necessarily a new issue, but could be the intensification, or changed perception of a familiar issue. UNEP’s strength lies in applying science to these emerging threats. Applying sound science to emerging issues will help foster a collective response through policy intervention. UNEP, together with its partners, will continue its efforts to lead effective responses to priority emerging issues affecting the region. This document presents the strategy for operationalising the core function 5, identify and respond to emerging environmental issues, of the regional strategy. The document include: process of addressing emerging environmental issues and proposed strategy for 9 selected emerging environmental issues.

Environmental Setting is Dynamic: We live in an era of technological innovations. After abandoning the hunter-gather lifestyle practiced for 90,000 years, our economy and society were agriculture-based for about 8,000 years. The invention of mechanization resulted in the industrial revolution which led to the modern industrial society. After nearly 200 years of the industrial revolution, we have now entered a knowledge age where we are now witnessing simultaneous revolutions in information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology. The pace of change appears to be speeding up, in part due to the tools of the knowledge age. During this industrialization process, type and amount of waste generated by mankind has significantly changed. This indicates that socio-economic and environmental setting is dynamic. In Asia and the Pacific region, rapid economic and population growth have brought many challenging environmental issues to the forefront. The issues constraining the region’s movement towards sustainable development are growing more complex. Current consumption habits, which are of growing concern, further add to the emerging environmental issues. As the Anchor institution for the global environment, UNEP is mandated to develop institutional capacity to address existing and emerging environmental issues.

4

Environmental issues are dynamic
KNOWLEDGE AGE (now)


AIR

Nano-particles? ?

• • • E-waste Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC)

INDUSTRIAL (200 Years)

WATER

LAND
AGRICULTURAL (800 years)

Together with our civilization, technology, lifestyles and waste products change significantly

• • • • Smog episodes Occupational Diseases

Climate change Ozone depletion

• • •

Air pollution Water Pollution Soil conservation

BC

1800

1900

2000

Future

2.

PROCESS The process of including the issue in UNEP’s work programme will include: (i) (i) Project development Issue identification Project formulation Project implementation. Partnership and network development Science and capacity building Public awareness and policy consultation with the Sub-regional Environment Policy Dialogue (SEPD) which reviews UNEP’s regional strategy and work plan annually; preparation of a one page brief, followed by a proposal for management approval; establishment of a team, in-house or with partners, to work on the issue; and documentation of scientific investigations and identification of responses to date; and assisting in formulating one or more projects to be implemented by a partner or donor agency to test responses to the issue. Project activities will be inline with the Governing Council approved Programme of work (POW).

This section describes the process of addressing emerging environmental issues. The process of addressing emerging environment issues include two major steps:

(ii) (iii)

(ii)

(iv) Identifying emerging issues may come from either policy dialogues or research findings from the scientific community. UNEP will respond to such issues only when it has both a mandate and for which substantive expertise exists, either inhouse or through one of its networks. At the global level, UNEP’s Global Environment Outlook (GEO) year book, an annual publication, and DEWA strategy on emerging issue identify many of the emerging environmental complexities. At the regional level, the following criteria will be applied to identify an emerging issue: (i) (ii) an issue that is either trans-boundary or common to several countries; and a regional issue that is not yet identified as a priority by regional or sub-regional forums on environment.

UNEP will make efforts to provide seed funds for project development. UNEP's seed funding and expertise will assist to leverage for additional project funding and expertise. Once the capacity and network to address the issue are better developed in the region, the projects on Emerging Issues will be transferred to the relevant programme in-house or to partner institutions. Process of project implementation is described in the Annex 1

6

Environment Policy Dialogues

Network of Scientists and Policy Makers

Scientific Studies

Emerging Issues
Capacity Building

One of the seven regional air pollution monitoring stations established under the Male’ Declaration
7

3.1

EMERGING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: INITIATIVES UNDER IMPLEMENTATION the region. UNEP will continue to facilitate intergovernmental cooperation and development of science and capacity to address the issue. Currently UNEP is actively assisting with Secretariat for two intergovernmental networks on transboundary air pollution: (i) Malé Declaration on Control and Prevention of Air Pollution and Its Likely Transboundary Effects for South Asia; Acid Deposition Monitoring Network for East Asia (EANET)

3.1.1 Atmospheric Brown Cloud Atmospheric Brown Could (ABC), a brownish haze, is caused by air pollution emissions containing aerosol particulates that reduce the amount of sunlight that can reach the Earth’s surface. Reduction in sunlight can have significant impacts on terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Preliminary assessment has been completed by INDOEX (Indian Ocean Experiment) research. Potential direct and indirect consequences of the haze include regional and global climate change and impacts on ecosystems, the water cycle, agriculture and human health. In collaboration with governments and scientists, UNEP is assisting with following: (i) (ii) establishment of observatory stations across the region; assessment of impacts of ABC on human health, water budgets and agriculture; and (iii) developing and disseminating information packages for policy makers including quantification of pollutant damages, and propose mitigation measures and policy options.

(ii)

3.1.3 Environment and Health Heath impacts of environmental degradation are becoming an emerging issue in the region. There is need to promote coordinated intervention at national and regional levels to reduce the adverse impacts of environmental deterioration on human health in the region. Devised a regional Charter on Environment and Health and identifies 6 priority areas: (i) Air quality; (ii) Water supply, hygiene and sanitation; (iii) Solid and hazardous waste; (iv) Toxic chemicals and hazardous substances; (v) Climate change, ozone depletion and ecosystem changes; (vi) Contingency planning, preparedness and response in environmental health emergencies In collaboration with governments and partner agencies, UNEP plan to assist in the implementation of the Regional Charter.

3.1.2 Transboundary air pollution Increasing energy use along with increasing urbanisation, industrialisation and motorization has increased the emissions of air pollutants. Some of the pollutants have long lifespans and travel thousands of kilometers away from the source and cause damage to our environment. Air pollution and its Transboundary effects are emerging environmental issue in 8

Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC)
Haze at 5km; up to 3km high Size of continental US Covering Indian Ocean, South Asia, Southeast Asia and China

9

3.2.

EMERGING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: INITIATIVES AT PROJECT DEVELOPMENT STAGE e-waste management was organized. The meeting discussed a strategy towards promoting environment friendly e-waste management and agreed on the need for a regional initiative. UNEP in collaboration with governments, expert agencies, and relevant organization will promote waste management through: (i) establishment of quantitative base and capacity for waste management at national and region levels; (ii) assist national governments in devising national strategies on control and management of wastes for a 10-20 years planning horizon. (iii) establish pilot demonstration projects on innovative waste prevention, recycling, disposal techniques and waste to energy solutions. 3.2.3 Eco-Housing and Eco-Transport Asia and the Pacific region is experiencing rapid urbanization. By 2025 more than half the population is projected to live in urban areas. A significant percentage of this total population, an estimated 600 million, will join the growing middle class. The first purchase of the new middle class is often a house and a car. Additional vehicles and houses means additional pollution loads. The increase in pollution leads to additional costs in the national budgets both in terms of fuel imports and health costs. A strong focus on a policy of prevention is advocated. In partnership with governments and experts, UNEP will assist with the promotion of sustainable housing and transport.

3.2.1 Glacier Melting and Glacial Lake Outburst Floods Climate change is causing the retreat of glaciers. Melting glaciers pose two main concerns: (i) a threat to regional water security by reducing the water reserves in the mountains and changing the timing of annual water flows; and an increase in the vulnerability to natural disasters, through Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF).

(ii)

Initial studies on the impact of climate change have been completed for Nepal, Bhutan, Pumqu basin in China, Astor basin in Pakistan, and Tista basin in Sikkim (India). In collaboration with governments and partner agencies, UNEP will assist with: (i) completing the glacial lake inventory for Hindu KushHimalaya and Central Asian regions; (ii) establishment of the early warning and monitoring systems; and (iii) development and pilot testing of adaptation measures. 3.2.2 Waste management, including Electronic Waste Waste generation increases every year especially in urban areas due to the increase in population, consumerism, and changing lifestyles. Rapid economic development has further accelerated the generation of additional waste. In many Asian cities, waste generation has far outstripped the available infrastructure and technology to deal with such increases. Disposing of unwanted electronic products (e-waste), one of the fastest growing type of waste. An expert group meeting on 10

Melting Glacial

Mobile Phone Subscribers
450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 1996 1997 1998 2001 2002

GLOF
Human settlement affected by Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF)

C e llula r m obile s ubs c ribe rs (m illion)

Asia: Growing Urban Population
Eco-house

Promote Prevention
Energy saving
15 times more energy efficient than ordinary urban house

Waste management
3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 1975 2000 2030

54% (2.6 billion) 37% (1.4 billion) 24%

Solid wastes to bio-gas generation; waste water recycling

Water saving
Rainwater harvesting; 40 litres: collected daily on the roof where water is condensed at night; 40 litres: sourced from the air conditioning system

Eco-transport
Toyota Prius Hybrid

Fuel efficiency
23 Km / litre; Saving: $5,000 over 15 years

Emission reduction
CO2 by 50% CO, HC and NOx by 90% below Japanese standards.

ANNEX 1: PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION
A three phased approach is being followed in implementing the projects on emerging environment issues: Phase I: Partnerships and network development; Phase II: Science and capacity building; and Phase III: Public awareness and policy Phase I: Partnerships and network development—UNEP will address emerging issues together with governments and scientific institutions with expertise in the identified issues. Phase I of the implementation process will include the development of a network of scientists and policy makers. Some of the existing scientific partnerships, in the region, fostered by UNEP include: (i) (ii) International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) for glacial lake outburst floods (GLOF); Scripps Institution of Oceanography/ Center for Clouds, Chemistry and Climate (SIO/C4) for atmospheric brown clouds (ABC); and Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Center (ADORC) for acid deposition. Phase II: Science and capacity building—Addressing emerging environmental issues requires understanding of the scientific aspects of the issue and the national capacities to respond to the issue. Phase II of the implementation process will focus on the development of the science and capacity building in terms of equipment and expertise. New technologies and science often require demonstration through pilot projects. Pilot projects are developed and implemented in this phase to demonstrate the feasibility of technological responses that could address emerging issues. Phase III: Public awareness and policy—During Phase III, results of the scientific findings will be disseminated to the public and fed into policy making processes. UNEP will facilitate development of regional treaties or agreements, if required. As action is required at all levels (from regional to individual) to implement environmental agreements, UNEP will make use of its regular consultations with stakeholders to keep awareness at a high level. When the capacity and network to address the issue are better developed in the region, the project will be transferred to the regular sub-regional activities of UNEP. For example, in 1998, UNEP identified the need for sub-regional cooperation on trans-boundary air pollution in South Asia. This led to the formulation of the Malé Declaration on trans-boundary air pollution, development of a network of scientists and policymakers at the regional level, and basic capacity building at the national level. UNEP is assisting the secretariat for the Malé Declaration as part of the regular activities for South Asia.

(iii)

Apart from working with key scientific institutions, UNEP also helps to establish scientific teams working across institutions. For example, a team of international scientists headed by Prof. Ramanathan of SIO/C4 and Prof. Paul J. Crutzen of Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry was established for studying of ABC.

NETWORK OF POLICY MAKERS AND SCIENTISTS

STAKEHOLDERS NETWORK

CAPACITY BUILDING

NATIONAL LEVEL

REGIONAL LEVEL

1. Background

Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC)
Objectives
The general objective is to promote regional capacity building and facilitate interactions between scientific and policy making process. The specific objectives are: ● to develop the science and the capacity to study the issue of aerosols in the region; ● ● to assess the impacts of ABC on climate change agriculture water budget and health, and to raise awareness on the issue and promote actions for mitigation.

During 1995-99, an international group of over 250 scientists collected data over the Indian Ocean as part of Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). INDOEX discovered a layer of brownish haze of air pollution extending as high as 3 km hovering over most of the Indian Ocean, South and Southeast Asia during the dry season. Air pollution containing aerosol particles emitted from anthropogenic sources such as fossil fuel and bio-fuel combustion and natural source like biomass burning and associated long-range transport leads to widespread layers of brownish haze, referred to as Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC). The pollution haze occurs frequently in all other heavily inhabited regions and downwind. It is a transboundary, transcontinental and trans-oceanic phenomenon. Potential direct and indirect consequences of ABC involve regional and global climate change, impacts on the water cycle, agriculture and human health. To address the concerns, UNEP has been commissioning a project called “Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC)” in collaboration with a group of eminent scientists from Asia, Europe and USA.

Major Activities
The major activities of the Project ABC are: ● Observation: establishment of a network of ground based monitoring stations across the Asia-Pacific region for data collection and capacity building. There are now fully operational stations equipped with a suite of state-of-the-art instruments to monitor aerosol properties, precipitation chemistry, gaseous species, solar radiation and meteorological parameters. Impact assessment: assessment of the potential impacts of ABC on agriculture, water, and health using the data from the monitoring stations. The lead regional institutions are coordinating the studies on the assessment of impacts of ABC on agriculture, water budgets and human health. Awareness and mitigation: provide sciencebased information produced from the impact assessment for policy makers and other stakeholders to mitigate atmospheric pollution.

Major Outputs
● ● Publication on the initial assessment of the impact of Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC); Increased capacity to study Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC) in the region with fully operational observatories in the Asia-Pacific region operated by local scientists; Increased understanding of the impacts of Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC) on health, agriculture, and water budget. The impact assessment studies will produce comprehensive scientific reports on impacts of ABC on water budget, agriculture, and human health including a summary report for policy makers; Knowledge concerning mitigation measures developed and effectively communicated to decision makers and general public.

Date: January 2009 Website: http://www.rrcap.unep.org/abc

Project Atmospheric Brown Clouds
Status Report: January 2009
UNEP commissioned Project ABC in 2002 to study the issue of Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABCs) in Asia. A Science Team comprising internationally renowned scientists was established. The ABC Science Team together with Impact assessment experts has conducted observation and the first assessment of impacts of ABCs on regional climate, water resources, agriculture and human health in Asia. Initial studies demonstrate that ABCs and its interaction with build-up of greenhouse gases significantly affect the regional climate, glacial melt, water budget, agriculture and public health. Results of Phase I implementation indicate that for the next decades, the regional aerosol effects will continue to play a major role as long as current strong sources of air pollution remain. The important but inadequately understood role that ABCs can play in regional and global climate change has opened a new dimension of human influence on earth’s climate. Achievements of the Project ABC during the phase I implementation and proposed direction of phase II are summarized in this status report. ABC SURFACE OBSERVATORIES
• • • • • • • • • • • • Maldives Climate Observatory Hanimaadhoo (MCO-H), -

Maldives Climate Observatory - Gan (MCO-G), Indian Climate Observatory – Pune (ICO-P), Nepal Climate Observatory Godavari (NCO-G), Nepal Climate Observatory Pyramid (NCO-P), Thailand Climate Phimai (TCO-P), Japan Climate Okinawa (JCO-O), Observatory observatory -

Strengthened capacity to monitor ABCs
● ABC Observatories: establishment of an integrated network of 12 strategically located state-of-the-art ABC surface climate and ABC pollution observatories and throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region – a major achievement in this relatively poorly monitored part of the world – that are now operated by national scientists with regular training through the project and support from Science Team. Regional Atmospheric Characterization experiments: Field campaigns APMEX (2004) and MAC (2006) conducted from ABC super site at Haminaadhoo in Maldives and EAREX (2005) and EAREX 2007 (in collaboration with PACDEX) conducted from ABC super site at Jeju in Korea to improve our understanding of ABCs in South Asia and East Asia. UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles): Development of light weight UAVs to monitor ABCs for the first time with UAVs. UAVs were deployed during MAC (2006) in Maldives. Aerosol and Precipitation measurements: Rain water sampling to document for the first time how soot ABCs are removed by rain in the South Asia. Transfer of knowledge to the local scientists about measurements of precipitation and aerosol sampling and analysis.

Korea Climate Observatory - Gosan (KCO-G), Pacific Climate Observatory Momote (PCO-MT), Pacific Climate Observatory Midway (PCO-MW), and -

Pacific Climate Observatory - Mauna Loa (PCO-ML) National Atmospheric and Climate Observatory – Trinidad Head (NACO-T)

ABC Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Improved science on ABCs
● ABC models: Creation of an assimilated aerosol radiative forcing and heating rates dataset on a scale of 50 km x 50 km for the entire Indo-Asia-Western Pacific region from 2000 to 2005. This product integrates weather forecast fields with satellite observations and surface emission of aerosol precursors in a regional chemical-transport model. This will serve as a source for many international assessments of ABCs on Asian weather and climate. Regional Hotspots: Spatial distribution of ABC and Identification of regional ABC hotspots around the world. The aerosol regional radiative forcing to climate system and associated impacts are significant, often higher than the global values, due to heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions of aerosol loading. The particularly affected regions with high values of aerosol burden are Asia (e.g., South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asian region), Africa (Southern and Central Africa), and South America (Amazon basin) and the oceanic region downwind. These are the regional hotspots, and the ABCs problem is not restricted to these regions only. New Scientific Understanding: A better understanding of the science of ABC with new findings on regional climate change through the studies by ABC scientists; such as - Surface dimming (reduction of solar radiation reaching the ground) and atmospheric solar heating are large over Asia. The studies have confirmed that ABCs may have masked global warming by as much as 50%. ABCs can weaken the monsoon circulation and reduce monsoon rainfall. ABCs increase strength and frequency temperature inversion in winter and spring of

WHAT ARE ABCs?
Atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) are regional scale plumes of air pollution that consist of copious amounts of tiny particles of soot, sulphates, nitrates, fly ash and many other pollutants.

                       

Atmospheric solar heating combined with soot deposition on the snow/ice can add to greenhouse warming and accelerate the retreat of glaciers and snow packs in Hindu-Kush-Himalayan (HKH) Mountains.

Global distribution of ABCs.

The images show aerosol optical depths (rough index for total aerosol content and quantitative index for sunlight intercepted) for anthropogenic aerosols for Dec to March (a); April to June (b); July to August (c) and Sept to Nov (d). The figure reveals the wide spread nature of ABCs and the strong seasonal dependence of ABCs which differ from region to region. Source: Ramanathan et al, 2007, ABC special Issue of JGR edited by Nakajima and Yoon.

Improved understanding on impacts of ABCs
● Impact Study Teams: Formation of international teams of experts from within and outside Asia to carry out comprehensive scientific assessment studies on the impacts of ABCs on agriculture, water budgets and human health in Asia, with Indian Agriculture Research Institute (India) as lead regional institution for coordinating agriculture impact study; Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) for water impacts, and Chulabhorn Research Institute (Thailand) for Health impacts. Capacity of Asian researchers has been significantly enhanced regarding the understanding of the ABCs issue and carries out impact assessment studies. First Impact Assessment Report with Focus on Asia: The first impact assessment report on “ABC Impacts on Regional Climate, Agriculture and Human Health” has been completed and published in November 2008. The impact assessment report is available at www.rrcap.unep.org/abc/impact/index.cfm. The report is the first attempts by the Project ABC to assess the effects of ABCs. The starting point of the report was an earlier preliminary assessment report on human health, food security and the water budget in 2002 that was based on the findings of Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX).

Phase II
Phase I results have revealed that the pollution haze is a frequently occurring phenomenon in and downwind of all heavily inhabited regions across the globe and ABC has become an issue of global significance. There is a need to develop the science and build the capacity of developing countries for monitoring, scientific understanding, impact assessment, and mitigation of atmospheric brown clouds. The experiences from the formulation and implementation of the Montreal Protocol show that the development of science should be supported by appropriate capacity building measures for prevention, mitigation and adaptation in order to address the emerging environmental issues. In view of this, the second phase will focus on the following subprogrammes in Asia: ● Sub-program 1 (Aerosol and Climate Observatory and Modeling): aims to build the necessary physical infrastructure for atmospheric monitoring (radiation, aerosol, precipitation, and meteorology) and data on atmospheric brown clouds for gaining better insights on science of ABCs, as well as training of local scientists and technicians. Sub-program 2 (Impact Assessment): aims to further refine the assessment of the impacts of ABCs on regional climate, water resources, agriculture and human health using the data from the observatory programme and model simulation results. The second impact assessment report will be published at the end of Phase II. Sub-program 3 (Adaptation and Mitigation): will carry out ABC mitigation and adaptation studies through application of various green technologies as pilot studies in order to develop practical mitigation measures to reduce emissions of ABCs and adaptation measures for glacial melt. Sub-program 4 (Policy): The firm information based on sound science, i.e., the findings from the impact assessment program and mitigation programme, will provide valuable basis for policy-making through the program on policy.

In Africa and Latin America, the project will conduct scoping studies and develop white Papers with assessment of the current situation regarding the available studies or ongoing relevant activities on the issues, if any, technical capacities and human resources. The white paper will identify the gaps in the existing system to study the issue of ABCs in Africa and Latin America.

Environment and Health
1. Background
Humans are a part of the ecosystem. The release of pollutants into the atmosphere, water or land beyond the carrying capacity of the ecosystem has a direct impact on human health. Air pollution contributes to an annual death of nearly 0.5 million people in Asia. Climate change, which includes extreme weather events and also changing pattern of diseases, cause death to the ever growing 1.5 million humans every year. These trends are a growing concern as urban migration is reaching up to 40% of the region's 3.6 billion people now living in cities. By 2025, urban areas will be home to more than half of the region's population. The responsibility for health and environmental protection is vested in different government agencies. Formulation and implementation of policies on environment and health require effective communication and joint action by the environment and health agencies at both national and regional levels.

Objectives
Objective of the initiative is to promote a coordinated intervention at national to regional levels for reduction of adverse impacts of environmental deterioration on human health in Asia.

Regional Ministerial Forum on Environment and Health in South East and East Asia

Major Activities
In November 2004, UNEP in collaboration with the WHO convened the First High-Level meeting on environment and health in Southeast and East Asian countries. The meeting requested UNEP and WHO to assist with the development and implementation of a Regional Charter for environment and health. Major activities include: ● Convene one Advisory Body meetings ● Convene annual Scientific seminar ● Complete annual progress report in the implementation of the regional charter by 4th quarter of 2008 ● Enhance knowledge sharing through the establishment and implementation of a dedicated website for the regional forum ● Convene the meetings of the High-Level officials to review the progress in the implementation of the Regional Charter ● Assist Technical Working Groups in implementing their work plan ● Compile a synthesis document on environment and health for the environment and health ministers.

Major Outputs
● Ministerial Forum Convened Ministerial Regional Forum and High Level Officials’ Meeting on Environment and Health, 8-9 August 2007, Bangkok. Regional Charter Devised a Regional Charter on environment and health in South East and East Asia Declaration Ministerial level declaration (Bangkok Declaration) on Environment and Health. Expert Networks Thematic Working Groups are established and corresponding work plans have been completed for 6 priority areas: (i) Air quality; (ii) Water supply, hygiene and sanitation; (iii) Solid and hazardous waste; (iv) Toxic chemicals and hazardous substances; (v) Climate change, ozone depletion and ecosystem changes; (vi) Contingency planning, preparedness and response in environmental health emergencies.
Date: January 2009 Website: http://www.environment-health.asia

Malé Declaration on Control and Prevention of Air Pollution and Its Likely Transboundary Effects for South Asia
1. Background
Air pollution is an emerging environmental issue in Asia as it is in other parts of the world. In 1998, UNEP together with Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) took the initiative to draw attention to air pollution and its transboundary effects for South Asia with the financial support from Sida. Malé Declaration on Control and Prevention of Air Pollution and Its Likely Transboundary Effects was discussed and adopted by Ministers of the Environment of South Asian in April 1998. Participating countries are Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Iran, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. South Asia Cooperative Environment program (SACEP) is also part of the network. Governments nominated National Implementing Agencies (NIAs) for the implementation of the Malé Declaration. UNEP hosts as the Secretariat. The implementation had three phases.

Objectives
The Malé Declaration’s objective is to aid the process of providing a clean environment through clean air. The Declaration calls for regional cooperation to address the increasing threat of transboundary air pollution and its possible impacts.

Bahawalnagar Deholran Chitwan Geliphu Sathkhira Port Canning

Anuradaphura Hanimaadu Transboundary air pollution monitoring network under the Malé Declaration

Major Activities
Phase I: During Phase I of the Malé Declaration implementation programme, 1998-2000, a network was established, baseline studies were completed and action plans drawn up. Phase II: A capacity building programme was initiated in Phase II of the implementation programme which included strengthening the monitoring network and training. National and regional level stakeholders networks were also established during this phase. By the end of Phase II in 2004, at national level, each of the participating countries established one transboundary air pollution monitoring station and the required skilled manpower to do the monitoring. Phase III: ● Networking: convene intergovernmental meetings and stakeholders’ meetings ● Monitoring: Assist NIAs in conducting regular monitoring. ● Emission Inventory: technical support for the compilation of emission inventory. ● Impact Assessment: enhance the impact assessment capacity of NIAs

Major Outputs
Policy developments: Malé Declaration on Control and Prevention of Air Pollution and Its likely Transboundary Effects for South Asia; and Network of policy makers and scientists for the implementation of the Malé Declaration; Capacity for monitoring: Baseline reports on the status of transboundary air pollution monitoring at the national level; Network of trainboundary air pollution monitoring sites in South Asia; Skilled manpower to conduct transboundary air pollution monitoring; Technical manual for conducting transboundary air pollution monitoring; Capacity for impact assessment: Methodology and skilled manpower to conduct assessment of health impact, corrosion impact, and crop impact; Emission inventory manual for compilation of emission data; Capacity for emission reduction: Demonstration projects for emission reduction; Compendium of good practices for emission reduction; National level strategies for emission reduction.
Date: January 2009 Website: www.rrcap.unep.org/male

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful