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New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services


Division of Public Health Services
Bureau of Infectious Disease Control
Baseline Arbovial Risk
New Hampshire, July 1, 2014
See current Arboviral Illness Surveillance, Prevention and Response Plan:
http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/cdcs/arboviral/documents/arboviralresponse.pdf
for additional information on how the NH DHHS estimates risk levels and community
and individual prevention activities to reduce the risk of human illness from arboviral virus.
Current Arboviral
Risk Level
- Baseline/No Data*
- Low
- Moderate
- High
- Very High
2013 Positive Cases
- Mosquito (WNV)
: 9
- Human (WNV)
I(
- Mosquito (EEE)
: 9
- Horse (EEE)
:
(
:
(
- Horse (WNV)
*Indicates no current activity detected
and/or no current mosquito surveillance
NH Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health Services
Arboviral Illness Response Plan
June 2014
24
Table 2. Guidelines for Phased Response to Arbovirus Surveillance Data

Risk Category Probability of
Human Illness
Recommended Response for
State Agencies and Town Officials
Recommend Response for the Public
and Individuals in Affected Areas

1

Baseline /No Data
1. Educational efforts directed to the general public
on personal protection and source reduction.
2. Routine human and veterinary surveillance.
3. Assess local ecology for mosquito abundance.
4. Consider larval and adult mosquito monitoring
with routine collection and testing of mosquitoes.

1. Repair Screens
2. Dump standing water weekly
3. Wear mosquito repellant when outdoors during peak mosquito
hours (from dusk to dawn)
4. Wear long sleeves and long pants when outdoors during peak
mosquito hours (from dusk to dawn)
5. Use mosquito netting on baby carriages and playpens when
outdoors
6. Arrange neighborhood clean-ups to get rid of mosquito
breeding sites
7. Be aware of stagnant water on property (e.g., unused swimming
pools) and consult local health officer
8. Clean roof gutters so that rainwater cannot collect in them.
9. Do not attempt to drain or alter natural water bodies such as
ponds, marshlands, and wetlands as they are regulated under state
law and any alterations may require the approval of state and
possibly federal agencies.



2

Low
Incorporates previous category response, plus:
1. Expand community outreach and public
education programs focused on risk potential and
personal protection, emphasizing source reduction.
2. Assess mosquito populations, monitor larval and
adult mosquito abundance, submit samples to PHL
for virus testing.
3. Use larvicides at specific sources identified by
entomologic survey and targeted at vector species. If
appropriate, consider source reduction techniques.
If current year activity includes EEE virus isolates in
mosquitoes, may consider adulticiding based on
current regional epidemiology and surveillance
efforts.
4. Enhance human and veterinary surveillance.

3

Moderate
Incorporates previous category response, plus:
1. Increase larval control, source reduction, and
public education emphasizing personal protection
measures.
2. Actions to prevent disease may include targeted
larviciding, and if current year activity, possibly
ground adulticiding targeted at likely bridge vector
species.
3. Enhance human surveillance and activities to
further quantify epizootic activity.

4

High
Incorporates previous category response, plus:
1. Intensify public education on personal protection
measures
a. Utilize multimedia messages including press
releases, local newspaper articles, cable channel
interviews, etc.
b. Actively seek out high-risk populations (nursing
homes, schools, etc.) and educate them on personal
protection.
c. Issue advisory information on adulticide spraying.
2. Consider intensifying larviciding and/or
adulticiding control measures as indicated by
surveillance.
3. DHHS will confer with local health officials to
determine if the risk of disease transmission
threatens to cause multiple human cases. If
surveillance indicates a continuing risk of human
disease and potential for an outbreak, intensified
ground-based adult mosquito control may be
recommended.
Incorporates previous category response, plus:
1. Avoid areas with heavy mosquito activity
2. Adjust outdoor activity to avoid peak mosquito hours (from
dusk to dawn)

NH Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health Services
Arboviral Illness Response Plan
June 2014
25

5

Very High
Incorporates previous category response, plus:
1. Continued highly intensified public outreach
messages through community leaders and the media
emphasizing the urgency of personal protection.
2. If risk of outbreak is widespread and covers
multiple jurisdictions, DHHS will confer with local
health officials and Arboviral Illness Task Force
members to discuss the use of intensive mosquito
control methods. A State of Emergency may be
declared pursuant to RSA 21-P:35.
Factors to be considered in making this decision
include the cyclical, seasonal and biological
conditions needed to present a continuing high risk
of EEE human disease.
The declaration of an emergency may trigger
application of mosquito adulticide. DHHS may
define targeted treatment areas for vector control
following the declaration of an emergency.
3. Ground-based adulticide applications may be
repeated as necessary to achieve adequate control.
Incorporates previous category response, plus:
1. Consider cancelling or rescheduling outdoor gatherings,
organized sporting events, etc., during peak mosquito hours