Staunton News Leader 07/03/2014 Page : A03

Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 07/03/2014 July 3, 2014 1:58 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA
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LOCAL EDITOR: WILLIAM RAMSEY, WRAMSEY@NEWSLEADER.COM, 540.213.9182
STAUNTON — A 32-year-old
man told police he was robbed
of hundreds of dollars Tuesday
night in Staunton – reporting
the incident about two hours af-
ter being confronted by two
men, one armed with a knife,
authorities said.
The man reported to police
that his car stalled about 9:30
p.m. near the intersection of
Garber and Drury streets, ac-
cording to a Staunton police re-
port.
The man said he exited his
car and was hoping to walk to a
nearbyhome inaneffort to bor-
row a phone. As he was walk-
ing, police said the man told
themhewas approachedbytwo
men, both about 20 years old.
One of the two men demanded
money, but the man refused.
Police said the second man
pulled a pocketknife with a 4-
inch blade, and again demand-
ed cash.
The victim, who works at a
local restaurant, told police he
gave the men $284 in cash. The
two assailants then fled into
some nearby woods, police
said.
The victim told police he
went back to his car and was
able to get the vehicle re-start-
ed after a short period of time.
Police said he drove back to his
place of employment in the Or-
chard Hill shopping center,
across from the Staunton Mall,
andcalledtoreport therobbery
at 11:30 p.m.
No injuries were reported.
When asked why he waited
two hours to contact authori-
ties, the victim said it was be-
cause “he didn’t have a phone,”
saidOfficer Jennifer Stevens, a
spokeswoman for the Staunton
Police Department.
No arrests were made.
Man robbed at knifepoint in Staunton
By Brad Zinn
bzinn@newsleader.com
STAUNTON — A Staunton
energy company is working
with two Virginia Solarize
programstomakesolarener-
gy easier to access and more
affordable.
Alternergy Incorporated
will be assisting Solarize
Charlottesville through the
summer and fall.
The Staunton company
has already been assisting
SolarizeRVA.
Solarize, a movement
which started in Portland,
Ore., involves members of
the community work togeth-
er to get discounts through
collective solar purchasing.
Local sustainable energy
organizations drive the So-
larize effort, a release said,
by seeking proposals for
pricing, materials and instal-
lation fromregional solar in-
stallers and selecting two to
be the programcontractors.
The process is stream-
linedfor homeowners andof-
fers free workshops, home
assessments and assistance
with financing and tax cred-
its, the release said.
Atypical cost for asystem
would be $10,000 and the So-
larize programis attempting
to finance the entire amount,
with customers providing a
down payment, said Joe Sa-
donis, AltenergyInc.’sStaun-
ton branch manager.
“Solarize programs can
give communities a huge and
immediate boost in solar de-
velopment,” Sadonis said.
“Adding assistance to partic-
ipants in accessing federal
tax credits, navigating the
Solar Renewable Energy
Credit market and securing
affordable financing re-
duces the learning curve as
well, and that’s a tremendous
benefit for homeowners
wanting to add solar to their
properties.”
Sadonis said Solarize is
beginningtoorganizeinHar-
risonburg.
Sadonis said he talks di-
rectly with customer and
triestoqualifythem—which
is a long process, when it
comes to obtaining informa-
tion of what system would
work best for them.
Some homes may not be
ideal forsolarpanels, hesaid.
“We’re not going to put so-
lar panels that we wouldn’t
want to put on our own
homes,” said Sadonis, who
addedthat homeswithalot of
shade are not good options
for solar energy.
Julie Markowitz, execu-
tive director of the Staunton
Downtown Development As-
sociation, said she’s happy
that solar energy isn’t just a
conversation anymore, it’s
actually happening.
“It’s just amazing what
Joe has been able to offer to
make it growas quickly as it
has,” Markowitz said.
“I thinkwhenyouget real-
lyknowledgeablepeoplewho
are able to implement new
tech and able to explain it in
fun ways it makes it a huge
difference in people to adopt
it.”
SolarizeRVA’s program
will run until July 15 and So-
larize Charlottesville will
run until Sept. 30.
The Richmond-based pro-
gram will be working with
the Richmond Region Ener-
gy Alliance. The Charlottes-
ville program is sponsored
by the nonprofit Local Ener-
gy Alliance Programin part-
nershipwiththeCityof Char-
lottesville, Albemarle Coun-
ty and the University of Vir-
ginia Community Credit
Union.
A ground-mounted photovoltaic system with 60 solar panels collects the sun’s energy at Charis Eco-Farm in Staunton as well as
provides shelter for their chickens, ducks and turkeys. HOLLY MARCUS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS LEADER
Solar firm to assist in initiative
Effort to make
energy affordable
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
STAUNTON — The city’s new mayor
said she hopes to continue what she
considersthewiseleadershipof Staun-
ton’s most recent mayor.
Carolyn Dull said Wednesday that
she was honoredbythe vote to leadthe
city’s council, and that
she’d try to continue the
legacy of Lacy King Jr.,
the past mayor who
chose not to run for re-
election this year.
“He was, in my opi-
nion, an outstanding
mayor,” said Dull, who
was elected to her third
four-year term on coun-
cil. “He was diligent in
his work, and a real pro-
ponent of having civil
discourse.”
Dull is slated to pre-
side over her first full
council meeting July 10.
Members on Tuesday
chose her to lead council
on a 4-2 vote. Ophie Kier,
who was also nominated to be mayor,
abstained, city records show.
Councilor Erik Curren was compli-
mentary of both candidates, but
thought Kier’s job in the city would
make him accessible for city func-
tions. Councilor Andrea Oakes also
backedKierandnominatedhimforthe
position.
Council members didn’t vote on
Kier’s nomination because Dull’s vote
was first. She served as vice mayor
during her last termon council.
After the mayoral vote, Kier was
elected vice mayor on a 6-0 vote, again
with himabstaining.
The mayor serves in a mostly cere-
monial capacity, leading meetings and
representing the city for official func-
tions.
Dull hopes
to continue
legacy of
leadership
By Calvin Trice
ctrice@newsleader.com
Dull
Kier
RICHMOND —A 35 mph speed limit
is now in effect on unpaved roads
across Virginia.
Drivers had been allowed to travel
upto55mph, but that changedTuesday
whenanewstatelawhit thebooks. The
Virginia Department of Transporta-
tion proposed the lower speed limit.
The law does not require VDOT to
post speed limits on unpaved roads.
The department is working with the
Department of Motor Vehicles to edu-
cate drivers on the newlimit.
State enacts 35 mph
limit on unpaved roads
Associated Press
STAUNTON —Some choice
pieces for cello will anchor
the opening performances
Thursday and Friday of the
Heifitz summer concert se-
ries, a tribute to the young
man who shared his life and
music with the Queen City
before his death in May.
The Heifetz International
Music Institute’s summer
season will be a musical me-
morial tribute
to cellist Dmi-
try Volkov. The
opening con-
certs areat 7:30
p.m. Thursday
and Friday at
Mary Baldwin
College’s Fran-
cis Auditorium.
The first half of the con-
cert will be devoted to Franz
Schubert’s Quintet for Two
Cellos, completed just weeks
before his death and not per-
formed in public until 22
years later.
Performers will be violin-
ists Shmuel Ashkenasi and
Katharina Kang, violist Mi-
chael Casimir, and cellists
Frans Helmerson and Timo-
thy Eddy.
Kang and Casimir are
both institute alumni artists-
in-residence this summer.
Following intermission,
acoustic blues artist Chic
Street Man will provide his
rendition of “Amazing
Grace.” He has been an insti-
tute faculty member for
years.
The rest of the concert
will comprise Volkov’s favor-
itepieces. Sixyounginstitute
cellists have been invited to
perform these pieces in hon-
or of their colleague.
Tickets for this concert
are available at www.heifet-
zinstitute.org or at the door.
Heifitz opens with musical tribute to Volkov
Staff Reports
Volkov

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