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MID CITY

EAST

Draft Small Area Plan


7/3/14

Government of the District of Columbia


Vincent, C. Gray, Mayor

TABLE OF CONTENTS

20
54
128
Mid City East Small Area Plan Table of Contents

110
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

76
6: IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

5: CORRIDOR HIGHLIGHTS

18
4: NEIGHBORHOOD HIGHLIGHTS

8
3: KEY FINDINGS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS

2: VISION

1: INTRODUCTION

EXECUTIVE STATEMENT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Mid City East Small Area Plan provides


a framework for conservation, development,
sustainability and connectivity in Mid City East, a
mosaic of neighborhoods including Bates/Truxton
Circle, Bloomingdale, Eckington, Hanover, LeDroit
Park, and Sursum Corda as well as sections of
Edgewood and Stronghold. The Mid City East area
sits near the center of the District of Columbia and
showcases historic residential fabric and institutions,
a rich diversity of residents, valued open spaces
and burgeoning retail amenities. The inviting
character of these neighborhoods is juxtaposed by
the presence of major corridors - Florida Avenue,

New York Ave, New Jersey Avenue, North Capitol


Street, and Rhode Island Avenue - that bisect these
neighborhoods and create real and formidable
boundaries, but also opportunities for retail
enhancement, new development and improved
connectivity.
The catalyst for studying and analyzing the Mid
City East area was the notable activism on the
part of some residents and civic organizations.
The 2006 DC Comprehensive Plan also specifies
the preparation of a small area plan for the
North Capitol/Florida Avenue business district.
Neighborhood groups advocated strongly to the
District for a small area plan for their respective
neighborhoods, as they were beginning to feel
the effects of growth and change and wanted an
opportunity to plan for the areas future. This level
of civic engagement and neighborhood-based
leadership at the outset was a harbinger of the
important role that the plans Advisory Committee,
comprised of representatives from Advisory
Neighborhood Commissions, civic organizations,
community groups, and the business community,
would play throughout the process in the
development of the plan.
With a number of planning efforts already
completed in the vicinity of Mid City East, the
boundaries of the small area plan were designed to
encompass those neighborhoods situated around a
contiguous portion of North Capitol Street that had
yet to have an approved small area plan to guide
land use and development, filling an important gap
in planning for this part the District of Columbia.
Sursum Corda, while already addressed in the
Northwest One Plan, was also included to address
that communitys intent to redevelop their property
while retaining affordability. The boundaries of the

Mid City East area reflect a political amalgam, with


most of the area in Ward 5, and other portions in
either Ward 1 or 6.
The Office of Planning (OP), working with its
consultant team, launched the process to create
the Mid City East Small Area Plan in 2013. OP
also partnered with the District Department of
Transportation (DDOT) to coordinate outreach
since that agency was simultaneously developing
a Livability Study for the same study area. By
having a single integrated process and website, OP
and DDOT were able to create a seamless public
participation experience for the development of
both documents. The planning process integrated
a more robust and creative range of engagement
opportunities beyond community-wide meetings,
including interactive online forums, office hours,
community meet- ups and storytelling. The
communitys values combined with technical
analysis and input from District Agencies helped
to define essence of the plan. Technical analysis
completed include an Existing Conditions
analysis, a Historic and Cultural Resources report,
and a Market study. The plan also incorporates
recommendations from DDOTs Mid City East
Livability Study completed in October 2013.
The public process began with a study area wide
Kick-Off on April 27, 2013, during which the
planning team engaged residents and stakeholders
in facilitated activities to begin developing a
vision for the plan and to identify issues and
opportunities. Neighborhood character was a key
concern especially the impact of architecturally
inconsistent additions to the tops of homes, or
pop-ups and the desire to preserve certain
buildings and structures that could be restored and
reused. Reinforcement of neighborhood place-

The many voices of the Mid City East community


emerged to define a cohesive vision for the area:
improve quality of life and enhance neighborhood
amenities and character while supporting a
community of culturally, economically, and
generationally diverse residents. The plan conveys
goals and key recommendations for neighborhood
character, commercial revitalization, redevelopment
and housing, neighborhood place-making and
public realm, parks/green space/stormwater
and connectivity. The following pages, 6 and 7,
summarize the plan vision and goals by theme.
The Mid City East Small Area Plan has
already gathered momentum for some of its
recommendations, with early implementation
underway on the following items:

Pursuit of a pilot Conservation District or


Historic District in Bloomingdale
Restoration of North Capitol Main Streets
Revival of a clean team, with a focus on
North Capitol between New York and Florida
Avenue
Optimizing access for North Capitol businesses
to the Great Streets Small Business Capital
Improvement Grants
Partnership with local architecture students to
complete a visualization of the North Capitol
Green Deck concept
Development of historic resource brochures
for neighborhoods in Mid City East
Completion of an agency resource fair at
Metroball DCs 13th annual New York Ave
basketball tournament
Submission of grant application for North
Capitol Street Streetscape design
Request for transfer of National Park Service
(NPS) triangle parks to District jurisdiction to
improve programming
Initiation of a New York Avenue Playground
study
Intent to release the solicitation for
redevelopment of Department of Housing and
Community Developments parcel at Florida
Avenue and North Capitol
Whats Inside:
The plan is organized as follows:

Chapter One provides an introduction to the


Study Area and the Small Area Planning process,
plan methodology and overview of community
engagement.
Chapter Two presents the vision for the Mid City
East Plan.
Chapter Three highlights select plan
recommendations from Chapter Two which are
organized for summary and reference purposes by
neighborhood.
Chapter Four highlights select plan
recommendations from Chapter Two which are
organized for summary and reference purposes by
corridor.
Chapter Five provides an implementation plan
to serve as a roadmap for implementing plan
recommendations including projected timeframe
and lead entity
Chapter Six presents the key findings of existing
conditions and technical analysis and the plan
vision, goals and recommendations by theme.
Appendices
This plan is further supplemented by the following
companion documents:

Mid City East Small Area Plan Executive Summary

making and improvements to public realm were


desired as was addressing the loitering and litter
that detract from the communitys image. Residents
were supportive of commercial revitalization along
key corridors as well as growing retail amenities and
options. Opportunities for redevelopment focused
on infilling vacant parcels and preserving housing
affordability. Residents expressed a desire for
more park improvements and multi-generational
programming as well as higher-quality green space
and a safer Metropolitan Branch Trail. Residents also
raised concerns about major vehicular roadways
and corridors within the study area and the desire
for better connectivity and crossings and the
opportunity for green decking over North Capitol
Street. They also described the need for better
wayfinding and lighting to and from Metro stations,
all of which are located on the periphery of the
study area.

Appendix A: Mid City East Market Study

Appendix B: Mid City East Historic Resources



Report
Appendix C: Mid City East Additional Maps and

Figures
Appendix D: Mid City East Historic Neighborhood

Brochures

1. NEIGHBORHOOD
CHARACTER

2. COMMERCIAL
REVITALIZATION

Vision: Mid City East neighborhoods will


retain their historic and cultural diversity, while
preserving their distinctive architectural character
and public spaces.

Vision: Mid City East will be an attractive area


with thriving existing businesses, emerging
small businesses, vibrant retail, and a growing
neighborhood residential base. North Capitol
Street and other major corridors will provide
neighborhood serving retail, dining options and
amenities to the community.

Goals:
1. Create the structure and employ the tools
for pursuing neighborhood-led conservation
efforts.
2. Reinforce and support neighborhood identity.

Goals:

Vision: Mid City East will prosper as an inclusive


community with a strong neighborhood fabric,
thriving businesses, and a diverse mix of quality
housing options.
Goals:

1. Improve resident access to healthy food and


dining opportunities throughout Mid
City East.

1. Support strategic land use designation


changes on key sites and the redevelopment of
publicly-owned properties.

2. Strengthen and expand the dining cluster



emerging at the intersection of Rhode Island
Avenue and First Street NW, and the dining
establishments along North Capitol Street.

2. Encourage infill of privately-held vacant lots


and increase site utilization to strengthen
neighborhood fabric and create opportunities
for new housing, unique retail offerings, and/or
workplaces.

3. Leverage Mid City Easts unique location


along North Capitol Street to support
commercial corridor vitality and
local entrepreneurs. Build on existing efforts
and explore new programs and incentives
to improve and promote commercial areas,
including the emerging creative economy
cluster.

LeDroit Park Gateway

3. REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
AND HOUSING

4. Improve the appearance and functionality


of commercial properties in MCE through
reinvestment in faades and interior spaces.

3. Support the redevelopment of Sursum Corda.


4. Maintain or increase the number of affordable
housing units throughout Mid City East to
better serve all household types, including
families.

Vision: Mid City East neighborhoods and


corridors will showcase a unique identity
and enhanced sense of place. Sidewalks
and public spaces will be attractive, safe
and well-maintained.
Goals:
1. Enhance North Capitol Street to celebrate its
importance and symbolic axial connection to
the Capitol.
2. Improve and maintain street trees and increase
tree cover throughout Mid City East.
3. Improve the appearance, walkability, safety
and cleanliness of Mid City East streets and
public spaces.
4. Celebrate the creativity of artists in the Mid
City East area and throughout the District.

5. PARKS, GREEN SPACE


AND STORMWATER
Vision: Mid City East will enjoy a variety of parks,
green spaces, and recreation options. Flooding
will be mitigated through the DC Clean Rivers
project and the employment of Low Impact
Development (LID) stormwater management
strategies.
Goals:
1. Improve the quality and accessibility of existing
playgrounds, parks and green spaces.
2. Identify opportunities and sites for new parks,
community gardens, green spaces and other
recreation.

6. CONNECTIVITY
Vision: Mid City East residents will experience
safe and enhanced connectivity between
neighborhoods. Residents will be able to travel
via car, bus, bike or on foot, through a pleasant
environment to their daily destinations.
Goals:
1. Improve mobility and physical connectivity
between the neighborhoods of Mid City East,
and connect the neighborhoods to the city.
2. Reduce or remove physical barriers and provide
for safe pedestrian routes and crossings to
schools, transit, parks and amenities.

3. Improve access to public recreational facilities


within Mid City East.
4. Decrease neighborhood flooding and improve
stormwater management.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Executive Statement

4. NEIGHBORHOOD
PLACEMAKING AND
PUBLIC REALM

5. Promote opportunities to enhance the sense


of identity in the Eckington and Bates/Truxton
Circle and Hanover neighborhoods.

North Capitol Street (Southbound)

1: INTRODUCTION
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including architecturally inconsistent development,


struggling retail and commercial corridors,
increasingly expensive housing, inadequate green
space, traffic, and barriers to connectivity. The DC
Office of Planning (OP), in collaboration with DC
Department of Transportation (DDOT), residents,
property and business owners, an Advisory
Committee, District agencies, and a consultant
team, led an interactive community-based process
to develop recommendations for the Mid City East
Small Area Plan, a framework for the preservation
of historic resources, revitalization of commercial
corridors and retail, increasing diverse housing
options, integrating green infrastructure, cultivating
development opportunities, and improving
connectivity.

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WHAT IS A SMALL AREA PLAN?

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MCE Study
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Office of Planning ~ May 22, 2014
Fig. 1.1
Study Area in Context
Government of the District of Columbia

Mid City East


Mid City East Boundary

OVERVIEW

This map was created for planning purposes


from a variety of sources. It is neither a
survey nor a legal document. Information
provided by other agencies should be
verified with them where appropriate.

Mid City East is the name given to the planning


area comprised of a group of neighborhoods
including Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover,
Bloomingdale, Eckington, LeDroit Park, and
Sursum Corda, as well as portions of Edgewood
and Stronghold. These architecturally, culturally
diverse, and vibrant urban neighborhoods are
rich with community, yet wrestling with concerns

Small Area Plans provide a framework for the


strategic development, redevelopment and/
or preservation of neighborhoods and corridors.
They address the Districts planning goals on
a more localized level and supplement the
Comprehensive Plan by providing detailed
direction for the development of city blocks,
corridors, and neighborhoods. They allow citizens
to develop strategic priorities that will shape
future development in their neighborhoods,
identify gaps and opportunities in city services and
resources deployed at the neighborhood level,
and shape critical capital budget decisions and
agency investment priorities. Small Area Plans are
submitted to the DC Council for approval. The
community vision, existing conditions and market
analysis, recommendations, and implementation
strategy of the Mid City East Small Area Plan are
outlined in this report. The DC Department of

Transportation (DDOT) concurrently developed the


Mid City East Livability Study. The Small Area Plan
team coordinated with the Livability Study team
throughout the process. Many of the findings and
recommendations of the Livability Study have been
incorporated into this Small Area Plan.

REGIONAL CONTEXT
The Mid City East planning area is centrally
located in the District of Columbia, just north of
the Capitol and northeast of downtown. See Fig.
1.2. The neighborhoods of Bates/Truxton Circle
and Hanover, Bloomingdale, Eckington, LeDroit
Park, and Sursum Corda, form the Mid City East
planning area which all have edges along North
Capitol Street and include parts of Ward 1, Ward
5 and Ward 6. The planning area encompasses
approximately 480 acres and is traversed by 5
major vehicular corridors including approximately
1 miles of North Capitol Street, approximately 1
mile of Rhode Island Avenue, approximately 1 mile
of New Jersey Avenue, approximately 1/2 mile of
Florida Avenue, and approximately 1/4 mile of New
York Avenue. See Fig. 1.3.

PLANNING CONTEXT
The Mid City East study area is surrounded by a
number of neighborhoods for which plans and
studies have been developed in the last decade.
These plans and studies include Howard Universitys
2011 Campus Master Plan, the 2006 Northwest
One Redevelopment Plan, the 2009 ULI Technical
Assistance Panel Report for the North Capitol
Main Street, and the NoMa Vision Plan and
Development Strategy.

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The Mid City East Small Area Plan was developed


through an extensive on-the-ground and creative
online community engagement and public
participation process. This process ensured
that residents and stakeholders developed the
vision and goals of the plan, and had numerous
opportunities to engage, provide ideas, participate,
and give feedback throughout the planning
process.

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LEGEND

Fig. 1.2 Ward Boundary Map


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In addition to these planning efforts for nearby


areas, the Mid City East Small Area Plan is also
guided by city-wide initiatives including the
Comprehensive Plan as the foundation, the Mayors
One City Action Agenda, the DC Vibrant Retail
Streets Toolkit, the Mayors Five-Year Economic
Development Strategy, the Sustainable DC Plan,
and DDOTs Public Realm Design Manual.
Recognizing the ongoing evolution of the Districts
neighborhoods and the rapid changes facing them,
residents of the Mid City East study area proactively
led the charge to initiate this planning process.

PROCESS AND METHODOLOGY

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OP directed the consultants in developing the plan


through field work, observation, documentation,
review of relevant plans and studies, analysis, public
meetings,discussions with residents, and feedback
from the projects online engagement sites. The
consultant team studied existing physical conditions
within Mid City East, including the urban design
of neighborhoods and corridors, the public realm,
parks and green space, and sustainability. Findings
were documented through GIS and other mapping
tools, and the analyses illustrated with drawings and
diagrams. Alternative concepts for achieving the
goals of the plan were developed to test and vet

Mid City
Area Plan Introduction
Mid City East Small
AreaEast
PlanSmall
Neighborhood
Highlights

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ideas. Plans, supporting diagrams, and 3-D models


were utilized to graphically illustrate ideas, the
written recommendations, and implementation
strategy of the Plan.
Through historic research, surveys, consultation with
the DC Historic Preservation Office, and discussions
with residents, the consultant team conducted an
analysis of existing historic and cultural resources.
This analysis included the identification of
potential landmarks and historic districts and the
examination of neighborhood-specific preservation
planning tools that could maintain and enhance
neighborhood character.

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The consultant team also conducted an analysis


of market conditions, and utilized the DC Vibrant
Retail Streets Toolkit to assess existing retail
within the study area. Based on these methods,
and in collaboration with the Office of Planning,
recommendations for commercial revitalization,
redevelopment and housing opportunities were
developed. Recommendations are grounded in
a quantitative analysis of existing demographic
and real estate market conditions in Mid City
East, as well as a qualitative evaluation of the
neighborhoods relative strengths and weaknesses
in comparison to competing commercial districts.
Through discussions with neighborhood residents,
business operators, and property owners, the team
developed specific strategies on how to fill market
voids, address current operational deficiencies,
and create a shared vision for future economic
diversification and commercial vitality.

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Fig. 1.3 Mid City East Study Area

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MCE Study Area


Boundary

Sursum Corda

Mid City East Small Area Plan Introduction


US Capitol View from North Capitol Street at Rhode Island Avenue

11

A HIGH COMMITMENT
TO PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
The Mid City East Small Area Plan at its core is a
community-based plan guided by market centered
solutions and a shared vision and principles. To
ensure a successful and comprehensive planning
process for the Mid City East Small Area Plan and
Livability Study, the DC Office of Planning (OP) and
the District Department of Transportation (DDOT)
developed an extensive, multi-faceted engagement
strategy that placed an emphasis on both traditional
and innovative methods of outreach. Both agencies
were committed to thinking outside the box
and launching a public engagement process that
would attract and involve the greatest number of
community residents and stakeholders within the
study area.
Prior to kicking off the planning effort, the
Office of Planning and the District Department
of Transportation actively attended Advisory
Neighborhood Commission (ANC) and Single
Member District (SMD) meetings as well as civic
association and Advisory Committee meetings to
get the word out about the unique joint planning
effort which would result in a Small Area Plan and a
Livability Study.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

12

An Advisory Committee was established at


the beginning of the process with 20 members
meeting for the first time on February 28, 2013
at the Fab Lab located on North Capitol Street
NW. The Advisory Committee was comprised of
representatives from the councilmembers of Wards

1, 5, and 6, Advisory Neighborhood Commissioners,


leaders of civic associations and local businesses
within the study area. Howard University, the NoMa
BID, and Common Good City Farm were also
members of the Advisory Committee.
Prior to each public meeting, the Advisory
Committee was convened to preview completed
components of the study and provide feedback. In
total, the Advisory Committee met four times, with
additional meetings held by a subgroup consisting
of business owners. The role of the Advisory
Committee was to provide guidance and feedback
about elements of the plan from the perspective of
their constituencies.

INTERAGENCY COORDINATION
To ensure a collaborative process that resulted in
an implementable plan, an Interagency Committee
was formed. Representatives from the District
of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA), District
of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS), District
Department of the Environment (DDOE),
DC Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR),
Department of Small and Local Business
Development (DSLBD), the Department of General
Services (DGS), DHCD, DMPED, DME, DDOT,
and DC Water met to discuss the Mid City East
planning area, and develop coordinated, actionable
solutions, and build interagency consensus.

ON-THE-GROUND
During the course of the planning effort, public
meetings and interactive open houses were
convened to engage community members and
inform them of Small Area Plan progress. Each

Focus Area Meeting Three for Bloomingdale/LeDroit Neighborhood


June 20, 2014, St. Georges Episcopal Church

Civic
Association
Meetings

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Civic
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Focus Area
Meeting

Civic
Association
Meetings

Walking
Tours

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Recommendations
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Storytelling

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Tours

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Meeting

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Hanover
Civic

Advisory
Committee
Meetings
Business
Focus Group
Meetings

Association
Meetings

An Early Implementation Committee was


established to assist in planning for early
implementation of some recommendations
introduced in the Small Area Plan.
Meet-Ups were a creative approach to public
engagement that manifested as a variety of
alternative meeting types and gave people
additional opportunities to engage.

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Business Focus Group Meetings engaged


local business and property owners to discuss
issues, opportunities and build consensus around
recommendations for the Mid City East study area.

Neighborhood
Focus Area
Meeting

LeDroit Park

Focus Area Meetings were tailored to emphasize


the specific characteristics of a targeted segment of
the study area and to convey findings of technical
analyses. A total of four focus area meetings were
held:
#1 - Sursum Corda - 06/08/2013
#2 - Eckington - 06/12/2013
#3 - LeDroit Park/ Bloomingdale - 06/20/2013
#4 - Truxton Circle/Bates/Hanover - 06/24/2013

Bloomingdale

North Capitol Street

A Kick-off Public Meeting and Open House was


held on April 27, 2013 at the Community Academy
Public Charter School located at First and
P Streets NW.

Walking
Tours

Mid City East Small Area Plan Introduction

public meeting included a presentation which


provided an update on the findings of the planning
process as well as a series of topic-specific,
facilitated, and interactive stations for adults and
children. Public meetings were important to the
planning process as opportunities for participants
to express ideas, provide feedback and build
consensus around the draft plan.

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Focus Area
Meeting

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Fig. 1.4 - Community Engagement Map

L Street

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Existing Conditions Walks - Participants were able


to walk each neighborhood in the planning area
with representatives from OP to examine existing
conditions, discuss opportunities and learn more
about the neighborhoods and the people who
live there.
Photo Walk - Participants were taken on a tour
down North Capitol Street in the Mid City East
area highlighting iconic neighborhood elements,
architecture, street art and other interesting
photographic opportunities.
Historic Walking Tours - In partnership with the
Historic Preservation Office, participants were
taken on tours of the Mid City East neighborhoods
of LeDroit Park, Bloomingdale, Eckington, Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover. Neighborhood
heritage, culture and architecture were highlighted
on these tours celebrating the richness and vibrancy
of each neighborhoods historic character.
Storytelling - Understanding the stories and
aspirations of residents is an important way to
capture the essence of a community. During the
course of the planning process, a local professional
videographer, Bryan Hayes, volunteered as a
Citizen Planner to document stories by residents
in the study area. Through storytelling, residents
discussed life in the Mid City East community, what
they liked about their neighborhood and their vision
for the future. The final video was played at the
September 26, 2013 public meeting and posted on
YouTube, www.midcityeast.com and
www.engage.midcityeast.com.

14

Office Hours were informal gatherings at local


venues throughout the planning area. Libraries,
cafs and recreation centers provided alternative
opportunities for residents and stakeholders during
convenient dates and times to ask questions,
provide feedback and discuss various aspects of the
planning process findings.
Big Bear Caf - 04/26/2013, 05/03/2013,
10/17/2013
Northwest One Library - 04/30/2013,
05/02/2013, 6/25/13, 10/15/2013
Windows Caf - 05/01/2013, 06/28/2013
Harry Thomas Sr. Recreation Center 06/17/2013
Uncle Chips - 06/26/2013
University Partnerships - The Office of Planning
was fortunate to have the opportunity to work with
students from the Howard University School of
Design and Catholic Universitys Graduate School
of Architecture and Planning. The Howard students
project was titled Project North Deck, which
explored the possibility of decking over a portion of
North Capitol Street. The vision for this project was
to create a greener North Capitol Street and unite
the neighborhoods of Eckington and Bloomingdale,
while providing a more pedestrian friendly
thoroughfare. You can find some of the details and
outcomes of their study on page 130.
The Catholic University Graduate Studios class
project was a corridor study for North Capitol tiltled
The New North Capitol Street. Their semester
long studio examined connectivity, public realm

12

cy
n
e
gs
g
n
A
i
t
e
Me
n
o
i
inat

Coor

Tour

C
AN gs
in
t
e
e

Walk
i
Mee ng
t-up
s

15

tion
a
i
c
o
s
As
ns
o
i
Civic
t
a
t
n
Prese

11

Neighborhood
Focus Meetings

Office Hours

Meet-ups

End loitering near Big Ben on


New York and North Capitol

Dare to Think Big


Create more consistent
streetscapes throughout the area

Fi

lan
an l P

Existing
Cond
ition
s An
alys
is
et

Histor
Analyic Reso
sis U urce
rba s A
n D na
esi lys
gn is
An Ma
aly rk
sis

b or h
ood Focus
A re a
M e e ti n g s

Small Area
Plan

Deck Over North Capitol Street


underpass and add a park on top

ig h

Mid
City
East

Accelerate neighborhood
sidewalk beautification

Ne

Revitalize the triangle


between Lincoln, R and
North Capitol Street NE

Draft Plan

30-day
Comment
Period

Mid City East Small Area Plan Introduction

Transform vacant properties


along North Capitol from New York
Avenue through Florida Avenue

Fra
D r m e wo
af t
r
R e co k Pl a n a n d
m m e n d atio ns

Discourage ugly pop-ups

Strengthen recommendations on
pedestrian safety and green space

Add more
Bikeshare stations

15

and neighborhood character. They examined key


intersections along North Capitol and developed
recommendations that would mitigate some
of the challenges that were identified during
the analysis process. The Office of Planning was
actively involved in the studio project and provided
information and feedback to the students as they
went through the iterative process. You can view a
sample of their work on page 128.

ONLINE
In order to reach a broader cross section of
residents and stakeholders, the traditional
on-the-groundoutreach process was
supplemented with an online engagement process.
A project website (www.midcityeast.com)
provided basic information, announcements about
public meetings and other events, and served as
a repository of information. Through an online
crowdsourcing platform (engage.midcityeast.com),
the consultant team posted interactive mapping
exercises and questions to prompt dialogue among
participants. Ideas and feedback were posted by
participants and discussed at each stage of the
Small Area Plan process.

OUTCOMES
The community engagement strategy for the Mid
City East Small Area Plan and Livability Study
engaged large numbers of participants through
on-the-ground venues and online tools.

16

ts
ipan

tic
r
a
P
e
Activ

Un
i

qu
e

We
b

sit

eV
isi
tor
s

1
6
2

ib

cr
ubs

il S
a
Em

ers

2
9
0
,
6
1
iews
V
e
g
r Pa
e
x
i
m
Mind

7
3
7,8

Advisory Committee meetings - 45 Participants


Public meetings - 110 Participants

iew
V
e
g
e Pa
t
i
s
b
We

Focus groups - 27 Participants

1383

Focus Area meetings - 75 Participants


Office Hours - 37 Participants
Meet ups - 72 Participants

Mindm

Mobile Workshops - 120 Participants


Online - Crowdsourcing:
1,383 visitors
16,092 page views
153 active participants
15 topics
200 ideas
170 comments
Online - Website:
2,062 unique visitors
3,299 visits
7,837 page views

20
Id

ea

ixer Vi
sitor

Mid City East Small Area Plan Introduction

3
5
1
2,0
62

On-the-Ground:

170
nts
e
m
m
Co

62% new visits


261 email subscribers

17

2: VISION
VISION STATEMENT
The Mid City East Small Area Plan
provides a framework for conservation,
development, sustainability and
connectivity in the neighborhoods
of Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover,
Bloomingdale, Eckington, LeDroit
Park, and Sursum Corda, as well as
portions of Edgewood and Stronghold.
The vision is to improve quality of life
and enhance neighborhood amenities
and character while supporting a
community of culturally, economically, and
generationally diverse residents.
This vision for Mid City East is further framed by the
six core themes listed below. The vision associated
with each theme reflects the communitys values
and aspirations for the area. These themes provide
an organizational basis for presenting the findings,
goals and plan recommendations described in
detail in Chapter 3.

18

1. Neighborhood Character - Mid City East


neighborhoods will retain their historic and
cultural diversity, while preserving their
distinctive architectural character and public
spaces.

2. Commercial Revitalization - Mid City East


will be an attractive area with thriving existing
businesses, emerging small businesses, vibrant
retail, and a growing neighborhood residential
base. North Capitol Street and other major
corridors will provide neighborhood serving
retail, dining options and amenities to the
community.
3. Redevelopment Opportunities and Housing
Mid City East will prosper as an inclusive
community with a strong neighborhood fabric,
thriving businesses, and a diverse mix of quality
housing options.
4. Neighborhood Placemaking and Public Realm
Mid City East neighborhoods and corridors
will showcase a unique identity and enhanced
sense of place. Sidewalks and public spaces will
be attractive, safe and well-maintained.
5. Parks, Green Space, and Stormwater
Mid City East will enjoy a variety of parks,
green spaces, and recreation options. Flooding
will be mitigated through the DC Clean Rivers
project and the employment of low impact
development (LID) stormwater management
strategies.
6. Connectivity - Mid City East residents will
experience safe and enhanced connectivity
between neighborhoods. Residents will be
able to travel via car, bus, bicycle, or on foot,
through a pleasant environment to their daily
destinations.

Photos of Kick-Off Event (April 2013)

19

Mid City East Small Area Plan Vision

3: KEY FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


OVERVIEW
The Mid City East Small Area Plan provides
recommendations and guidance for the
revitalization of the study areas community of
neighborhoods. In this chapter, the plans findings
and recommendations are described through six
core themes:
1Neighborhood Character - opportunities
to conserve the architectural character and cultural
resources of each neighborhood.

Core themes are described through a summary


analysis of the existing conditions analyses, key
findings, vision, goals, and recommendations.
The Mid City East Small Area Plan integrates
sustainability at every level through
recommendations that support and advance the
Districts Sustainable DC Plan. Small Area Plan
recommendations tie in to specific action items
from the Sustainable DC Plan which was released
on February 23, 2013. You can find a list of these
action items on page _.

2Commercial Revitalization - opportunities


to revitalize neighborhood commercial areas
including retail, dining, and small office space.
3Redevelopment Opportunities and
Housing - opportunities to improve the
neighborhoods through infill, new development,
and the provision of affordable housing.
4Neighborhood Placemaking and Public
Realm - opportunities to enhance neighborhood
identity and improve sidewalks and public spaces.
5Parks, Green Space, and Stormwater opportunities to add or enhance parks and green
space while reducing stormwater runoff.

20
20

6Connectivity - opportunities to improve


connectivity and mobility between neighborhoods
and from the neighborhoods to other District
destinations.

National Geographic Subscription Department - 1709 3rd Street

The Flea Market at North Capitol and Lincoln Rd, NE

21

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

EXISTING LAND USES


Residential - The predominant land use in the
Mid City East planning area is residential comprised
of an eclectic mix of row houses, single family
detached, single family attached, and multifamily
homes. This predominantly residential use is a
strength of the area and it provides a strong
population base to support local businesses.
Retail/Commercial - Retail is concentrated primarily
along North Capitol Street and is also found
on Florida Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue, and
First Street NW. While retail along North Capitol
Street struggles, there are pockets of successful
neighborhood retail and restaurants in areas such as
First Street and Rhode Island Avenue NW. The many
retail corner stores are an amenity for residents.
Larger concentrations of commercial and retail are
located in the NoMa area to the southeast of the
study area and in the Mount Vernon Triangle area to
the southwest.

22
22

Low Density Residential


Low-Medium Density Residential
Medium Density Residential
High Density Residential
Commercial
Transport, Communication, Utilities
Industrial

Industrial or Production, Distribution and Repair


(PDR) - There is a concentration of industrial uses
in the Eckington area primarily along 4th Street NE,
on the eastern portion of the planning area near the
railroad tracks. These uses are located across from
residential neighborhoods, though there appear to
be few significant conflicts between these two uses
in Eckington.

Mixed Use

Public Facilities - Many schools and recreation


centers exist within the study area. Small to medium
parks, and other institutional uses are scattered
throughout the community. These are educational
and recreational amenities for residents and have
the potential to function as centers of community.
Existing land uses are illustrated in Fig. 3.1.

Transportation Right of Way

Institutional
Federal Public
Local Public
Public, Quasi-Public, Institutional
Parks and Open Spaces
Parking
Roads; Alleys; Median

Undetermined
Water
Vacant

Fig. 3.1 - MCE Existing Land Use Map

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FUTURE LAND USES
The District of Columbia Comprehensive Land Use
Map graphically depicts the land uses desired and
projected for the future throughout the city. The
Mid City East planning area consists predominantly
of low to medium density residential development,
together with commercial uses along North Capitol
Street and Florida Avenue. Smaller commercial
nodes are found within residential areas. Higher
density retail and mixed use development are found
to the north at the McMillan site, to the southwest
at Mount Vernon Triangle, and east of study area in
NoMa. Industrial uses continue alongside residential
in Eckington, while schools, recreation centers,
parks and other institutional uses are located
throughout the planning area. See Fig. 3.2.
Low Density Residential
Moderate Density Residential
Medium Density Residential
High Density Residential
Low Density Commercial
Moderate Density Commercial
Medium Density Commercial
High Density Commercial
Production, Distribution and Repair
Federal
Local Public Facilities
Institutional
Parks, Recreation and Open Space

Fig. 3.2 - MCE Comp Plan Future Land Use Map

23

1. NEIGHBORHOOD
CHARACTER
SUMMARY
The Mid City East planning area encompasses
neighborhoods that developed during the late
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries including
LeDroit Park, Bloomingdale, Eckington, Bates/
Truxton Circle, Hanover and Sursum Corda, a lowincome cooperative housing development that was
constructed in the late 1960s as a part of urban
renewal efforts.
Today, over fifty percent of the buildings in Mid
City East were constructed before 1939 and as a
result, many of the neighborhoods have retained
their historic urban character. Each neighborhoods
early developmental history is reflected in its
historic building stock, providing a distinctive and
rich architectural heritage and cultural history. The
Mid City East neighborhoods offer a diverse mix
of building types including residential, commercial,
institutional, and industrial.

24
24

Each neighborhood has a varying degree of


preservation policies and tools in place to preserve
and support neighborhood character. These
tools include historic districts, historic landmark
designations, heritage trails, and historic site
markers/signage. Within the planning area, a total
of eleven buildings are listed in the DC Inventory of
Historic Sites and in the National Register of Historic
Places. These historic landmarks are dispersed
throughout the Mid City East neighborhoods, with
the largest concentration in the Bates/Truxton
Circle and Hanover area. Additionally, two historic
districts are located within or near the planning

area: LeDroit Park and Mount Vernon Square. A


historic resources analysis was conducted as part of
the existing conditions assessment phase of the Mid
City East planning project. The analysis included
compiling existing research on the development
of each neighborhood and executing a series
of surveys in coordination with the DC Historic
Preservation Office (DCHPO). Through surveys and
recommendations from the DCHPO and community
members, a list of potential historic landmarks and
districts within the planning area was generated.
This list was further vetted during community
meetings, resulting in a final list of approximately 32
sites and 2 potential historic districts. See Fig. 3.3.
Key Findings:

VISION
Mid City East neighborhoods will
retain their historic and cultural
diversity and preserve their
distinctive architectural character
and public spaces.

Historic resources and architecture are highly


valued by the community.
Over fifty percent of the building stock within
Mid City East was constructed before 1939.
Diversity in building types: residential,
commercial, institutional, industrial ranging
from the1870s to the 1930s.
Historic building stock illustrates the rich
architectural heritage and cultural history of
Mid City East neighborhoods.
Each neighborhood has its own distinct cultural
heritage and architectural character.
Eleven landmarks listed in the DC Inventory
of Historic Sites and in the National Register
of Historic Places. One Historic District is
located within Mid City East (LeDroit Park)
Corner of First and V Street, NW in Bloomingdale

Historic Landmarks/Historic Districts are designated places


that are protected for their contribution to the cultural and
aesthetic heritage of DC. They include buildings or districts,
archaeological sites, engineering structures, objects, or
landscape features. Benefits to property owners can include
tax credits for rehabilitation.
Multiple Property Designation focuses on developing
historic contexts for discontiguous historic properties that
are related historically or thematically. Themes include
building types, and architectural styles, context or historic
development patterns. This provides a tool for designation
of an area that is not eligible for historic district designation.
Conservation Districts protect the historic character
of a neighborhood through design guidelines written
for new construction and additions which are often similar
to, but more lenient than, historic district design guidelines,
and focus on regulating consistent massing, height,
setback, and orientation. Conservation Districts have
not yet been created in the District but the DC Office of
Planning is pursuing their creation.
Faade Grant Programs are funded through private or
public funds, to encourage historic preservation. Most are
targeted to older buildings or long-established businesses.
Heritage Tourism promotes places and activities
that represent stories of past and present generations
of a neighborhood, preserve its heritage, and make it
accessible to both residents and visitors.

Bloomingdale Rowhouse Neighborhood

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

MID CITY EAST HISTORIC


PRESERVATION TOOLS

25

IL
LA

DR

Channing Street

NW

CHANNING ST NW

CHANNING ST NE

ST NW
COLLEGE

ADAMS ST NW

Designated Historic Districts

13

Av
en

ue

R ST NE

JE
NEW

Bates/Hanover/
Truxton Circle

1ST ST NW

ue
Aven
KIRBY ST NW

3RD ST NW

W
NE

Existing Historic Landmark

M ST NW

Potential Historic Landmark

W
NE

R
YO

KA

VE

NW

k
Yor
New

nue

3RD ST NE

5TH ST NE

4TH ST NE

2ND ST NE
EN

NE
AL

PL

NE

8.
9.

ER
INT

32

E3
AT
ST 5 I
ER
9
INT TE 3
A
ST

I
95

Fig. 3.3 - MCE Designed and Potential Historic Landmarks

5.
6.
7.

TN

10.

M ST NE

PIERCE ST NE

K ST NW

ES

PATTERSON ST NE

M ST NW

L Street

MO
RS
N ST NE

N ST NE

Ave

Sursum
Corda

L ST NW

3RD ST NW

AV

30

L PL NW

L ST NW

RK
YO

O ST NE

PIERCE ST NW

4TH ST NW

4.

HANOVER PL NW

MORGAN ST NW

3.

D
O ST NW

RIDGE ST NW

OPID0023062

VE
N

29
31

Potential Historic District

400

AA

P ST NE

rsey

5TH ST NW

FL
OR
ID

2ND ST NE

Je
New

P ST NW

2.

PORTER ST NE

1ST PL NW

NW

1.

HARRY THOMAS WAY NE

28

1ST TER NW

AVE

3RD ST NW

RSEY

6TH ST NW

Q ST NE

BATES ST NW

Existing Historic District

L ST NW

17

Eckington
Bloomingdale

Potential Historic Landmarks

24

QUINCY PL NE

Q ST NW

O ST NW

15

16
QUINCY PL NW

33

26

1ST ST NE

WARNER ST NW

25

K ST NE

L ST NE

11.
6TH ST NE

VE
N

RANDOLPH PL NE

John Fox Slater School, 1891


John Mercer Langston School, 1902
Chapman Stables (Brass Knob), 1906
Margaret Murray Washington School, 1912
Samuel Chapman Armstrong Technical
High School, 1901-1902
Samuel Gompers House, 1902
Nathaniel Parker Gage School, 1904
Old Engine House 12 Bloomindgale Firehouse, 1897
Mary Church Terrell House, 1894
M Street High School Perry School, 1890
Augusta & Louisa Apartment Buildings, 1900

Potential Historic Districts

27

RANDOLPH PL NE

5TH ST NE

AA

4TH ST NW

R ST NW

RANDOLPH PL NW

S ST NE

4TH ST NE

FL
OR
ID

14

18

ABBEY PL NE

ida

Eckington

S ST NE

S ST NW

I.
J.
K.

23
SEATON PL NE

3RD ST NE

Flo
r

RICHARDSON PL NW

21

CONGRESS ST NE

NW

19

22

NE

VE

T ST NE

AVE

DA

11

F.
G.
H.

TODD PL NE

SEATON PL NE

SEATON PL NW

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

NE

AN

U ST NE

LeDroit Park

Designated Landmarks

W ST NE

UHLAND TER NE

U ST NE

1ST ST NE

ISL

NE

V ST NE

NORTH CAPITOL ST

E
OD

VE

ECKI
NGTO
N PL

3RD ST NW

78
2ND ST NW

RH

9
10

T ST NW

North Capitol Street

4TH ST NW

S ST NW

DA

TODD PL NE

12

T ST NW

THOMAS ST NW

Ave

AN

ARE

LeDroit Park
T ST NW

20

U ST NW

1ST ST NE

3RD ST NW

5TH ST NW

U ST NW

DELA
W

ELM ST NW

Rho

nd

la
e Is

E
OD

2ND ST NE

E PL NW

V ST NW

ISL

nue
RH

SUMMIT PL NE

Bloomingdale

FLAGLER PL NW

OAKDAL

200

The list below, and adjacent diagram, show existing designated historic landmarks and districts in Mid City
East, and suggests potential new districts and landmarks.

ADAMS ST NE

1ST PL NE

V ST NW

Feet

Designated and Potential Historic Landmarks in Mid City East

ST NW

W ST NW

BRYANT ST NE

26

N
ST

ASCOT PL NE

W ST NW

D
OO

CHANNING ST NE

EW

CROMWELL TER NE

BRYANT ST NE

BRYANT

N ST NW

G
ED

2ND ST NE

PL NW

LINC
OLN
RD

MC
M

HOWARD

NE

DOUGLAS ST NE

12.

Ionia Whippers Medical Office


(1890, 511 Florida Avenue, NW)
Anna Julia Cooper Residence
(1900, 201 T Street, NW)
Lucy Diggs Slowe Hall
(1943, 1919 3rd Street, NW)
Bryant Street Pumping Station
(1904, 300 Block Bryant Street, NW)
Hurd House (1905, 116 Bryant Street, NW)
Barnett Aden House
(1910, 127 Randolph Place, NW)
Sylvan Theater (1913,
116 Rhode Island Ave, NW)
Bloomingdale Liquor Store Building
(1913, 1828 First Street, NW)
Saint Martins Catholic Church #1
(1913, 1900-1909 North Capitol Street, NW)
Saint Martins Catholic Church #2
(1939, 1902 North Capitol Street, NW)
Saint Martins Convent
(1923, 116 T Street,NE)
Central Methodist Protestant Church
(Now Mt Bethel Baptist Church
(1902,1901 First Street, NW)

13. Memorial Church of the United Brethren (Now


Metropolitan Wesley Ame Zion)
(1904, 1712 North Capitol Street, NW)
14. Early Subdivision Houses - Villas
(1890s, various locations)
15. Onondaga Apartment
(1901, 147-49 R Street, NE)
16. Owasco Apartment (1903, 11 R Street, NE)
17. Eckington School (1897, 111 Quincy Place, NE)
18. Emery School (1901, 1725 Lincoln Rd, NE)
19. Langley High School (1923, 101 T Street, NE)
20. Lincoln Road Methodist Episcopal
(1923, 2001 Lincoln Road, NE)
21. McKinley Technology High School
(1928, 151 T Street, NE)
22. Eckington Car Barn (1898, 1901 4th Street, NE)
23. Sanitary Grocery Company Warehouse
(1899, 1845 4th Street, NE)
24. Sanitary Grocery Company Warehouse
(1929, 1629 Eckington Place, NE)
25. Schlitz Brewing Company Bottling Plant
(1908, 309 Randolph Street, NE)
26. National Geographic Printing Plant
(1924, 326 R Street, NE)
27. National Biscuit Company Stable & Warehouse
(1907, 336 Randolph Place, NE)
28. Bates Street - Washington Sanitary Housing Company
(1897-1936, Bates Street, NW)
29. Catanias Bakery Building
(1905, 1404 North Capitol Street, NW)
30. Letts Grocery Company
(1917, 52 O Street, NW)
31. Washington Animal Rescue League
(1931, 71 O Street, NW)
32. Mount Airy Baptist Church
(1925, 1100 North Capitol St NW)
33. Masjid Muhammad: The Nations Masjid.
(1519 4th Street, NW)

African-American Heritage, alleyways, churches,


schools, industrial history.
Most Mid City East residents support
reinvestment and new construction in their
community, but are opposed to insensitive
changes that damage the human scale and
character that make their neighborhoods
attractive. While some new development has
been welcomed, others have been seen as
incompatible with existing community character.
Few historic designations in Bloomingdale
and Eckington.
Current historic designations do not represent
history beyond the 1920s.

RECOMMENDATIONS
GOAL #1: Create the structure and engage the
tools for pursuing neighborhood-led conservation
efforts.
MCE 1.1 - Develop a community-led neighborhood
conservancy to lead historic preservation efforts
and build consensus around preferred preservation
strategies in Bloomingdale.
MCE 1.2 - Explore options for designating
Bloomingdale as a Historic District or a Pilot
Conservation District. After the designation, or
completion of the pilot project, share lessons
learned with other Mid City East neighborhoods.
MCE 1.3 - Develop a community-led neighborhood
conservancy to lead historic preservation efforts
and build consensus around preferred preservation
strategies in Eckington.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

Opportunities for cultural tourism include:

MCE 1.4 - Explore options for designating


Eckington as a Historic District or a Pilot
Conservation District. After the designation, or
completion of the pilot project, share lessons
learned with other Mid City East neighborhoods.
MCE 1.5 - Develop a community-led neighborhood
conservancy to lead historic preservation efforts
and build consensus around preferred preservation
strategies in Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover.
MCE 1.6 - Explore designating individual buildings
under a multiple property document for the row
houses on Bates Street, in an effort to preserve
the cultural relevance of the sanitary housing
movement.
MCE 1.7 - Prepare educational material that
outlines the pros/cons associated with various
preservation tools based on neighborhood models
to inform and equip neighborhood conservancies.
GOAL #2: Reinforce and support neighborhood
identity.
MCE 1.8 - Augment existing signage programs or
establish new neighborhood signage for LeDroit
Park, Bloomingdale, Eckington, and Bates/Truxton
Circle and Hanover. Create unique designs including
art, landscape, and/or streetscape and street
furniture to identify the distinctive character of
each neighborhood.
MCE 1.9 - Create markers to commemorate lost
landmarks such as the former Truxton Circle and
fountain that once served as a neighborhood anchor
and landmark. *WT2.2
T Street Market - 4th Street, NW

27

Neighborhood

Bates/Truxton
& Hanover

Historic Historic
District Landmarks

Potential
Conservation Multiple Property
Historic
District
Designation
District

Strengths

Blocks with intact row houses

Largest concentration of designated landmarks


Intact row house neighborhood

Bloomingdale

Eckington

15

LeDroit Park

Oldest neighborhood in the study area


One of two historic districts in MCE and immediate vicinity

Sursum Corda

Mid to late 20th century public housing bordered by late 19th and
early 20th century institutional and residential buildings

Fig. 3.4 - Historic Resources Summary Table

28
28

Identified
Potential
Landmarks

Strong historic commercial corridor along Rhode Island and


portions of North Capitol Street
Somewhat intact row house neighborhood

Strong historic industrial corridor along eastern edge

A Neighborhood Conservancy is a community


led organization that can advocate for cultural
heritage and historic preservation, explore the
implementation of existing preservation tools, or
new preservation strategies. A Neighborhood
Conservancy can:
Consult with the DC Historic Preservation
Office to learn about relevant preservation
tools.
Build consensus around preferred preservation
strategies.
Explore private and grant funding to support
survey and research efforts.
Develop pattern books and other educational
material to document varied architectural
styles, neighborhood history and educate
community about the benefits of compatible
design and conservation of character defining
architectural features.
Coordinate with existing heritage education
efforts such as Cultural Tourism DC, Heritage
Trails and the African American Heritage Trail
to develop neighborhood tours.

Upper Level Residential additions in Eckington - 136 Quincy Place, NW

Mid CityMid
EastCity
Small
Area
Plan
Key
and Recommendations
East
Small
Area
Plan Findings
Neighborhood
Highlights

WHAT IS A NEIGHBORHOOD
CONSERVANCY AND
WHAT CAN IT DO?

29

2. COMMERCIAL
REVITALIZATION
SUMMARY
The purpose of the existing conditions market
analysis was to gain an understanding of the
current market conditions and potential as well as
the reality for commercial revitalization, housing,
redevelopment and infill in the Mid City East
planning area.

Demographic Highlights
Younger and more affluent childless households
are moving to the neighborhood that was once
primarily comprised of older residents and
larger family households.
17,858 people live in 7,308 households.
The population has risen steadily at 1.2% per
year, with most of the growth occurring in
Bloomingdale and Sursum Corda.
Over half of Mid City East residents have
moved in since 2005.
Mid City East household sizes have shrunk from
an average of 2.88 people per household to
2.44 people per household.
The number of single young professionals and
couples has increased.
Families have decreased from 55% percent in
2000 to 42% in 2013.

30
30

Households with children decreased from 24%


to 15%.

Median home size declined between 2000 and


2010, resulting in a lower supply of homes that
have enough bedrooms to support families with
children.
Area household incomes have nearly doubled
between 2000 ($32,300) and 2013 ($60,100).

Retail Analysis
Primarily neighborhood-serving and
locally-owned businesses.
Retail is clustered along arterial roads.
Some convenience retail is scattered
throughout the study area.

VISION
Mid City East will be an attractive area with
thriving existing small businesses, emerging
small businesses, vibrant retail and a growing
neighborhood residential base. North Capitol
Street and other major corridors will provide
neighborhood serving retail, dining options and
amenities to the community.

Minimal growth and reinvestment in most areas.


Successful, growing food and beverage cluster
in the commercial area around First Street and
Rhode Island Avenue NW.
Food service and convenience stores in Mid
City East capture over 50% of local resident
spending.
Retail uses are very limited and capture only 5%
of residents retail spending.
A city-wide influx of residents and rising incomes will
impact the local real estate market by enhancing the
consumer base for neighborhood businesses and
may continue to drive up home prices and rents.
The combination of development constraints and
underperformance of existing commercial buildings
suggests that there is a greater opportunity to
improve the viability of existing retail spaces than to
construct new space.
First Street at Rhode Island Avenue, NW

A successful revitalization effort will need to address


several challenges, including perceptions of safety,
ground floor vacancy, continuity of commercial
uses, high automobile traffic volumes, unfavorable
pedestrian conditions, underinvested and blighted
storefronts, loitering, and other public realm
deficiencies.

Old Engine Company #17 - Washington Firehouse Restaurant

Given a reasonable capture rate of local and outside


spending and the availability of ideal retail spaces, it
is estimated that 22 new stores could be added to
the Mid City East area by 2018. Key opportunities
include an increased diversity of restaurants, and
neighborhood goods and services.
Future new development outside the study
area at the McMillan Reservoir, Howard Town
Center and CityMarket at O, will provide new
retail near the study area, and an increase in area
population. However, most of the opportunities
for development of new commercial space within
Mid City East are concentrated in key cluster areas
along North Capitol Street, both within the study
area boundaries and adjacent parcels in the NoMa
neighborhood. The area on the west side of North
Capitol Street, between New York Avenue and
Randolph Street could attract a robust and diverse
mix of uses, particularly entrepreneurial/creative
services that build upon the existing presence of the

There are two major opportunities for enhanced and


expanded neighborhood-oriented retail: 1) Grow
collective neighborhood purchasing power through
increased density in and around Mid City East, and
2) Leverage public and nonprofit support that can
promote retail revitalization through coordinated
marketing, public realm management, provision
of technical assistance to business and property
owners, and operational and capital funding for
targeted initiatives and investments.

Office and Industrial Analysis


3,200 people work in the Mid City East
study area.
55% work in the information, health care, or
professional/technical services sector.
Office use is predominantly limited to spaces
in converted townhomes, spaces originally
designed for traditional retail use, and upper
floors above retail establishments along the
commercial corridors.

Available office spaces are generally small (under 5,000


SF) and more affordable than citywide office rents
($38 per square foot).
Industrial and flex space (400,000 SF in 14 buildings) are
primarily concentrated between 4th Street NE and the
railroad lines in the eastern portion of Eckington.
Industrial space is almost fully leased
and commands competitive rents around
$14 per SF.
A high concentration of small businesses and people
working from home demonstrate an entrepreneurial
spirit.
In Bloomingdale, nearly 10 percent of employed
residents work from home, twice the citywide average.
Mid City East has comparable accessibility and
more affordable rents relative to nearby NoMa and
Downtown DC.
The mix of office, industrial, and creative space fosters
opportunities to promote local entrepreneurship, enable
business diversification, enhance the unique character of
the neighborhoods within Mid City East, and create value in
non-traditional and under-performing spaces along North
Capitol Street.
Accessibility and affordable rents could help attract
small businesses and start-ups. Overall, there is limited
opportunity to provide considerably more square footage
of office or industrial space, but upper floors of buildings
on North Capitol Street have the potential for becoming
repurposed as more effective work spaces. Select infill
development sites also present an opportunity to include
creative workspaces on the ground floor of new mixed-use
projects.

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

O Street Studios and Fab Lab; neighborhood retail


and services especially in mid-sized redevelopment
sites; and small concentrations of neighborhood
dining and social spaces.

31

RECOMMENDATIONS
Goal #1: Improve resident access to healthy
food and dining opportunities throughout
Mid City East.
MCE 2.1 - Building on the success of the
Bloomingdale Farmers Market, increase year round
access to healthy food options for Mid City East
residents by encouraging corner store owners to
enroll in DC Central Kitchens Healthy Corners,
the Healthy Food Retail Program (administered by
DSLBD), and similar programs to expand availability
of fresh local produce and healthy prepared foods.
Provide technical assistance to help accelerate the
application process. *FD2.1, FD2.3
Goal #2: Strengthen and expand the dining
cluster emerging at the intersection of Rhode
Island Avenue and First Street NW, and the
dining establishments along North Capitol Street.
MCE 2.2 - Reinforce the market positioning of the
commercial cluster around Rhode Island Avenue
and First Street NW as a dining destination that
attracts patrons from neighborhoods outside Mid
City East through attraction of additional food
service businesses and expanded marketing efforts
in partnership with the Restaurant Association of
Metropolitan Washington (RAMW.)
MCE 2.3 - Explore potential to host a Taste of
or similar-type event on the vacant lot at Florida
Avenue and North Capitol Street to highlight
neighborhood food service operators and other
small businesses, as well draw to attention to
North Capitol as a viable commercial street. *FD2.2

32
32

Windows Cafe and Market - Rhode Island Avenue and First Street, NW

MCE 2.4 - Identify opportunities for the


development of a food service incubator that
provides emerging entrepreneurs and caterers
with access to shared kitchen and food preparation
space, which will in turn lower operational
overhead and result in economies of scale through
cooperative purchasing and increased market
exposure.
MCE 2.5 - Support and coordinate with the
efforts of the Rhode Island Avenue Main Street
organization.
Goal #3: Leverage Mid City Easts unique
location along North Capitol Street to support
its commercial corridor vitality and local
entrepreneurs. Build on existing efforts by

exploring new programs and incentives to improve and


promote commercial areas throughout Mid City East,
including the emerging creative economy cluster.
MCE 2.6 - Implement an approach to commercial
revitalization on North Capitol Street that builds on existing
assets, fills market voids, and acknowledges the limitations of
North Capitol Street as a traditional retail street. A diverse and
robust mix of uses could include entrepreneurial production
and creative services; day-to-day goods and services; and the
expansion of neighborhood dining.
MCE 2.7 - Inventory, monitor, and encourage development
of boutique/small office space (10,000 square feet and less)
along the North Capitol Street corridor, specifically focused
on the segment south of P Street, that may offer appropriate
space for a diverse and robust mix of uses including arts uses,
creative services companies, and start-ups. *BE2.3

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

MCE 2.8 - Encourage property owners in the


industrial/production, distribution, and repair
(PDR) portions of Eckington to retain and, where
possible, expand warehouse/flex spaces that may
offer appropriate space for small-scale production
tenants. *BE2.3
Assist businesses, entrepreneurs, and
developers in accessing funding for industrial
space improvements as well as resources for
business start-up and operation.
Working with property owners, business
associations, and businesses, highlight the
potential for emerging industries in the
creative, green, and technology sectors to be
tenants of PDR space. As part of this, share
findings and recommendations from the
Ward 5 Industrial Land Transformation Study.
Identify opportunities for appropriate PDR
spaces to incorporate a retail experience that is
complimentary to production activity and takes
advantage of pedestrian and bike accessibility.
MCE 2.9 - Promote the MCE area to the creative
economy community as a more affordable
alternative to downtown and other high-rent office
markets, but with a similar level of access to transit
and amenities. *BE2.3
MCE 2.10 - Expand the focus of North Capitol
Main Street business recruitment efforts beyond
traditional retail (consumer businesses) to include
creative services, physical and graphic design
companies, arts organizations, and technologybased start-ups (producer businesses). *BE2.3
MCE 2.11 - Market available arts and performance
space (temporary and permanent) through

The Red Hen Restaurant - First and Seaton Place, NW

33

DC Space Finder and other property listing channels


that target the creative economy sector. *BE2.1
MCE 2.12 - Identify funding for a business plan
competition to attract start-up companies and
creative economy entrepreneurs to Mid City East.
*BE2.2
MCE 2.13 - Provide assistance to the North Capitol
Main Street leadership to regularly evaluate and
update the organizations business plan to help
prioritize ongoing initiatives and allocation of funds.
MCE 2.14 - Continue to provide clean and safe
services along North Capitol Street through the
DSLBD-funded Clean Team.
MCE 2.15 - Develop a work plan to provide
technical assistance to business and property
owners in facilitating development approvals,
licensing, applications for District grant funding
(such as Great Streets) for storefront and physical
property improvements.
MCE 2.16 - Develop a marketing and branding
strategy for North Capitol Street that highlights the
existing character and retail node as a burgeoning
area for small independent businesses in existing
buildings, while encouraging larger, established
retail to anchor new development. Restaurants,
the creative economy, retail shops and other small
businesses should be encouraged as tenants to
create a more vibrant retail street.
MCE 2.17 - Implement the Vibrant Streets Retail
toolkit for the North Capitol Street corridor within
Mid City East.

34
34

MCE 2.18 - Establish a task force to address


loitering and safety issues. Task force should include

New Jersey Avenue at Q Street, NW

representatives from NCMS, ANCs, MPD, residents


and business and property owners.
Goal #4: Improve the appearance and
functionality of commercial properties in MCE
through reinvestment in faades and interior
spaces.
MCE 2.19 - Promote commercial faade
improvements and rehabilitations for properties
along North Capitol Street guided by established
programs, incentives, or guidelines. *WS2.3
MCE 2.20 - Promote commercial faade
improvements and rehabilitations for properties
along Rhode Island Avenue guided by established
programs, incentives, or guidelines. *WS2.3

MCE 2.21 - Provide outreach to commercial property owners


in MCE neighborhoods to ensure that they are knowledgeable
about programs such as DC Main Streets and Great Streets.
MCE 2.22 - Encourage existing property owners and new
development, where possible, to design ground floor space
in new development, with sufficient flexibility to provide
larger retail bays that can accommodate more established
businesses and regional/national credit tenants.
MCE 2.23 - Encourage property owners on North Capitol
Street to upgrade and reposition upper floor spaces to
provide affordable workspace.
MCE 2.24 - Provide technical assistance to help facilitate the
Certificate of Occupancy process for small property owners
seeking a change of use. *JE1.1

AVE NW

RD N
E
OLN
BRYANT ST NE

RH

W ST NW

TH O M A S S T N W
T ST NW

OLN
LIN C
TODD PL NE

RAN DO LPH PL NE

RAN DOL PH PL NW

R S T NE

NE

E N
W

HO

E
E N

PE

NE

AV

ST

NE

N S T NE

NE

RS

ST

TH ST NE

NE

E AV
E
WAR

DELA

North Capitol
M ST NE
Main Street
Boundary O R L E A N S P
TH ST NE

MORTON P
Retail Clusters

Corner Stores
TH ST NE

RD S T NE

ND S T NE

RD S T N

TH

N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

I ST NWI S T NW

PL

NE
MCE Boundary
Area

L ST NE

ST NW

MO

N S T NE

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

M ST NE

ST

LEGEND

AL

NE

TH

YO

ST

ST ST NE

AT

ST NW

L ST NW

EW

ABBEY PL NE

ST

ON PL NW

I ST NW

YO

PIER CE ST N E

ST ST NW

ER

Fig. 3.5 - Retail Market Analysis


T NW

NE
VE

INT

L ST NW

I ST NW

ST PL NW

PIERC E ST NW

NE

O ST NE

ST ST NE

TH ST NW

N S T NW

MORGAN ST NW

W
E N

O ST NE

HANOVER PL W
N

W
VE N
EY A

NE

AV

E N
E

TH

O ST NW

ERS

M ST NW

T NW

AV

HA R R Y T

NE

ST ST NW

NEW

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

RID GE ST NW

DA

P ST NE

N S T NW

YO

RI

TH

LO

ON P
L NE

Q ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

MAR ION ST N W

Q ST NW

S WA
Y

Q IN C Y PL N E

MA

A A
V

Vibrant Retail Streets Toolkit equips retailers,


landlords, business and neighborhood associations,
nonprofits and government agencies with the tools
and requirements needed to support more successful
and dynamic retail streets in the District. For more
information, visit www.vibrantstreetdc.com

S ST NE

P ST NW

O ST NW

TODD PL NE

SE ATON PL NE

BATES S T NW

O ST NW

S T NE

EC IN
GT

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

WARNER ST NW

ID

SL
E I

S T NE

W
E N

SEATON PL NW

ST S T NW

TH ST NW

S ST NW

R S T NW LO R

OD

AV

T ST NE

SEATON PL NW

S ST NW

Q ST NW

RH

T ST NW

D
AN

TH ST NE

S T NW

TH ST NE

ND ST N W

T ST NW

TH ST NW

NW
TH ST

T ST NW

RD ST N W

S T NW

V ST NE

H L A N D TE R N E

PAR ER ST NE
I ST NE

MID CITY EAST COMMERCIAL


REVITALIZATION TOOLS
Great Streets is a grant program administered by
the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and
Economic Development. Grants are up to a maximum
of $85,000 each to support and foster growth
amongst small businesses. Grant funds may be
utilized to reimburse the grantee for the purpose of
capital expenditures to improve the subject property.
Grant opportunities exist on North Capitol Street and
Rhode Island Avenue in Mid City East.

W ST NE

RD S T NE

V ST NW

W
ELM ST N

ND ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

GEORG IA A VE N W

W ST NW

V ST NW

DE

AD AMS ST NE

ADAM S S T NW

RD N
E

TH ST NW

A DAM S S T NW

PL NW
OA DALE

D O GL AS ST NE

A SCOT P L N E

V ST NW

C HAN N IN G ST N E

CH ANN IN G ST NW

N DR
NW

BRYA NT ST NW

ST NW

GE

LINC

LLA

ST NW

COLL EGE

BRYA NT

MI

ED

ND S T NE

GEORGIA

MC

ST ST NW

PL NW

E V A R TS S T N E

L ST NE

ST NE

DSLBD provides services and funding to help retail


corridors and strengthen our neighborhoods to
improve the quality of life for everyone living in the
District. Small and local retailers are found in clusters
along the traditional commercial corridors. Through
neighborhood renewal programs, DSLBD supports
nonprofit organizations and small businesses working
to revitalize the Districts retail districts. Examples of
programs are:
DC Main Streets Program
Business Improvement Districts (BIDs)
Clean Teams
Healthy Food Retail
Streetscape Loan Relief
Please got to the DSLBD website for more
information about their programs and assistance.

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

NW

W
TH ST N
HOWARD

ST NE

T
E V A R TS S T N E

http://dslbd.dc.gov/service/revitalizing-our-neighborhoods

35

3. REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
AND HOUSING
SUMMARY
There has been little new development within the
Mid City East study area. Most of the significant
large-scale recent and/or planned construction is
underway nearby, especially in the adjacent NoMa
neighborhood. There are a limited number of large
potential redevelopment sites within the study area.
There are a few vacant sites with potential for new
development, most notably the property at the
intersection of North Capitol Street and Florida
Avenue NW. Most potential redevelopment
opportunities are underutilized sites with existing
buildings, such as the UPO site in LeDroit Park,
or buildings with the potential for adaptive
reuse development, such as the Langston and
Slater Schools on P Street NW and the Emery
School in Eckington. Potential development and
redevelopment opportunity sites are illustrated in
Fig. 3.6.

Housing Analysis
Mid City East has 8,393 existing housing units
with 1,925 new housing units between 2000
and 2013, a 2% average annual increase.
Significant investment has occurred in the Mid
City East neighborhoods as demonstrated
by the renovation and restoration of existing
housing stock.

36
36

177 housing units currently planned or


proposed within Mid City East.
11,500 units planned or underway just outside
of Mid City East (7,200 units in NoMa alone,
including projects currently under construction).
Mid City East has a greater proportion of
subsidized housing (15% of all units) than DC
does as a whole (13% of all units).
There are approximately 3,600 units of Low
Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) housing and
2,600 units of Section 8 housing in and near the
study area.
The bulk of the housing stock in Mid City East
consists of pre-1950s row homes, a product type
that has historically appealed to homebuyers and
renters seeking attainably priced single family
homes relative to other close-in neighborhoods.
Mid City East has a higher rate of home ownership
(48% own, 52% rent) than the DC average (42%
ownership), indicating residents commitment to the
neighborhood and desire to invest in it.

VISION
Mid City East will prosper as an
inclusive community with strong
neighborhood fabric, thriving
businesses and a diverse mix of
quality housing options.

Increased demand for housing near downtown DC


has led to significant appreciation in home values
and increased rents in Mid City East. There are a
few large affordable housing communities in Mid
City East including Sursum Corda, the Kelly Miller
and Sibley developments, and the Northwest
Cooperative Homes.
Despite the supply of income-restricted housing,
the neighborhood has become increasingly
unaffordable to many middle and lower-income
households. In fact, approximately 40% of
households spend over 35% of their income

Rowhouses in Eckington, NE

The high volume of pipeline housing development


in neighborhoods adjacent to Mid City East
will somewhat temper future cost increases by
adding to the supply of available units to help
meet increased market demand. Most of the new
housing developments will also have affordability
requirements through inclusionary zoning,
which will set aside units specifically targeted to
households earning less than 50% and/or less
than 80% of area median income. However, given
limited opportunities to build new housing within
the study area proper, it will become increasingly
challenging for lower-income families to remain
in the neighborhood with the exception of those
home owners who are already living in affordable
developments.
Approximately 2,400 new units are projected to
be developed in Mid City East by 2025 including
units created through the subdivision of existing
housing stock, and small multifamily developments
throughout the neighborhood. Projections show
that there is a significantly higher proportion of
demand for units with lower prices and rents than
is available in the market. While Mid City East is
challenged by limited development capacity, there
are select opportunities to preserve and expand
affordable housing supply. Most notable is the
potential mixed-income redevelopment of Sursum
Corda which is being pursued by the cooperative.

3rd and S Street, NE

RECOMMENDATIONS
GOAL #1: Support strategic land use designation
changes on key sites and the redevelopment of
publicly-owned properties.
MCE 3.1 - Pursue a future land use designation
change at the intersections of North Capitol
Street and New York Avenue and North Capitol
and Florida Avenue, from low density commercial/
moderate density residential to moderate
density commercial/medium density residential
to encourage mixed-use development and

create a thriving neighborhood edge with a


welcoming physical environment. See Figs. 3.6 for
redevelopment and infill opportunity parcels.
MCE 3.2 - When development is achieved through
a Planned Unit Development (PUD) process, the
ground floor of development on the west side
of North Capitol Street in the study area should
accommodate retail services. *BE1.1
MCE 3.3 - When development is achieved through
a PUD process, redevelopment of vacant and
underutilized properties at the four corners of the
intersection of Florida Avenue and North Capitol

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

on housing. More than 30% is considered cost


burdened. Home values have risen sharply with a
9% annual growth since 2000, while rents have risen
by a 7% annual increase since 2000. This increase in
rent has caused some residents to relocate to more
affordable neighborhoods.

37

Street within Mid City East should incorporate


ground floor commercial uses with entrances facing
sidewalks along or proximate to North Capitol.
MCE 3.4 - Ensure that new development enhances
public space by requiring new development to
use alleys for all vehicular access to the site and
that mechanical equipment (i.e. transformers) are
located on private property or alleys.
MCE 3.5 - Integrate energy efficient lighting
on buildings and in sidewalk elements in new
development and redevelopment.
MCE 3.6 - Solicit proposals to redevelop properties
controlled by the District into creative mixed-use,
residential or commercial developments. See Fig.
3.6. *BE1.1, BE2.3, NA2.1, NA 2.2, NA2.4, WT2.2,
NA3.5
The DHCD parcels on the south side of Florida
Avenue at Q Street NW Pursue a land use
designation change from Moderate Density
Residential/Low Density Commercial to
Medium Density Residential/Moderate Density
Commercial in an effort to encourage site
redevelopment.

38
38

The Langston and Slater school buildings on


P Street NW As redevelopment opportunities
arise for these sites, and when existing uses
are no longer relevant or can be included in
the redevelopment plan, adaptively reuse
and redevelop both buildings together.
Consider innovative business uses, including
creative economy start-ups, to complement
development along North Capitol Street.
Residential and cultural uses should also be
considered.

Kelly Miller Public Housing

The former Emery School site in Eckington


Pursue a land use designation change from
moderate density residential to moderate
mixed use/light industrial. As redevelopment
opportunities arise for this site, and once
existing uses are no longer needed or can be
included in the redevelopment plan, adaptively
reuse the former Emery School building as
part of a place-making redevelopment of the
entire Emery School site for Eckington as a
long-term future project. Encourage mixed
use development including neighborhoodscale retail, live/work, office, residential, light
industrial, public amenities, and green space.

GOAL #2: Encourage infill of privately-held vacant lots and


increase site utilization to strengthen neighborhood fabric
and create opportunities for new housing, unique retail
offerings, and/or workplaces.
MCE 3.7 - Pursue a future land use designation change for the
corner of North Capitol and Hanover Streets, NW
MCE 3.8 - Infill vacant parcels, redevelop underutilized parcels
or repurpose existing vacant buildings. *BE2.3, NA2.4, WT2.1,
WT2.3

RD N
E

V ST NW

OLN
LIN C
TODD PL NE

S ST NE

RAN D LPH PL NE

RAN DOL PH PL NW

R S T NE

NE

E N
W

HO

NE

N S T NE

ST

AL

PL

MO

N S T NE

TH ST NE

NE

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

M ST NE

RS

DELA

ST

Land Use
Designation
Change Areas

NE

M ST NE

TH ST NE

ABBEY PL NE

RD S T NW

TH

N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

I ST NE

Potential
Redevelopment/
ORLE ANS P
Infill Sites
MORTON P

TH ST NE

RD S T NE

ND S T NE

I ST NWI S T NW

PAR ER ST NE

NE

NE

YO

TH

ST

NE

PE

L ST NE

ST NW

TH ST NW

I ST NW

ST ST NE

AT

ON PL NW

I ST NW

NE

NE
VE

PIER CE ST N E

ST NW

ST

L ST NW

Fig. 3.6 - Redevelopment


and Infill Map
ST NW
T NW

PIERC E ST NW

ER

L ST NW

E
E N

LEGEND

E AV
E

NW
W
E N

AV

O ST NE

INT

T NW

MORGAN ST NW

TH ST NW

W
NE

AV

WAR

N S T NW

O ST NE

ST ST NE

HANOVER

VE
EY A

M ST NW

NE

YO

TH

O ST NW

ERS

RID GE ST NW

E N
E

NE

ST ST NW

NEW

TH ST NW

N S T NW

AV

P ST NE

O ST NW

YO

DA

HA R R Y T

ST

P ST NW

RI

TH

LO

ON P
L NE

Q ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

MAR ION ST N W

Q ST NW

S WA
Y

Q IN C Y PL N E

MA

A A
V

SE ATON PL NE

BATES ST N

O ST NW

TODD PL NE

EC IN
GT

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

WARNER ST NW

S T NE

SEATON PL NW

ST S T NW

TH ST NW

S ST NW

ID

SL
E I

S T NE

W
E N

T ST NE

SEATON PL NW

S ST N

OD

V ST NE

H L A N D TE R N E

TH ST NE

RH

AV
ND

W ST NE

TH ST NE

RD ST N W

TH O M A S S T N W
T ST NW

TH ST NW

NW
TH ST

ND ST N W

S T NW

OD

Mid CityMid
EastCity
Small
Area
Plan
Key
and Recommendations
East
Small
Area
PlanFindings
Neighborhood
Highlights

LINC

OLN

RH

S T NE

V ST NW

T ST NW

C HAN N IN G ST N E

ND ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

GEORG IA A VE N W

W ST NW

T ST NW

AD AMS ST NE

ADAM S S T NW

W
ELM ST N

Q ST NW

Vacant parcel on the west side of Kirby Street


at the intersection of New York Avenue (former
DC Public Library kiosk site)

BRYANT ST NE

W ST NW

PL NW
OA DALE

GE

D O GL AS ST NE

RD N
E

TH ST NW

A DAM S S T NW

S T NW

TH ST NW

Vacant parcel at the NE corner First & O Street

ST NW

R S T NW LO R

Vacant parcel between Hanover and O Street


NW, along the west side of North Capitol
Street

CH ANN IN G ST NW

N DR
NW

BRYA NT ST NW

V ST NW

New York Pizza site at the intersection of


North Capitol Street, Florida Avenue NE and
Q Street NE
Vacant site at the corner of Lincoln Road and
Randolph Place NE

ED

A SCOT P L N E

T ST NW

Vacant sites along North Capitol Street NW at


Bates Street and Hanover Place

LLA

E V A R TS S T N E

ND S T NE

AVE NW

Vacant site at the corner of Randolph Place and


3rd Street NE

MI

ST NW

COLL EGE

BRYA NT

TH ST NW

Vacant site at the corner of Rhode Island


Avenue and 3rd St NE

MC

GEORGIA

Underutilized properties at Rhode Island and


Florida Avenues NW, including the UPO site,
post office site, and gas stations
Underutilized small commercial property
bounded by New Jersey Avenue, Q, 4th,
and Franklin Streets NW

PL NW

ST ST NW

W
TH ST N
HOWARD

Opportunities include:

T NE

E V A R TS S T N E

L S T N E Boundary
MCE
Area
ST NE

39

GOAL #3: Support the redevelopment of


Sursum Corda
MCE 3.9 - Change the future land use designation of
Sursum Corda from moderate density residential and
low density commercial to high density residential and
medium density commercial. Development under the
new land use designation should be achieved through
a Planned Unit Development and should meet the
following criteria and encourage the development of a
mixed-income neighborhood through:
The provision of 199 affordable units within the
project at varying levels and types of subsidies not
to exceed 60%. *BE1.1, BE2.5
The addition of market rate units that will represent
at least 66% of the total units developed on site.
Reflect the height and scale of existing
neighborhood developments. Development on the
Sursum Corda site should step down towards First
Street NW and towards the Mt. Airy Baptist Church,
and step up towards North Capitol Street NW.
Extend the street grid, including L Street NW from
First Street NW to North Capitol Street, NW and
Pierce Streets NW between First Street NW and
First Place NW.
Include sustainable development components
such as green/park space and other community
amenities. *EN1.3, NA 2.1, NA 2.2, NA2.4, N 3.5,
WS2.3, WT 2.1, WT 2.2, BE 3.1

40
40

Sursum Corda Co-operative

MCE 3.10 - Use the DC Preservation Catalog


of affordable units to develop early intervention
techniques to preserve affordable units prior to
expiration of affordability controls.
MCE 3.11 - Provide incentives to developers to
include affordable units above and beyond the
minimum required for inclusionary zoning.
MCE 3.12 - In the event of long-term future
redevelopment of current public housing or private
affordable housing developments, maintain or
increase the number of affordable units on site.

Sursum Corda Co-operative

North Capitol Street at Florida Avenue, NW

Rhode Island Avenue at New Jersey Avenue, NW

Capitol Food Mart - 1634 North Capitol Street

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

GOAL #4: Maintain or increase the number


of affordable housing units throughout MCE
to better serve all household types, including
families. *BE1.1, BE2.5, BE3.1

41

4. NEIGHBORHOOD
PLACEMAKING
AND PUBLIC
REALM
SUMMARY
Throughout our public engagment process, Mid
City east residents expressed a strong sense of
community identity but also a concern with the
inconsistency of the outward identity and sense
of place of each neighborhood. For instance, the
gateway in LeDroit Park is a distinctive feature
identifying that neighborhood. Bloomingdale and
Eckington have banners. The retail and restaurant
enclave at Rhode Island Avenue and First Street
NW is a place that gives a sense of identity to the
Bloomingdale neighborhood. Eckington and Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover have no identifying
placemaking or community gathering spaces. Their
neighborhood identities should be strengthened.
Neighborhood Fabric
The neighborhoods of Mid City East are strong
in neighborhood character and fabric. Each
community is distinct in its history and unique
development over the years. The layout of the
eclectic mix of building types in Mid City East row
houses, single family and multifamily homes, small
commercial, industrial, and institutional uses, as
well as the street and block networks, provide the
neighborhoods their strong fabric and cohesiveness.

42
42

However, gaps from underutilized and vacant


parcels in various places weaken the urban texture

and become areas for loitering and vandalism.


Further challenges include a limited presence of
large development sites in the study area. Parcel
depths along the main commercial corridors
are shallow, making larger retail establishments,
residential development, or office buildings difficult
or impossible to accommodate. Although there
are significant barrieirs to large scale development,
the existing vacant and underutilized sites are
opportunities for new development on a smaller
scale. This new development would strengthen
the urban texture, by providing needed amenities
and services for residents, creating opportunities
for improved streetscape and public spaces, and
bringing an additional population to add eyes on
the street.

VISION
Mid City East neighborhoods and
corridors will showcase a unique
identity and enhanced sense of place.
Sidewalks and public spaces will be
high quality, safe and well-maintained.

Pedestrian Experience
Most destinations within Mid City East are within
walking distance. However, the pedestrian
experience throughout the Mid City East planning
area varies considerably from neighborhood to
neighborhood and from the major corridors and
roadways to the internal neighborhood streets.
The quality and maintenance of streetscape is
inconsistent in many areas with mostly
well-maintained sidewalks on internal neighborhood
streets. However, there are pockets throughout
the study area where trees, paving and vegetation
require maintenance. Along major roadways,
North Capitol Street and Florida Avenue in
particular, the streetscape needs improvement,
with narrow sidewalks, and wide and frequent curb
cuts, that detract from the walking experience and
create a lack of cohesion in the public space.
Storefronts in many of the areas along North Capitol
Street and Florida Avenue are dated and lack

maintenance. Such storefronts, coupled with loitering, which


residents identified as a big issue, create the perception of
a lack of safety. Storefronts should be designed to be more
inviting to customers, and the issue of loitering needs to be
examined and addressed.
North Capitol Street
The neighborhoods of Mid City East are located along an
important spine in the District of Columbia, North Capitol
Street. This major thoroughfare connects downtown DC to
northern parts of the city, and Maryland. It also has great
symbolic importance as a gateway into the District on axis with
and providing views to the Capitol and National Mall.
However, this symbolic street is a high-traffic, high congestion
roadway, and one of the least pedestrian-friendly streets in
the city. As the neighborhoods around it become revitalized,
North Capitol should be transformed into an attractive,
vibrant street that invites pedestrian activity; encourages
retail, restaurants, and businesses; and becomes a significant

Undertaking a comprehensive streetscape design


and connectivity study is recommended to chart
the path forward to enable this important street to
realize its full potential. This study should include
consideration of sustainably designed paving,
enhanced lighting, wayfinding signage, public
art, and vegetation, as well as the maintenance
of existing and the addition of new trees to line
the corridor wherever possible. Additionally, the
reinstated North Capitol Main Street program will
be key to revitalizing retail in the area, assisting with
business development, and maintaining cleanliness.
Corridor Enhancements
Mid City East is traversed by several important
vehicular corridors including North Capitol Street,
Rhode Island Avenue, Florida Avenue, New York
Avenue, and New Jersey Avenue. Enhanced
streetscape is needed along parts of these major
corridors, and particularly along North Capitol
Street, to help create a vibrant public realm. North
Capitol Street needs enhancements to celebrate its
axial connection to the Capitol, and create a public
realm that encourages pedestrian activity, new retail
and commercial establishments, and additional
residents. Streetscape within neighborhoods
is generally good, but continued repair and
maintenance are needed.
Gateways and Nodes
The Mid City East Livability Study suggests
intersections as neighorhood gateways, or nodes
which should be specially designed places that
reflect local character and could include narrowed
lanes, increased pedestrian lighting, more densely

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

amenity for the residents who live along it and in


the surrounding communities.

planted street trees, parklets, or more richly planted


landscaping. The Small Area Plan also identified
these nodes also as potential locations for public
art, neighborhood identity-giving architectural
elements, and enhanced wayfinding signage.
Rhode Island Ave at First Street, NW
Rhode Island Ave at Florida Avenue, NW
Florida Avenue at First Street, NW
Florida Avenue at North Capitol Street, NW
New York Avenue at North Capitol Street, NW
Public Art
Another way to celebrate the uniqueness of the
Mid City East area will be to work with local artists
to identity locations for public art, and enhance
the sense of identifty by creating new or enhancing
the existing neighborhood places that define each
neighborhood. In addition to the gateways and
nodes identified in the Livability Study, the Small
Area Plan suggests new placemaking opportunities
for Eckington and Bates/Truxton Circle and
Hanover. See Fig. 3.7.

RECOMMENDATIONS
GOAL #1: Enhance North Capitol Street and
celebrate its importance and symbolic axial
connection to the Capitol.
MCE 4.1 - Undertake a comprehensive streetscape
and connectivity design study for sidewalks and
public spaces along North Capitol Street to
celebrate the importance of the axial and visual
connection to the Capitol. Design should build
on existing guidelines, standards, and regulations

Florida Avenue Mural

43

identified in DCs Public Realm Design Manual


and include new, sustainably designed paving,
lighting, wayfinding signage, public art, trees, and
vegetation. Expand green space and integrate
LID and sustainable stormwater management.
Design should explore innovative ways to increase
connectivity east-west across North Capitol Street.
*EN1.3, NA2.2, WT2.2

MCE 4.6 - Educate Mid City East residents about


public space regulations, and the intent behind
them.

GOAL #2: Improve and maintain street trees and


increase tree cover throughout Mid City East.

MCE 4.8 - Identify neighborhood groups and civic


associations interested in developing strategies for
maintaining streetscape and sidewalk cleanliness in
locations throughout Mid City East neighborhoods
and corridors.

MCE 4.2 - Work with DDOTs Urban Forestry


Administration to maintain the health of existing
street trees and identify locations for and plant
additional street trees along North Capitol Street
to reinforce the axial and visual connection to the
Capitol and provide shade and increased tree cover.
*NA2.1
MCE 4.3 - Work with DDOTs Urban Forestry
Administration and Casey Trees to maintain and
protect existing trees throughout Mid City East.
MCE 4.4 - Determine the existing tree canopy
for neighborhoods, and identify where trees are
missing. Set specific goals for increasing the canopy.
Work with Casey Trees and DDOTs Urban Forestry
Administration to develop a strategy and timeline
for planting new street trees. *NA2.1, NA2.4
MCE 4.5 - Work with the Cherry Blossom Society
to identify locations for and plant a minimum of 50
cherry trees throughout Mid City East. *NA2.1
GOAL #3: Improve the appearance, walkability,
safety and cleanliness of Mid City East streets
and public spaces.

44
44

MCE 4.7 - Engage the Clean Team of the North


Capitol Street Main Street program to keep
sidewalks along and near North Capitol Street
consistently free of litter.

MCE 4.9 - Identify neighborhood groups to act


as stewards to work with landowners to improve
the appearance and walkability of the industrial/
production, distribution, and repair (PDR) portions
of Eckington.
MCE 4.10 - Provide required public realm and
pedestrian facilities with any new development.
Ensure that fences, curb cuts, display windows, and
caf seating areas comply with regulations. Refer
to the District of Columbias Public Realm Design
Manual for specific requirements.
MCE 4.11 - Identify and restore sidewalks in need
of repair throughout Mid City East neighborhoods.
MCE 4.12 - Increase pedestrian lighting around
Sursum Corda.
MCE 4.13 - Improve neighborhood alley lighting
throughout Mid City East. *NA2.2
MCE 4.14 - Improve pedestrian lighting in the light
industrial/PDR portions of Eckington. *NA2.2

MCE 4.15 - Engage in a dialogue with MPD to


potentially increase police presence focusing on
identified problem spots including parts of North
Capitol Street, Hanover Place, the Park at LeDroit
and the Metropolitan Branch Trail.
GOAL #4: Celebrate the creativity of artists
in the Mid City East area and throughout the
District.
MCE 4.16 - Work with local arts organizations,
artists, and residents to identify locations for
and install public art throughout Mid City East.
Focus efforts on identified gateways, nodes and
opportunity sites including North Capitol Street,
connections to Metrorail Stations, and underpasses,
as well as other appropriate locations as determined
by the community.
MCE 4.17 - Use public art as an opportunity in
new development or redevelopment to celebrate
the identity and vibrancy of Mid City East
neighborhoods and corridors.
GOAL #5: Promote opportunities to enhance the
sense of identity in the Eckington and Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover neighborhoods.
MCE 4.18 - Working with the Deputy Mayors
Office of Education (DME) and the Department of
General Services (DGS), and once current uses are
no longer needed in the existing buildings or can
be included in the redevelopment plan, create a
neighborhood-defining place for Eckington at
the location of the former Emery School buildings
and site by creating a long-term future re-use and
redevelopment project.

RD N
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RH

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TODD PL NE

SE ATON PL NE

S ST NE

RAN DO LPH PL NE

RAN DOL PH PL NW

HO

E
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E
E N

N S T NE

ST
MO

WAR

ST

ST

Potential Gateways

NE

Neighborhood
M ST NE

Corridor
ORLE ANS P
Improvements
MORTON P

Streetscape
L ST NE
Improvements
TH ST NE

RD S T NE

ND S T NE

RD S T

TH

N O R T H C A P I TO L S

I ST NWI S T NW

TH ST NE

ABBEY PL NE

E AV
E N
E

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

M ST NE

RS

N S T NE

LN
E
MCE
Boundary
Area

NE

AV

AL

NE

LEGEND

L ST NE

ST NW

TH ST NW

I ST NW

ST ST NE

AT

ST NW

I ST NW

NE

YO

PIER CE ST N E

ST ST NW

ST

ON PL NW
Fig. 3.7 Public
Realm Improvement Map

L ST NW

AV

TH ST NE

PIERC E ST NW

ER

L ST NW

T NW

ST PL NW

DELA

NW

YO

YO

O ST NE

INT

NW

NE

ST ST NE

N S T NW

MORGAN ST NW

TH ST NW

NE

E
AV

O ST NE

HANOVER PL W
N

VE
EY A

M ST NW

E N
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TH

O ST NW

ERS

TH ST NW

RID GE ST NW

T NW

AV

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ST ST NW

NEW

TH ST NW

O ST NW

N S T NW

DA

P ST NE

HA R R Y T

TH

P ST NW

RI

ST

LO

ON P
L NE

Q ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

MAR ION ST N W

Q ST NW

MA

Q IN C Y PL N E

TH

E N
W

S WA
Y NE

R S T NE

AV

BATES S T NW

O ST NW

TODD PL NE

EC IN
GT

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

WARNER ST NW

IDA

S T NE

SEATON PL NW

ST S T NW

TH ST NW

R S T NW LO R

SL
E I

W
E N

T ST NE

SEATON PL NW
S ST NW

OD

H L A N D TE R N E
S T NE

TH ST NE

T ST NW

S ST NW

Q ST NW

RH

AV
ND

V ST NE

TH ST NE

RD ST N W

TH O M A S S T N W

T ST NW

TH ST NW

NW
TH ST

ND ST N W

S T NW

W ST NE

RD S T NE

W
ELM ST N

ND ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

V ST NW

OD

PAR ER ST NE
I ST NE

Mid CityMid
East
Small
Area
Plan
Plan
Key Findings
and Recommendations
City
East
Small
Area
Neighborhood
Highlights

OLN

D O GL AS ST NE

RD N
E

TH ST NW

W ST NW

T ST NW

AD AMS ST NE

ADAM S S T NW

V ST NW

S T NW

ND S T NE

BRYANT ST NE

W ST NW

TH ST NW

GEORG IA A VE N W

TH ST NW

MCE 4.19 - Work with the Truxton Circle community


to find a way to celebrate the former Truxton Circle
at the intersection of Florida Avenue and North
Capitol Street. Pursue the possibility of salvaging,
restoring, and incorporating the old Truxton Circle
fountain as part of a park or open space on land
near the intersection.

A DAM S S T NW

PL NW
OA DALE

T ST NW

Integrate LID and sustainable stormwater


management. *WT2.2
Include public art within the redevelopment.

ST NW

GE

C HAN N IN G ST N E

CH ANN IN G ST NW

N DR
NW

BRYA NT ST NW

V ST NW

Create physical connections to the Harry


Thomas Recreation Center and to the
McKinley Tech campus.
Create a green connection to North Capitol
Street along Lincoln Road. *NA2.1, WT2.2

LLA

ED

A SCOT P L N E

BRYA NT

MI

ST NW

COLL EGE

AVE NW

Including neighborhood-scale retail, residential,


a park/green space, public spaces, and
community amenities. *NA2.4, NA3.5

Once the current function is no longer needed


or can be included in the redevelopment plan,
adaptively reuse the old Emery School building
as part of the redevelopment.

MC

GEORGIA

Extending Randolph Place NE and connect it to


First Street NE, creating a complete block.

Including an architectural feature or


neighborhood gateway sign to identify the
Eckington neighborhood.

PL NW

E V A R TS S T N E

LINC

HOWARD

ST ST NW

W
TH ST N

Considerations should include:

T NE

NW

E V A R TS S T N E

ST NE

45

PARKS, GREEN
SPACE AND
STORMWATER
SUMMARY
Most residents of the Mid City East planning area
are within a five-minute walk of a park or recreation
center. The quality and usage of parks, green spaces
and playgrounds in the area varies. Neighborhood
parks would benefit from increased usage and eyes
on the park. Some parks are not accessible to all
potential users - suggesting the need for multigenerational programming. The areas playing fields
and recreation centers contain significant green
spaces and are an important amenity for residents,
however, they are structured, programmed places.
There are few significant passive green spaces,
and numerous grassy triangles of varying quality
and maintenance.

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS


Florida Avenue Park
The Florida Avenue Park has a basketball court
and a sparse playground area. There is minimum
vegetation, other than a few trees. Due to the tall
iron fence around it, the park feels very enclosed
and inaccessible to the general public.
New York Avenue Playground

46

The New York Avenue Playground has basketball


courts, a baseball field, and green space. There
is also a playground and pavilion building. Some
residents must cross busy New York Avenue to
access the park. Residents reported that the park
is well utilized but that the fence makes it less used

than it could be. They noted that due to the lack of


staffing and supervision, there are crime and drug
issues.
The Park at LeDroit
While residents expressed concerns about security
at the Park at LeDroit, they report much satisfaction
with the variety of programmed elements in the
park. This open (unfenced) park includes a dog park,
a multi-use playing field, jogging and walking paths,
a pavilion, seating areas, a playground for children,
garden plots, and the community garden plots of
the Common Good City Farm organization.
Howard Playground
This park has large playing fields and a playground.
It is located south and east of the Washington
Metropolitan High school between the LeDroit
Park and Bloomingdale neighborhoods. It is also
enclosed by a fence that may deter use of the park
by residents.

VISION
Mid City East will enjoy a variety of parks,
green spaces, and recreation options.
Flooding will be mitigated through the DC
Clean Rivers project and the employment
of Low Impact Development (LID)
stormwater management strategies.

Sursum Corda Playground


Sursum Corda has a small paved playground
which is in need of greening, maintenance and
improvement.

RECREATION FACILITIES
McKinley Technology School Playing Field
The McKinley Tech playing field accommodates
football, soccer, and track. The green part of the
campus is inwardly focused and cut off from the
neighborhood by steep topography and the large
surrounding school building. In addition, a fence
separates the school grounds from the
Harry Thomas Sr. Recreation Center.

Bacio Pizzeria at Seaton Place and First St., NW

This recreation center includes tennis and basketball


courts, a swimming pool, a soccer field and a brand
new playground. It is separated from the McKinley
Tech field by a chain link fence. Furthermore,
additional fencing along Lincoln Road makes it
feel unwelcoming.
Dunbar High School Facilities
While the future fields at Dunbar High School are
not yet constructed, area residents expressed a
desire to have community access to the fields and
facilities at Dunbar once they are completed.

GREEN SPACES
Crispus Attucks Park
Very few informal park spaces exist in the Mid City
East study area, such as Crispus Attucks Park. This
informal neighborhood green space is situated
within a residential block. As a result, it feels like a
private park, and is not often used by the general
public.
Various Triangular Green Spaces
Several small National Park Service (NPS)-owned
green spaces are scattered throughout the study
area. Many of these green spaces could contribute
to stormwater management efforts and become
more utilized if better vegetated and maintained.

URBAN AGRICULTURE
Common Good City Farm
Common Good City Farm is located on the west
side of the Park at LeDroit. Its mission is to grow
food, educate, and help low-income DC community

Common Good City Farm at Park at LeDroit (West Side)

members meet their food needs. This farm serves


as a replicable model of a community-based urban
food system.
Farm at Walker-Jones
This farm is a vegetable garden for the Walker-Jones
Elementary School. It is a great educational resource
for local students to learn about growing food in an
urban environment.

STORMWATER
In Mid City East overall, approximately 35-45% of
the land area neighborhood consists of unpaved, or
pervious, surfaces, while approximately 55-65% is
paved, or impervious. There are large green spaces
in the study area which provide pervious surfaces.

These consist primarily of parks and playing fields. Pervious or


unpaved green spaces absorb stormwater and infiltrate it into
the ground, reducing runoff, flooding, and the need for piping
and infrastructure to collect and detain water.
DC Water is working with residents to address the flooding
problems in Bloomingdae and LeDroit Park by mitigating
impacts and alleviating the flooding. They are in the process
of constructing the Northeast Boundary Tunnel and First
Street Tunnel. These projects will add six million gallons of
stormwater storage from two stormwater lines that run east
and west of the McMillan site, using existing and new facilities
on the site itself. This will add stormwater and wastewater
storage in a new tunnel under First Street NW. It will also
realign the Northeast Boundary section of the Clean Rivers
Project, to make it more effective in preventing flooding and
require less tunneling under private property.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

Harry Thomas Sr. Recreation Center

47

MI

CH

IGA

MICH I
GIRA R

ST NW

ST
NW

RD N
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ED

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TH O M A S S T N W
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T ST NW

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TODD PL NE

TOD D PL NE
T ST NE

ST S T NW

SE ATON PL NE

S ST NE

RAN DO LPH PL NE

RAN DOL PH PL NW

R S T NE

Q IN C Y PL N E

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M ST NE

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ORLE ANS P
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TH ST NE

RD S T NE

ND S T NE

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N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

NEW

RD S T NW

PAR ER ST NE
I ST NE

ST NE

H S T NE
G PL NE

G ST NW

MA

SS

G ST NE

TH

ST ST NW
W
VE N
EY A
E RS

ND S

TH ST NW

Office of Planning ~ January 25, 2013


Government of the District of Columbia

MO

ABBEY PL NE

ST

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

G ST NW

AL

L ST NE

I ST NWI S T NW

H S T NW

PE

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ST NW

I ST NW

E
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NE
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PIER CE ST N E

ST ST NW

ER

ST NW
T NW

Fig. 3.8 Park Map

ST PL NW

PIERC E ST NW

ON PL NW

AV

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WAR

18

L ST NW

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INT

L ST NW

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TH ST NE

TH ST NW

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20

OD

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V ST NW

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ELM ST N

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N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

W ST NW

D O GL AS ST NE

AD AMS ST NE

ADAM S S T NW

W ST NW

T ST NW

ND S T NE

TH ST NW

A DAM S S T NW

21

GE

OLN

ST ST NW

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NW

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48

LI

TH ST NE

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PL NW
OA DALE

NW
TH ST

Other Parks
20. CRISPUS ATTUCKS - 63 U Street, NW
21. PARK @ LeDROIT - V and
2nd Streets, NW

LLA

BRYA NT ST NW

V ST NW

T ST NW

TH ST NW

Additional strategies for increasing pervious


surfaces through low impact development
(LID) are needed. These methods include
alley greening strategies, new green spaces
with development and redevelopment, and
improvements to existing small green spaces,
such as the National Park Service-owned
triangular green spaces throughout
Mid City East.

MI

S T NW

TH ST NW

Residents desire access to school facilities for


recreation and meeting space.

N L
I N ST
NE

1,000
GIRA RD ST

A SCOT P L N E

TH ST NW

Additional green spaces should be created with


new development wherever possible.

NPS Parks
12. RESERVATION 276 - Florida Ave.
and R Street, NW
13. RESERVATION 276A - Florida Ave.
and First Streets, NW
14. RESERVATION 277 - Florida Ave.
and Q Street, NW
15. RESERVATION 277A - Q Street and
Lincoln Road, NE
16. RESERVATION 277C - Lincoln Road
and Quincy Place, NE
17. RESERVATION 192 - New Jersey
Ave. and N Street, NW
18. RESERVATION 181 - New York Ave.
NE and M Street, NW
19. RESERVATION 190 - New Jersey
Ave. and 4th Street, NW

MC

ST NW

COLL EGE

GEORG IA A VE N W

Underutilized triangular green spaces could be


improved and could contribute to stormwater
management efforts through community
involvement.

PL NW

BRYA NT

TH ST NW

Residents voiced interest in increased dog


walking locations, and improved or new dog
parks.

HOWARD

AVE NW

Residents expressed a desire for additional


shade in neighborhood parks and green
spaces, and opportunities for more community
gardening.

DC Parks
1. K.C. LEWIS - Bryant and W
Streets., 4th Street., NW
2. ANNA J. COOPER CIRCLE T and 3rd Streets, NW
3. SMALL PARK - Rhode Island
Ave. and T St., west of
First Street, NW
4. SMALL PARK - Rhode Island
Ave., First and U Streets., NW
5. SMALL PARK - Rhode Island
Ave. and U St., NW
6. TRIANGLE - Rhode Island Ave.,
Lincoln Street, U Street, NE
7. TRIANGLE - Rhode Island
Ave.,4th St., W Street, NE
8. SMALL PARK - Rhode Island
Avenue and V Street, NE
9. HARRY THOMAS RECREATION
CENTER - Lincoln Rd. and 2nd
St. to R and T Streets, NE
10. FLORIDA AVENUE
PLAYGROUND - First Street
and Florida Avenue, NW
11. NEW YORK AVENUE
PLAYGROUND - New York Ave.
and First St., NW

RA

500

NE

RD

E V A R TS S T N E

GEORGIA

Neighborhood parks and playgrounds could


be improved to be more welcoming, increase
accessibility and usage by creating more entries
around the perimeter, programming spaces for
multi-generational use, and addressing crime,
drug, and loitering issues.

E
D ST N

E
IN ST N
RAN L

W
TH ST N

Key Findings

VE NE
GAN A

TH S T N E

N A VE NW

TH ST NE

GIRAR D

PL NW

T NW

GRESH AM

MORR IS P

Mid City East

GOAL #1: Improve the quality and accessibility of


existing playgrounds, parks and green spaces.
MCE 5.1 - New York Avenue Playground - Consider
adding entries to the playground at appropriate
points around the parks perimeter to encourage
increased neighborhood access and use. Consider
repurposing the baseball field for use as a multipurpose field, and adding informal green space or
community garden plots. Identify opportunities for
safe, multi-generational design and programming,
including a tot lot on the side of the old library
kiosk. Add shade trees where possible. *HW1.1,
NA3.3
MCE 5.2 - Howard Playground - Consider adding
entries at appropriate points around the parks
perimeter to encourage increased neighborhood
access and use. Identify opportunities for safe,
multi-generational design and programming.
*HW1.1, NA3.3
MCE 5.3 - Park at LeDroit - Improve the dog park
at the Park at LeDroit. Add shade trees where
possible. Identify opportunities for safe, multigenerational design and programming. *HW1.1,
NA3.3
MCE 5.4 - Reservation 181 - The National Park
Service (NPS)-owned triangular park bounded
by M Street, New York Avenue and First Street
NW - Establish a local Friends of... group that
would be responsible for making enhancements
and maintaining features that go beyond typical
park maintenance. Improvements could include
incorporating green stormwater management
techniques such as bioswales and rain gardens.

MCE 5.5 - Reservation 276-A - The NPS-owned


triangular park bounded by Florida Avenue, First
and R Streets NW. Establish a local Friends of...
group that would be responsible for making
enhancements and maintaining features that go
beyond typical park maintenance. Improvements
could include creating an architectural gateway
feature identifying Bloomingdale from the south,
removing thick bushes, and adding native perennial
plantings, lighting, and benches, and incorporating
LID stormwater management techniques. *WS1.5
MCE 5.6 - Reservation 190 - The NPS-owned
triangular park bounded by New Jersey Avenue, 4th
and Franklin Streets NW. Establish a local Friends
of... group that would be responsible for making
enhancements and maintaining features that go
beyond typical park maintenance. Improvements
could include additional vegetation and seating,
and connection of the property to the north by
closing Franklin Street. *WS1.5

DID YOU KNOW ABOUT THE DC


PUBLIC REALM DESIGN MANUAL?
The Public Realm Design Manual is a summary of
District of Columbia regulations and specifications
for the design of public space elements. This
document should be used by all property owners
and developers to ensure that the public space
design, including building projections, sidewalks,
landscaping and the Public Parking Area meets the
Districts requirements.
For more information see: http://dc.gov/
DC/DDOT/Projects+and+Planning/
Standards+and+Guidelines/View+All/
DDOT+Public+Realm+Design+Manual

MCE 5.7 - Reservation 277 - The NPS-owned


triangular park bounded by North Capitol
Street and Lincoln Road NE at Quincy Place
NE - Establish a local Friends of... group that
would be responsible for making enhancements
and maintaining features that go beyond typical
park maintenance. Improvements could include
enhanced vegetation and native plantings. Remove
the low metal fence to discourage loitering, and
enlarge the sidewalk along North Capitol to
improve walkability. *WS1.5
MCE 5.8 - Cemetery Dog Walking - Engage in a
dialogue with the owners of the cemeteries to the
north of Eckington about the potential to allow dog
walking.

Crispus Attucks Park - Bloomingdale

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

RECOMMENDATIONS

49

GOAL #2: Identify opportunities and sites for


new parks, community gardens, green spaces and
other recreation.
MCE 5.9 - P Street - Work with DDOT to extend the
P Street Greenway through Mid City East.
MCE 5.10 - Community Academy PCS - Create a
new green space for community and student use
on part of the CAPCS parking lot with any future
redevelopment of that site. Explore the possibility of
incorporating a community garden.
MCE 5.11 - Florida Avenue Park - Redevelop this
park with increased tree cover and vegetation
with any future long-term redevelopment of the
Northwest Cooperative Homes. *HW1.1, NA3.5
MCE 5.12 - Eckington Dog Park - Work with
residents and landowners to identify an appropriate
location and develop a dog park in Eckington.
*HW1.1, NA3.5
MCE 5.13 - Community Gardens - Incorporate
community gardens on appropriate sites with new
parks and green spaces. *FD1.4
MCE 5.14 - Explore the opportunities for a
Green Deck over North Capitol Street. Support
a community or privately led initiative to create a
Green Deck over North Capitol Street between
T Street and Rhode Island Avenue. Include this
recommendation in the Streetscape Study described
in MCE4.1. *NA3.5

50

GOAL #3: Improve access to public recreational


facilities within Mid City East.
MCE 5.15 - Working with the Deputy Mayors
Office for Education (DME), create a coordinating
committee consisting of DPR, DGS, DCPS and
school leaders to provide guidance and develop
policy that will inform the process regarding shared
access to local school facilities for public use and
recreational activity.
Work with the coordinating committee
to allow public access to Dunbar High
School recreational and sports facilities for
neighborhood residents during designated
days and times. *HW1.1
Work with the coordinating committee to allow
public access to the McKinley Tech facilities
for neighborhood residents during designated
days and times. *HW1.1, NA3.
GOAL #4: Decrease neighborhood flooding and
improve stormwater management.
MCE 5.16 - Work with DC Water on a strategy for
educating residents about the upcoming DC Clean
Rivers Project initiatives in MCE that will be under
construction, including the Northeast Boundary
Tunnel and First Street Tunnel.
MCE 5.17 - Ensure that new development supports
sustainability and contributes to flood-mitigation
efforts. *WT2.1

Crispus Attucks Park - Bloomingdale

MCE 5.18 - Prioritize implementation of Low Impact


Development (LID) stormwater strategies in Bloomingdale
to address flooding concerns.
MCE 5.19 - Support opportunities to implement
LID stormwater strategies throughout Mid City East
neighborhoods. Prioritize DDOTs Mid City East Livability
Study recommendations for LID measures including curb
extentions/bioretention planters, tree box bioretention
planters, permeable paving, impervious surface removal, rain
gardens, and tree infill. See the Mid City East Livability Study
for details.

SUMMARY
There are five major corridors in the study area North Capitol Street, Florida Avenue, Rhode Island
Avenue, New Jersey Avenue and New York Avenue.
North Capitol Street - This highly symbolic
roadway, with an axis and views south toward the
U.S. Capitol, it is a high speed thoroughfare with
underpasses in two locations. These act as gashes
in the neighborhood fabric and reduce connectivity
between the east and west sides of Mid City East
neighborhoods.
Florida Avenue and New York Avenue - These
diagonal streets are corridors that traverse the
gridded neighborhood streets and provide eastwest connectivity across the city. Both are very
often congested with traffic. The intersection of
Florida Avenue and North Capitol Street, and the
intersection of New York Avenue and North Capitol
Street are considered by residents to be among
the most dangerous and difficult for pedestrians
to cross.
Rhode Island and New Jersey Avenues - These
corridors are also busy and important connectors,
but quieter and more residential in character, better
maintained, and with good tree cover. Residents
described problems wth narrow sidewalks along
Rhode Island Avenue in some places. New Jersey
Avenue generally has generous, wide sidewalks and
streetscape that create a comfortable pedestrian
experience.

Barriers - There are both physical and psychological


barriers within the study area. They include the
underpasses and bridges over North Capitol Street,
the width of major corridors, multiple intersecting
streets as well as challenging topography, and
retaining walls.
Metrorail, Bus, and Capital Bikeshare - There are
four Metrorail stations on the periphery of the study
area: Rhode Island Ave to the northeast, NoMa to
the southeast, Shaw to the northwest and Mount
Vernon Square to the southwest. While there are
many stations nearby, residents often need to cross
busy, congested streets, including North Capitol
Street, to access these stations.
Bus routes are well distributed in the study area,
but residents would like the frequency of bus
arrivals increased. There are Capital Bikeshare
stations within the Mid City East planning area. They
are located at the intersection of Florida Avenue
NW and R Street NW, and at the intersection of First
Street NW and Rhode Island Ave NW. Additional
Bikeshare stations are needed to improve mobility
in the area.
Metropolitan Branch Trail - Eckington residents
have good proximity and connectivity to the
Metropolitan Branch Trail which allows access to
downtown for cyclists. However, connection points
at T Street, S Street and Randolph Place NE need
better signage to identify the trail, enhanced
vegetation and maintenance. In addition, residents
have expressed major concerns about safety on the
trail. Some residents have ceased using the trail
because of recent incidents.

VISION
Mid City East residents will experience
safe and enhanced connectivity to the
immediate and surrounding neighborhoods.
Residents will be able to travel via car,
bus, bike or on foot, through a pleasant
environment to their daily destinations.

PRIORITY PEDESTRIAN STREETS


The Mid City East Livability Study identifies the following
neighborhood streets, which are often adjacent to parks or
schools, and therefore have a lot of pedestrian activity, as
priority streets that need to be calmed to provide greater
pedestrian safety through traffic calming strategies.
4th Street NE
2nd Street NE
First Street NW
Lincoln Road NE

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

CONNECTIVITY

51

RECOMMENDATIONS
GOAL #1: Improve mobility and physical
connectivity between the neighborhoods of Mid
City East and connect the neighborhoods to the
city.
MCE 6.1 - Develop creative ways to connect along
and across North Capitol Street in order to knit
Mid City East neighborhoods together and
improve connectivity for residents. Include this
in the Streetscape Study described in MCE 4.1.
MCE 6.2 - Extend or reestablish the DC street grid
with any future public or private development or
redevelopment including:
Quincy St. NW between First and 2nd Streets
NE in the Bates/Truxton Circle and
Hanover area.
Randolph Place NE between North Capitol
Street and First Street NE in Eckington.
L Street NW between North Capitol Street and
First Street NW in the Sursum Corda area.
Pierce Streets NW to First Place NW in the
short term in the Sursum Corda area,
potentially continuing to North Capitol Street
in the long-term future.

LEGEND
Boundary Area
Priority Pedestrian
Streets

52

Fig. 3.9 MCE Connectivity Map

Metropolitan Branch
Trail

MCE 6.3 - Work with McKinley Tech to explore


creating terracing stair connections to the McKinley
Tech campus from surrounding sidewalks at walled
areas to improve connectivity to and from the
school for students and public.
MCE 6.4 - Support the recommendations of
DDOTs Livability Study to implement modifications
to public streets and sidewalks to improve
walkability, safety, and connectivity. These include:
New York Avenue/North Capitol Street/
N Street - street and sidewalk modifications
and improvements.
Florida/North Capitol Street/Q St./Lincoln
Rd. - street and sidewalk modifications and
improvements.
Florida/New Jersey/Rhode Island/S Street/
4th Street - street and sidewalk modifications
and improvements.
New Jersey Avenue between N Street NW
and Florida Ave. NW - street and sidewalk
modifications and improvements.
First Street NW Corridor - changes at
unsignalized intersections including stop sign
control and traffic mini-circles.
Eckington Place NE Corridor - narrowing the
roadway between Florida Avenue NE and
R Street NE.

Capital Bikeshare Station at First and Rhode Island Avenue, NW

5th Street and Rhode Island Avenue - installing


crosswalks and curb ramps across Rhode Island
Avenue and median along the 5th Street NW
alignment, and extending the existing 5th
Street bike lanes from Rhode Island Avenue to
Florida Avenue.
MCE 6.5 - Work with DDOT to improve wayfinding
to the Metropolitan Branch Trail within Mid City
East, and add vegetation, lighting, and public art to
improve the trails aesthetics, enhance safety, and
encourage increased use.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Key Findings and Recommendations

GOAL #2: Reduce or remove physical barriers


and provide for safe pedestrian routes and
crossings to schools, transit, parks and amenities.

53

4: NEIGHBORHOOD HIGHLIGHTS
OVERVIEW
The previous chapter described the existing
conditions, key findings, and recommendations for
the core themes of the Mid City East Small Area
Plan. This chapter describes and highlights issues,
opportunities, and recommendations identified by
the Small Area Plan as they relate to each
neighborhood.
In addition, the Neighborhood Highlights reference
recommendations from DDOTs Mid City East
Livability Study, the companion study to the
Mid City East Small Area Plan. Please refer to the
Livability Study report for complete details.

Bates/Truxton Circle
and Hanover
Within the Mid City East planning area, Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover refers to the area
roughly bounded by New Jersey Avenue to the
west, Florida Avenue to the north, North Capitol
Street to the east and New York Avenue to the
south. See Fig. 4.1. This eclectic and architecturally
rich area consists of a mix of housing types,
institutional uses including several schools, parks
and playgrounds, and small businesses.

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER
The Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover area is home
to a large collection of historic landmarks in the
planning area. As an area that developed in the

Major concerns of community members include the


need to revitalize commercial areas along North
Capitol Street, the conservation of the
neighborhoods historic and architectural character,
enhancing parks and playgrounds, having access to
local school facilities, solving parking issues with the
growing number of schools in the neighborhood,
and addressing loitering, cleanliness and safety
issues.

LEGEND
MCE Study
Boundary Area
Bates/Truxton Circle
and Hanover
Neighborhood

54

Fig. 4.1 Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover Keymap

N
Bates Street, NW

$59,092

$438,000

Median Income

Average Home
Sales Price

GENDER

MEDIAN AGE

White
27.9%

Male
51.2%
Female
48.8%
1 - Source: DC OTR, Real Property Sales Database
2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst

ETHNICITY

Black
63.1%

33

Hispanic 7.8%
Two or More Races 3.6%
Asian 3.6%
Other 1.7%
American Indian 0.1%
Pacific Islander 0.0%

Mid City East Small Area Plan Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover

BATES/TRUXTON CIRCLE AND HANOVER NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE 2013

55

fl

or

id

av
e

nu

N
8

Coordinate with DDOT and Cultural Tourism


DC to augment existing signage programs
where needed or establish new neighborhood
signage. Create unique designs including
art, landscape, and/or streetscape and street
furniture to identify Bates/Truxton Circle and
Hanovers distinctive historic character.

14

13

12

beginning of the late nineteenth century and


in close proximity to the emerging subdivisions
of Bloomingdale, Eckington, and LeDroit Park,
these neighborhoods feature a diversity of
historic resources including residential, industrial
and a clustering of notable school buildings.
Several of the historic landmarks in the area lack
proper signage and are in need of restoration
or rehabilitation. Finding ways to highlight and
celebrate these resources will encourage local
stewardship, generate heritage tourism, and
encourage investment in neglected historic sites.
As the neighborhood continues to grow and attract
new residents, the low-scale building stock is also
threatened by inappropriate rooftop and other
additions. These incompatible additions threaten to
change the character of the neighborhood. Major
recommendations include:

56

Commemorate the former Truxton Circle and


fountain that once served as a neighborhood
anchor and landmark. Fig. 4.2 shows existing
and potential historic districts and landmarks in
Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover.

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
AND HOUSING
Pursue an approach to commercial
revitalization on North Capitol Street which
includes a diverse and robust mix of uses
including entrepreneurial production and
creative services; day-to-day goods and
services; and the expansion of neighborhood
dining. See Fig. 4.3.
Support efforts of the North Capitol Main
Street organization to provide strategic
marketing for neighborhood businesses.

p street

5
first street

new jersey avenue

Consider designating individual buildings


under a multiple property document for the
row houses on Bates Street.

10

11

6
9

north capitol street

Develop a community-led neighborhood


conservancy to lead historic preservation
efforts and build consensus around preferred
preservation strategies for Bates/Truxton Circle
and Hanover.

8
e

nu

LEGEND

ne

ve
ka
or

Site of Historic
or Cultural
Interest
DC Historic
Landmark

Fig. 4.2 Bates and Hanover Historic Resources Locations


Historic Resources

1. JOHN FOX SLATER


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, 1891
2. LANGSTON SCHOOL, 1902
3. FORMER SITE OF TRUXTON CIRCLE, c.1900
4. NEW YORK AVENUE PLAYGROUND, 1909
5. SAMUEL CHAPMAN ARMSTRONG
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL, 1901-1902
6. O ST. VOCATIONAL SCHOOL, 1912

7. BATES STREET - WASHINGTON


SANITARY HOUSING CO., c. 1897
8. CHAPMAN GARAGE & STABLE, 1906-1912
9. J.C. LETTS GROCERY CO. BUILDING, 1917
10. WASHINGTON ANIMAL RESCUE
LEAGUE, 1931
11. CANTANIAS BAKERY BUILDING,1905

NE

R S T NE

YO

N S T NE

HO

NE
ST
ST
E

NE

ST

NE

NE

M ST NE

TH ST NE

ORLE ANS P
MORTON P

TH ST NE

RD S T NE

ST N
E

G ST NW

H S T NE

L ST NE

ST NE

Infill vacant parcels and redevelop underutilized


parcels in Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover.
See Fig. 4.3
Vacant and underutilized properties at the
intersection of Florida Avenue and North
Capitol Street should incorporate ground floor
commercial uses with entrances facing
North Capitol Street.
Include affordable units in future
residential development.

NEIGHBORHOOD PLACEMAKING
AND PUBLIC REALM
Maintain existing and plant additional street trees
throughout Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover
where needed.
Identify Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover
neighborhood groups and civic associations
interested in developing strategies for
maintaining streetscape and sidewalk cleanliness.
Identify and restore sidewalks needing repair in
Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover.

Potential Redevelopment/
Infill Sites
MCE Boundary
Area
G ST NE
TH

ST ST NW
W
VE N
EY A
E RS

Office of Planning ~ January 25, 2013

G PL NE

SS

PL

I ST NE

North Capitol Main Street Boundary

MA

AL

PAR ER ST NE

Land Use Designation Change Areas

ND S

G ST NW

N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

NEW

RD S T NW

TH ST NW

Neighborhood

ND S T NE

Potential
H S Gateways
T NW

TH ST NE

M ST NE

ST ST NE

AT

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

LEGEND

RS

N S T NE

L ST NE

Fig. 4.3 Bates/Truxton


Circle and Hanover Revitalization
Map
I ST NW
I ST NWI S T NW

Government of the District of Columbia

MO

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

ST NW

PE

NE

ABBEY PL NE

ST

ST NW

E
E N

NE
NE

NE
VE

PIER CE ST N E

ST ST NW

ER

N PL NW

AV

NE

E AV
E

NW

ST PL NW

PIERC E ST NW

L ST NW

O ST NE

INT

L ST NW

NE

YO

WAR

NW
W
E N

O ST NE

N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

N S T NW

MORGAN ST NW

TH ST NW

AV

E N
E

ST ST NE

HANOVER

VE
EY A

AV

TH

O ST NW

ERS

M ST NW

NE

DA

DELA

ST ST NW

NEW

TH ST NW

RID GE ST NW

R
YO

RI

HA R R Y T

TH

LO

ON P
L NE

Q ST NE

ST

Q ST NW

S WA
Y

Q IN C Y PL N E

TH

NW

MA

A A
VE

RAN DO LPH PL NE

RAN DOL PH PL NW

EC IN
GT

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

MAR ION ST N W

TH ST NW

N S T NW

Pursue a future land use designation change


for North Capitol Street, at the intersections of
North Capitol Street and New York Avenue and
at North Capitol and Florida Avenue, from low
density commercial/moderate density residential
to moderate/medium density mixed use to
encourage mixed-use development and create
a thriving neighborhood edge with a welcoming
physical environment. See Fig. 4.3.

S ST NE

P ST NE

O ST NW

TODD PL NE

SE ATON PL NE

P ST NW

O ST NW

I ST NW

TODD PL NE

BATES ST N

ST NW

SEATON PL NW

ST S T NW

TH ST NW

S ST NW

WARNER ST NW

SL
E I

T ST NE

SEATON PL NW

R S T NW LO R
ID

OD

MORR IS P

Mid City East

Improve neighborhood alley and pedestrian


lighting throughout Bates/Truxton Circle and
Hanover.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover

T ST NW

S ST N

ST NW

RH

S T NE

TH ST NE

TH O M A S S T N W

A
ND

S T NE

NW
VE

ST NE

ND ST N W

T ST NW

S T NW

T ST NW

TH ST NW

NW
TH ST

ST NW

RD ST N W

S T NW

OL ST

W
ELM ST N

57

Engage in a dialogue with MPD to potentially


increase police presence at identified problem
spots including parts of North Capitol Street
and Hanover Place.
Identify locations for the installation of public
art within Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover.
Include public art in any new development or
redevelopment to celebrate Bates/Truxton
Circle and Hanovers identities. See Fig. 5.3 for
neighborhood placemaking opportunities in
Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover.

PARKS AND GREEN SPACE


New York Avenue Playground - Create more
entries to encourage neighborhood use.
Explore multi-purposing fields, opportunities
for safe, multi-generational design and
programming, and adding shade trees.

Support the recommendations of DDOTs


Livability Study for New York Avenue/North
Capitol Street/N Street - street and sidewalk
modifications and improvements.
Per the DDOT Livability Study, prioritize the
following neighborhood streets within Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover as pedestrian streets
in need of traffic calming as a result of high
pedestrian activity and adjacency to parks
or schools:
- First Street, NW

Improve small triangular parks through local


Friends of... groups responsible for making
enhancements and maintaining features.

- R Street, NW

- O Street, NW

Extend the P Street Greenway.

- N Street, NW

Improve the Florida Avenue Park with


any future redevelopment of the adjoining
development. Add vegetation and
green space.

58

Extend or reestablish the DC street grid with


any future public or private development or
redevelopment including Quincy Street NW
between First and 2nd Streets NE in the Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover area.

Incorporate a community-accessible green


space in any redevelopment of the CAPCS
parking lot. See Fig. 4.3.

Triangle Park at First and Florida Avenue

CONNECTIVITY

Create a coordinating committee to develop a


policy regarding shared access to Dunbar
school facilities for public use and recreation.

See DDOTs Mid City East Livability Study for details.

Intervention

Curb Extension/Bioretention Planters Curb extension planters would be well suited for
four way neighborhood intersections. First phase
opportunities include:

Mid City East Small Area Plan Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
Specific Location

5th Street at intersections of R, Q, P, and O Streets NW


4th Street at intersections at R and Q Streets NW
3rd Street at intersections at R and Q Streets NW
First Street at intersections of Q, Bates, and N Streets NW
North Capitol Street at P Street NW

Tree Box Bioretention Planters - Streets with wide


enough sidewalks and lack mature trees may be
good candidates for tree box planters. Streets to
focus on include:

3rd Street between Florida and New Jersey Avenues NW


4th Street between Richardson Place & R Street NW
4th Street between Q and P Streets NW
New Jersey Avenue in discreet locations between Florida Avenue
and P Street
Street between 4th and 5th Streets NW
Street between North Capitol Street and First Street NW

Rain Gardens - Opportunities include:

N Street between North Capitol Street and First Street NW


Grounds of Kipp DC: Will Academy along P Street

Green space on the southeast corner of New Jersey Avenue and


O Street

Permeable Paving - Permeable paving is


most appropriate in alleyways throughout this
neighborhood. First phase alleys should be based
on the condition of the alley, the presence of
utility lines, and the total amount of stormwater
than can be captured. First phase opportunities
include:
Impervious Surface Removal - Few places
for impervious surface removal exist with the
exception of the paving in front of the former
Slater and Langston Elementary School

Tree Infill - Any places identified as places for tree


box planters may also qualify for conventional
street tree plantings.

Green spaces along parking lots of Dunbar along First Street


between P Street and New York Avenue

Alleys defined by 5th Street, P Street, New Jersey Avenue, and R Street
Alleys defined by 3rd Street, North Capitol Street, P and Q Streets
Alleys defined by First Street, North Capitol Street, N Street,
and P Street

P Street (Slater and Langston School Site)

Bates Street, NW

59

Bloomingdale,
LeDroit Park
Bloomingdale and LeDroit Park are two unique
neighborhoods within the Mid City East planning
area. These areas are roughly bounded by Howard
University to the west, the McMillan Reservoir to
the north, North Capitol Street to the east, and
Florida Avenue to the south. The neighborhoods
are traversed by Rhode Island Avenue. Residents
are proud of the unique heritage and architectural
history of LeDroit Park, and the strong building
fabric and architectural character of Bloomingdales
housing stock. Successful clusters of small
businesses and new dining establishments have
been drawing residents and visitors in recent years.
Among the concerns community members
expressed about these neighborhoods were the

repeated problems with flooding, the unfriendly


pedestrian experience along North Capitol Street,
the barrier North Capitol Street presents to
connecting east-west to Eckington, incompatible
vertical additions to buildings or pop-ups, and
safety issues at the Park at LeDroit.
This chapter contains a summary of
recommendations from the Mid City East Small
Area Plan and Livability Study related to this
neighborhood. Please see DDOTs Mid City
East Livability Study for full details of those
recommendations.
Pursue a future land use designation change
for North Capitol Street, at the intersections
of North Capitol Street and New York Avenue
and at North Capitol and Florida Avenue, from
low density commercial/moderate density
residential to moderate/medium density mixed
use to encourage mixed-use development and
create a thriving neighborhood edge with a
welcoming physical environment.
Infill vacant parcels and redevelop underutilized
parcels in Bloomingdale and LeDroit Park.
Vacant and underutilized properties at the
intersection of Florida Avenue and North
Capitol Street in Bloomingdale should
incorporate ground floor commercial uses with
entrances facing North Capitol.
Include affordable units in future residential
development.

LEGEND
MCE Study
Boundary Area
Bloomingdale/
LeDroit Park
Neighborhood

60

Fig. 4.4 Bloomingdale/LeDroit Park Keymap

N
Bloomingdale Rowhouses

(Bloomingdale) $619,000
(LeDroit Park) $750,000

(Bloomingdale) $86,568
(LeDroit Park) $29,086

Median Income

Average Home Sales Price

GENDER

MEDIAN AGE

Male
(Bloomingdale)
50.8%
Female
(Bloomingdale)
49.2%
Male
(LeDroit Park)
44.8%
Female
(LeDroit Park)
55.2%
1 - Source: DC OTR, Real Property Sales Database
2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst

ETHNICITY

33.2
(Bloomingdale)

White
27.9%

White
13.6%

Black
77.5%

(Bloomingdale)
Hispanic 7.8%
Two or More Races 3.6%
Asian 3.6%
Other 1.7%
American Indian 0.1%
Pacific Islander 0.0%

Black
63.1%

22.6
(LeDroit Park)

(LeDroit Park)
Hispanic 5.4%

Mid City East Small Area Plan Bloomingdale, LeDroit Park

BLOOMINGDALE, LeDROIT PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE 2013

Two or More Races 4.5%


Asian 2.5%
Other 1.5%
American Indian 0.3%
Pacific Islander 1.5%

61

62

LeDroit Park, the earliest of the Mid City East


neighborhoods to be developed, was subdivided
in 1873 and developed as an architecturally
unified residential suburb. Originally established
as an exclusively white subdivision, LeDroit Park
transitioned to an integrated neighborhood by the
turn of the twentieth century. By the 1940s, it was
home to some of the citys most prominent and
influential African Americans. Today, LeDroit Park is
listed as a historic district and retains a high degree

10
11

Develop a community-led neighborhood


conservancy to lead historic preservation
efforts and build consensus around preferred
preservation strategies for Bloomingdale.

9
13

Explore options for designating Bloomingdale


as a historic district or a pilot conservation
district. Fig. 4.5 shows existing and potential
historic districts and landmarks in Bloomingdale
and LeDroit Park.

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT
Host an event that highlights neighborhood
businesses and draws attention to
North Capitol as a viable commercial street.
Pursue an approach to commercial revitalization
on North Capitol Street which includes a
diverse and robust mix of uses including
entrepreneurial production and creative
services; day-to-day goods and services; and
the expansion of neighborhood dining.
Support efforts of North Capitol Main Street
to provide strategic marketing for
neighborhood businesses.

7
5

17

nu

n
sla

16

i
de

rh

e
av

14 15

north capitol street

Bloomingdales intact historic fabric makes the


neighborhood a strong candidate for listing in the
National Registery of Historic Places as a historic
district. A historic district designation is a valuable
tool that can provide protection from unwanted
demolition and inappropriate alterations. Given the
concerns voiced by residents regarding unwanted
pop-up additions, as an alternative planning tool,
the neighborhood should also be considered for a
pilot conservation district project.

first street

Bloomingdale is rich in architectural and cultural


heritage. As a late nineteenth century neighborhood
that developed outside of the original city
boundaries, Bloomingdale features a diversity of
historic resources including residential, commercial,
and institutional buildings. Its rapid development
between the late 1880s and 1920s resulted in lowscale, dense brick row house development that
remains largely intact today. As the neighborhood
continues to grow and attract new residents, the
character of low-scale building stock is threatened
by incompatible additions that could change the
character of the neighborhood and its lively but
uniform rooflines.

of its historic character, scale, and architectural


fabric. There are several opportunities in LeDroit
Park to increase and update signage to further
promote and distinguish the general boundaries of
the neighborhood.

fourth street

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER

1
fl

LEGEND
Site of Historic
or Cultural
Interest

or

id

av
e

12

nu

18

DC Historic
Landmark
Potential Historic
District

Existing Historic
District

Fig. 4.5 LeDroit Park and Bloomingdale Historic Resources Locations


Historic Resources

1. LEDROIT PARK HISTORIC DISTRICT


2. MARY CHURCH TERRELL HOUSE
3. DR. IONIA R. WHIPPER RESIDENCE/
OFFICE, 1890
4. ANNA JULIA COOPER RESIDENCE, 1900
5. LUCY DIGGS SLOWE HALL, 1943
6. OLD ENGINE HOUSE #12 BLOOMINGDALE FIREHOUSE, 1897
7. NATHANIEL PARKER GAGE SCHOOL
8. CRISPUS ATTUCKS PARK
9. SAMUEL GOMPERS HOUSE, 1902

10. HURD HOUSE, 1905


11. BRYANTT STREET PUMPING STATION, 1904
12. BARNETT ADEN GALLERY, 1910
13. BLOOMINGDALE COURT
14. SYLVAN THEATER, 1913
15. BLOOMINGDALE LIQUOR STORE
BUILDING, 1913
16. SAINT MARTINS, 1902 & 1939
17. RHODE ISLAND AVENUE METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 1902
18. MEMORIAL CHURCH OF THE UNITED
BRETHREN IN CHRIST, 1903-1904

RD N
E
BRYANT ST NE

DE
Conduct a Rcomprehensive
streetscape and
HO
connectivity study for North Captitol Street
within Mid City East.

A SCOT P L N E

RD N
E

W ST NW

V ST NW

TH O M A S S T N W
T ST NW

OLN
LIN C

SE ATON PL NE

RAN DO LPH PL NE

Q IN C Y PL N E

AV

E
E N

PE

Include public art in any new development or


redevelopment to celebrate Bloomingdale
NE
A LLeDroit Parks identities. See Fig. 5.6.
and
P
NE

NE

R
YO

NE

E N
E

W
VE N
EY A

N S T NW

NW

NE

E
Potential
Redevelopment/
E N
A V Sites
Infill
R
O

MCE Boundary Area

N S T NE

N S T NE

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

M ST NE

MO

TH ST NE

TH ST NW

N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

HANOVER

O ST NE

O ST NE

LN
E

ST

O ST NW

ST ST NE

ERS

M ST NW

MORGAN ST NW

AV

Identify locations for the installation of public


art within Bloomingdale and LeDroit Park.

TH

ST ST NW

NEW

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

RID GE ST NW

DA

P ST NE

Land Use Designation Change Areas

N S T NW

RI

HA R R Y T

TH

LO

ST

Q ST NE

North Capitol Main Street Boundary

Neighborhood

S WA
Y NE

E N
W

MA

AV

P ST NW

Potential Gateways

Engage in a dialogue with MPD to potentially


increase police presence at identified problem
areas in including parts of North Capitol Street,
and the Park at LeDroit.

R S T NE

BATES ST N

O ST NW

Improve neighborhood alley and pedestrian


lighting throughout Bloomingdale and
LeDroit Park.

S ST NE
RAN DOL PH PL NW

Identify Bloomingdale and LeDroit Park


neighborhood groups and civic associations
interested in developing strategies for
maintaining streetscape and sidewalk
cleanliness.
Identify and restore sidewalks in need of repair
in Bloomingdale and LeDroit Park.

HO

MAR ION ST N W

TH ST NW

O ST NW

TODD PL NE

SEATON PL NW

Q ST NW

Fig. 4.6 Bloomingdale/LeDroit Park Revitalization Opportunity Map

LEGEND

TODD PL NE

NE

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

WARNER ST NW

ISL

ON P
L NE

R S T NW LO R
ID
A

ST S T NW

TH ST NW

S ST NW

DE

S T NE

T ST NE

SEATON PL NW

S ST N

Q ST NW

O
RH

D A
AN

S T NE

NW
VE

EC IN
GT

ND ST N W

T ST NW

S T NW

T ST NW

TH ST NW

NW
TH ST

RD ST N W

S T NW

H L A N D TE R N E

Maintain existing and plant additional street


trees along North Capitol Street and where
needed throughout Bloomingdale and
LeDroit Park.
TH ST NE

W
ELM ST N

V ST NE

TH ST NE

PL NW
OA DALE

S T NE

V ST NW

W ST NE

ND ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

TH ST NW

GEORG IA A VE N W

W ST NW

V ST NW

T ST NW

AD AMS ST NE

ADAM S S T NW

RS

NE

A DAM S S T NW

TH ST NW

ST NW

ST

NE

M ST NE

ST

AVE NW

BRYA NT ST NW

NEIGHBORHOOD PLACEMAKING
AND PUBLIC REALM

C HAN N IN G ST N E

Mid City East Small Area Plan Bloomingdale, LeDroit Park

OLN
CH ANN IN G ST NW

N DR
NW

TH

LLA

ST NW

COLL EGE

BRYA NT

MI

ND S T NE

GEORGIA

MC

LINC

PL NW

ST ST NW

W
TH ST N
HOWARD

D O GL AS ST NE

63

PARKS, GREEN SPACE


Howard Playground - Create more entries
to encourage neighborhood use. Explore
opportunities for safe, multi-generational
design and programming and adding shade
trees.
Park at LeDroit - Improve dog park and add
shade trees. Explore opportunities for safe,
multi-generational design and programming.
Triangle parks - Improve small triangular parks
through local Friends of... groups responsible
for making enhancements and maintaining
features.

Per the DDOT Livability Study, prioritize


the following neighborhood streets within
Bloomingdale/LeDroit Park as pedestrian streets
in need of traffic calming as a result of high
pedestrian activity and adjacency to parks or
schools:
-

First Street NW

R Street NW

T Street NW

See DDOTs Mid City East Livability Study for details.

Support a community or privately led Green


Deck over North Capitol Street to better
connect Bloomingdale and Eckington.

CONNECTIVITY

Support the recommendations of DDOTs Livability


Study to implement modifications to public streets
and sidewalks to improve walkability, safety, and
connectivity. These include:
Florida/North Capitol Street/Q St./
Lincoln Rd. - street and sidewalk modifications
and improvements.
First Street NW Corridor - changes at
unsignalized intersections including stop sign
control and traffic mini-circles.
5th Street and R Street NW - Install curb ramps
at 5th and R Streets to bring intersection
crossing up to ADA standard.

64

LeDroit Park Neighborhood mural

Neighborhood beautification at First and Q St, NW

Intervention

Specific Location

6th Street at intersections with U and T Streets NW

5th Street and T Street NW

4th St at intersections with T and U Streets and Florida Avenue NW

2nd St at intersection at W, V, T, S and Randolph Place

First Street at intersection with Channing, W, V, and U Streets,


Randolph Place, and R Street NW

North Capitol Street intersections with Channing, Bryant, W, and


Seaton Streets, Randolph Place, and Quincy Street.

Tree Box Bioretention Planters - Streets with wide enough sidewalks and
lack mature trees may be good candidates for tree box planters. U Street
NW, Seaton Place NW, Randolph Place NW, and First Street NW

U Street NW

Seaton Place, NW

Permeable Paving - Permeable paving is most appropriate in alleyways


throughout this neighborhood. Alleys are most appropriate where existing
alleys are in poor condition and utility lines are far enough below grade
to accommodate a reservoir layer. Because many of LeDroit Parks alleys
are brick alleys in relatively good condition, we have not recommended
placing those. First phase opportunities include:

Alleys defined by First, 2nd, Seaton, and S Streets NW

Alleys defined by First, 2nd Streets, Randolph Place, and


R Street NW

Alley defined by North Capitol and T Streets, and


Rhode Island Avenue NW

Alley defined by Flagler, V, First, and U Streets NW.

Sidewalks along Rhode Island Avenue from Florida Avenue


to 3rd Street

Sidewalk inside of park area R Street from First Street to


Florida Avenue.

2nd Street and Florida Avenue, NW corner

Randolph Place and North Capitol Street, NW & SW corners

First Street and Rhode Island Avenue, SW corner

Bryant and North Capitol Streets, SW corner

First and U Streets, SW corner

Curb Extension/Bioretention Planters - One of the better opportunities


for adding LID is through the use of curb extension planters located at
intersections of neighborhood streets. Since parking is not allowed at
intersection corners, curbs can be extended the full width of a parking
bay. Many of the intersections on 2nd Street NW and 4th Street NW
may be good places depending upon configuration existing. First phase
opportunities include:

Impervious Surface Removal - Several intersections along North Capitol


Street as well as Florida Avenue NW offer places where removing concrete
in front of private businesses or homes may be a good alternative. First
phase opportunities include:

Rain Gardens - Very few opportunities for rain gardens exist. Crispus
Attucks Park may be one possible location. Another may be the Elm Street
entrance of the Park at LeDroit. First phase opportunities include:

Tree Infill - Any places identified as places for tree box planters may also
qualify for conventional street tree plantings.

Bicycle Art installation at Rhode Island Avenue and First Street, NE

Mid City East Small Area Plan Bloomingdale, LeDroit Park

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Northwest corner of 2nd and W Streets NW.


Crispus Attucks Park
Entrance at Park at LeDroit

Alleyway at Bryant St., NW

65

Eckington
Eckington has been a unique neighborhood from
its beginnings as land which was the country
home of Joseph Gales, Jr., owner of the National
Intelligencer newspaper and Mayor of Washington
from 1827 to 1830. This neighborhood is roughly
bounded by North Capitol Street to the west,
Glenwood, Prospect Hill and St. Marys cemeteries
to the north, railroad tracks and the Metropolitan
Branch Trail to the east, and Florida Avenue to
the south.
This hilly and eclectic neighborhood consists of
a variety of housing types including row houses,
single family homes, duplexes and low rise multifamily buildings, as well as some small businesses
and corner stores. It is also home to a number of
institutions, the largest of which is the McKinley

Techology High School, the Harry Thomas Sr.


Recreation Center, and a cluster of industrial, or
PDR (production, distribution and repair) businesses
along the railroad tracks which coexist with the
adjacent residential neighborhood.
There is an unmistakable sense of community and
pride in Eckington, but also a concern that there
is not an identifiable place that defines the
neighborhood. Among community members other
concerns are the lack of accessible, informal green
space, the lack of a dog park, and safety issues with
the Metropolitan Branch Trail. They also expressed
concerns about sidewalk widths and maintenance
along North Capitol Street, Rhode Island Avenue
and along some internal neighborhood streets.
Residents described issues with pedestrian and
bicycle connectivity to other neighborhoods
across North Capitol Street, and walkability to
the Rhode Island Avenue and New York Avenue
Metro stations.
This chapter contains a summary of
recommendations from the Mid City East Small
Area Plan and Livability Study related to this
neighborhood. Please see DDOTs Mid City
East Livability Study for full details of those
recommendations.

LEGEND
MCE Study
Boundary Area
Eckington
Neighborhood

66

Fig. 4.7 Eckington Key Map

N
Eckington Rowhouses

$56,083

$489,000

Median Income

Average Home
Sales Price

GENDER

MEDIAN AGE

White
16.4%

Male
49.1%
Female
50.9%
1 - Source: DC OTR, Real Property Sales Database
2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst

ETHNICITY

Black
77.1%

Mid City East Small Area Plan Eckington

ECKINGTON NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE 2013

Hispanic 5.8%
Two or More Races 2.5%
Asian 1.6%
Other 2.0%
American Indian 0.2%
Pacific Islander 0.1%

36.7
67

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
AND HOUSING

68

Identify Eckington neighborhood groups and


civic associations interested in developing
strategies for maintaining streetscape and
sidewalk cleanliness.

Retain and expand (where possible) warehouse


and flex spaces.

Identify and restore sidewalks needing repair


in Eckington.

Infill vacant parcels and redevelop underutilized


parcels in Eckington to strengthen
neighborhood fabric.

Improve neighborhood alley and pedestrian


lighting throughout Eckington, including the
light industrial/PDR portions.

4th street

11
10

14
5
12
13
2

LEGEND
Site of Historic
or Cultural
Interest

plac

fl

or

id

DC Historic
Landmark

ton

Convene an Eckington neighborhood group


to work with landowners to improve the
appearance and walkability of the industrial/
production, distribution, and repair (PDR) area.

9
t street

av
e

ing

Maintain existing and plant additional


street trees along North Capitol Street and
throughout Eckington where needed.

e
av

Create unique designs including art, landscape,


and/or streetscape and street furniture
to identify Eckingtons distinctive historic
character.

od

rh

north capitol street

Coordinate with DDOT and Cultural Tourism


DC to augment existing signage programs
where needed or establish new neighborhood
signage.

nu

nd

a
isl

nu

eck

Explore options for designating Eckington as


an historic district or a pilot conservation
district. Fig. 4.8 shows potential historic
landmarks in Eckington.

Conduct a comprehensive streetscape and


connectivity study for North Captitol Street
within Mid City East.

nr
oa

Develop a community-led neighborhood


conservancy to lead historic preservation
efforts and build consensus around preferred
preservation strategies in Eckington.

NEIGHBORHOOD PLACEMAKING
AND PUBLIC REALM

col

Eckington is a well-defined, late nineteenth


and early twentieth century neighborhood,
characterized by the juxtaposition of brick row
houses with an industrial corridor to the east. The
neighborhood has diverse historic and cultural
resources including churches and prominent school
buildings but does not have any historic properties
listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
Its intact historic fabric makes the neighborhood a
strong candidate for a listing as a historic district
a valuable tool that can provide protection from
unwanted demolition and inappropriate alterations.
As an alternative planning tool, the neighborhood
should also be considered for a pilot conservation
district project.

Include affordable units in future residential


development in Eckington.

lin

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER

Fig. 4.8 Eckington Historic Resources Locations

ne

Historic Resources

1. EARLY SUBDIVISION HOUSES - VILLAS,


1890s
2. ONONDAGA APARTMENT, 1901
3. OWASCO APARTMENT, 1901
4. ECKINGTON SCHOOL, 1897
5. EMERY SCHOOL, 1901
6. McKINLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL,
1928
7. LANGLEY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL, 1923
8. LINCOLN ROAD METHODIST EPISCOPAL,
1916-1923

nu

ve
ka

r
yo

9. SAINT MARTINS CONVENT, 1923


10. SANITARY GROCERY COMPANY
WAREHOUSES, 1923
11. ECKINGTON CAR BARN, 1898
12. SCHLITZ BREWING COMPANY BOTTLING
PLANT, 1908
13. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
PRINTING PLANT, 1924
14. NATIONAL BISCUIT CO. STABLE &
WAREHOUSE, 1907

BRYANT ST NE

NE
RH

A SCOT P L N E

A DAM S S T NW

RD N
E

T ST NW

LIN C

H L A N D TE R N E
S T NE

W
E N
AV

S T NE

TODD PL NE

TODD PL NE

Once current uses are no longer needed in


the existing buildings or can be included in
redevelopment plan, create a neighborhooddefining place for Eckington at the location
of the former Emery School buildings and site
by adaptively reusing the old Emery School
building and creating a long-term future re-use
and redevelopment project. Project elements
should include:

T ST NE

SEATON PL NW

S ST NE

RAN D LPH PL NE

RAN DOL PH PL NW

R S T NE

Q IN C Y PL N E

Extend Randolph Place NE and connect


it to First Street NE, creating a complete
block.

Include neighborhood-scale retail,



residential, a park/green space, public
spaces, community amenities, and LID
and sustainable stormwater management.

ST ST NW

NE

ST

PL

NE

Potential Redevelopment/
MO
Infill Sites
R

Boundary

Land
T N EDesignation Change Areas
N SUse

SE

N S T NE

ST
MCE Boundary
N EArea

TH ST NE

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

M ST NE

AL

TH

E
E N
Extention
A V of Street Grid
R
Y O Capitol Main Street
North
EW

E N
E

Neighborhood
N S T NW

NW

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

W
VE N
EY A

Potential Gateways

O ST NE

O ST NE

ST ST NE

ERS

HANOVE

NE

Fig. 5.9 Eckington Revitalization Opportunity Map


O ST NW

PE

NE

EW

AV

ST

E N
E

OR

NE

P ST NE

AV

TH

DA


NE

ST

RI

N PL
NE

LO

HA R R Y T

EC IN
G TO

BATES ST N

HO

Q ST NE

TH

Q ST NW

LEGEND

NE

E N
W

S WA
Y

A A
V

SE ATON PL NE

SEATON PL NW

MA

R S T NW LO R
ID

ST S T NW

S ST NW

MORGAN ST NW

Identify locations for the installation of public


art in Eckington. Include public art in any new
development or redevelopment to celebrate
Eckingtons identity.

TH ST NE

AN

V ST NE

TH ST NE

T ST NW

HO

ISL
DE

S T NE

TH O M A S S T N W

ND ST NE

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

T NW

ND ST N W

S T NW

Engage in a dialogue with MPD to potentially


increase police presence at identified problem
areas in Eckington including parts of North
Capitol Street, and the Metropolitan
Branch Trail.

W ST NE

OLN

W ST NW

V ST NW

AD AMS ST NE

ADAM S S T NW

NW

OD

Mid City East Small Area Plan Eckington

BRYA NT ST NW

- Include an architectural feature, public



art, and a neighborhood gateway sign to

identify the Eckington neighborhood.
- Create physical connections to the Harry
Thomas Recreation Center, the McKinley

Tech campus and a green connection to

North Capitol Street along Lincoln Road.

69
M ST NE

PARKS, GREEN SPACE


Improve small triangular parks through local
Friends of... groups responsible for making
enhancements and maintaining features.
Support a community or privately led Green
Deck over North Capitol Street to better
connect Eckington and Bloomingdale.

Support the recommendations of DDOTs


Livability Study for Eckington Place NE and
Florida/North Capitol St/Q St./Lincoln Rd.
Per the DDOT Livability Study, prioritize
the following neighborhood streets within
Eckington as pedestrian streets in need of
traffic calming as a result of high pedestrian
activity and adjacency to parks or schools:

Develop a dog park in Eckington and engage


in a dialogue with the owners of the cemeteries
north of Eckington about the potential to allow
dog walking.

2nd Street NE

4th Street NE

Create a coordinating committee to


develop a policy regarding shared access to
McKinley Tech school facilities for public use
and recreation.

R Street NE

T Street NE

Lincoln Road

Implement Low Impact Development (LID)


opportunities from DDOTs Mid City East
Livability Study.

CONNECTIVITY

Improve wayfinding to the Metropolitan Branch


Trail; add vegetation, lighting, and public art
to improve aesthetics, enhance safety, and
encourage increased use. Please see the Mid
City East Livability Study for full details.

Extend or reestablish the DC street grid with


any future public or private development or
redevelopment including Randolph Place NE
between North Capitol Street and First St. NE
in Eckington.
Work with McKinley Tech to explore creating
terracing stair connections to the McKinley Tech
campus from surrounding sidewalks at walled
areas to improve connectivity to and from the
school for students and public.

70

Harry Thomas Recreation Center Playground

Spring in Mid City East

Intervention
Curb Extension/Bioretention Planters - Curb extension
planters would be well suited for intersections at the
bottom of steep hills, capturing and slowing down
fast-moving stormwater. First phase opportunities include:

Mid City East Small Area Plan Eckington

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
Specific Location
4th Street at intersections with U, V, and W Streets NE
3rd Street at intersections with T Street, Seaton Place,

S Street and Randolph Place NE

2nd Street at intersections with T Street, Seaton Place,

S Street and Randolph Place NE

Tree Box Bioretention Planters - Streets with wide


enough sidewalks and that lack mature trees may be
good candidates for tree box planters. Streets to
focus on include:

3rd Street between Florida and New Jersey Avenues NW


4th Street between Richardson Place & R Street NW
4th Street between Q and P Streets NW
New Jersey Avenue in discreet locations between

Florida Avenue and P Street

Street between 4th and 5th Streets NW


Street between North Capitol Street and First Street NW

Rain Gardens - Opportunities include:

N Street between North Capitol Street and First Street NW

South side of 5th Street NE between 4th Street and the

Metropolitan Branch Trail.

Grounds of the former Emery Elementary School and Langley

High School along T Street.

Permeable Paving - Permeable paving is most appropriate


in alleyways throughout this neighborhood. Almost all of
Eckingtons alleys are paved with heavily patched asphalt.
First phase alleys should be based on the condition of the
alley, the presence of utility lines, and the total amount of
stormwater than can be captured.
Impervious Surface Removal - Few places for impervious
surface removal exist with the exception of the northeast
corner of U Street and Summit Place.
Tree Infill - Any places identified as places for
tree box planters may also qualify for conventional
street tree plantings.

U Street at Summit Place NE.

Typical Eckington Neighborhood View

71

Today, members of the cooperative are actively


working on a higher density redevelopment plan for

Sensitivity to lower density buildings to the north


and south suggests that the redevelopments
massing should step down toward those existing
buildings. The redevelopement also offers the
opportunity to integrate sustainable design
strategies including LID stormwater management,
re-establish street grid, extending Pierce
and L Streets, and to create a significant green/park
space and other amenities for community use.

nu

ve
ka

ne

r
yo

n street

2
1

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER

LEGEND
MCE Study
Boundary Area
Sursum Corda
Neighborhood

72

Fig. 4.9 Sursum Corda Keymap

The Sursum Corda area experienced a prolonged


period of decline in the first half of the twentieth
century and was redeveloped in the 1960s as an
urban village-style public housing project as part
of urban renewal efforts. While some existing fabric
was demolished for the construction of the Sursum
Corda housing project, traces of the neighborhoods
development in the 1890s were retained and are
existant today. These resources include the M Street
School, the Augusta & Louisa Apartment Buildings,
and the Chesapeake and the Potomac Telephone
Company Warehouse. While the historic resources
in the area are limited, additional signage and
connections to heritage trails in adjacent historic

north capitol street

Sursum Corda lies within the Northwest One


planning area and is generally bounded by First
Street NW to the west, M Street NW to the
north, First Place NW to the west, and L Street
NW to the south. It consists of 199 housing units
constructed as an experiment in cooperatively
managed low-income housing in 1968. In 2005,
the District of Columbia created the Northwest
One Redevelopment Plan as part of its New
Communities initiative for neighborhood
rehabilitation, and that effort has resulted in many
improvements to the area including new housing,
and a new library and recreation center complex.

Sursum Corda that would increase the number of


housing units on site, and create a mix of additional
uses including retail and commercial. The District
would like to retain or increase affordable units on
the site as part of that redevelopment. The site
is adjacent to higher density development across
North Capitol Street to the east (NoMa) and in the
Mount Vernon Triangle district to the west, making
it reasonable to adjust the land use designation to
allow for greater density and height at the site. This
would enable members to retain affordable units as
part of the redevelopment effort.

first street

Sursum Corda

3
4

LEGEND
Site of Historic
or Cultural
Interest
DC Historic
Landmark

Fig. 4.10 Sursum Corda Historic Resources Locations


Historic Resources

1. AUGUSTA & LOUISA APARTMENTS, 1900-1901


2. PERRY (M STREET) SCHOOL
3. CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC TELEPHONE CO., 1900-1901
4. MOUNT AIRY BAPTIST CHURCH, 1926-1929

MA

NE

ST

DELA

PIER CE ST N E

Land Use Designation Change Areas

NEW

RD S T NW

Neighborhood

North Capitol Main Street Boundary

I ST NWI S T NW

Potential Redevelopment/
Infill Sites
MCE Boundary Area

H S T NE

- Reflect the height and scale of existing


MORTON P
neighborhood developments. Development
on the Sursum Corda site should step down
ST NE
towards First Street NW and towards Lthe
Mt. Airy Baptist Church, and step up towards
North Capitol Street NW.
TH ST NE

Potential Gateways

N O R T H C A P I TO L S T

TH ST NW

T NW

Extention of Street Grid

- The addition of market rate units that will


represent at least 66 percent of the total units
ORLE ANS P
developed on site.

RD S T NE

ST NW

ND S T NE

ST ST NE

AT

ST NW

ST

L ST NE

Fig. 4.10 Sursum Corda Revitalization Opportunity Map

LEGEND

ST

TH

M ST NE

- The provision of 199 affordable units within the


project at varying levels and types of subsidies
not to exceed 60% AMIM(*BE1.1,
S T N E BE2.5); and

TH ST NE

ER

L ST NW

HO

P A T TE R S O N S T N E

Mid City East Small Area Plan Sursum Corda

N S T NE

TH

Change the future land use designation


of Sursum Corda from moderate density
M Odensity residential and
residential to high
RS
E
medium density commercial.
S T Development
NE
under the new land use designation
should be
N S T NE
achieved through a Planned Unit Development
and encourage the development of a
mixed-income neighborhood through:
TH ST NE

PIERC E ST NW

YO

NE

INT

ST NW

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
NE
AL
PL
REDEVELOPMENT
N

ABBEY PL NE

W
E N

W
NE

E
AV

O ST NE

E AV
E N
E

N S T NW

NW

N O R TH C A P I TO L S T

W
VE N
EY A

HANOVE

O ST NE

ST ST NE

ERS

AV

WAR

O ST NW

MORGAN ST NW

TH ST NW

ST NW

E N
E

PE
N Ecan promote the sites and establish
neighborhoods
VE
A
a historic
R context for the neighborhood. Fig. 4.10
Y O existing and potential historic landmarks.
shows
EW

NE

ST ST NW

NEW

E ST NW

AV

P ST NE

ST NW

OR

DA

NE

T NW

RI

ST

LO

HA R R Y T

TH

BATES ST N

ON P
L NE

Q ST NE

EC IN
GT

Q ST NW

- Extend the street grid, including L Street NW


from First Street NW to North Capitol Street,
ST NE
NW and Pierce Streets NW between First
Street NW and First Place NW.

PAR ER ST NE

- Include sustainable development components


NE
suchI SasT green/park
space and other community
amenities. See Fig. 4.11.

73

NEIGHBORHOOD PLACEMAKING
AND PUBLIC REALM
Maintain existing and plant additional street
trees throughout throughout the Sursum Corda
area where needed.

Incorporate community gardens on appropriate


redevelopment sites with new parks and green
spaces.

Identify a Sursum Corda area neighborhood


groups and civic association interested
developing strategies for maintaining
streetscape and sidewalk cleanliness.

Establish a coordinating committee to explore


allow public access to Dunbar High Schools
new recreational and sports facilities for
neighborhood residents during designated
days and times.

Identify and restore sidewalks needing repair in


the Sursum Corda area.
Improve neighborhood alley and pedestrian
lighting throughout the Sursum Corda area.
Engage in a dialogue with MPD to potentially
increase police presence at identified problem
areas including parts of North Capitol Street.
Identify locations for and the installation of
public art within the Sursum Corda area.
Include public art in new development or
redevelopment. See Fig. 4.11.

PARKS, GREEN SPACE AND


STORMWATER
Consider adding entries to the New York
Avenue Playground at to encourage increased
neighborhood access and use, and identifying
opportunities for safe, multi-generational
design and programming.

74

Sursum Corda Co-operative

management techniques such as bioswales and


rain gardens.

Establish a local Friends of... groups that


would be responsible for making enhancements
and maintaining features of NPS-owned
triangular parks. Incorporate LID stormwater

Ensure that redevelopment in Sursum Corda


supports sustainability and contributes to
flood-mitigation efforts.
Support opportunities to implement LID
stormwater strategies including DDOTs
Livability Study recommendations.

CONNECTIVITY
Extend or reestablish the DC street grid with
any future public or private development or
redevelopment including Pierce Street and
L Street NW. See Fig. 4.11.
Support the recommendations of DDOTs
Livability Study to implement modifications to
improve walkability, safety, and connectivity at
New York Avenue/North Capitol Street/
N Street.
Prioritize First Street NW as a pedestrian street
in need of traffic calming as a result of high
pedestrian activity. Please see the Mid City East
Livability Study for details.

$16,527

$220,000

Median Income

Average Home
Sales Price

GENDER

MEDIAN AGE

White
10.2%

Male
43.6%
Female
56.4%
1 - Source: DC OTR, Real Property Sales Database
2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst

ETHNICITY

Black
76.8%

Mid City East Small Area Plan Sursum Corda

SURSUM CORDA NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE 2013

Hispanic 2.3%
Two or More Races 1.5%
Asian 10.5%
Other 0.5%
American Indian 0.4%
Pacific Islander 0.0%

31.9
75

5: CORRIDOR HIGHLIGHTS
OVERVIEW
The neighborhoods of Mid City East are traversed
by North Capitol Street, Rhode Island Avenue,
Florida Avenue, New York Avenue, and New
Jersey Avenue. While these important vehicular
corridors connect destinations in the city, they
are also important pedestrian streets which
connect, or sometimes divide, neighborhoods.
These corridors are also important as the
locations of small commercial/ retail clusters
within the neighborhoods. Some of these clusters
are succeeding, while others are in need of
revitalization and reinvestment so that they can
thrive and better serve the needs of local residents.
This chapter highlights issues, opportunities and
recommendations identified by the Small Area
Plan for areas along these major corridors as it
relates to neighborhood character, commercial
revitalization, redevelopment opportunities,
housing, placemaking, public realm, parks, green
space, and connectivity. A complete detailed list of
recommendations can be found in Chapter 3 and in
the Implementation Plan in Chapter 6 of this report.
This chapter also incorporates recommendations
from DDOTs Mid City East Livability Study. Please
refer to that study for full details.

76

Capitol View from North Capitol Street

North Capitol Street in Washington DC is a formal,


symbolic street with axial views to the Capitol, a
major vehicular corridor connecting downtown
DC to the Maryland suburbs, and a neighborhood
street, passing through the communities of Mid City
East. This important street has not yet lived up to
its potential. While it functions well as a vehicular
corridor, traffic volumes, speed, street width, and
underpasses make crossings difficult and sometimes
dangerous. These conditions deter pedestrian
activity and connectivity between neighborhoods
to the east and west. This situation, in addition to
uninviting storefronts, poorly maintained sidewalks,
and loitering, has contributed to a lack of significant
development, and retail services that would
otherwise cater to neighborhood residents.

Undertaking and implementing a comprehensive


streetscape study (see MCE 4.1), implementing
the Vibrant Retail Streets toolkit (see MCE 2.17),
and establishing a task force to address loitering
and safety issues (see MCE 2.18) should be the
first steps to creating a road map for revitalizing
this important street. Other opportunities and
recommendations for North Capitol Street are
described below, and diagrammed in Fig. 5.3.

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER
Several potential historic landmarks exist along
North Capitol Street, including Catanias Bakery
and the Old Bloomingdale Fire House. See Fig. 6.6.
In addition, North Capitol Street between Florida
Avenue and Channing Street lies within the area
that could be explored as a potential Bloomingdale
or Eckington Historic District or Conservation Pilot
Project.

Fig. 5.2 North Capitol Street and the National Mall Relational Map

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION

N
Fig. 5.1 North Capitol Keymap

Commercial revitalization opportunities along


North Capitol Street should be focused on the area
between New York Avenue and Randolph Street
within Mid City East. Due to existing conditions,
North Capitol Street may be limited as a retail
street. The North Capitol Main Streets organization
should develop a marketing and branding strategy,
and work with business owners to encourage a
robust mix of uses including dining, entrepreneurial
or creative services businesses, as well as day-today goods and services. Building owners should
be encouraged to and assisted with implementing
facade improvements, and repositioning interior
spaces to accommodate retail and small businesses.
Capitol View from North Capitol Street (circa 1950)

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

NORTH CAPITOL
STREET

77

REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
AND HOUSING
The successful revitalization of North Capitol Street
will depend on several factors, as mentioned above,
including strengthening the neighborhood fabric
by infilling vacant lots and redeveloping small
commercial areas to be viable for a variety of types
of businesses. Fig. 5.3 shows the areas the Small
Area Plan recommends as potential redevelopment
opportunities along North Capitol Street, as well
as areas recommended for land use designation
changes. Owners should be encouraged to and be
assisted with implementing facade improvements,
and repositioning interior spaces to accommodate
retail and small businesses.
O Street, NE and North Capitol Street

78
78

North Capitol (facing west)

North Capitol (facing west)

40,000

Annual Average
Daily Traffic Counts

1 - Source: DC Department of Transportation, Traffic Volume Map 2012


2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst
3 - Source: CoStar 2014 Second Quarter Results

758,691 sq. ft.

Existing Commercial
Square Footage

$4,182,400

Monthly Consumer
Spending Average
*

*Number derived from annual spending average across the five retail areas.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

NORTH CAPITOL STREET CORRIDOR PROFILE 2013

79

PLACEMAKING AND PUBLIC REALM


Undertaking a detailed and comprehensive
streetscape design, beautification, and connectivity
study, jointly led by the Office of Planning and
DDOT is recommended to chart the path forward
to enable this important street to realize its full
potential. This study should include:
Big Ideas - alternatives on how to renew North
Capitol Street as a corridor and neighborhood
street including decking, tunneling, and
bringing North Capitol to grade.
Connectivity - ideas for eliminating or
mitigating the barriers to and improving
east-west connectivity.
High-Quality Streetscape - paving, enhanced
lighting, wayfinding signage, furnishings, and
public art.
Trees and Plantings - maintenance of existing
and additions of new trees to line the street
where possible.
Sustainability - integrated energy efficient
lighting, as well as LID stormwater management
strategies.

with the MPD. Locations for public art should be


identified through the collaboration of local arts
organizations and residents. See Fig. 5.3.
Livability Study Recommendations - Many
locations along North Capitol Street have
sub-standard sidewalk widths due to mature
trees, and narrow space between them and the
walls as well as fences separating the public parking
areas in front of row houses. The most pronounced
examples are along the 1500 block and the
1900 2200 blocks of North Capitol Street on
the west side of the roadway.

80
80

1
2

Work with property owners to relocate fences


in the public space further away from the curb
line.
3

Replace tree-box fences with tree grates


with removable rings to enable trees to grow
without girdling.

Explore available sidewalk materials and


techniques to sustainably span or traverse
over tree roots to provide sidewalk widths and
grades that meet ADA standards.
LEGEND

Implementation Plan - a cost estimate, funding


strategy, and timeline for carrying out the steps
necessary to realize the plan.
In addition, the public realm along North Capitol
Street would be greatly enhanced by engaging the
Clean Team of the North Capitol Street Main Street
program to keep sidewalks along and near North
Capitol Street consistently free of litter. Safety issues
should be addressed by engaging in a dialogue

Major Streetscape Improvements Needed


Enhanced Streetscape and Landscape Opportunity
N Capitol Street Commercial Revitalization Focus Area
Potential Redevelopment Opportunity Sites
Land use change opportunity
Retail cluster

Park Enhancement Opportunities


Enhanced Park and Green Space Opportunities

Extension of P Street Greenway


Green Deck Opportunity
Existing Street Trees
Potential locations for new trees along N. Capitol Street
Extension of DC Street Grid Opportunity
Neighborhood Identity/Placemaking/Public Art Opportunity Sites
1
2

Neighborhood Gateways
Potential Historic Landmarks
Existing Historic Landmarks

Fig. 5.3 Revitalization Opportunity Map

Intervention
Curb Extension/Bioretention Planters Opportunities include:

Specific Location
North Capitol intersections with Channing, Bryant, W, Seaton, Randolph,
and Quincy Streets
North Capitol Street at P Street NW

Tree box bioretention planters at:

Street between North Capitol and First Street


N Street between North Capitol and First Street

Impervious Surface Removal - Opportunities include:

Bryant and North Capitol Streets, SW corner

Permeable Paving at:

The alley defined by North Capitol Street, T Street, and


Rhode Island Avenue NW.
Alleys defined by 3rd, North Capitol, P, and Q Streets
Alleys defined by First, North Capitol, N and P Streets
South side of 5th Street NE between 4th Street and the
Metropolitan Branch Trail.
Grounds of the former Emery Elementary School and Langley High School
along T Street.

PARKS, GREEN SPACE

Intersection of North Capitol and Lincoln Rd., NE

Reservation 277 is a small triangular park bounded


by North Capitol Street, and Lincoln Road at
Quincy Place. Loitering is an issue at this park
which is near small businesses. The Small Area Plan
recommends the establishment of a local Friends
of... group that would be responsible for making
enhancements and maintaining features that go
beyond typical park maintenance. Improvements
could include enhanced vegetation and native
plantings, and removing the low metal fence to

discourage loitering, and enlarge the sidewalk along North


Capitol to improve walkability.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Residents described the need to create better connections


across North Capitol Street between neighborhoods. One
suggestion was the creation of a Green Deck across North
Capitol Street between T Street and Rhode Island Avenue.
The Small Area Plan recommends exploring this opportunity
as a community or privately led initiative. See also page 128
for details about Project North Deck, a project created by
Howard University students to explore this idea as part of the
Small Area Plan process.

81

CONNECTIVITY
As described previously, traffic congestion, speed,
street width, underpasses/bridges and narrow
sidewalks along parts of North Capitol Street
form both physical and psychological barriers to
connectivity among neighborhoods. The Small Area
Plan recommends undertaking a comprehensive
streetscape and connectivity study to develop ways
to beautify and improve connectivity across
North Capitol Street. Additionally, the DDOT
Livability Study describes recommended
transportation improvements as follows:
Florida/North Capitol Street/Q St./
Lincoln Rd. Challenges:
Poor conditions and access for pedestrians
and cyclists.
Need to extend the Q Street NW bicycle lanes
to reach Q Street NE as recommended in the
2005 bicycle master plan.
Residents desire to restore an identifiable
place reminiscent of the historic Truxton Circle
and fountain.
Address pedestrian and public safety concerns
Rationalize the many movements occurring at
this location.
Recommended Improvements:
Reconfiguration of this intersection.
Install a new signal at Q Street NW and Florida
Avenue NW to permit protected pedestrian
and bicycle crossing across Florida Avenue at
this location. Tie signal to North Capitol signal

82

82

Fig. 5.4 DDOT Livability Study Illustration

Slightly realign Q Street NW to a closer to


90 degree intersection with Florida Avenue
to improve sight lines and safety.
Install curb extensions on Q Street NW.
Install high visibility crosswalk and bike box
across Q Street NW.
Install painted bicycle crossing adjacent to
Florida Avenue crosswalk.
Install protected contra flow bike connector
from Q Street crossing to North Capitol Street
along Florida Avenue and through Truxton
Circle Park and behind bus stop.
Close the slip lane from southbound North
Capitol Street to westbound Florida Avenue
and relink Truxton Circle Park to the square.
Widen curb radii at the northwest corner
of North Capitol Street and Florida Avenue
sufficient to accommodate right turn
movements of SU 30 and WB 50 design
vehicles (large trucks, tractor trailers, and
buses). WB 50 vehicles must turn from the
second lane of North Capitol Street onto
Florida Avenue in order to navigate the acute
angle. Smaller delivery trucks can turn directly
from the curb lane of North Capitol Street into
the curb lane of Florida Avenue.

Intersection at North Capitol and Florida Avenue

To permit the safe turning movement, right


turns should be restricted to Right On Red
Only during peak hours.

Extend North Capitol Street curb between


Florida and Q Street NE and tighten Q Street
NE curb radii.

Slightly shift northern North Capitol Street


cross-walk to shorten slightly and accommodate
the new curb radii. Install painted bicycle
crossing adjacent to crosswalk and move stop
bar north to retain setback from the crosswalk.

Install protected cycle track from North Capitol


Street crossing to and onto new Q Street
bike lane.

Close the short segment of Lincoln Road from


Q Street to Quincy Place and expand the green
space at the gateway. Maintain alley access for
alley between Q Street and Quincy place via
connection to Quincy Place.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

to allow for consistent progression along the


corridor. Signal spacing is 330 feet, measured
centerline to centerline to North Capitol Street
and compliant with MUTCD and NACTO
guidelines.

Synchronize signals at North Capitol and


Quincy Street and Quincy Street and Lincoln
Road to permit seamless progression between
North Capitol and Lincoln Road NE.

83

NEW YORK AVENUE

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER

While only a small stretch of New York Avenue


exists within Mid City East, this thoroughfare
carries vehicles at high speeds and is consistently
congested. It acts as a barrier, dividing the Bates/
Truxton Circle and Hanover neighborhood from
Sursum Corda and the community around it. Drivers
use this roadway to travel to and from downtown,
the Maryland suburbs, and to access Route 395. The
intersection of New York Avenue and North Capitol
Street was described by residents as one of the
most dangerous in Mid City East. DDOTs Livability
Study recommends significant improvements to this
intersection. See Fig.5.8.

Two existing historic landmarks are found along


New York Avenue in Mid City East - the Augusta &
Louisa Apartment Buildings, and the Perry School.
See Fig. 5.7.

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT
While this stretch of New York Avenue is lined
primarily with residential buildings, a cluster of
small commercial struggles to survive here. Building
owners should be encouraged to, and assisted,
with implementing facade improvements, and
repositioning interior spaces to accommodate retail
and small businesses.
Fig. 5.7 shows the area the Small Area Plan
recommends for a land use designation change
at the intersection of North Capitol Street and
New York Avenue. This corner could anchor and
help catalyze development along North Capitol
Street and improve the character of an important
intersection in Mid City East.

PLACEMAKING AND PUBLIC REALM

N
84
84

Fig. 5.6 New York Avenue Keymap

The intersection of New York Avenue and North


Capitol Street should be celebrated as a an
important node and gateway from the south to
the neighborhoods of Mid City East. The Small
Area Plan recommends streetscape enhancements
along New York Avenue to improve walkability and
connectivity. DDOT identified the sidewalk along
the north side of New York Avenue at North Capitol
Street as constrained by the size of a mature tree

Willie Wood Way at New York Avenue, NE

PARKS AND GREEN SPACE

Reservation 181

N
LEGEND

Major Streetscape Improvements Needed


Enhanced Streetscape and Landscape Opportunity
N Capitol Street Commercial Revitalization Focus Area
Potential Redevelopment Opportunity Sites
Land use change opportunity

Two significant green spaces exist along New York


Avenue - the New York Avenue Playground, and
Reservation 181, the grassy triangle bounded by
New York Avenue, First Street NW and M Street
NW. The Small Area Plan recommends adding
entries to the New York Avenue playground at
appropriate points around the parks perimeter to
encourage increased neighborhood access and
use; adding informal green space or community
garden plots; identifying opportunities for safe,
multi-generational design and programming,
and adding shade trees where possible. The Plan
also recommends enhancing the green space of
Reservation 181 by establishing a local Friends
of... group. See Fig. 5.7. DDOTs Livability Study
suggests creating green space within the closed
portions of N Street NW and NE. See Fig. 5.8.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

and the presence of a fence dividing the public


parking area of a row house from the sidewalk.
DDOTs Livability Study recommends working with
the property owner to move the fence in public
space further from the street edge and expanding
the sidewalk to meet acceptable standards.

Retail cluster
Park Enhancement Opportunities
Enhanced Park and Green Space Opportunities
Extension of P Street Greenway
Green Deck Opportunity
Existing Street Trees
Potential locations for new trees along N. Capitol Street
Extension of DC Street Grid Opportunity
Neighborhood Identity/Placemaking/Public Art Opportunity Sites
Neighborhood Gateways
1

Potential Historic Landmark

Existing Historic Landmark

Fig. 5.7 New York Avenue

85

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
DDOTs Livability Study recommends the following
locations at New York Avenue as opportunities for
LID/Stormwater improvements:
Green spaces along parking lots of Dunbar
along First Street NW between P Street and
New York Avenue.
Tree Box filters along First Street NW between
New York Avenue and M Street NW
Green spaces within the closed portions of
N Street NW and NE.

Rhode Island Avenue

86
86

New York Avenue at First Street, NW

New York Avenue at S Street, NW

58,000

Annual Average
Daily Traffic Counts

1 - Source: DC Department of Transportation, Traffic Volume Map 2012


2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst
3 - Source: CoStar 2014 Second Quarter Results

29,260 sq. ft.

Existing Commercial
Square Footage

$3,673,075

Monthly Consumer
Spending Average
*

*Number derived from annual spending average across the five retail areas.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

NEW YORK AVENUE CORRIDOR PROFILE 2013

87

88

Fig. 5.8 DDOT Livability Study Illustration

DDOTs Livability Study identified issues with the


intersection of New York Avenue/N Street/North
Capitol Street. These include insufficient crossing
times, small queuing spaces, uncontrolled crosswalks
and unprotected median refuge space, and too little
green space. The Livability Study recommends the
following improvements:
Immediate: Re-timing signal at New York
Avenue and North Capitol Street to ensure
sufficient pedestrian clearance interval
to address major safety concerns at that
intersection, and the installation of a permanent
curb at New York Avenue and N Street NW.
Temporary: Installation at New York Avenue/
North Capitol Street/N Street. This intersection
can be reconFig.d using pavement markings,
bollards, planters, and flex posts. Given the
heavy traffic at this location, a bell bollard is
recommended. This is a heavy iron cone which
can protect pedestrians in vulnerable positions,
such as the median of New York Avenue.
Pavement paint should also be installed to
redirect vehicles even prior to extending the
pedestrian space.
Future Improvements:
Realign N Street NE from separated access
points for ingress off of North Capitol Street/
New York Avenue and egress off of New York
Avenue to a consolidated point of entry and
egress on and off of New York Avenue. Move
ingress/egress point further east to provide
further relief to the major intersection. Consider
permitting left turns from N Street onto

New York Avenue in non-peak hours only (this


should be further studied and assessed by the
proposed development project at New York
and N Street NE).
Landscape the reservation and closed portion
of N Street NE at North Capitol Street to create
an attractive gateway amenity.
Extend the sidewalk above lower North Capitol
Street to align with New York Avenue.

Further study the installation of a new traffic


signal at N Street NW and New York Avenue NW
tied to the existing North Capitol signal. The
spacing between intersections is 374 ft,
an adequate signal spacing distance by MUTCD
and NACTO guidelines. The purpose of the
signal is to protect the relatively high number
of pedestrians currently crossing at uncontrolled
locations in this vicinity (49 in the PM peak hour).

Install a sidewalk on the north side of N Street


NE concurrent with parcel redevelopment.
Close slip lane from eastbound New York
Avenue to southbound North Capitol Street
and adjust curb radii at corner to accommodate
an SU 30 design vehicle (30 single unit truck).
Install signage directing larger trucks to utilize
M Street NW.
Slightly realign western crosswalk across New
York Avenue to reduce crossing distance.
Install raised median along New York Avenue
west of North Capitol Street. Extend beyond
crosswalk(s).

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

CONNECTIVITY

Install a permanent curb and pilot or permanent


LID treatment at the location of the currently
closed eastbound N Street NW.
Close unused driveway along north side of
New York Avenue NE.
Coordinate with WMATA to relocate bus stops
to the far side of North Capitol Street and
New York Avenue intersection.
North Capitol at Bates Street

89

RHODE ISLAND
AVENUE

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER

Rhode Island Avenue within Mid City East is a busy


street and an important east-west connector across
the city. It has an impressive line of trees and is
primarily residential in character with small sections
of neighborhood commercial, including a cluster of
retail and restaurants at First Street, NW. Residents
expressed a general satisfaction with Rhode Island
Avenue and the organic changes occurring with the
revitalization of small commercial areas. However,
streetscape improvements are needed along areas
where sidewalks are in disrepair or are extremely
narrow due to overgrown trees.

N
90
90

Fig. 5.13 Rhode Island Avenue Keymap

Several potential historic landmarks exist along


Rhode Island Avenue, including the Sylvan Theater
and the Bloomingdale Liquor Store. See Fig. 5.14.
In addition, Rhode Island Avenue traverses the areas
that could be explored as a potential Bloomingdale
or Eckington Historic District or Conservation Pilot
Project.

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT
Recognizing the success of the growing cluster of
small retail and dining at the intersection of Rhode
Island Avenue and First Street NW, the Small Area
Plan has a goal of strengthening and expanding this
area to serve the neighborhood. Recommendations
include expanding marketing efforts in partnership
with the Restaurant Association of Metropolitan
Washington (RAMW), supporting and coordinating
with the efforts of the Rhode Island Avenue Main
Street organization, and promoting commercial
facade improvements for properties along this
important avenue.
At the intersection of Florida and New Jersey
Avenue, opportunities exist for redeveloping
underutilized parcels including gas stations
and the United Planning Organization (UPO)
site. Redevelopment could bring additional
neighborhood amenities, strengthen the
neighborhood fabric and pedestrian character, and
create a gateway at this intersection. See Fig. 5.14.

Rhode Island Avenue, NW

Rhode Island Avenue at First Street NW has


a successful cluster of retail and dining which
has given the neighborhood of Bloomingdale a
strengthened sense of identity and place. This
area has become a gateway for the neighborhood.
The intersection of Rhode Island Avenue at
Florida Avenue has a similar opportunity as a
gateway through enhanced streetscape and the
redevelopment of underutilized parcels as
discussed above.
DDOTs Livability Study identified locations
along Rhode Island Avenue for specific sidewalk
improvements:

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

PLACEMAKING AND PUBLIC REALM

N
1

1 1
1

Rhode Island Avenue at Florida Avenue and Rhode


Island Avenue at Lincoln Road - In both identified
locations (and other segments along Rhode Island
Avenue) the sidewalk of Rhode Island Avenue is
dramatically heaved by a mature trees. Trees should
be preserved and solutions implemented that
restore and widen sidewalks above the tree roots:
Work with adjacent properties to relocate fence
lines within the public space.
Explore available modern sidewalk
technologies such as rubber or permeable
pavement to allow sidewalk restoration over
tree roots.
Widen sidewalk to meet minimum standards
for access.

Fig. 5.14 Rhode Island Avenue Revitalization Opportunity Map


LEGEND
Major Streetscape
Improvements Needed

Retail cluster

Existing Street Trees

Enhanced Streetscape and


Landscape Opportunity

Park Enhancement Opportunities

Potential locations for new trees along


N. Capitol Street

North Capitol Street Commercial


Revitalization Focus Area

Enhanced Park and Green


Space Opportunities

Potential Redevelopment Opportunity Sites

Extension of P Street Greenway

Land use change opportunity

Green Deck Opportunity

Extension of DC Street Grid Opportunity


Neighborhood Identity/Placemaking/
Public Art Opportunity Sites
Neighborhood Gateways

Potential Historic Landmark

Existing Historic Landmark

91

PARKS AND GREEN SPACE

CONNECTIVITY

There are no parks along Rhode Island Avenue.


However, the Small Area Plan recommends
enhancing small triangular green spaces by
establishing local Friends of... groups that
would be responsible for making enhancements
and maintaining features that go beyond typical
park maintenance. Enhancements could include
vegetation, seating, lighting, public art, and the
integration of LID stormwater strategies such as rain
gardens and bioswales.

DDOTs Livability Study identified locations along


Rhode Island Avenue for specific connectivity
improvements:

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
DDOTs Livability Study describes opportunities
along Rhode Island Avenue for the implementation
of LID stormwater management strategies including:
Impervious surface removal at:

5th Street and Rhode Island Avenue NW


Install crosswalks and curb ramps across
Rhode Island Avenue and median along the
5th Street NW alignment.
Extend the existing 5th Street bike lanes from
Rhode Island Avenue to Florida Avenue. These
lanes would serve as a substitute to the 6th
Street bike lanes recommended in the
2005 Bicycle Master Plan.
See DDOTs Livability Study for details.
Rhode Island at T Street, NW

First & Rhode Island, SW corner


Permeable paving at:
Alley defined by North Capitol Street, T Street,
and Rhode Island Avenue NW
Sidewalks along Rhode Island Avenue from
Florida Avenue to 3rd Street
See DDOTs Livability Study for details.

92

Anna J. Cooper Circle, NW

33,100

Annual Average
Daily Traffic Counts

1 - Source: DC Department of Transportation, Traffic Volume Map 2012


2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst
3 - Source: CoStar 2014 Second Quarter Results

292,686 sq. ft.

Existing Commercial
Square Footage

$5,523,897

Monthly Consumer
Spending Average
*

*Number derived from annual spending average across the five retail areas.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

RHODE ISLAND AVENUE CORRIDOR PROFILE 2013

93

FLORIDA AVENUE

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER

Florida Avenue is typically a busy, congested


roadway traversing Mid City East neighborhoods
northwest to southeast, lined with a mix of
residential and commercial uses. Community
members expressed the desire to see vacant and
underutilized parcels infilled or redeveloped,
especially at Florida Avenue and North Capitol
Street, and Florida Avenue and Rhode Island
Avenue. They also expressed the need to see
walkability and connectivity improvements along
Florida Avenue. Streetscape is inconsistent along
this street with very narrow sidewalks in some
places. Existing green spaces are in need of
enhancement.

One potential historic landmark, Ionia Whippers


Medical Office, is located along Florida Avenue. In
addition, Florida Avenue forms the southern border
of areas that could be explored as a potential
Bloomingdale or Eckington Historic District or
Conservation Pilot Project.

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT
At its intersection with Rhode Island Avenue, the
opportunity exists for redeveloping underutilized
parcels including gas stations and the United
Planning Organization (UPO) site. Redevelopment
could bring additional neighborhood amenities,
strengthen the neighborhood fabric and pedestrian
character, and create a neighborhood gateway at
this intersection. A land use designation change is
recommended for properties at the intersection of
Florida Avenue and North Capitol Street to anchor
and catalyze additional development in that area,
bringing needed businesses and services to the
neighborhood and activating the sidewalks. The
Small Area Plan also recommends commercial
facade improvements for existing businesses along
Florida Avenue.

N
94
94

Fig. 5.15 Florida Avenue Keymap

Florida Avenue at 4th Street, NW

21,000

Annual Average
Daily Traffic Counts

1 - Source: DC Department of Transportation, Traffic Volume Map 2012


2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst
3 - Source: CoStar 2014 Second Quarter Results

215,096 sq. ft.

Existing Commercial
Square Footage

$5,553,126

Monthly Consumer
Spending Average
*

*Number derived from annual spending average across the five retail areas.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

FLORIDA AVENUE CORRIDOR PROFILE 2013

95

PLACEMAKING AND PUBLIC REALM


Several important nodes, or gateways, were
identified along Florida Avenue at its intersection
with Rhode Island Avenue, First Street NW,
and North Capitol Street. These areas offer the
opportunity for enhanced placemaking and
neighborhood identity through banners, signage,
or public art. The desire to celebrate the former
Truxton Circle was expressed by community
members. The Small Area Plan recommends
exploring the possibility of salvaging, restoring,
and incorporating the old Truxton Circle fountain
as part of a park or open space on land near the
intersection.

Enhanced streetscape is needed in some areas


to improve walkability and the character of
Florida Avenue. Property owners should provide
generous sidewalks as part of development and
redevelopment proposals for sites along Florida
Avenue. DDOTs Livability Study proposed
improvements will significantly improve its
intersection with North Capitol Street.

Fig. 5.16 Florida Avenue Revitalization Opportunities Map


LEGEND

96

Florida Avenue (facing west)

Major Streetscape
Improvements Needed

Retail cluster

Existing Street Trees

Enhanced Streetscape and


Landscape Opportunity

Park Enhancement Opportunities

Potential locations for new trees along


N. Capitol Street

North Capitol Street Commercial


Revitalization Focus Area

Enhanced Park and Green


Space Opportunities

Potential Redevelopment Opportunity Sites

Extension of P Street Greenway

Land use change opportunity

Green Deck Opportunity

Extension of DC Street Grid Opportunity


Neighborhood Identity/Placemaking/
Public Art Opportunity Sites
Neighborhood Gateways

Potential Historic Landmark

Existing Historic Landmark

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Two triangular park spaces exist along Florida


Avenue. Reservation 276-A, at the intersection of
Florida Avenue, First and R Streets NE, presents
an opportunity to enhance a green space by
establishing a local Friends of... group to make
enhancements and maintain features that go
beyond typical park maintenance. Enhancements
could include create a gateway to Bloomingdale
by adding vegetation, seating, lighting, public art,
wayfinding signage, and the integration of LID
stormwater strategies such as rain gardens
and bioswales.

DDOTs Livability Study describes locations along


North Capitol Street for the implementation of LID
stormwater management strategies.

Florida Avenue Park should be redeveloped


with any future long-term redevelopment of the
Northwest Cooperative Homes to include increased
tree cover and vegetation.

Impervious surface removal at:

Curb extensions/bioretention planters at:


4th St at intersections at T St, U St, and
Florida Avenue NW
Tree box bioretention planters at:
3rd St between Florida Ave & New Jersey Ave
Florida Ave & P St
Intersections along North Capitol Street and
Florida Avenue
2nd & Florida, NW corner

Permeable paving at:


Sidewalks along Rhode Island from Florida
to 3rd St.
Sidewalk inside of park area R St from First
to Florida.
See DDOTs Livability Study for further details.

CONNECTIVITY
See the North Capitol Street section for DDOTs
suggested improvements to the intersection of
Florida Avenue/North Capitol Street/Q Street/
Lincoln Road. In addition, the DDOT Mid City East
Livability Study identified the following connectivity
improvements for:
Florida/New Jersey/Rhode Island/S Street/
4th Street - Redesign of the multi-corridor,
multi-intersection area at the convergence of
Florida Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue and
New Jersey Avenue.
Florida Avenue Challenges:
This intersection presents many barriers to
walking and cycling.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

PARKS AND GREEN SPACE

Traffic movements are confusing and not


intuitive to many users. Transit users are
stranded on a literal island.
Several intersections lack crosswalks on
all approaches.

Playground at First Street and Florida Avenue, NE

97

Recommendation for further study:


Close S Street NW between New Jersey
Avenue and Florida Avenue for vehicular traffic.
Permit left turns from southbound 4th Street
onto eastbound Florida, facilitated through
signalization.
Permit right turns from southbound 4th Street
to southwest-bound Rhode Island Avenue
through the use of signalization and directional
pavement marking.
Close S Street at New Jersey Avenue to create
a cul de sac.
Extend curbs 4-feet into S Street to allow tree
planting space, except in the new cul de sac to
permit vehicles to navigate a 3-point turn.

98
98

Florida Avenue at 4th Street

Fig. 5.17 DDOT Livability Study Illustration

Florida Avenue at 5th Street

99

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

NEW JERSEY AVENUE


New Jersey Avenue is a predominantly residential
street with pockets of institutional/religious uses
and small commercial. This avenue is generally quiet
from a traffic perspective, and generously wide.
Buildings are set back from the street, creating large
areas for sidewalks, vegetation and front yards.
Recent streetscape improvements have enhanced
the streets character and cohesion. Opportunities
to bring additional amenities to the neighborhood
exist with revitalization or redevelopment.

NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER
No Historic Resources were identified along this
stretch of New Jersey Avenue.

COMMERCIAL REVITALIZATION,
REDEVELOPMENT
Very little commercial exists along New Jersey
Avenue, a wide street with large building setbacks.
The Small Area Plan recommends revitalizing or
redeveloping the underutilized small commercial
strip at New Jersey and Q Street, and the multiple
gas station sites at New Jersey and Rhode Island
Avenues. See Fig. 5.18.

PLACEMAKING AND PUBLIC REALM


The pedestrian experience along New Jersey
Avenue is predominantly positive, due in large
part to pedestrian improvements that have been
implemented in the last few years, and the large
setbacks of green space and mature trees along this
corridor.
As described previously, the intersection of Florida
Avenue/Rhode Island Avenue/New Jersey Avenue
should be celebrated as a an important node and
gateway from the west to the neighborhoods of
Mid City East. See Fig. 5.16.

N
100
100

Fig. 5.18 New Jersey Avenue Keymap

New Jersey Avenue (facing North)

14,500

Annual Average
Daily Traffic Counts

1 - Source: DC Department of Transportation, Traffic Volume Map 2012


2 - Source: ESRI Business Analyst
3 - Source: CoStar 2014 Second Quarter Results

34,843 sq. ft.

Existing Commercial
Square Footage

$4,182,400

Monthly Consumer
Spending Average

*Number derived from annual spending average across the five retail areas.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

NEW JERSEY AVENUE CORRIDOR PROFILE 2013

101

PARKS AND GREEN SPACE


The Small Area Plan recommends establishing a
local Friends of... group to enhance Reservation
190, the triangular park owned by NPS and
bounded by New Jersey Avenue, 4th and Franklin
Streets NW. The group would be responsible for
making enhancements and maintaining features that
go beyond typical park maintenance. Improvements
could include additional vegetation and seating,
and connection of the property to the north by
closing Franklin Street. See Fig. 5.15.

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
DDOTs Livability Study describes locations along
North Capitol Street for the implementation of LID
stormwater management strategies.
New Jersey Avenue, NW

Tree box bioretention planters at:


3rd St between Florida Ave & New Jersey Ave
New Jersey Ave in discreet locations
between Florida Ave & P St
Permeable paving at:

N
LEGEND

Alleys defined by 5th St, P St, New Jersey,


& R St

Retail cluster
Park Enhancement Opportunities
Enhanced Park and Green Space Opportunities
Extension of P Street Greenway

Rain Gardens at:

Green Deck Opportunity


Existing Street Trees
Potential locations for new trees along N. Capitol Street
Extension of DC Street Grid Opportunity

Green space on the southeast corner of


New Jersey Ave and O St.
See DDOTs Livability Study for details.

102

Major Streetscape Improvements Needed


Enhanced Streetscape and Landscape Opportunity
N Capitol Street Commercial Revitalization Focus Area
Potential Redevelopment Opportunity Sites
Land use change opportunity

Neighborhood Identity/Placemaking/Public Art Opportunity Sites


Neighborhood Gateways
1

Potential Historic Landmark

Existing Historic Landmark

Fig. 5.19 New Jersey Revitalization Opportunities Map

New Jersey Avenue, NW

DDOTs Livability Study identified locations for


specific connectivity improvements along New
Jersey Avenue:
New Jersey Avenue, 4th Street and S Street
NW - Install four curb ramps at 4th Street,
S Street, and New Jersey Avenue NW to bring
intersection crossing up to ADA standard.
New Jersey Avenue Corridor:
Retrofit New Jersey Avenue with new lane
widths between N Street NW and Florida
Avenue NW that better accommodate cycling
on this corridor, and connect to planned bike
lanes on New Jersey Avenue between H
Street NW and N Street NW. The existing lane
designations and temporal conditions are to
remain unchanged, thus keeping two peak
period travel lanes in the primary direction of
travel, while the opposite side of the avenue
would retain a single travel lane and parking.
During off- peak periods, both directions will
have a single travel lane and parking.
Recommended Improvements:

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

CONNECTIVITY

Change lane widths to provide 13.5 feet of


width for the right-hand lane, enough space to
function as a shared travel lane for automobiles
and bicycles.

Fig. 5.20

Install shared lane sharrow pavement


markings to widened lane. Under most
conditions, parked vehicles would occupy only 8
feet of width, leaving 5.5 feet of width to serve
as a de facto shared bicycle space.

103

Close unused or redundant curb cuts along the


New Jersey Avenue corridor.
Refresh high visibility crosswalk markings.

OTHER LIVABILITY
STUDY CONNECTIVITY
RECOMMENDATIONS:
First Street NW Corridor Challenges:
Preponderance of longer distance vehicle trips
more appropriately accommodated on parallel
arterials.
Low compliance at existing stop-controlled
intersections.
Speeds inhospitable to community bicycling.
Recommended Improvements:
Replace all existing stop controlled
intersections with landscaped mini
roundabouts. Mini roundabouts should have
trees or other vertical elements in them to
interrupt sightlines to distant horizons. The
design speed of the mini-circles is 20 MPH.
Mini-circles are designed with a 15 foot
diameter which accommodates an SU-30 truck
design vehicle.
Remove existing stop signs and replace with
yield and directional arrows.
Crosswalks should be clearly marked across all
legs leading to mini roundabouts.
Signalized intersections remain unchanged.

104
104

Fig. 5.21 DDOT Livability Study Illustration

Mid City East Small Area Plan Corridor Highlights

Eckington Place NE Corridor Challenges:


Need to slow speeds

Need to remove excess impervious surface


Need to improve safety for pedestrians

Need to expand green space and tree cover


Recommended Improvements:
Eliminate center turn lane from Harry Thomas
Way NE to R Street NE and realign existing two
travel lanes at center of the street.
Extend curb lines 6 toward the center of the
street to expand green space planting zone
between street and sidewalk.
Plant additional trees and potentially install
significant low impact design feature for
stormwater retention and infiltration along
the corridor.
Replace existing four-way stop at Q Street NE
and Eckington with signature roundabout.
Roundabout is designed with 22-foot
diameter. Accompanying curb extensions and
channelizing medians utilize a DL-23 design
vehicle (23 foot long, 8.5 feet wide delivery
truck).
Install median refuges at the two T
intersections where there is some surplus
median space to improve pedestrian crossings.

Beau Thai Restaurant - 1700 New Jersey Ave, NW

105

7: IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Overview

The following Implementation Plan is a road map for implementing the recommendations of the Mid City East Small Area Plan for the neighborhoods of Bates/Truxton
Circle and Hanover, Bloomingdale, Eckington, LeDroit Park, and Sursum Corda, as well as portions of Edgewood and Stronghold. The agency or organization responsible
for leading the implementation is listed, along with the support or partner agencies or organizations, time frame for implementation and source of funding.

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Neighborhood Character


Item No.

MCE 1.1

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

ANC,
Develop a community-led neighborhood conservancy to lead historic preservation
Neighborhood
efforts and build consensus around preferred preservation strategies in Bloomingdale.
Civic Associations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

DCOP

Short-term

Private

DCOP

Short-term

Public &
Private

MCE 1.2

Explore options for designating Bloomingdale as a historic district or a pilot


conservation district. After the designation, or completion of the pilot project, share
lessons learned with other Mid City East neighborhoods.

ANC,
Neighborhood
Civic
Associations,
Bloomingdale
Conservancy

MCE 1.3

Develop a community-led neighborhood conservancy to lead historic preservation


efforts and build consensus around preferred preservation strategies in Eckington.

ANC,
Neighborhood
Civic Associations

DCOP

Short-term

Private

Explore options for designating Eckington as a historic district or a pilot conservation


district. After the designation, or completion of the pilot project, share lessons
learned with other Mid City East neighborhoods.

ANC,
Neighborhood
Civic
Associations,
Eckington
Conservancy

DCOP

Short-term

Public &
Private

MCE 1.4

106

Action

Supporting
or Partner
Agencies/
Organizations

Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting
or Partner
Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 1.5

Develop a community-led neighborhood conservancy to lead historic preservation


efforts and build consensus around preferred preservation strategies in Bates/Truxton
Circle and Hanover.

ANC,
Neighborhood
Civic
Associations,
Eckington
Conservancy

DCOP

Short-term

Private

MCE 1.6

Explore designating individual buildings under a multiple property document for


the row houses on Bates Street, in an effort to preserve the cultural relevance of the
sanitary housing movement.

Short-term

DCOP

Mid-Term

Public &
Private

MCE 1.7

MCE 1.8

MCE 1.9

Prepare educational material that outlines the pros/cons associated with various
preservation tools based on neighborhood models to inform and equip neighborhood
conservancies.

Augment existing signage programs or establish new neighborhood signage in for


LeDroit Park, Bloomingdale, Eckington, Bates/Truxton Circle and Hanover. Create
unique designs including art, landscape, and/or streetscape and street furniture to
identify the distinctive character of each neighborhood.

Create markers to commemorate lost landmarks such as the former Truxton Circle
and fountain that once served as a neighborhood anchor and landmark.

DCOP

MCE
Neighborhood
Conservancies,
DCOP, DCHPO,
DDOT, Cultural
Tourism DC

MCE
Neighborhood
Conservancies,
DCOP, DCHPO,
DDOT

ANC, MCE
Neighborhood
Conservancies,
Short-term
DC
Preservation
League
DCOP, DC
Preservation
League, DC
Commission
on Arts &
Humanities

Mid-Term

MCE
Neighborhood
Conservancies,
DCOP, Cultural
Tourism
DC, DC
Long-term
Preservation
League, DC
Commission
on Arts &
Humanities

Public &
Private

Public

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Neighborhood Character

Public

107

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Commercial Revitalization

108

Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 2.1

Building on the success of the Bloomingdale Farmers Market, increase year round
access to healthy food options for MCE residents by encouraging corner store owners
to enroll in DC Central Kitchens Healthy Corners, the Healthy Food Retail Program
(administered by DSLBD), and similar programs to expand availability of fresh local
produce and healthy prepared foods. Provide technical assistance to help accelerate
the application process.

DSLBD

DC Central Kitchen

Short to
Long Term

Public-Private

MCE 2.2

Reinforce the market positioning of the commercial cluster around Rhode Island
Avenue and First Street NW as a dining destination that attracts patrons from
neighborhoods outside Mid City East through attraction of additional food service
businesses and expanded marketing efforts in partnership with the Restaurant
Association of Metropolitan Washington (RAMW.)

NCMS

Local restaurant
organizations,
business owners

Short Term

Public

MCE 2.3

Explore potential to host a Taste of or similar-type event on the vacant lot at


Florida Avenue and North Capitol Street to highlight neighborhood food service
operators and other small businesses, as well draw to attention to North Capitol as a
viable commercial street.

NCMS

Private property
owner

Short Term

Public-Private

MCE 2.4

Identify opportunities for the development of a food service incubator that


provides emerging entrepreneurs and caterers with access to shared kitchen and
food preparation space which will in turn lower operational overhead and result in
economies of scale through cooperative purchasing and increased market exposure.

DMPED

NCMS

Long Term

Public-Private

MCE 2.5

Support and coordinate with the efforts of Rhode Island Avenue Main Street.

NCMS, Civic
Associations

DSLBD

Short to
Long Term

N/A

MCE 2.6

Implement an approach to commercial revitalization on North Capitol Street that


builds on existing assets, fills market voids, and acknowledges the limitations of
North Capitol Street as a traditional retail street. A diverse and robust mix of uses
could include entrepreneurial production and creative services; day-to-day goods and
services; and the expansion of neighborhood dining.

NCMS

Property owners

Mid Term

Public

Item No.

MCE 2.7

Action
Inventory, monitor, and encourage development of boutique/small office space
(10,000 square feet and less) along the North Capitol Street corridor, specifically
focused on the segment south of P Street, that may offer appropriate space for a
diverse and robust mix of uses including arts uses, creative services companies, and
start-ups.

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

NCMS

WDCEP

Short Term

Public

DCOP

DMPED, WDCEP,
DSLBD

Short Term

Private

Encourage property owners in the industrial/ production, distribution, and repair


(PDR) portions of Eckington to retain and, where possible, expand warehouse/flex
spaces that may offer appropriate space for small-scale production tenants.

MCE 2.8

Assist businesses, entrepreneurs, and developers in accessing funding for


industrial space improvements as well as resources for business start-up and
operation.
Working with property owners, business associations, and businesses, highlight
the potential for emerging industries in the creative, green, and technology
sectors to be tenants of PDR space. As part of this, share findings and
recommendations from the Ward 5 Industrial Land Transformation Study.
Identify opportunities for appropriate PDR spaces to incorporate a retail
experience that is complimentary to production activity and takes advantage of
pedestrian and bike accessibility.

MCE 2.9

Promote the Mid City East area to the creative economy community as a more
affordable alternative to downtown and other high-rent office markets, but with a
similar level of access to transit and amenities.

NCMS

Local tech/startup organizations,


WDCEP

Short to
Long Term

Public-Private

MCE 2.10

Expand the focus of North Capitol Main Street business recruitment efforts beyond
traditional retail (consumer businesses) to include creative services, physical and
graphic design companies, arts organizations, and technology-based start-ups
(producer businesses).

NCMS

WDCEP

Short to
Long Term

Public-Private

MCE 2.11

Market available arts and performance space (temporary and permanent) through DC
Space Finder and other property listing channels that target the creative economy
sector.

NCMS

Local arts
organizations

Short Term

N/A

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Commercial Revitalization

109

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Commercial Revitalization


Item No.

110

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 2.12

Identify funding for a business plan competition to attract start-up companies and
creative economy entrepreneurs to Mid City East.

DMPED

Local tech/startup organizations,


WDCEP, DSLBD

Mid Term

Public-Private

MCE 2.13

Provide assistance to the North Capitol Main Street leadership to regularly evaluate
and update the organizations business plan to help prioritize ongoing initiatives and
allocation of funds.

DSLBD

NCMS

Short to
Long Term

N/A

MCE 2.14

Continue to maintain clean and safe services on North Capitol Street through the
DSLBD-funded clean team.

DSLBD

NCMS

Short to
Long Term

Public

MCE 2.15

Develop a work plan to provide technical assistance to business and property owners
in facilitating development approvals, licensing, and obtaining funds for physical
property improvements.

DSLBD, DCRA

NCMS

Short to
Long Term

Public

MCE 2.16

Develop a marketing and branding strategy for North Capitol Street that highlights
the existing character and retail node as a burgeoning area for small independent
businesses in existing buildings, while encouraging larger, established retail to anchor
new development. Restaurants, the creative economy, retail shops and other small
businesses should be encouraged as tenants to create a more vibrant retail street.

NCMS

Business Owners

Mid Term

Public

MCE 2.17

Implement the Vibrant Streets Retail Toolkit for the North Capitol Street corridor
within Mid City East

DCOP

Short Term

Public

MPD, CAC

ANCs,
Neighborhood Civic
Associations, Main
Street Organizations,
Business
Organizations,
business owners,
property owners

Short to
Long Term

N/A

DSLBD, DMPED

NCMS, business
owners

Mid Term

Public

MCE 2.18

Establish a task force to address loitering and safety issues. Task force should include
representatives from NCMS, ANCs, MPD, business and property owners, and
residents.

MCE 2.19

Promote commercial faade improvements and rehabilitations for properties along


North Capitol Street guided by established programs, incentives, or guidelines.

Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 2.20

Promote commercial faade improvements and rehabilitations for properties along


Rhode Island Avenue guided by established programs, incentives, or guidelines.

DSLBD, DMPED

NCMS, business
owners

Mid Term

Public

MCE 2.21

Provide outreach to commercial property owners in MCE neighborhoods to ensure


that they are knowledgeable about programs such as DC Main Streets and Great
Streets.

DSLBD, DMPED

NCMS, business
owners

Mid Term

Public

MCE 2.22

Encourage existing property owners and new development, where possible, to


design ground floor space in new development, with sufficient flexibility to provide
larger retail bays that can accommodate more established businesses and regional/
national credit tenants.

NCMS

Business Owners

Short Term

Private

MCE 2.23

Encourage property owners on North Capitol Street to upgrade and reposition upper
floor spaces to provide affordable workspace.

NCMS

Business Owners

Short Term

Private

MCE 2.24

Provide technical assistance to help facilitate the Certificate of Occupancy process for
small property owners seeking a change of use.

DCRA

Short to
Long Term

Public

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

DCOP

Short Term

N/A

DCOP

Short to Long
Term

N/A

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Revelopment Opportunities and Housing


Item No.

MCE 3.1

MCE 3.2

Action
Pursue a future land use designation change on the west side of North Capitol at the
intersection of Florida Avenue NW and at the intersection of North Capitol and New York
Avenue, from low density commercial/moderate density residential to moderate density
commercial/medium density residential to encourage mixed-use development and create a
thriving neighborhood edge with a welcoming physical environment.
When development is achieved through a Planned Unit Development (PUD) process, the
ground floor of development on the west side of North Capitol Street in the study area
should accommodate retail services

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Commercial Revitalization

111

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Revelopment Opportunities and Housing


Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

MCE 3.3

When development is achieved through a PUD process, redevelopment of vacant and


underutilized properties at the four corners of the intersection of Florida Avenue and
North Capitol Street within Mid City East should incorporate ground floor commercial
uses with entrances facing sidewalks along or proximate to North Capitol.

DCOP

MCE 3.4

Ensure that new development enhances public space by requiring new development
to use alleys for all vehicular access to the site and that mechanical equipment (i.e.
transformers) are located on private property or alleys.

DCOP

MCE 3.5

Integrate energy efficient lighting on buildings and in sidewalk elements in new


development and redevelopment.

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

Short to
Long Term

N/A

DPW

Short to
Long Term

N/A

DCOP

DDOE

Short to
Long Term

N/A

DHCD

DCOP

Short Term

DGS

DCOP

Long Term

DME

DCOP

Long Term

Solicit proposals to redevelop properties controlled by the District into creative


mixed-use residential or commercial developments.
The DHCD parcels on the south side of Florida Avenue at Q Street NW Pursue
a land use designation change from Moderate Density Residential/Low Density
Commercial to Medium Density Residential/Moderate Density Commercial in an
effort to encourage site redevelopment.

MCE 3.6

The Langston and Slater school buildings on P Street NW - Adaptively reuse and
redevelop both buildings together in the future once existing uses are no longer
needed. Consider innovative business uses, including creative economy start-ups,
to complement development along North Capitol Street. Residential and cultural
uses should also be considered. Create a green neighborhood park, focal point or
plaza in the space between the buildings.
The former Emery School site in Eckington Pursue a land use designation
change from moderate density residential to moderate mixed use/ light industrial.
As redevelopment opportunities arise for this site, and once existing uses are
no longer needed, adaptively reuse the former Emery School building as part
of a place-making redevelopment of the entire Emery School site for Eckington
as a long-term future project. Encourage mixed use development including
neighborhood-scale retail, live/work, office, residential, light industrial, public
amenities, and green space.

112

N/A

Item No.
MCE 3.7

Action
Pursue a future land use designation change for the corner of North Capitol and
Hanover Streets, NW

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

Property Owners

Short to
Long Term

Private

Property Owners

Short to
Long Term

Private

Infill vacant parcels, redevelop underutilized parcels, or repurpose existing vacant


buildings. Opportunities include:
Underutilized properties at Rhode Island and Florida Avenues NW, including the
UPO site, post office site, and gas stations
Underutilized small commercial property bounded by New Jersey Avenue, Q ,
4th, and Franklin Streets NW
Vacant Site at the corner of Rhode Island Avenue and 3rd St. NE
Vacant Site at the corner of Randolph Place and 3rd Street NE
MCE 3.8

Vacant Sites along North Capitol Street NW at Bates Street and Hanover Place
New York Pizza site at the intersection of North Capitol Street, Florida Avenue NE
and Q Street NE
Vacant site at the corner of Lincoln Road and Randolph Place NE
Vacant parcel between Hanover and O Street NW, along the west side of North
Capitol Street
Vacant parcel at the NE corner First & O Street
Vacant parcel on the west side of Kirby Street at the intersection of New York
Avenue (former DC Public Library kiosk site)

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Revelopment Opportunities and Housing

Community Academy PCS parking lot.

113

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Revelopment Opportunities and Housing


Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

DCOP

DHCD

Short Term

N/A

Mid Term

N/A

Change the future land use designation of Sursum Corda from moderate density
residential to high density residential and medium density commercial. Development
under the new land use designation should be achieved through a Planned Unit
Development and should meet the following criteria:
Encourage the development of a mixed-income neighborhood through:
The provision of 199 affordable units within the project at varying levels and types
of subsidies not to exceed 60% AMI (*BE1.1, BE2.5)
MCE 3.9

The addition of market rate units that will represent at least 66 percent of the total
units developed on site.
Reflect the height and scale of existing neighborhood developments.
Development on the Sursum Corda site should step down towards First Street
NW and towards the Mt. Airy Baptist Church, and step up towards North Capitol
Street NW.
Extend the street grid, including L Street NW from First Street NW to North
Capitol Street, NW and Pierce Streets NW between First Street NW and
First Place NW.
Include sustainable development components such as green/park space and other
community amenities.

114

MCE 3.10

Use the DC Preservation Catalog of affordable units to develop early intervention


techniques to preserve affordable units prior to expiration of affordability controls.

DCOP

MCE 3.11

Provide incentives to developers to include affordable units above and beyond the
minimum required for inclusionary zoning.

DCOP

DHCD

Mid Term

N/A

MCE 3.12

In the event of long-term future redevelopment of current public housing or private


affordable housing developments, maintain or increase the number of affordable units
on site.

DHCD, DMPED,
DCHA

DCOP

Mid Term

N/A

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 4.1

Undertake a comprehensive streetscape and connectivity study design study for


sidewalks and public spaces along North Capitol Street to celebrate the importance
of the axial and visual connection to the Capitol. Design should build on existing
guidelines, standards, and regulations identified in DCs Public Realm Design Manual
and include new, sustainably designed paving, lighting, wayfinding signage, public
art, trees, and vegetation. Expand green space and integrate LID and sustainable
stormwater management. Design should explore innovative ways to increase
connectivity east-west across North Capitol Street.

DDOT

DCOP

Short Term

Public

MCE 4.2

Work with DDOTs Urban Forestry Administration to maintain the health of existing
street trees and identify locations for and plant additional street trees along North
Capitol Street to reinforce the axial and visual connection to the Capitol and provide
additional shade and increased tree cover.

DDOT

Casey Trees

Mid Term

Public

MCE 4.3

Work with DDOTs Urban Forestry Administration and Casey Trees to maintain and
protect existing trees along city streets throughout MCE.

DDOT

Mid Term

Public

MCE 4.4

Determine the existing tree canopy for neighborhoods, and identify where trees
are missing. Set specific goals for increasing the canopy. Work with Casey Trees and
DDOTs Urban Forestry Administration to develop a strategy and timeline for planting
new street trees.

DDOT

Casey Trees, Cherry


Blossom Society

Short to
Long Term

Public

MCE 4.5

Work with the Cherry Blossom Society to plant a minimum of 50 cherry trees in
locations identified throughout MCE.

DDOT

Casey Trees, Cherry


Blossom Society

Short to
Long Term

Public

MCE 4.6

Educate MCE residents about public space regulations, and the intent behind them.

DCOP/DDOT

Local ANCs and Civic


Associations

Short to
Long Term

N/A

MCE 4.7

Engage the Clean Team of the North Capitol Street Main Street program to keep
sidewalks along and near North Capitol Street consistently free of litter.

NCMS Clean Team

Short Term

N/A

MCE 4.8

Identify neighborhood groups and civic associations interested in developing


strategies for maintaining streetscape and sidewalk cleanliness in locations
throughout Mid City East neighborhoods and corridors.

Local ANCs and Civic


Associations

Short to
Long Term

N/A

Item No.

Action

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Neighborhood Placemaking and Public Realm

115

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Neighborhood Placemaking and Public Realm

116

Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 4.9

Identify neighborhood groups to act as stewards to work with landowners to improve


the appearance and walkability of the industrial/production, distribution, and repair
(PDR) portions of Eckington.

DDOT

Local ANCs and Civic


Associations

Mid Term

Public

MCE 4.10

Provide required public realm and pedestrian facilities with any new development.
Ensure that fences, curb cuts, show windows, and caf seating areas comply with
regulations. Refer to the District of Columbias Public Realm Design Manual for
specific requirements.

DCOP/DDOT

Short to
Long Term

Public-Private

MCE 4.11

Identify and restore sidewalks in need of repair throughout Mid City East
neighborhoods.

Local ANCs, civic


associations, business
owners

Short to Mid
Term

N/A

MCE 4.12

Increase pedestrian lighting around Sursum Corda.

DDOT

DCOP

Short

Public

MCE 4.13

Improve neighborhood alley lighting throughout Mid City East.

DDOT

Property Owners,
Civic Associations

Short to
Long Term

Public

MCE 4.14

Improve pedestrian lighting in the industrial/ PDR portions of Eckington.

DDOT

DCOP

Mid Term

Public

MCE 4.15

Engage in a dialogue with MPD to potentially increase police presence focusing on


identified problem spots including parts of North Capitol Street, Hanover Place, the
Park at LeDroit and the Metropolitan Branch Trail.

Local ANCs, Civic


Associations, Business
Owners

MPD, DCOP

Short Term

N/A

MCE 4.16

Work with local arts organizations, artists, and residents to identify locations for and
install public art throughout Mid City East. Focus efforts on identified gateways,
nodes, and opportunity sites including North Capitol Street, connections to Metrorail
Stations, and underpasses, as well as other appropriate locations as determined by
the community.

DCCAH

DCOP, Local arts


organizations, civic
associations

Mid Term

Public-Private

MCE 4.17

Use public art as an opportunity in new development or redevelopment to celebrate


the identity and vibrancy of Mid City East neighborhoods and corridors.

DCCAH

DCOP, Local arts


organizations, civic
associations

Short to
Long Term

Public-Private

Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

DME, DMPED, DGS,


DCPS

DCOP

Long Term

Public-Private

Local Civic Association

DDOT

Mid Term

Public

Working with the Deputy Mayors Office of Education (DME) and the Department of
General Services (DGS), and once current uses are no longer needed in the existing
buildings, create a neighborhood-defining place for Eckington at the location of
the former Emery School buildings and site by creating a long-term future re-use and
redevelopment project. Considerations should include:
Extending Randolph Place NE and connect it to First Street NE, creating a
complete block.
MCE 4.18

Including neighborhood-scale retail, residential, a park/green space, public


spaces, and community amenities.
Including an architectural feature or neighborhood gateway sign to identify the
Eckington neighborhood.
Once the current function is no longer needed, adaptively reuse the old Emery
School building as part of the redevelopment.
Create physical connections to the Harry Thomas Recreation Center and to the
McKinley Tech campus.
Create a green connection to North Capitol Street along Lincoln Road.
Integrate LID and sustainable stormwater management.
Include public art within the redevelopment.

MCE 4.19

Work with the Truxton Circle community to find a way to celebrate the former Truxton
Circle at the intersection of Florida Avenue and North Capitol Street. Pursue the
possibility of salvaging, restoring, and incorporating the old Truxton Circle fountain as
part of a park or open space on land near the intersection.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Neighborhood Placemaking and Public Realm

117

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Parks, Green Space and Stormwater

118

Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 5.1

New York Avenue Playground - Consider adding entries to the playground at


appropriate points around the parks perimeter to encourage increased neighborhood
access and use. Identify opportunities for safe, multi-generational design and
programming including a tot lot on the site of the old library kiosk. Add shade trees
where possible.

DPR

DCOP

Mid Term

Public

MCE 5.2

Howard Playground - Consider adding entries at appropriate points around the


parks perimeter to encourage increased neighborhood access and use. Consider
repurposing the baseball field for use as a multi-purpose field, informal green space
or community garden plots. Identify opportunities for safe, multi-generational design
and programming.

DPR

DCOP

Mid Term

Public

MCE 5.3

Park at LeDroit - Improve the dog park at the Park at LeDroit. Add shade trees where
possible. Identify opportunities for safe, multi-generational design and programming.

DPR

DCOP

Mid Term

Public

MCE 5.4

Reservation 181 - Reservation 181 - The National Park Service (NPS)-owned triangular
park bounded by M Street, New York Avenue and First Street NW - Establish a local
Friends of... group that be responsible for making enhancements and maintaining
features that go beyond typical park maintenance. Improvements could include
incorporating green stormwater management techniques such as bioswales and rain
gardens.

Local ANCs and civic


associations

NPS

Short Term

N/A

MCE 5.5

Reservation 276-A - The NPS-owned triangular park bounded by Florida Avenue, First
and R Streets NW. Establish a local Friends of... group that would be responsible
for making enhancements and maintaining features that go beyond typical park
maintenance. Improvements could include creating an architectural gateway feature
identifying Bloomingdale from the south, removing thick bushes, and adding native
perennial plantings, lighting, and benches, and incorporating LID stormwater
management techniques.

Local ANCs and civic


associations

NPS

Short Term

N/A

MCE 5.6

Reservation 190 - The NPS-owned triangular park bounded by New Jersey Avenue,
4th and Franklin Streets NW. Establish a local Friends of... group that would be
responsible for making enhancements and maintaining features that go beyond
typical park maintenance. Improvements could include additional vegetation and
seating, and connection of the property to the north by closing Franklin Street.

Local ANCs and civic


associations

NPS

Short Term

N/A

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

MCE 5.7

Reservation 277 - The NPS-owned triangular park bounded by North Capitol Street
and Lincoln Road NE at Quincy Place NE - Establish a local Friends of... group that
would be responsible for making enhancements and maintaining features that go
beyond typical park maintenance. Improvements could include enhanced vegetation
and native plantings. Remove the low metal fence to discourage loitering, and
enlarge the sidewalk along North Capitol to improve walkability.

Local ANCs and civic


associations

NPS

Short Term

N/A

MCE 5.8

Cemetery Dog Walking - Engage in a dialogue with the owners of the cemeteries to
the north of Eckington about the potential to allow dog walking.

Local ANCs and civic


associations

DCOP

Short Term

N/A

MCE 5.9

P Street - Work with DDOT to extend the P Street Greenway through Mid City East.

DDOT

DCOP

Mid Term

Public

MCE 5.10

Community Academy PCS (CAPCS) - Create a new green space for community and
student use on part of the CAPCS parking lot with any future redevelopment of that
site. Explore the possibility of incorporating a community garden.

CAPCS

Long Term

Private

MCE 5.11

Florida Avenue Park - Redevelop this park with increased tree cover and vegetation
with any future long-term redevelopment of the Northwest Cooperative Homes.

Northwest
Cooperative Homes

Long Term

Private

MCE 5.12

Eckington Dog Park - Work with residents and landowners to identify an appropriate
location for and develop a dog park in Eckington.

DPR

DCOP, local ANCs


and civic associations

Mid Term

Public

MCE 5.13

Community Gardens - Incorporate community gardens where appropriate with new


parks and green spaces.

DPR

DCOP, local ANCs


and civic associations

Short to
Long Term

Private

MCE 5.14

Explore the opportunities for a Green Deck over North Capitol Street. Support a
community or privately led initiative to create a Green Deck over North Capitol Street
between T Street and Rhode Island Avenue. Include this in the streetscape study
described in MCE 4.1

Local ANCs and civic


associations

DCOP, DPR, DDOT,


DDOE

Long Term

Private

Item No.

Action

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Parks, Green Space and Stormwater

119

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN: Parks, Green Space and Stormwater


Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

DCOP, Local ANCs


and civic associations

DCPS, DME

Short Term

N/A

MCE 5.16

Work with DC Water on a strategy for educating residents about the upcoming DC
Clean Rivers Project initiatives in MCE that will be under construction, including the
Northeast Boundary Tunnel and First Street Tunnel.

DC Water

Local ANCs and civic


associations

Short Term

N/A

MCE 5.17

Ensure that new development supports sustainability and contributes to floodmitigation efforts.

DC Water

Short to
Long Term

Public

MCE 5.18

Prioritize implementation of Low Impact Development (LID) stormwater strategies in


Bloomingdale to address flooding concerns; DDOT to implement, DDOE to support.

MCE 5.19

Support opportunities to implement LID stormwater strategies throughout


Mid City East neighborhoods. Prioritize DDOTs Mid City East Livability Study
recommendations for LID measures including curb extentions/bioretention planters,
tree box bioretention planters, permeable paving, impervious surface removal, rain
gardens, and tree infill. See the Mid City East Livability Study for details.

Mid Term

Public

Item No.

MCE 5.15

Action
Working with the Deputy Mayors Office for Education (DME), create a coordinating
committee consisting of DPR, DGS, DCPS and school leaders to provide guidance
and develop policy that will inform the process regarding shared access to local
school facilities for public use and recreational activity.
Work with the coordinating committee to allow public access to Dunbar High
Schools new recreational and sports facilities for neighborhood residents during
designated days and times.
Work with the coordinating committee to allow public access to the McKinley
Tech facilities for neighborhood residents during designated days and times.

120

DDOT

DDOE

Item No.
MCE 6.1

Action
Develop creative ways to connect along and across North Capitol Street in order to
knit Mid City East neighborhoods together and improve connectivity for residents.

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

DDOT

Extend or reestablish the DC street grid with any future public or private development
or redevelopment including:
Quincy St. NW between First and 2nd Streets NE in the Bates/Truxton Circle and
Hanover area
MCE 6.2

Randolph Pl. NE between North Capitol Street and First St. NE in Eckington
L Street NW between North Capitol Street and First St. NW in the Sursum Corda
area

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

Short Term

Public

Property Owners

DDOT, DCOP

Short to
Long Term

Private

DCOP

DCPS

Mid Term

Public

Pierce Streets NW to First Place NW in the short term in the Sursum Corda area,
potentially continuing to North Capitol Street in the long-term future
MCE 6.3

Work with McKinley Tech to explore creating terracing stair connections to the
McKinley Tech campus from surrounding sidewalks at walled areas to improve
connectivity to and from the school for students and public.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN:Connectivity

121

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN:Connectivity
Item No.

Action

Lead Agencies/
Organizations

Supporting or
Partner Agencies/
Organizations

Time Frame

Funding
Needed

DCOP

DDOT

Mid Term

Public

DCPS

Local ANCs and Civic


Associations

Mid Term

Public

Support the recommendations of DDOTs Livability Study to implement modifications to


public streets and sidewalks to improve walkability, safety, and connectivity. These include:
New York Avenue/ North Capitol Street/N Street - street and sidewalk modifications and
improvements.

MCE 6.4

MCE 6.5

122

Florida/ North Capitol Street/ Q St./Lincoln Rd. - street and sidewalk modifications and
improvements.

Florida/New Jersey/Rhode Island/S Street/4th Street - street and sidewalk modifications


and improvements.

New Jersey Avenue between N Street NW and Florida Ave NW - street and sidewalk
modifications and improvements.

First Street NW Corridor - changes at unsignalized intersections including stop sign


control and traffic mini-circles.

Eckington Place NE Corridor - narrowing the roadway between Florida Avenue NE and
R Street NE

5th Street and Rhode Island Avenue - Installing crosswalks and curb ramps across Rhode
Island Avenue and median along the 5th Street NW alignment, and extending the
existing 5th Street bike lanes from Rhode Island Avenue to Florida Avenue.

See the Mid City East Livability Study for details.


Work with DDOT to improve wayfinding to the Metropolitan Branch Trail and add vegetation,
lighting, and public art to improve the trails aesthetics, enhance safety, and encourage
increased use.

Glossary:
ANCs
Advisory Neighborhood Committees
DCHPO
DC Historic Preservation Office
DCOP
DC Office of Planning
DC Water
DC Water and Sewer Authority
DCCAH
DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities
DCRA
Department of Consumer and Regulatory
Affairs
DDOE
District Department of the Environment
DDOT
District Department of Transportation
DGS
Department of General Services
DME
Deputy Mayor for Education
DMPED
Deputy Mayor for Planning and
Economic Development
DPR
Department of Parks and Recreation
DPW
Department of Public Works
DSLBD
Department of Small and

Local Business Development
HPRB
Historic Preservation Review Board
LID
Low Impact Development
MBT
Metropolitan Bike Trail
MCE
Mid City East
MPD
Metropolitan Police Department
NCMS
North Capitol Main Street Organization
NPS
National Park Service
PDR
Production, Distribution, and Repair
PUD
Planned Unit Development
UFA
Urban Forestry Administration
WDCEP
Washington DC Economic Partnership

Mid City East Small Area Plan Implementation Plan

Time Frame:
Short-term (1-2 years)
Mid-Term (2-5 years)
Long-term (5-10 years)

Caption

123

8: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
District of Columbia
Vincent C. Gray, Mayor

DC Office of Planning

Ellen McCarthy, Acting Director


Harriet Tregoning, Former Director

Sam Zimbabwe, Associate Director


Colleen Hawkinson, Manager, Strategic Planning
Gabriela Vega, Project Manager
Karina Ricks, Nelson Nygaard Associates

Wanda Sherrod, Bloomingdale Civic Association


Kim Mosley, Eckington Civic Association
Rashidi Christian, Edgewood Civic Association
Eric Fidler, LeDroit Park Civic Association
Phyllis Klein, Fab Lab DC
Maybelle Bennett, Howard University
Community Association
Stephanie Slewka, Common Good City Farm

DC Office of Planning Team

Mid City East Advisory Committee

Lonnie Duren, Sursum Corda Co-op

Tracy Gabriel, Associate Director,


Neighborhood Planning

Commissioner Gail Anderson-Holness, ANC 1B11

LaQuasha Mosely, Kelly Miller Residents Council

Rosalynn Hughey, Deputy Director

Commissioner Tony Norman, ANC 1B Chair

Chelsea Liedstrand, Project Manager

Commissioner Marc Morgan, ANC 1B01,


LeDroit Park Civic Association

Joyce Tsepas, Former Project Manager

Commissioner, ANC 5E03

Deborah Crain-Kemp, Ward 5 Planner

Commissioner Sylvia Pinkney, ANC 5E04

Kim Williams, DC Historic Preservation Office

Commissioner Joyce Robinson-Paul, ANC 5E05

Joel Lawson, Associate Director,


Development Review

Commissioner Teri Quinn, ANC 5E06

Rishawna Gould, Visual Information Specialist

Commissioner Mark Mueller, ANC 5E08

Steve Calcott, Deputy Preservation Officer


Laine Cidlowski, Urban Sustainability Planner
Josh Ghaffari, Community/Facilities Planner
Stephen Gyor, Development Review Specialist
Sakina Khan, Senior Economic Planner
David Maloney, State Historic Preservation Officer
Chris Shaheen, Public Space Program Manger
Kim Williams, Architectural Historian

124

DDOT Livability Study Team

Sylvia Matthews, Hanover Civic Association

Commissioner Wanda Foster, ANC 5E07


Commissioner Dianne Barnes, ANC 5E09,
ANC 5E Chair
Commissioner Kevin Chapple, ANC 6E02
Commissioner Rachelle Nigro, ANC 6E04,
ANC 6E Chair
Commissioner Alvin Judd, ANC 6E06
Commissioner Alfreda Judd, ANC 6E07
Bradley Thomas, North Capitol Main Streets
Geovani Bonilla, Bates Area Civic Association

Christine Leake, Northwest Cooperative


Sharon Jones, LeDroit at Kelly Miller
Residents Council
Galin Brooks, NoMa BID
Council Member Jim Graham, Ward 1
Council Member Kenyan McDuffie, Ward 5
Council Member Tommy Wells, Ward 6

Smith Group
Merrill St. Leger

HR & A Advisors

Commercial Revitalization and Redevelopment


Rob Wolcheski

Storytelling
Bryan Hughes

Market Analysis
Jon Stover

EHT Traceries

Historic Resources
Laura Hughes
Latishia Allen

AmericaSpeaks

Online Community Engagement


Kim Sescoe
Elana Goldstein
Chris Berendes
Steve Brigham

Catholic University

Mid City East Small Area Plan Acknowledgements

Green Door Advisors

Instructor:
Miriam Gusevich

Students:
John Abowd, M. Arch II/MCRP
Filipe Da Silva Pereiera, M. Arch II/MCRP
Anthony DiManno, M. Arch III/MCRP
Matthew Hosko, M. Arch III/MCRP
Anjelica Lewis, MCRP
Adanze Okoroha, MCRP
Emily Pierson, M. Arch II/MCRP
Alexandra Sacci, M. Arch III/MCRP
Nina Sakic, M. Arch II/MCRP
Benjamin Sullivan, MCRP

Howard University
Project North Deck Team
Anthony Bright
Tolu Rufai
Marcell Snodgrass
Joseph-Constantine Stewart

Caption

125

SUSTAINABLE DC
Tie-ins to specific Sustainable DC Plan elements
are found after each of the the recommendations
in Chapter 2, and are indicated with an asterisk
(e.g., *HW1.1).
JE1.1 - Complete a review of regulatory reform
options to make it easier to do business in the
District.
HW1.1 - Expand public park access and
programming to promote healthy lifestyles
through physical exercise.
BE1.1 - Increase affordable housing in the
District.
BE2.1 - Ease permitting requirements for
temporary arts, community, and business uses.
BE 2.2 - Create a government-backed revolving
loan fund to support new businesses with
a priority for those developed by District
residents.
BE2.3 - Convert five vacant buildings into
permanent cultural or business incubation
centers.

FD1.2 - Streamline the process to find and use


land for community agriculture projects.
FD1.3 - Install educational gardens at 50% of
DC Public Schools.
FD1.4 - Develop orchards or other foodproducing landscaping on 5 acres of DCs
public spaces.

TR2.1 - Develop a citywide, 100 mile bicycle


lane network.
TR2.2 - Expand the Capital Bikeshare program by
200 stations.
WS1.5 - Implement Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES)
guidelines for park maintenance.
WS2.3 - Require the use of recycled and salvaged
building materials.

FD2.1 - Expand the DC Healthy Corner Store


initiative.

WT2.1 - Install 2 million new square feet of green


roofs.

FD2.2 - Introduce fresh food circulators and


mobile vendors in neighborhoods with poor
access to fresh foods.

WT2.2 - Increase the use of green infrastructure along


public rights of way.

FD2.3 - Expand the Produce Plus program to


farmers markets and corner stores citywide.
NA2.1 - Plant 8,600 new trees citywide per
year until 2032.
NA2.2 - Replace 75% of public lighting with
fixtures that reduce light pollution.
NA2.4 - Require trees and green space on all
new development sites.

BE2.5 - Locate new affordable housing in


walkable neighborhoods.

NA2.5 - Stipulate use of native plant varieties


for District government plantings and
landscaping.

BE3.1 - Rehabilitate all public housing to be


green, healthy, and capable of meeting net-zero
energy standards.

NA3.3 - Renovate and improve all District


playgrounds.

EN1.3 - Replace all street and public lighting

126

with high-efficiency fixtures.

NA3.5 - Create small parks and green spaces in


areas with inadequate open space.

WT2.4 - Build 25 miles of green alleys.

NORTH CAPITOL STREET: A SYMBOLIC LANDSCAPE


North Capitol Street is one of the primary
corridors in Pierre LEnfant 1791 Plan of the city of
Washington D.C. Looking south on North Capitol,
there is a vantage point of the United States
Capitol Building which perfectly shows the power
of the city. This promenade to the Capitol building,
which is a recognizable cultural icon illustrates how
the city has developed through out the centuries.

Washington D.C. plans have tempered the walkway,


making it a primary vehicular corridor. North Capitol
Street corridor serves as a connector to some of the
citys major landmarks, such as McMillan Reservoir,
Prospect Hill Cemetery, President Lincolns Cottage,
and Armed Force Retirement Home; however, the
corridor is far from grand and green as intended in
the 1791 plan.
With approximately 130,000 trips daily, the North
Capitol Street corridor is a major transportation
route for the District of Columbia, as it serves as a
connector to Interstate 395 for much of the northern
section of the city. The street additionally occupies
several uses such as commercial traffic, local traffic,
public transportation, pedestrian traffic, emergency
vehicles, and parking.

Originally planned to serve as one of the major


gateways leading to the capitol grounds, LEnfant
specified that the major corridors were to be wide,
grand, lined with trees; they would be situated in a
manner that they connect ideal topographical sites
throughout the city, and become a place where
important structures, monuments and fountains
were to be erected. While LEnfants plans where
progressive and transformative, current

The office has also created and published strict


streetscape standards designed to increase quality,
while retaining the character of Washingtons wellestablished communities.
This represents a critical step in the redevelopment
of North Capitol Street especially as local residents
become more cognizant of sustainable and
community-oriented design. As an area with such a
vast amount of improvement potential, the North
Capitol Street and its immediate area can serve as
the new standard for many currently underutilized
public areas of the city. As such, the US Capitol is
in a position to showcase the full effectiveness of
quality urban planning and design.

Mid City East Small Area Plan Acknowledgements

CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY

In recent years, the District Office of Planning has


taken on major efforts to increase the quality of
the citys streetscapes, citing two main drivers
critical to their success: the physical elements of the
streetscape and the types of activities taking place
within the public space.

127

THE NEW NORTH CAPITOL PROJECT


The current major intersections at Rhode Asland, Florida, and New York Aves are the primary
choke points of traffic. By simplifying these traffic patterns through fewer traffic lanes and the
use of right angles, traffic flow will improve.
RHODE ISLAND AVE.

RESIDENTIAL CORE

The northern section of North Capitol,


is primary residential and neighborhood
focused. Adding open and green space
will further enhance a sense of community
in the area.

TRUXTON CIRCLE

RHODE ISLAND AVE.

TRANSITION SPACE
This historic spot, the namesake of the
neighborhood, indicates the transition
from residential to commercial space. By
reintroducing the circle to the traffic
pattern, this place will have more
significance and intent.
TRUXTON CIRCLE

NEW YORK AVE.

COMMERCIAL CORE

From New York Ave to the Capitol


building is a commercial zone. Enhancing
the sidewalks will allow for more pedestrian
activity and economic development to
occur on this historical street.

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NEW YORK AVE.

PROPOSED PLAN - NORTH CAPITOLat RHODE ISLAND

PROPOSED PLAN - TRUXTON CIRCLE

PROPOSED PLAN - NORTH CAPITOL at NEW YORK AVENUE

Mid City
Mid
East
City
Small
EastArea
Small
Plan
AreaPlan
Acknowledgements
Student Work

CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING

129

STUDENT WORK
Illis Design Group, a group of Howard University
architecture students, engaged with the Mid City
East planning team at different points in the design
process. Of particular interest to the students was
the idea of bridging across North Capitol Street
to connect the Bloomingdale and Eckington
neighborhoods. They worked together over a
number of weeks to develop their concepts. They
met with the planning team and presented their
work, received critique and feedback, and went
on to refine and complete their concept. They
presented their work alongside the work of the
planning team at the final public meeting of the
project on September 26, 2013.

PROJECT: NORTH DECK

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

SITE PLAN

SOUTH SECTION

NORTH SECTION

WEST SECTION

130
130

Illis Design Group

Fig. 6.5 - Project: North Deck drawings prepared by Illis Design Group

DNA STRAND UNRAVELS ABOUT ENDS


EMPHASIZING ITS DOUBLE HELIX PATTERN

DOUBLE HELIX STRANDS SPLIT ABOUT


THEIR SHARED LONGITUDINAL AXIS

THREE DIMENSIONAL PLAY OF THE FREQUENCY


PUSHED AND PULLED TO CREATE SELF SUSTAINING
MOUNDS

The use of sustainable strategies to


reduce the environmental impact.

Activities within the deck power


sustainable systems throughout
the deck.

Bio-swales utilize vegetation along


walkways and the perimeter of
Vegetated spaces

Native plant growth, based on


existing DC temperature and
drought tolerance

THE RESULTING SIN COS WAVES ARE


THEREAFTER INVERTED

THROUGH COMPRESSION/TENSION
A VOCAL FREQUENCY IS ARRIVED

DIFFERENT EXPERIENCES CREATED BY


THE FLEXIBLE MOVEMENT
Subsurface Rainwater Collection
Permeable Hardscape

Rain Gardens are implemented into


the deck in order to capture, filter
and distribute excess water into its
retention system

GENERATION OF ENERGY THROUGH THE JUMPING MOTION ACTIVATED BY PISTONS UNDER THE RUBBER TOPOGRAPHY FOR KIDS IN TURN PUMPING
WATER COLLECTED ON THE SITE AND STORED IN THE MOUNDS.

Project: North Deck drawings prepared by Illis Design Group

PROJECT CONCEPT STATEMENT


BY ILLIS DESIGN GROUP:
The voice of a community is its most valuable
and powerful asset. It inspires a sense of pride,
purpose and identity within a group of people. The
neighborhoods that surround the North Capitol
corridor have become the grounds for a rapidly
changing environment. This area currently serves
heavy traffic flow, a promising commercial and
retail district, but more importantly its surrounding
community.
By proposing a dynamic and lively place, the
North Capitol Deck will embody this new found
voice. The Deck allows the corridor to become a
vibrant datum that fulfills the needs of its residents
and enriches the culture of the area. The abstraction
of this literal voice will not only represent and
reflect character of the area, but also creates a
sophisticated and yet simplistic visual interaction
throughout the site.

Illis Design Group

Mid City
Mid East
City Small
East Small
Area Area
Plan Plan
Acknowledgements
Student Work

SUSTAINABILITY IDEAS

TRANSFORMATION DIAGRAMS

131