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ASTHMA & ALLERGIES


asthmaandallergies.ca
YOUR GUIDE TO LIVING
LIFE WITHOUT LIMITS
Race car star Alex Tagliani empowers Canadians
to efectively manage their life-threatening allergies.
Kathy Smart
Advice for leading
a fun and healthy
gluten-free lifestyle
Featuring
EDUCATING CHILDREN
Key steps for
classroom safety
IS ASTHMA PREVENTABLE?
A landmark study that
may lead to its cause
FOOD ALLERGIES
Education, awareness, and
effective management P
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A SPONSORED FEATURE BY MEDIAPLANET
2 ASTHMAANDALLERGIES.CA
CHALLENGES
Asthma and allergies: There is hope
A
llergic conditions
range from mild
hay fever to life-
threatening an-
aphylaxis, and
asthma is one of
the most frequent causes of hos-
pitalization in children. A diagno-
sis of allergy, asthma, or anaphyl-
axis can be a life-altering event for
individuals and their families, and
the costs associated with medical
care and absences from work and
school make this a signicant pub-
lic health issue.
A positive outlook is key to
overcoming obstacles
It is not uncommon for people with
allergies and asthma to feel isolated
and anxious. Sometimes there is a
sense that others do not understand
the gravity of their condition. It can
also be dif cult for parents to trust
that a child with allergies or asth-
ma will be safe and act responsibly.
Those afected may also worry about
the potential for a severe asthma
attack or allergic reaction, though
even mild cases can disrupt lifestyle
if not well-managed.In all cases,the
importance of a positive outlook
cannot be understated; this is espe-
cially true when dealing with chil-
dren,who are quick to adopt a nerv-
ous parents attitude.
While allergies and asthma can-
not be cured, they can be efective-
ly managed with proper education,
preventive measures, and profes-
sional care.
Here are three steps for
reducing risks associated
with these conditions:
Step 1 Increase awareness
Awareness starts with an accurate
medical assessment, preferably by
an allergist. This allows patients
and their families to know exact-
ly what prompts the reaction and
to inform friends, teachers, and
co-workers about the condition;
having a letter from the physician
on hand is helpful in this regard.
While the patient and family may
need some time to gain a thorough
understanding of the implications
of the diagnosis,it is vital to ensure
that allergic or asthmatic children
comprehend their condition well
enough to be able to take respon-
sibility for their own safety as soon
as possible.
Step 2 Avoid and prevent
exposure to allergens
Avoidance involves preventing
exposure to allergens. If the aller-
gen is a food, adopting new eating
habits and learning to read food
labels carefully can present an in-
itial challenge. If there is an al-
lergy to airborne substances, ex-
posure can be minimized by tak-
ing simple steps, like shutting
windows on windy days. Avoid-
ance may also involve taking pre-
ventative medications before the
allergy season begins, which can
make symptoms easier to control,
and possibly prevent them.
Step 3 Take action
Action involves being prepared and
knowing how to respond to worsening
symptoms or an emergency.It is cru-
cial for patients with severe allergies
and asthma to carry both preventa-
tive and emergency medications,and
that they be accessible at all times.It is
best to develop an emergency action
plan with a physician,and to share it
with others; in particular, parents of
children with life-threatening aller-
gies should meet with the school be-
fore the year begins to establish a plan
of action. Special attention may be
needed when the usual routine is al-
tered,such as camp,vacations,start or
change of school or job,and parties.
Education and preparation
are key for long-term safety
The outlook for allergy and asthma
patients is positive. Awareness cam-
paigns and informational websites
have vastly improved the publics
understanding of these conditions.
Medical research and pharmaceut-
ical developments in recent years
give hope for more treatment op-
tions.Though there is no such thing
as a 100 percent risk-free lifestyle for
people with asthma and allergies,
most patients who seek appropriate
medical care are able to enjoy a nor-
mal and productive life,with rare ab-
sences from school or work. The key
is to manage risks and the associat-
ed anxiety by staying educated, in-
forming others,and being prepared.
Mediaplanets business is to create new
customers for our advertisers by providing
readers with high-quality editorial content
that motivates them to act.
MARY L. ALLEN
ALLERGY / ASTHMA
INFORMATION ASSOCIATION
It is not
uncommon for
people with
allergies and
asthma to
feel isolated
and anxious.
Sometimes there
is a sense that
others do not
understand the
gravity of their
condition.
You need to
organize... and
make sure that
everyone that
comes into contact
with your child
realizes they have a
food allergy and the
severity of it.
BREATHE BETTER, LIVE WELL
Education and preparation allow
you to manage your allergic
conditions and live life to the fullest.
PHOTO: THINKSTOCK.COM
MARY L. ALLEN
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Allergies and asthma are a growing public health issue. Every year in Canada,
there are 146,000 emergency room visits due to asthma attacks,
and one in 13 Canadians sufers from a signicant food allergy.
ASTHMA AND ALLERGIES
FIRST EDITION, JUNE 2014
Publisher: Nerissa Bradley
Business Developer: Brandon Cleary
Managing Director: Joshua Nagel
Production Manager: Laura Shaw
Lead Designer: Matthew Senra
Designer: Scott Dixon
Contributors: Mary L. Allen, , D.F.
McCourt, Ishani Nath, Beatrice Povolo
Send all inquiries to
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Distributed within:
The Toronto Star, June 2014
This section was created by Mediaplanet
and did not involve the Toronto Star or its
Editorial Departments.
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respective owners
Ming Tsai :
fired up about
food allergies
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THE CANADIAN ASTHMA EPIDEMIC
We are in the midst of an
asthma epidemic. Roughly 20
percent of Canadian children
and 10 percent of adults
suffer from asthma more
than triple the rate seen just
50 years ago. And no one
knows exactly what causes it.
Understanding the origins of asth-
ma and allergies is the major focus of
the CHILD (Canadian Healthy Infant
Longitudinal Development) Study,
launched in 2008 as a collaboration
between the Canadian Institutes of
Health Research and the AllerGen
NCE research network.
A look at the CHILD Study
With more than 3,000 families par-
ticipating,this is the largest hands-on
birth cohort study to have ever been
conducted in Canada. CHILD looks at
how the environment that a child is
exposed to during pregnancy and in
the rst few years of life can interact
with genetics to cause allergies,asth-
ma and other chronic diseases.
We recruited mothers during
their pregnancies and have followed
these families after birth into their
home environments, and through
childhood to age ve years, says
CHILD Study Director and McMaster
University professor Malcolm Sears.
Theres reason to hope that asth-
ma may be preventable. If you
look at identical twins, says Study
Co-Director Padmaja Subbarao, a
respirologist at Sick Kids Hospital,
sometimes only one twin in a twin
set will develop asthma, suggesting
that environmental factors may in-
uence the genetics.
Minimizing risks
One of the studys main discoveries
thus far casts new light on an old
theory known as the hygiene hy-
pothesis, which suggests that an ex-
cessively clean and sterile environ-
ment may increase the risk of kids
allergies and asthma.If true,it would
help explain why these diseases are
more prevalent in developed coun-
tries than in the developing world.
Encouragingly, this means that
parents might have the power to
help guard their kids against asth-
ma and allergies through simple
changes, like increasing outdoor
play. CHILD researchers hope that
their results might inuence pub-
lic policy and even urban planning,
helping to build cities that naturally
keep us healthier.
Of course, there is more work to
do, and that work requires ongoing
funding.If the CHILD Study is able to
follow their cohort into adulthood,
they expect further breakthroughs
not only in regards to asthma and al-
lergies,but also other chronic condi-
tions such as type 2 diabetes, obes-
ity, and mental illness. Were still
in the early days of a very signicant
study, Dr. Sears says with convic-
tion and optimism.
D.F. MCCOURT
editorial@mediaplanet.com
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From home to school to
restaurants, allergic in-
dividuals, and those who
care for them, must be
vigilant when managing
their allergies. However,
with some planning and
preparedness, allergic in-
dividuals can stay safe
while enjoying the same
experiences as others.
Although the primary responsibil-
ity for managing allergies lies with
the individual at risk (and their
parents), the support and under-
standing of others plays a key role
in helping keep them safe. This is
especially true when trying to se-
lect safe, nutritious food options
for children with food allergies.
Here are some helpful tips for
parents, teachers, daycare staf
and others in the community to
help allergic children stay safe.
Importance of reading
food labels
Read the full ingredient list and
label on all food and beverage
products for potential allergens.
Read the label three times:
1) Before buying the product
2) Before putting it away
3) Before serving to an allergic
individual
Avoid products that have
precautionary warnings for
your specic allergens (e.g.May
contain egg).
Dont rely on allergen free claims
or symbols (e.g.Peanut-Free)
always read the ingredient list and
any precautionary statements on
the packaging.
Do not purchase products that
are not labelled or do not have an
ingredient list.
Avoid products from bulk
bins due to the higher risk of
potential cross-contamination.
If in doubt or you have a
question about a product,contact
the manufacturer directly to
ask for more information about
the ingredients or potential for
cross-contamination.
By following these simple
steps, you can rest assured and
maintain peace of mind that your
children are not only eating well
but also eating safely.
BEATRICE POVOLO,
ANAPHYLAXIS CANADA
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Viable nutritious options
for children
DONT MISS
Canadian race car star Alex
Tagliani lives with food al-
lergies every day and they
never hold him back. Media-
planet got up close and per-
sonal with him to see how he
manages his allergies and
helps to raise awareness.
Mediaplanet As part of your
Summer of TAG program,
youre touring Canadian cit-
ies to speak to children about
anaphylaxis management
what inspired you to get in-
volved with this initiative?
Alex Tagliani I have a personal story
to tell people that will help increase
the awareness of food allergies, so I
wanted to get involved with Anaphyl-
axis Canada,and EpiPen,and with the
Summer of TAG program to help reach
out to children and teens.When I talk
to kids,I actually learn a lot from them
on how they manage their allergies
and what their challenges are.If I can
share my experience and help them
feel more comfortable about their al-
lergies, then I can make a diference.
Through the Summer of TAG initiative,
kids can help raise awareness of food al-
lergies as well as take part in my hel-
met and race car design contests in
their own community.
MP What was it like growing
up with your food allergies?
AT Ive had food allergies to peanuts
and tree nuts since I was very young.
Growing up with these allergies was
a challenge for me because there
wasnt a lot of awareness and it was
hard for people to understand the
seriousness of this issue. I had to be
very independent from a young age
and make sure I knew how to avoid
nuts and peanuts at all times.
MP What was your experi-
ence of having allergies
when you were in school?
How did your peers react?
AT When I was in school, and espe-
cially when I was living away from
home in boarding school, there
wasnt the awareness about food al-
lergies that there is today. I was the
only one at my high school with food
allergies,so I had to make sure I was
very careful with everything I ate.
My friends were supportive and I
didnt let my allergies stop me from
participating in school activities. I
found that I just had to be more care-
ful than the other kids.
MP Today, many people with
allergies self-diagnose in-
stead of getting tested. Why
do you think its important
that people get tested?
AT I think its important to have
the proper allergy tests done by an
allergist to make sure you have an
accurate diagnosis. Trying to self-
diagnose can be dangerous and I
wouldnt recommend it. Its not
worth risking your health and safety.
MP As a world-class ath-
lete training and travelling,
what do you do to manage
your health when youre on
the go? What advice do you
have for Canadians to do
the same?
AT When it comes to my allergies, I
need to be very cautious when I travel
especially outside of North Amer-
ica.Not all countries understand food
allergies or have the same food label-
ling practices.I always bring my own
food when I travel,and of course,my
EpiPens. When dining out, I always
talk to the restaurant manager or
chef directly about my allergies be-
fore I order to ensure there is a safe
meal option for me.
MP What tips do you have for
parents in managing their
childs allergies?
AT Teach your kids from a young age
how to manage their allergies and let
them know that even though they
have to be more careful compared to
other kids,they can still do anything
in life including driving a race car!
MP Whats next for you in
your career?
AT That I cant say for sure. Im not
done racing yet,so Ill see where the
next few years take me. Im enjoy-
ing what Im doing and the path that
Im on. I will stay in racing and con-
tinue to raise awareness of allergies
long beyond that.
ALEX TAGLIANI: ON THE FAST TRACK
TO RAISING ALLERGY AWARENESS
ISHANI NATH
editorial@mediaplanet.com
T
hey say it takes a vil-
lage to raise a child. Ac-
cording to health ex-
perts, when it comes to
keeping children safe in
school,the same logic applies.
The wellbeing of our students
within the school system is a
shared responsibility, says Chris
Markham, the CEO of the Ontario
Physical and Health Education
Association.
This team-based approach is par-
ticularly important for children who
sufer from asthma or severe aller-
gies which, if not managed prop-
erly,can be fatal.
Both chronic conditions are
prevalent among young Canadians.
According to Anaphylaxis Canada,
approximately 300,000 Canadian
children have identied food aller-
gies. Asthma which can be con-
nected to allergies or an independ-
ent condition afects an estimated
8.5 percent of Canadians over the age
of 12 and is a major cause of hospital-
ization in children.
Setting the standard
Sabrina Shannon was an ordinary
Ontario teenager until the day she
went to school and did not return
home. The 13-year-old sufered a
fatal allergic reaction to dairy after
eating french fries served from the
same tongs used for poutine.
In response to this tragedy, a bill
was drafted to help ensure the safe-
ty of students with severe allergies.
Sabrinas Law the rst legislation
of its kind in the world requires all
publicly-funded schools in Ontario to
have an anaphylaxis action plan.
The law was put into force in 2006
and mandates that schools create
specic action plans for students
with severe allergies. This involves
providing regular training to staf
about spotting signs and symp-
toms, instruction on treating reac-
tions, and developing strategies to
help minimize the exposure of al-
lergens at schools.
Sabrinas Law provides schools
with the key safety measures they
need to consider when developing
their anaphylaxis policies to help
protect students at-risk, explains
Anaphylaxis Canada representative
Beatrice Povolo.
Povolo describes Sabrinas Law as
the leading North American stan-
dard and adds that since the legis-
lation was enacted, other provinces
have created similar guidelines and
no child has sufered from a fatal al-
lergic reaction at a publicly funded
school in Ontario.
Helping students breathe
easy at school
When it comes to children with
asthma,there is still work to be done
to ensure that students can breathe
easily while at school.
Within school boards across the
province, theres inconsistent ap-
plication of processes to ensure that
students with asthma have easy
access to their medication, says
Opheas Markham.
A new bill, currently under con-
sideration, hopes to change that.
Ryans Law is inspired by Ryan
Gibbons who died of an asthma at-
tack in 2012 while his inhaler was
in the schools of ce. He was 12. If
passed, the bill would put in place
health and education strategies, in-
cluding allowing Ontario students
with asthma to carry their medica-
tion with them.
This law would help prioritize the
management of asthma in schools,
says Ontario Lung Association rep-
resentative Chris Haromy, adding
that like Sabrinas Law,it would help
standardize the approach to child
safety.
In addition to making medicine
readily available to children with asth-
ma,Haromy says creating an asthma
friendly setting requires everyone to
be on the same page in terms of pre-
vention,detection and treatment.
The management of asthma isnt
just at home and it isnt just at school.
Its in every location, says Haromy,
And it involves everybody.
The ABCs of asthma and allergies in schools
editorial@mediaplanet.com
EMPOWERING CHILDREN
Alex educates Canadian kids on
staying safe and on what to
do in the event of a reaction.
PHOTO: ALAN C LEE
I NSI GHT
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Ming Tsai, TV host of Simply
Ming, and owner of the
Blue Ginger restaurant
in Wellesley, MA, is also
a passionate food allergy
advocate. Tsai shares his best
practices for allergy-friendly
dining, and tips for parents
raising kids with allergies.
Mediaplanet Where does your
commitment to food allergies
advocacy and awareness
come from?
Ming Tsai Sixteen years ago I
opened up my restaurant Blue Gin-
ger and that was before we had chil-
dren. I believed and still believe
that every restaurant should be able
to safely serve food to anyone that
comes into it.Fast forward two years
and my rst son, Daniel, was born.
The very unfunny joke from upstairs
was that he was born with food aller-
gies to soy,wheat,peanuts,tree nuts,
dairy,eggs,and shellsh.
So, that furthered my commit-
ment to food allergies because of one
event we experienced when he was
three trying to go to a restaurant.We
explained his allergies and said we
just wanted sliced turkey on lettuce,
and the manager basically said hed
rather not serve us.That of course in-
furiated me and furthered my con-
viction to get other restaurants as
safe as we are at Blue Ginger.
MP As a parent, what was it
like for you raising your son
with food allergies?
MT We as parents were as dili-
gent as every other parent in this
world; we just had to take extra
precautions. Granted, I realize Im
a chef so its a little easier for me
considering I have two restau-
rants. But absolutely for my wife,
the mom, there was nothing more
anxiety filled than having a child
with food allergies because every
possible birthday party, or the
school itself, are all places where
youre not with your kid. You do
need to organize and get your
ducks in order to make sure, abso-
lutely, that everyone that comes
into contact with your child real-
izes they have a food allergy and
the severity of it.
MP What is one of the
most important things
parents can do to keep
their children safe?
MT I would say the most import-
ant is that once your child is at
least two or three, they need to
realize they have allergies. At age
three, David knew his seven aller-
gies and he could say it. So before
hed eat anything hed say, I have
allergies, whats in there? and
that is much more important than
even two parents being all over it
because the two parents are not al-
ways going to be there.
MP What are some of your
favourite substitutions?
MT A lot of Asian products, brown
rice, and fried rice. Its important to
not portray the food allergy not like
you cant eat that but rather that you
can eat this. You can still make de-
licious food. You can absolutely get
around it, you just have to nd the
products that dont have the allergies
in them that your kid has and perfect
how to use those products.
MP What tips do you have for
parents?
MT A great tip of course is that you
put the bracelet on right? Kids at a
young age will ask whats this for?
And you say this explains your food
allergies this you must show to
every parent before you eat any-
thing. So here, if you cant remem-
ber your seven allergies because
youre three, you have to remember
you have the bracelet so if you point
that out parents say oh! Everyone
knows what a MedicAlert bracelet
looks like and that takes notice.
MP What recommendations
do you have for children to
have as normal of a lifestyle
as possible?
MT I think to make your home
completely safe and sterile is then
bad training for the kid with the al-
lergies.When they go out to the real
world and over to a friends house,
theyre not going to be in a ster-
ile environment like their home. I
think that disparity is too extreme.
I think more importantly, back to
my rst point, is that you need to
train your child,saying you have to
ask, and you have to read labels
etc. because that is so key. Again,
you can blame a restaurant or your
friend all day long for your kid get-
ting sick but its the kids respon-
sibility to make sure people know
whats going on. Its important
to train them and have them say
dad, whats in this? at home so
that they repeat that action when
theyre not at home.
According to Statistics
Canada, 8.5 percent of
Canadians over 12 years
of age have been
diagnosed with asthma
and asthma affects 13
percent of children.
Every year, asthma kills
approximately 500 adults
and 20 children in Canada,
and accounts for 146,000
emergency room visits.
Food and drug allergies are among
the most severe and a growing pub-
lic health concern afecting approxi-
mately 2.5 million Canadians, based
on self-reporting.
Separate or together, asthma and
allergies can be quite severe,which
is why being prepared in case of an
emergency is so crucial.
Kyle Dine, Canadian childrens
songwriter and food allergies advo-
cate and educator, knows rst-hand
what its like to grow up with food al-
lergies and ensure his own safety.
A staple that communicates
when you cant
Kyle Dine, a musician and allergy
educator who performs at school
assemblies across North America
about food allergies, knows
this rst-hand. Kyle has worn a
MedicAlert ID bracelet since his
youth for his asthma and allergies
to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, seafood,
mustard and penicillin.
When I was younger it helped
me communicate my complicated
list of allergies to grown-ups, he
explains.Whether it was a bracelet
or dog tag necklace, it was a staple
on me at school and any situation
involving new people.
Today,Kyle continues to wear his
insurance for other but equally im-
portant reasons.
Safeguarding against risks
Now that Im an allergic adult,
Im quite capable of letting people
know about my food restrictions,
yet I still wear my MedicAlert every
day. I experienced a life-threatening
reaction a few years ago where
my symptoms made it extremely
dif cult to breathe, let alone speak.
Luckily I was with my family,but I am
quite aware that this situation could
arise in the future in the company of
those who are not as aware.
For me, I not only wear my
MedicAlert to help communicate for
me in an emergency, but to serve as
a tool to spread awareness to others,
and to remind myself to stay vigilant
and condent while managing a
life-threatening condition.
MING TSAI: FIRED UP
ABOUT FOOD ALLERGIES
THE INSURANCE YOU WEAR WHEN SEVERE
ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA TAKE YOUR BREATH AWAY
editorial@mediaplanet.com
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Kyle Dine, Canadian childrens
songwriter and food allergies
advocate and educator, knows
first-hand what its like to grow up
with food allergies and ensure his
own safety.
COMMITTED TO SAFETY AND QUALITY SERVICE
Ming is motivated to serve delicious, allergy-free dishes so that every
patron is served safely.
PHOTO: ANTHONY TIEULI
...there was nothing
more anxiety lled
than having a child
with food allergies
because every
possible birthday
party, or the school
itself, are all places
where youre not with
your kid.
1 in 2 Canadians know someone
with a serious food allergy

About 300,000 Canadian children
under 18 years have food allergies
AND
I NSI GHT
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6 ASTHMAANDALLERGIES.CA
In Canada, one in three people
have allergic rhinitis (more com-
monly referred to as hay fever),
one in 10 have asthma, and one
in 12 have anaphylaxis to a food.
The prevalence of all these allergic
conditions has grown over the last
several years for a number of rea-
sons, but control of allergic rhinitis
and asthma is still elusive.
Here are three ways on how to cope
this allergy season:
1. Pay close attention to your indoor
environment and air quality
Control starts with avoiding allergens. Its
best started with paying attention to the bed-
room, since this is where you spend at least
eight hours of the day.Keeping the windows
closed at home or ltering incoming air may
help. Keeping car windows closed during
your allergy season is also important.
2. For optimal symptom relief,
choose the right treatment
Most patients with hay fever do not main-
tain good control during their worst sea-
son.When even a moderate degree of nasal
congestion is present, intranasal steroids
are the rst line of therapy. They are best
started prior to your allergy season and
continued throughout the season.Nonsed-
ating antihistamines are useful when
symptoms arent controlled or minimal.
Antileukotrienes may be added if symp-
toms are still not controlled. Sterile saline
washes may also be benecial.
3. Ask your allergist about new ad-
vancements and treatment options
Immunotherapy can be tried when conserv-
ative measures fail, and there are now sub-
lingual tablets for grass and ragweed pol-
len allergic individuals.These can be taken
at home after the rst tablet is taken in the
doctors of ce. Most Canadians are vitamin
D decient.Low levels have been associated
with increased allergy problems and a lack
of response to therapy.
In summary,more studies need to be done
to determine the rise in allergy conditions,
but until then, its important to keep your
symptoms controlled.
K
athy Smart is a registered chef, hol-
istic nutritionist, founder of Live
the Smart Way, best-selling author,
and North Americas gluten-free expert. If
theres one thing people with celiac disease
and gluten sensitivity can learn from Kathy,
its that having these conditions has never
felt so empowering.
Mediaplanet When did you discover
you had celiac disease?
Kathy Smart Ive been a celiac since I was
12 years old and Im going to be 36, so you can
kind of do the math.Ive been a celiac for quite
a long time before it was known or talked
about very much.
MP What happened after you were
diagnosed?
KS I realized how if I changed what I ate,I could
change my life and I could do the things I wanted
to do.I decided I wanted to help and teach every-
body about how they could live healthy and live
gluten-free and if theyre dealing with food al-
lergies that theyre not alone.
MP What is the difference between
celiac disease and non-celiac
gluten sensitivity?
KS First thing is, celiac disease is an auto-
immune disease. So, when you eat gluten, its
not that the gluten is damaging things, its
your bodys reaction to the gluten. Your im-
mune system reacts by damaging the small,
little villi in your small intestine, making it
at. So, a person with celiac disease will have
a lot of vitamin and mineral deciencies. For
gluten sensitivity, when an individual eats
gluten,the body reacts not as an autoimmune
disease, but as an inflammation their
tummy will be sore, and theyll have inam-
matory symptoms,perhaps in their joints.The
key diference is that one is autoimmune,and
the other is an inammatory reaction.
MP What should someone do if they
suspect they have celiac disease?
KS The last thing they should do is go glu-
ten-free. Because you need to be tested by
your doctor and that test is only valid if youve
been eating the gluten protein.So if someone
suspects theyre celiac, get tested. If it comes
back negative and you feel better being glu-
ten-free, perhaps you have an intolerance. Id
say go 30 days gluten-free, see if you feel bet-
ter.Your body will tell you.
MP Youre always on the go-how do
you travel, eat well, and stay healthy?
KS The way I travel gluten-free is that I have
little snacks with me. Ill have little packages
of almonds, Ill have little containers of tuna,
Ill have little nut bars, Ill travel with little
vegetable juices I prepare for it.I even came
out with my own breakfast cereal line be-
cause I noticed breakfast is really hard when
you have celiac disease. So I just prepare for
it. I pack for it. As soon as I land, no matter
where I am, I always nd a grocery store and
I get fresh fruits, fresh veggies, I look for pro-
teins,nuts,and seeds and Im good.
MP For many people, having a gluten-
free diet can take a lot of time prepar-
ing meals and shopping for the right
foods. What advice do you have?
KS Keep it simple. Even in your meals: some
steamed broccoli,some chicken baked in some
honey keep things simple. Back to basics,
I like to tell people.You can cook healthy meals
in 20 minutes, thats what I do. You can prep
ahead of time.Take a Sunday,one or two hours,
and make all your meals up. Youll be eating
healthier,and youll feel better too.
MP What advice do you have for Can-
adians living with celiac disease or
gluten sensitivity?
KS The advice I would give you is to have fun.
That might sound bizarre,but have fun trying
new foods and thinking outside of the box.
Use black beans to make brownies. Use avo-
cados to make pudding.See it as a way to take
back your health and take back your life.How
awesome is it that you have a disease that you
actually have a cure for? The cure is eating
delicious, healthy, gluten-free foods. I think
thats fantastic.
FAST FACTS
Kathy Smart: Experiment,
explore and live gluten-free
Allergy conditions are on the
rise!
PAUL KEITH
editorial@mediaplanet.com
editorial@mediaplanet.com
PAUL KEITH
PRESIDENT,
CANADIAN SOCIETY OF ALLERGY
AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY
I decided I wanted to
help and teach everybody
about how they could live
healthy and live gluten-
free and if theyre
dealing with food allergies
that theyre not alone.
PHOTO: NATHAN LEGIEHN
VISIT ASTHMAANDALLERGIES.CA FOR EXCLUSIVE RECIPES AND
AN EXTENDED VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH KATHY SMART
PHOTOS: JAMES PARK