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MINOR PROJECT ON
FREQUENCY MODULATED WIRELESS
MICROPHONE

GUIDED BY:- SUBMITTED BY:-


MAYANK MITTAL PRATIK SADIWALA
PRATIKSH SINGH
                   

MINOR PROJECT ON
RADIO REMOTE CONTROL USING DTMF

GUIDED BY:- SUBMITTED BY:-


MAYANK MITTAL PALLAVEE
ANKITA SOLANKI

                  

 
INTRODUCTION

A wireless microphone, as the name implies, is a microphone without a physical cable


connecting it directly to the sound recording or amplifying equipment with which it is associated.

Reg Moores developed a radio microphone that was first used in "Alladin on Ice" in
1949.

John F. Stephens developed an FM wireless microphone for a Navy musical show in 1951 on
the Memphis Naval base

Modern wireless microphone technology, which for the first time offered performance with
audio and dynamic range equivalent to a cord, originated with the introduction of the first
compander wireless microphone offered by Nady Systems, Inc in 1976 according to company
claims. Nady systems, Inc was honored with an Emmy award for this breakthrough technical
achievement in 1996.

More commonly known as a Radio Microphone, there are many different standards, frequencies
and transmission technologies used to replace the microphone's cable connection and make it
into a wireless microphone. They can transmit, for example, in radio waves using UHF or VHF
frequencies, FM, AM, or various digital modulation schemes. Some low cost models use infrared
light. Infrared microphones require a direct line of sight between the microphone and the
receiver, while costlier radio frequency models do not.

Some models operate on a single fixed frequency, but the more advanced models operate on a
user selectable frequency to avoid interference, and allow the use of several microphones at the
same time.

This simple FM wireless microphone transmitter can transmit speech over a short range. It can
be used as a simple cordless microphone. The circuit uses two integrated circuits from Maxim.
IC1 a MAX4467, is an amplifier raising the microphone signal to a level suitable for frequency
modulation (FM). IC2 is a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) with integrated varactor (a.k.a.
varicap diode).

 
WORKING

Its nominal frequency of oscillation is set by inductor L1. The inductor value 390 nH provides an
oscillation frequency of about 100 MHz. For best performance, L1 should be a high-Q
component. L1 may consist of 4 turns of silver-plated wire wound around a 10-mm drill bit, and
stretched to a length of about 1.5 cm. The wire diameter can be anything between 26 SWG (0.5
mm) and 20 SWG (1 mm). No core is used.
The MAX4467 is a micropower opamp for low voltage operation and providing 200-kHz gain
bandwidth at a supply current of just 24 μA. When used with an electret microphone, some form
of DC bias for the microphone capsule is necessary. The MAX4467 has the ability to turn off the
bias to the microphone when the device is in shutdown mode. This can save several hundred
microamps of supply current, which can be significant in low power applications particularly for
battery powered applications like cordless microphones. The MICBias pin provides a switched
version of Vcc to the bias components.

Resistor R1 resistor limits the current to the microphone element. The output impedance of the
MAX4467 is low and well suited to driving cables over distances up to 50 m. The MAX2606
intermediate-frequency (IF) voltage-controlled oscillators (VCO) has been designed specifically
for portable wireless communication systems. The IC comes in a tiny 6-pin SOT23 package. The
low-noise VCO features an on-chip varactor and feedback capacitors that eliminate the need for
external tuning elements. Only an external inductor (here, L1) is required to set the oscillation
frequency and produce a properly operating VCO. To minimize the effects of parasitic elements,
which degrade circuit performance, place L1 and C5 close to their respective pins. Specifically,
place C5 directly across pins 2 (GND) and 3 (TUNE).
CONSTRUCTION

Wireless microphone circuit schematic

 
COMPONENTS
Parts List:

R1,R2 = 2K (brown-black-orange)

R3,R7 = 20K (brown-black-yellow)

R4,R5 = 100 ohm (yellow-violet-brown)

R6 = 168K

R8 = 47K

R9 = 330 ohm

R10,R11 = 1K

C1 = 100 nF

C2 = 4.7uF-16V, electrolytic

C3 = 10 uF-10V

C4 = 470 nF

C5 = 0.001uF (1nF), ceramic

C6 = 1 uF-10V, ceramic

C7 = 680 pF

C8 = 10 uF-10V

L1 = 390uH, variable inductor

Mic = Electret mike, 2 wires

Ic1 = MAX 4467

Ic2 = MAX 2606


APPLICATION

Device purpose:
This circuit is mainly intended to provide common home stereo amplifiers with a microphone
input. The battery supply is a good compromise: in this manner the input circuit is free from
mains low frequency hum pick-up and connection to the amplifier is more simple, due to the
absence of mains cable and power supply.
Using a stereo microphone the circuit must be doubled. In this case, two separate level controls
are better than a dual-ganged stereo potentiometer.
Low current drawing (about 2mA) ensures a long battery life.

Advantages and disadvantages

The advantages are:

• Greater freedom of movement for the artist or speaker.


• Avoidance of cabling problems common with wired microphones, caused by constant
moving and stressing the cables.
• Reduction of cable "trip hazards" in the performance space

The disadvantages are:

• Sometimes limited range (a wired balanced XLR microphone can run up to 300 ft or 100
meters). Some wireless systems have a shorter range, while more expensive models can
exceed that distance.
• Increased latency at longer distances
• Possible interference with or, more often, from other radio equipment or other radio
microphones, though models with many frequency-synthesized switch-selectable
channels are now plentiful and cost effective.
• Limited operation time due to battery life.
• Noise or dead spots (places where it doesn't work, especially in non-diversity systems)
• Limited number of operating microphones at the same time and place, due to the limited
number of radio channels (frequencies
BLOCK DIAGRAM

There are four Main components in block diagram of Frequency Modulated wireless
Microphone.They are:-

• Microphone:-It is a device by which audio signal given is converted into electrical signal &
transferred to Transmitter.

• Transmitter:-It is used to transmit electrical signal provided by Microphone to Transmitting


antenna from which the signal is send to receiving antenna.

• Receiver:-It is used to receive transmitted signal from receiving antenna and convert it from
electric signal to audio signal again.

• Sound system or radio:-The converted audio signal is transferred to a Sound System or


radio so that the transmitted audio signal can be easily listened on it.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. wireless microphone system: Revolabs.
2. www.electroschematics.com
3. www.electronicslab.com
4. www.flashwebhost.com
5. www.electronics4u.com
6. www.redcircuit.com
 

 
CONTENTS
1.Introduction
2.Block diagram
3.Construction
4.Components
5.Working
6.Application
7.Bibliography