Staunton News Leader 07/08/2014 Page : A01

Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 07/08/2014 July 9, 2014 2:04 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA
As summer heats up, so
does race for The Chase » B1
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014 • WWW.NEWSLEADER.COM
PROUDLY SERVING OUR COMMUNITY FOR 107 YEARS
STAUNTON, WAYNESBORO & AUGUSTA CO., VA.
VOL. 124, NO. 189 • COPYRIGHT 2014 • $1 RETAIL • FOR HOME DELIVERY PRICING,
SEE INSIDE
ADVICE B6
NATION/WORLD B4
COMICS B5
DEATHS A4
LOCAL A3
LOTTERY A2
OPINION A5
SPORTS B1-B3
TV GRID B6
WEATHER
91

69
PM T-STORMS
STAUNTON — The suspect in
the killing at F.R. Drake Co. in
Waynesboro confessed the
deadly shooting to police and
claimed that the victim was his
friend, according to evidence
presented Monday at a court
hearing.
It was also re-
vealed at the pre-
liminary hearing
that the suspect,
Boyd W. Wise-
man, 54, of
Waynesboro, was
found competent
to stand trial by a
Western State
psychologist.
Wiseman is charged with
second-degree murder and use
of a firearm in the commission
of a felonyinthe Feb. 27 slaying
of co-worker Jeffrey S. Ear-
hart, 38.
Officer Robert Dean, of the
Waynesboro Police Depart-
ment, testified in Waynesboro
General District Court that he
was called to the scene after
Earhart’s bodywas foundinside
a shop at F.R. Drake, located at
1300 Hopeman Parkway, about
a quarter-mile from Drake’s
main office on Industrial Way.
Dean said it was first be-
lieved that Earhart suffered a
heart attack, and when the offi-
cer arrivedat thecompanyaco-
worker was giving himCPR. As
Dean prepared a defibrillator,
Earhart’s shirt was removed,
and a bullet wound was found
on his abdomen. A second gun-
shot wound was discovered on
the upper area of Earhart’s
back.
According to the Drake web-
site, the company designs and
produces automatic loading
systems for hot dog food pro-
duction.
As police worked the scene,
Capt. Rebecca Meeks testified
she received a call that Wise-
man had turned himself in at
the Waynesboro Police Depart-
ment.
Under questioning, Meeks
said Wiseman complained “that
his head was pounding” and his
thoughts “cloudy at times.”
Said Meeks, “He was a little
slow in speech.”
The captain said he also ad-
mitted to the slaying. “I killed
my friend,” he reportedly told
Meeks.
Wiseman said he shot Ear-
hart after his co-worker hurled
an expletive at him, Meeks tes-
tified. Althoughhecouldn’t give
specific details, Wiseman said
he remembered hearing “two
Police: Man confessed to killing
Wiseman, 54, found
competent to stand
trial on charges
By Brad Zinn
bzinn@newsleader.com
Wiseman
See WISEMAN, Page A6
ALBEMARLE COUNTY — A
Waynesboro woman killed on
July4 ina motorcycle crashhas
been identified.
Sharon E. McGaughey, 49,
died after her motorcycle hit a
tree inthe 3000 blockof Browns
Gap Turnpike in Albemarle
County. The crash took place
Fridayshortlyafter3p.m. inthe
western part of the county.
Authorities said McGaughey
was headed south when she lost
control of the bike and veered
right off the roadway.
Rider inexperience was a
factor in the fatal crash, au-
thorities said.
Woman
ID’d in
fatal
crash
McGaughey, 49, died
in motorcycle wreck
By Brad Zinn
bzinn@newsleader.com
CRIMORA — Donna Abshire
has been helping her grand-
daughter, Raygan Batton, in a
fight against childhood cancer
that could soon end happily.
Abshire wants to pay for-
ward all the community sup-
port the family has received.
Abshire and her friends are
hosting the second annual Ray
of Sunshine Festival on July 20
at Augusta Expo. The proceeds
will benefit the University of
Virginia Children’s Hospital
and a child in Waynesboro who
is battling Stage 3 Wilms’ Tu-
mor, atypeof childhoodkidney
cancer.
“We are very thankful for
the love and support our com-
munity has shown us and
thankful for the many prayer
warriors keeping us lifted in
prayer,” Abshire said.
During last year’s festival,
more than 3,000 people came
Festival planned for childhood cancer awareness
Grandmother giving
back to community
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
Donna Abshire and her granddaughter, Raygan Batton, sit on their
front porch Monday in Crimora. LAURA PETERS/THE NEWS LEADER See FESTIVAL, Page A6
WEYERS CAVE — Enroll-
ment for schoolchildren in
summer school has been
growing for decades in
Weyers Cave, but inthis case
the news is positive for edu-
cation.
Blue Ridge Community
College began its third week
hosting the good kind of
warm season extra credit in
“Learning Can Be Fun.” Par-
ents are happy to send their
kids toit, andthekids want to
be there.
During the previous two
week-long sessions, young
people learned about creat-
ing a musical, robotics, sing-
ing for performance and vol-
leyball among other courses.
This week, the sessions in-
clude classes onthe four sea-
sons of art, animating with
flash and “tom-toms and to-
tempoles.”
“We want to give the kids
the opportunity to experi-
ence what it’s like to be on a
college campus and give
them an early exposure to
Blue Ridge Community Col-
lege,” said Sandi Belcher,
programcoordinator.
“Learning Can Be Fun”
has grown steadily through
its two decades of existence
to as many as 675 kids ex-
pected for 63 classes. Two
more weeks of classes will
followafter this week.
ART, ANIMATIONFEATUREDTHIS WEEK
Thomas
Vann, 14,
works on a
pottery
wheel
during a
“Learning
Can Be Fun”
summer
session at
Blue Ridge
Community
College in
Weyers Cave
on Monday.
GRIFFIN
MOORES/THE
NEWS LEADER
A year of ‘fun’ learning
BRCC hosting
summer program
By Calvin Trice
ctrice@newsleader.com
Brynlee Smith, 5, smiles at instructor Nilda Jolloff at the clay
workshop at the “Learning Can Be Fun” session at Blue Ridge
Community College on Monday. GRIFFIN MOORES/THE NEWS LEADER
MISSION, Texas —Deputy Ru-
dy Trevino was patrolling a
park along the Texas-Mexico
border when he spied move-
ment in the darkness. Swinging
his spotlight toward the motion
revealed 14 women and chil-
dren who had just sneaked
across theRioGrandeinasmall
boat.
In minutes, they were loaded
into a Border Patrol van and
whisked away — a typical en-
counter here in the 5-mile slice
of deep South Texas that has be-
come the epicenter of the re-
cent surge in illegal
Human
drama
at border
Children streaming
across into S. Texas
By Christopher Sherman
Associated Press
SIX AGENCIES
WORK TOGETHER
All through the night, gov-
ernment buses idle near the
border wall — a mile or two
from the river — awaiting
loads of immigrants. The zone
in South Texas near the Rio
Grande is patrolled by no
fewer than six local, state and
federal law-enforcement
agencies, including gunboats
crewed by Texas state troop-
ers with night-vision goggles
and the Border Patrol’s white
and green trucks. Helicopters
swoop above the winding
waterway.
See BORDER, Page A6
TO GO
Augusta Expo at 277 Expo Road in
Fishersville on July 20 at 1 p.m.
Staunton News Leader 07/08/2014 Page : A06
Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 07/08/2014 July 9, 2014 2:04 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA
WEATHER
A6 • THE NEWS LEADER • TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2014
5- day Forecast for Staunton & Waynesboro
Al manac
Ki d’s Corner
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s
110s
Nati onal Forecast for Tuesday, Jul y 8
Nati onal
Extremes
Regi onal Forecast
Wa a Wa Wa Wa a Wa Wa Washington sssssss
/76 7 /7 /7 /7 6/7 6/7 96/7 96/7
w New N Yo Yo Yo YYYY kk rk rk
91/7 /75 91/755 /7 91 9
Miam
89/76 8
Atlanta
91/72
ooo ttt r Detr D
80/622 /6 80 8
uston uston uston uston ou ou Hou Hou Hou n to us ou Ho
92/74 92/ 92/ 92/ 92/ 92 92 9
Chicago ago ago agoo ag ca hi C
82/61 82/6111 61 2/6
Minneapolis Minneapol olis
76/57 /5
Kansas nsas K Cit City Cityy Cit
81/61 81/61
aso Pa
9994/75 94/75
Denver ver en De D
82/599 /5 82 8
Billingss g
84/59
LLo Loss les gele Ange ng es ele ge n A
88880 800/ 0/66 8 6 /6
SSSaan S Francisco F o sc cis nc a Fr
771 71/59 /59
Seattle
84/6000000000
Washington
96/76
New York
91/75
Miami
89/76
Atlanta
91/72
Detroit
80/62
Houston
92/74
Chicago
82/61
Minneapolis
76/57
Kansas City
81/61
El Paso
94/75
Denver
82/59
Billings
84/59
Los Angeles
80/66
San Francisco
71/59
Seattle
84/60
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Statistics for Staunton are compiled using hourly information from
the Shenandoah Airport and radar estimates as of 5 p.m. yesterday.
Precipitation is supplemented with the information from the National
Weather Service the following day. Statistics for Waynesboro are as of
8 a.m. yesterday and are supplied by the National Weather Service.
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs
for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Yesterday for the 48
contiguous states
For current radar, updated forecasts, go to www.newsleader.com
Major today 8:25 a.m. 8:52 p.m.
Minor today 2:12 a.m. 2:39 p.m.
Major Wednesday 9:15 a.m. 9:43 p.m.
Minor Wednesday 3:00 a.m. 3:29 p.m.
TEMPERATURE Staunton Waynesboro
High/Low 89°/61° 81°/52°
Normal high/low 84°/63°
Record high 100° in 2012
Record low 45° in 1983
24 hrs 0.00" 0.00"
Month to date 0.26" 0.87"
Normal month to date 0.85"
Year to date 18.36" 19.93"
Normal year to date 19.82"
Sol unar Tabl es
The solunar period indicates peak feeding times for fish and game.
Ni ght Sky
– Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences
The moon continues its parade past the planets and bright
stars on the ecliptic, approaching the reddish star Antares in
Scorpius the Scorpion, so-named ("rival of Mars") because
its color can fool observers into thinking it's the red planet.
Venus rises at 3:57 a.m. Mars sets at 12:58 a.m. Jupiter sets
at 9:16 p.m. Saturn sets at 2:21 a.m.
Albany 87 69 t 83 65 pc
Anchorage 67 56 pc 64 55 sh
Atlanta 91 72 pc 88 71 t
Austin 95 71 s 96 72 s
Baltimore 95 74 t 88 68 pc
Boise 98 69 s 98 69 pc
Boston 90 74 pc 87 70 pc
Buffalo 80 61 t 75 59 pc
Burlington 87 69 t 82 62 t
Casper 82 51 s 91 58 pc
Charleston, WV 86 67 t 84 63 c
Chattanooga 92 73 pc 83 69 t
Chicago 82 61 t 79 55 pc
Cleveland 78 62 t 77 60 pc
Dallas 97 78 s 97 78 pc
Denver 82 59 t 89 63 pc
Detroit 80 62 t 78 57 pc
Duluth 68 49 t 71 51 pc
El Paso 94 75 pc 96 78 pc
Fairbanks 70 58 t 66 56 t
Houston 92 74 t 94 73 t
Indianapolis 81 63 t 79 57 pc
Kansas City 81 61 t 85 65 pc
Knoxville 89 71 pc 79 67 t
Los Angeles 80 66 pc 79 64 pc
Louisville 89 70 t 87 65 pc
Memphis 92 74 pc 88 70 t
Miami 89 76 t 90 77 t
Morgantown 83 69 t 81 62 c
Nashville 93 71 t 85 66 t
New Orleans 90 75 t 91 76 t
New York City 91 75 t 88 72 pc
Orlando 90 73 t 90 74 t
Philadelphia 94 76 t 89 72 t
Phoenix 102 79 t 99 85 t
Pittsburgh 80 64 t 80 59 pc
Raleigh 96 74 pc 95 69 pc
St. Louis 87 68 t 86 67 pc
Salt Lake City 97 72 s 94 70 t
San Francisco 71 59 pc 71 59 s
Seattle 84 60 pc 81 58 pc
Tucson 91 77 t 90 76 t
West Palm Beach 89 75 t 89 75 t
Wheeling 78 64 t 79 57 pc
TODAY WEDNESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY
In the Sky
Moon Phases
Full
Aug 3 July 26 July 18 July 12
Last New First
TODAY TONIGHT WEDNESDAY
91° 69°
A couple of
afternoon t-storms
A shower or
t-storm in spots
THURSDAY FRIDAY
83°/62° 84°/60° 83°/61° 86°/64°
A thunderstorm in
spots
Partly sunny with a
t-storm
Mostly sunny
SATURDAY
An afternoon
t-storm possible
HIGH:
112° in Thermal, CA
LOW:
35° in Boca Reservoir, CA
RF: 93° RF: 70° RF: 86°/63° RF: 92°/60° RF: 89°/63° RF: 92°/65°
The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® (RF) is an exclusive index of effective
temperature based on eight weather factors. Shown is the highest and lowest values of the day. The higher the
AccuWeather.com UV Index™ (UV Index) number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
UV Index: 7
Warm today with clouds and sun; an afternoon thun-
derstorm or two. A shower or thunderstorm in the area
tonight. A shower or thunderstorm in spots tomorrow
and Thursday.
PRECIPITATION Staunton Waynesboro
Alexandria 96/76/t
Arlington 95/76/t
Blacksburg 88/68/t
Bluefield 86/67/t
Charlottesville 92/72/t
Danville 95/71/pc
Elkins 83/65/t
Fairmont 82/67/t
Fredericksburg 97/74/t
Harrisonburg 91/69/t
Lewisburg 86/66/t
Lexington 89/69/t
Lynchburg 92/69/t
Marion 87/68/t
Martinsburg 92/70/t
Martinsville 94/69/t
Moorefield 91/69/t
Newport News 97/77/pc
Norfolk 95/77/pc
Petersburg 102/76/pc
Richmond 97/74/pc
Roanoke 92/72/t
Virginia Beach 94/76/pc
Washington 96/76/t
Winchester 91/70/t
Wytheville 87/67/t
City Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W
Sunrise today 6:01 a.m.
Sunset today 8:42 p.m.
Sunrise Wednesday 6:01 a.m.
Sunset Wednesday 8:42 p.m.
Moonrise today 4:47 p.m.
Moonset today 2:30 a.m.
Levi, William Perry Elementary
Periods of sun, a thunderstorm or two this afternoon.
High 89 to 93. Winds southwest 7-14 mph. Expect 4-8
hours of sunshine with a 65% chance of precipitation
and average relative humidity 60%. Drying conditions
fair. Humid tonight with a shower or thunderstorm
around. Low 67 to 71.
Agri cul ture Forecast
Source: Virginia Adult & Pediatric Allergy & Asthma
Pol l en
Trees Absent
Grasses High
Weeds Low
Mold Moderate
FREE
to dance to pray to tweet to report
Thanks to the First Amendment,
you can be whoever and
whatever you want to be.
Learn more and celebrate your
freedoms by sharing your videos,
photos, stories and songs.
Show us how free you can be.
1forall.us
share your news and photos
Publishedl
Our Tools. Your News.
Write your own story. Upload your photos.
Place your own calendar listing. Fast and free.
NV-0000142675
Why Is Brightview Baldwin Park
Shenandoah Valley’s Choice?
Please call us.We have a few upgraded apartments
and we have created new dining venues, as well as
an outdoor recreation area.
– Chip & Michelle
21 Woodlee Road
Staunton, VA 24401
www.BrightviewBaldwinPark.com
“We looked at other communities and we chose
Baldwin Park because of the continuum of care and
the beautiful grounds. We made the right move.”
– David & Betty Floyd
“I chose Baldwin Park because of the people. The
residents and staff are terrific.”
– Helen Stewart
540-885-1122
NV-0000168425
N
V
-
0
0
0
0
1
6
8
6
3
66 E. Beverley St, Downtown Staunton
Mon-Sat 10-5
(540) 885-0653 • www.crownltd.net
Trollbead Dream Sale
25% off
most beads today through July 15th.
immigration.
Every day human dra-
ma unfoldsacross this
arid landscape that bris-
tles withcameras, lookout
towers and heavily armed
patrols.
Children stream
into U.S.
Most of the impover-
ished immigrants hail
from Central America,
and many come with chil-
dren. They often turn
themselves over to au-
thorities immediately af-
ter crossing the river, fol-
lowing the advice of
smugglers, friends and
relatives, who tell them
they will eventually be re-
leased and allowed to con-
tinue to their destination.
For parents withyoung
children, that has largely
beentruebecausetheU.S.
has only one long-term
family detention facility
in Pennsylvania, and it’s
full. Most parents are
handed notices to appear
at the immigration office
closest to their destina-
tion and dropped off at
bus stations across the
Southwest.
Childrenarrivingwith-
out their parents are
transferred to custody of
the Health and Human
Services Department,
which tries to reunite
them with family mem-
bers in the U.S.
Bothgroups haveoften
been allowed to remain in
the U.S. while their immi-
gration cases move for-
ward, a process that can
sometimes take years.
Migrants’ willingness
to surrender to authori-
ties has created a system
in which smugglers need
only to get their human
cargo to the American
side of the river, rather
than guiding them to a
populated area.
Just since October, the
Border Patrol’s Rio
Grande Valley sector has
made more than 194,000
arrests, nearly triple that
of any other sector. In the
first week of June alone,
agents in this area south
of Mission arrested more
than 2,800 people, most
from Honduras, Guate-
mala and El Salvador,
making it the highest-vol-
ume arrest zone onthe en-
tire U.S. border. More
than60 percent were chil-
dren.
When Anzalduas Park
is busy on weekend after-
noons, it takes only sec-
onds for a watercraft to
dart across the river and
deposit three or four peo-
ple onto U.S. soil.
Trevino said the past
two months have been
“chaos.” He’s corralled
100 people in a night and
had a group of 50 walk up
to him at the park bath-
room.
These immigrants, waiting for bus tickets in McAllen,
Texas, onJune 20, entered the country through an area
referred to as zone nine. It is the busiest sector along the
U.S.-Mexico border. ERIC GAY/AP
Continued from Page A1
Border
out for live music, raffles
and more to raise money
for Raygan’s surgeries.
Almost 3 years old,
Raygan has been battling
neuroblastoma, a cancer-
ous tumor that forms on
small children’s nerve tis-
sue. In October, she had
90 percent of the tumor
removed, with the re-
maining portion testing
as benign.
Raygan is now going
through antibody therapy
at the U.Va. Medical Cen-
ter’s Children’s Hospital.
She is cancer free, and
the antibody treatment is
a precaution to make sure
the cancer doesn’t reap-
pear, Abshire said.
“Hopefully by October
(Raygan) will be on the
up,” she said. Raygan has
a 60 percent chance of
beating the cancer.
In the past year, Ray-
gan has undergone the re-
moval of her tumor, che-
motherapy and almost a
month of bone marrow
transplants.
At her home Monday,
Abshire covered Raygan
up with two pink blan-
kets.
The living room was
dark in the middle of the
afternoon to help Raygan
sleep and handle the ef-
fects of her medication,
Abshire said.
Raygan has gone
through two of the six
scheduled rounds of
treatment.
The antibody is given
through a needle or drip,
and it “hunts for stray
neuroblastoma,” Abshire
said. The therapy tracks
down the mature cancer
cells and fights off the in-
fection, she said.
“If there are any stray
cells in there ... her im-
mune system will attack
them,” Abshire said. “It’s
like a little war.”
Raygan’s head, which
was once bald, is now
filled with blonde hair, a
physical sign of her pro-
gress.
“I almost have a pony-
tail,” Raygan said.
Continued from Page A1
Festival
booms” and seeing Ear-
hart fall face first to the
floor.
The victim was shot
once in the back and once
in the stomach.
Wiseman said he was
on a variety of medica-
tions, including sedatives
and painkillers, Meeks
said. It was unclear,
though, if Wiseman was
under the influence when
the shooting took place,
she said.
Wiseman said after
shooting Earhart, he got
in his vehicle and threw
two shell casings out of
the window. He then re-
loaded his gun with the in-
tention of killing himself,
and Meeks said he put the
gun in his mouth.
“He said he had chick-
ened out,” she testified.
Police recovered the
gun. “It was a Derringer
two-shot,” Meeks said.
After hearing the evi-
dence, Judge William
Heatwole certified the
murder and gun charges
to a Waynesboro grandju-
ry scheduled to meet
Monday.
Wiseman remains at
Middle River Regional
Jail, where he is being
held without bond.
Continued from Page A1
Wiseman

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful