CHAPTER 6

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CHAPTER SIX - mECTAR IHABA
I CAN`T HEAR YOU VERY WELL! - BAC HHOXO CHBmHO!
In Chapter Six you will learn how to do the following:
1. to use the telephone
2. to say how old you are
3. to express likes and dislikes (using the verb npann1tcn)
4. to shop for clothes
You will learn the following points of grammar:
1. expressing possession (to have`)
2. the numerals 1,000 +
3. impersonal expressions and the dative case (pronouns and singular nouns)
4. the accusative of adjectives
Activity One - Hepnoe sa(anne
Writing The Russian for a female telephone operator is, as you already know,
1e¬e]onnc1xa. See how many Russian words you can make in 5 minutes using these
letters. (The letters 1 and e may each appear twice in words.)
Activity Two - B1opoe sa(anne
Reading The words and phrases below are all associated with telephoning. By using
the knowledge of Russian which you have already acquired and a process of deduction, see
if you can identify their meaning from the jumbled-up list of equivalent English terms. (You
will find the answers in the vocabulary section.)
noµ1a1nnnin 1e¬e]on, 1e¬e]onnµona1i, 1e¬e]onn:ann×, 1e¬e]onna× c1annn×,
ionoµn1i no 1e¬e]ony, 1e¬e]onna× 6yµxa, an1oxo6n¬inin µaµno1e¬e]on,
1e¬e]onnin µa:ionoµ, xo6n¬innx.
to speak on the telephone, portable phone, telephone installation, telephone conversation,
mobile, carphone, telephone booth, to telephone, telephone exchange
Until recently, using the telephone in Russia posed quite a problem and
required both patience and perseverance. It was often difficult to get
through and reception could be very poor. Most long-distance and
international calls on public phones had to be booked in advance at the
central telegraph office (nen1µa·inin 1e·eiµa]) or a head post-
office (non1ax1). However, the situation has changed for the better in
the last few years. About half the population now has a mobile phone
(xo6n·inin 1e·e]on or co1onon 1e·e]on), and in big cities it is
possible to phone virtually anywhere from a public phone ( 1e·e]on-
an1oxa1 or 1axco]on), using coins ( xone1i), a phone card
(1axco]onna× n·ac1nxona× xaµ1onxa) or even a credit card
(xµeµn1na× xaµ1onxa).
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Activity Three - Tpe1te sa(anne
Listening/Reading/Speaking Read and listen to the following text about booking
an international phone call and then take it in turns to play the parts of the speakers.
Tyµnc1(xa) - 3µµanc1nyn1e. Mo»no :axa:a1i µa:ionoµ c me]]n¬µox*'
C·y»amnn - Mo»no, xonenno. Cxa»n1e, no»a¬ync1a, n xaxon c1µane
naxoµn1c× me]]n¬µ'
Tyµnc1(xa) - me]]n¬µ naxoµn1c× n Be¬nxo6µn1annn, 1o ec1i n Ani¬nn.
C·y»amnn - Cennac 6yµe1e ionoµn1i'
Tyµnc1(xa) - ,a, cennac.
C·y»amnn - Hoxeµ a6onen1a, no»a¬ync1a.
Tyµnc1(xa) - Hoxeµ a6onen1a' × ne nonnxan.
C·y»amnn - Kaxon noxeµ ni na6nµae1e'
Tyµnc1(xa) - A-a-a, cennac non×1no. × na6nµan 269-18-75 (µnec1n mec1iµec×1
µen×1i - nocexnaµna1i - cexiµec×1 n×1i).
C·y»amnn - A ni ne :nae1e xoµ ioµoµa'
Tyµnc1(xa) - 3nan. Koµ - 0114 (no¬i - c1o ne1iµnaµna1i).
C·y»amnn - 3nann1 044-114-269-18-75 (no¬i coµox ne1iµe - c1o
ne1iµnaµna1i - µnec1n mec1iµec×1 µen×1i - nocexnaµna1i -
cexiµec×1 n×1i). Koio ni ni:inae1e'
Tyµnc1(xa) - Lio ]axn¬n× - Aµaxc, a nx× Kµnc1o]eµ.
C·y»amnn - Ha cxo¬ixo xnny1'
Tyµnc1(xa) - Ha n×1i xnny1, no»a¬ync1a.
C·y»amnn - H×1i xnny1. 51o 115 (c1o n×1naµna1i) µy6¬en.
Tyµnc1(xa) - H¬a1n1i nax'
C·y»amnn - ,a, xne.
Tyµnc1(xa) - Ho»a¬ync1a. (Hands over the monev)
C·y»amnn - Bo1 nama cµana. Iyµxa noxeµ n×1i. 2µn1e, no»a¬ync1a, y
1e¬e]ona.
Tyµnc1(xa) - Cnacn6o.
C·y»amnn - ,o cnnµann×!
* ÷ with Sheffield` - you will learn this construction in Chapter 7.
Activity Four - He1nëp1oe sa(anne
Speaking Pairwork. Using the above dialogue as your model, make up two similar
conversations in a telegraph office, taking the names and telephone numbers of friends or
relatives. (Or if you cannot recall a suitable number, invent friends in, say, Brighton |01273]
and Aberdeen |01224].) Reverse the roles after the first dialogue.
Remember: in Scotland = n Bo1·anµnn, in Wales = n V5·ice, in (Northern) Ireland ÷ n (Ceneµnon)
Hµ·anµnn, in America = n Axeµnxe, in Canada ÷ n Kanaµe. If a number has five digits, you should split
it up into two elements of three and two (e.g. 45897 ÷ 458 97) and if it has six digits you should refer to three two-
figure numbers (e.g. 918462 ÷ 91 84 62).
xo»no(') one can, can one? nonnxa1i (I) to understand na 5 xnny1 for 5 minutes
:axa:a1i to book na6nµa1i (I) to dial 115 µy6¬en 115 roubles
µa:ionoµ conversation non×1no understood n¬a1n1i nax' do I pay you?
c1µana country xoµ ioµoµa town code xne (dative) (to) me
naxoµn1c× is situated no¬i = ny¬i zero, nill cµana change
Be¬nxo6µn1ann× Great Britain :nann1 that`s to say 6yµxa booth
1o ec1i i.e. ni:ina1i (I) to call »µn1e wait
6yµe1e ionoµn1i? will you speak? na cxo¬ixo for how many y 1e¬e]ona (here:) by the
noxeµ a6onen1a subscriber `s no. xnny1? minutes? telephone
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Activity Five - Hn1oe sa(anne
Reading/Speaking Read the following statements about prices and write them out in
figures on the products below. Then interview your partner about the prices. (Your question
will, of course, be Cxo·ixo c1on1 ...' each time.)
1. Bnno c1on1 µnec1n coµox µy6¬en.
2. Toµ1 c1on1 c1o µnenaµna1i µy6¬en.
3. Ciµ c1on1 µen×noc1o cexi µy6¬en.
4. M×co c1on1 nocexiµec×1 n×1i µy6¬en.
5. Hnno c1on1 µnaµna1i n×1i µy6¬en.
6. X¬e6 c1on1 mec1i µy6¬en n×1iµec×1 xoneex.
Cardinal numbers (1,000 +)
Below are the numbers from1,000 onwards. (You have already learnt the numbers 1 to 100 in
Chapter Two and 200 to 1,000 in Chapter Eive.) After 10,000 you will recognize the recurring
patterns and forming larger numbers should pose few serious problems.
1, 000 ( oµna ) 1ic ×na 20, 000 µnaµna1i
2, 000 µ n e 100, 000 c 1 o  1ic×n
3, 000 1 µ n  1ic ×nn 200, 000 µne c 1n
4, 000 ne 1iµe 1, 000, 000 ( oµnn) xn··non*
5, 000 n×1i 2, 000, 000 µ n a
6, 000 mec1i 3, 000, 000 1 µ n  xn··nona*
7, 000 c e xi  1ic×n 4, 000, 000 ne 1iµe
8, 000 noc e xi 5, 000, 000 n×1i
9, 000 µe n×1i 20, 000, 000 µe c ×1i  xn··nonon
10, 000 µe c ×1i 100, 000, 000 c 1 o
* The forms xn··non and xn··nona equally apply in numbers such as 21,000,000 and 22,000,000.
Activity Six - mec1oe sa(anne
Listening/Writing Listen twice to the following numbers and jot them down in
figures. When you have checked your answers write the numbers out in full in Russian. To
help you, the first one is done for you.
1. 7896 Cexi 1ic×n nocexico1 µen×noc1o mec1i___________________________
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
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Activity Seven - Ce(tuoe sa(anne
Speaking/Writing Eirst, read out the following telephone numbers in Russian. Then
write them out in full, paying particular attention to spelling. (Remember that seven-digit
numbers split up into three elements of three, two and two |e.g. 579-85-91], that six-digit
numbers split up into three equal elements of two |e.g. 88-17-11] and that five-digit numbers
split up into two elements of three and two |e.g. 338-29].)
1. 998345 4. 728018 7. 9015534 10. 2948670
2. 356729 5. 42217 8. 304066 11. 665941
3. 1076354 6. 601844 9. 85623 12. 5171282
Activity Eight - Boctuoe sa(anne
Listening Listen twice to the following telephone numbers in Russian and write them
down in the spaces provided below. To help you, the first one is done for you.
1. 1845932 4. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 7. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 10. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
2. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 5. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 8. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 11. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
3. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 6. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 9. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 12. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
Activity Nine - ±enn1oe sa(anne
Listening/Reading/Speaking Read and listen to the transcript of the following
telephone call and then take it in turns to play the parts of the speakers.
Hnna - A¬¬o!
C1enan - Honµocn1e Ha1amy, no»a¬ync1a.
Hnna - Bac n¬oxo c¬imno. Ionoµn1e iµoxne.
C1enan - Ha1amy, no»a¬ync1a.
Hnna - Bi, naneµnoe, omn6¬nci noxeµox. Kaxon noxeµ ni
na6nµae1e'
C1enan - 79-64-23 (cexiµec×1 µen×1i - mec1iµec×1 ne1iµe - µnaµna1i
1µn).
Hnna - 51o 79-64-32 (cexiµec×1 µen×1i - mec1iµec×1 ne1iµe -
1µnµna1i µna).
C1enan - H:nnnn1e, no»a¬ync1a.
Hnna - Hnneio. ,o cnnµann×.
C1enan - ,o cnnµann×.
Honµocn1e Ha1amy - Accusative case
Remember that the direct object of the verb (i.e. Ha1ama) goes into the Accusative case.
a¬¬o! (used on phone) hello! iµoxne louder
nonµocn1e (imperative) ask for, call naneµno(e) probably
nac n¬oxo c¬imno I can`t hear you ni omn6¬nci noxeµox you`ve got the wrong number
(very) well n:nnnn1e sorry, excuse me
ionoµn1e (imperative) speak nnneio (here:) it doesn`t matter
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Activity Ten - ±ecn1oe sa(anne
Listening/Reading/Speaking Read and listen to the transcript of the following
telephone call and then take it in turns to play the parts of the speakers.
C1enan - A¬¬o'
O·iia - × nac c¬yman.
C1enan - 51o Ha1ama'
O·iia - He1, +1o ne Ha1ama.
C1enan - A Ha1amy xo»no'
O·iia - Ona :µeci y»e ne »nne1. Ho:nonn1e no noxeµy 15-74-89.
C1enan - Xoµomo. 15-74-89. Cnacn6o 6o¬imoe.
O·iia - Ho»a¬ync1a. ,o cnnµann×.
Activity Eleven - O(nnna(na1oe sa(anne
Listening/Reading/Speaking Listen to the telephone conversation and fill in the gaps
in the partial transcription below. When you are sure that you know all the missing words,
read through the conversation in pairs.
Ha1ama - A¬¬o! C¬yman.
C1enan - _______________. 51o 1i, Ha1ama'
Ha1ama - ,a, y 1e¬e]ona.
C1enan - 51o _______________ C1enan. Hoxnnmi xen×'
Ha1ama - Konenno noxnn.
C1enan - × cnona n ________________. V 1e6× ec1i cno6oµnoe nµex×'
Ha1ama - ,a, ec1i.
C1enan - ,anan nc1µe1nxc×.
Ha1ama - ,anan. A xoiµa'
C1enan - ¹eµe:___________ y nxoµa n Xµax Xµnc1a Cnacn1e¬×. Ti :naemi,
iµe naxoµn1c× Xµax Xµnc1a Cnacn1e¬×'
Ha1ama - He1, ne_____________.
C1enan - 51o concex nonoe :µanne. Tax, iµe µanime naxoµn¬c× o1xµi1in
6accenn «Mocxna».
Ha1ama - ,a, cennac noxnn. ,o _______________!
C1enan - Hoxa!
RUSSIAN TELEPHONE ETIQUETTE
There are many more standard telephone expressions in Russian than in English. When making a call Russians
usually say A··o! (sometimes pronounced A·e!), which may be followed by the name of the town (e.g. A··o!
Mocxna'). The most frequent response is either A··o! or × nac c·yman, C·yman nac or simply
C·yman (literally: I hear you`). Russians rarely give their names when they pick up the receiver, although if
they expect the call to be for them personally they sometimes reply V 1e·e]ona (literally: On/By the phone`).
If they wish to identify themselves they may, of course, use the phrase 51o ionoµn1 ... (literally: this is ...
speaking`). When the quality of the line is poor, you will often hear Russians remark Bac (or Te6×) n·oxo
c·imno or × nac (1e6×) n·oxo c·imy (I can`t hear you very well).
(× nac) c¬yman yes, speaking cnona again iµe naxo- where is ...
xo»no (nonµo- can I speak y 1e6× (ec1i) ...' do you have? µn1c× ...' (situated)?
cn1i) (+ acc) ' to ...? cno6oµnoe nµex× spare time concex nonin brand new
y»e ne no longer µanan nc1µe1nxc× let`s meet µanime previously
no:nonn1e no call (number) xoiµa (') when (?) naxoµn¬c× (m) was
noxeµy ..., ring ... neµe: nac in an hour situated
y 1e¬e]ona speaking y nxoµa n (¹ acc) by the o1xµi1in open(-air)
51o ionoµn1 ... ... speaking entrance to 6accenn swimming-
noxnnmi xen×' remember me? Xµax Xµnc1a Cathedral of pool
noxnn (1e6×) I remember you Cnacn1e¬× Christ the µo nc1µenn till we next
Saviour meet
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XPAM XPHCTA CHACHTL¹×
Activity Twelve - ±nena(na1oe sa(anne
Listening Listen to the following recordings of Russians stating their age and fill in the
details below. The first one is done for you.
1. Anna Pavlovna 46 6. Viktor Luzhkov ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
2. Galya ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 7. Nelya Sergeevna ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
3. Boris Ivanovich ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 8. Pyotr ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
4. Yuri Popov ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 9. Katya ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
5. Svetlana ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ 10. Pavel Oblomov ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
Activity Thirteen - Tµnnaµna1oe :aµanne
Reading Look at the picture of the Kuligin family and identify the names and ages of
the family members, using the description below.
µnoe µe1en two children ona µa:neµena she is divorced µe6enox child
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CATHEDRAL OF CHRIST THE SAVIOUR
In 1931 Stalin decided to destroy one of the most
powerful symbols of Russian Orthodoxy, the
imposing 19th century Cathedral of Christ the
Saviour, situated in the heart of Moscow. In its
place Khrushchev ordered the construction of a
huge open-air heated swimming pool, named
Moskva. In a seemingly extravagant act of
reconciliation with the past, the mayor of
Moscow, Luzhkov, resolved to rebuild the
cathedral on its original site.
51o Ky¬ninni. Bo1 µeµymxa, Hnan Han¬onnn, n 6a6ymxa, Maµn× He1µonna.
Lxy nocexiµec×1 cexi ¬e1, a en nocexiµec×1 mec1i ¬e1. 51o nx cin, Ba¬eµnn
Hnanonnn. Lxy mec1iµec×1 ¬e1. Lio »eny :ony1 Lxa1eµnna. Ln n×1iµec×1 mec1i
¬e1. V nnx µnoe µe1en, Panca n Hioµi. Hx 1µnµna1i ¬e1 n µnaµna1i µen×1i
¬e1. Panca µa:neµena, n y nee oµnn µe6enox, He1×. Lxy n×1i ¬e1.


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HOW OLD ARE YOU? CKO¹IKO TLIL (BAM) ¹LT'
When Russians talk about age they say to me ... years`, to you ... years` etc., which is expressed by use
of the Dative case. You have already met most of the Dative forms of the personal pronouns: to me =
xne, to you = 1e6e or nax (see above), to him = exy, to her ÷ en, to them = nx.
Activity Fourteen - He1mpna(na1oe sa(anne
Writing Work out the Russian for the English phrases on the left-hand side by
matching up the ages on the right with the appropriate personal pronouns in the middle. (The
only unfamiliar form is done for you.)
He is eighteen years old Mne µnaµna1i n×1i ¬e1
She is eleven years old Te6e µen×1i ¬e1
You (formal/plural) are thirty-six years old Lxy µen×noc1o cexi ¬e1
We are twenty-five years old Ln nocexnaµna1i ¬e1
They are seventy years old Hax oµnnnaµna1i ¬e1
I am ninety-seven years old Bax cexiµec×1 ¬e1
You (informal) are nine years old Hx 1µnµna1i mec1i ¬e1
O±HH IO±
±BA/TPH/HETLPE IO±A
HRTB > ±BA±HATB HET
The most common form of the word for years` is ue1, as you already know; e.g. Cxo·ixo 1e6e ·e1'
(How old are you?) - Mne oµnnnaµna1i ·e1. (I am eleven years old.). However, for reasons which
will become clear later in the course, after the number one you must use the word ro(; e.g. exy oµnn
ioµ (he is one year old), en µnaµna1i oµnn ioµ (she is twenty-one years old). After two, three and
four you must use the form ro(a; e.g. exy 1µn ioµa (he is three years old), en 1µnµna1i ne1iµe
ioµa (she is thirty-four years old), nax c1o µna ioµa (you are a hundred and two years old).
Activity Fifteen - Hn1na(na1oe sa(anne
Speaking Establishing the ages of other students in the class. Every student in the
class should ask every other student his or her age Cxo·ixo 1e6e ·e1' or Cxo·ixo
nax ·e1' if you wish to be more formal. The student being questioned can either tell the
truth or make up an alternative age. The questioner then has to decide whether the age
suggested is nµann·ino (correct) or nenµann·ino (incorrect). If the questioner guesses
correctly the interviewee will respond 1i nµan(a) or, more formally, ni nµani (you`re
right), but if he/she gets it wrong, the response will be 1i ne nµan(a) or ni ne nµani.
If the questioner is right he/she gets a mark, if not, the interviewee gets the mark. However ,
the interviewee will get no marks if the questioner spots a mistake in his/her use of the forms
ioµ, ioµa and ·e1. The winner is the student who emerges with the largest overall number
of marks.
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Activity Sixteen - mec1na(na1oe sa(anne
Speaking Role-play
1. You are on holiday in Moscow and you have fallen ill. You have gone to the
no·nx·nnnxa (the equivalent of your local medical centre or GP`s surgery) and the re-
ceptionist asks to take down your details. Reverse the roles when you have completed the
scene.
Your role Your partner`s role - the receptionist
Say hello. Respond appropriately. Ask the patient for
his/her name.
State your first name and your surname. Ask the patient what nationality he/she is.
Give your nationality. Ask him/her where he/she is living in Moscow.
Say that you are living in the Hotel Rossiya. Ask him/her how old he/she is.
State your age. Tell the patient to take a seat. ( Caµn1eci)
Thank the receptionist.
2. You have been asked by the local police to find out some basic information about a
(non English-speaking) Russian tourist who has got lost from his/her party. Reverse the roles
when you have completed the scene.
Your role Russian tourist
Say hello and introduce yourself. Respond appropriately.
Ask the tourist his/her name. Give a suitable Russian name.
Ask him/her where he/she is living. Say in a hostel (o6me»n1ne) in Enfield.
Ask for his/her age. State your age.
Ask him/her if he/she has a passport. Reply that your passport is in the bus.
Ask if he/she knows London well. Say no.
Tell him/her not to worry. (He 6ecnoxon1eci)
and offer him/her a seat. Express your gratitude.
Activity Seventeen - Ceuna(na1oe sa(anne
Writing Write a short description of your family in Russian, giving their names, ages,
where they live and other relevant information (e.g. their nationality, their interests/hobbies,
their jobs and their place of work).
You may find the phrases below helpful. (Do not worry about the endings and other unfamiliar forms -
they will all be explained at a later stage.)
nany/o1na :ony1 ... (my) father/dad is called ... eio :ony1 ... he is called ...
xaxy/xa1i :ony1 ... (my) mum/mother is called ... ee :ony1 ... she is called ...
xonx µoµn1e¬en :ony1 ... my parents are called ... nx :ony1 ... they are called ...
y xen× oµnn 6µa1, y xen× I have one brother, 6µa1a/xonx my brother/s
µna/1µn/ne1iµe 6µa1a two/three/four brothers 6µa1ien :ony1 ... is/are called ...
y xen× oµna cec1µa, I have one sister, cec1µy/xonx cec1eµ my sister/s
y xen× µne/1µn/ne1iµe two/three/four sisters :ony1 ... is/are called ...
cec1µi
µeµymxy :ony1 ... (my) grandfather is called ... 6a6ymxy :ony1 ... (my) grandmother is called...
y xen× µnoe/1µoe/ I have two/three/
ne1neµo µe1en four children
cina :ony1 ... (my) son is called ... µoni :ony1 ... (my) daughter is called ...
xonx µe1en :ony1 ... my children are called ...
nane ... ioµ/ioµa/¬e1 dad is ... years old xaxe ... ioµ/ioµa/¬e1 mum is ... years old
caµn1eci, no»a¬ync1a please take a seat ne 6ecnoxon1eci (imperative) do not worry


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Activity Eighteen - Boceuna(na1oe sa(anne
Listening/Writing As you will have noticed in the exercise above, not only do the
personal pronouns change in the Dative case, but nouns also change their forms. There are
four basic endings: y, -m, -e, -n:
(m) Hnan ~ Hnany, Bacn·nn ~ Bacn·nn, ynn1e·i ~ ynn1e·n
(f) Anna ~ Anne, 1e1× ~ 1e1e, Maµn× ~ Maµnn
Listen to the statements about the following people and fill in their ages in the gaps below.
The first one is done for you. When you have completed the listening task, write out the
nominative form of the people mentioned.
1. Cne1¬ane Hnanonne _____ ¬e1.
2. Ioµncy Hnxo¬aennny _____ ¬e1.
3. C1yµen1y _____ ¬e1.
4. C1yµen1xe _____ ¬e1.
5. Ia6ymxe _____ ¬e1.
6. Anµµen Cnµoµony _____ ¬e1.
7. ¹nµxn¬e He1µonne _____ ¬e1.
8. Hµenoµana1e¬n _____ ¬e1.
9. Haµe»µe Bacn¬ienne _____ ¬e1.
10. Bn1a¬nn ,xn1µnennny _____ ¬e1.
Activity Nineteen - ±enn1na(na1oe sa(anne
Reading The Dative case is also used in a wide range of impersonal expressions,
such as Hnany cxynno - Ivan is bored` (literally: To Ivan it is boring`). (Eor a more
comprehensive list of impersonal expressions, see the Grammar section.)
Bnx1oµy xoµomo. 3nnanµe cxynno. deµoµy nece¬o.
,enymxe xo¬oµno. Hx 1en¬o. Ma¬innxy n¬oxo.
Lxy nµann1c× io¬i]. Ln nµann1c× 1ennnc. Hµe nµan×1c× xon]e1i.
cxynno bored xo¬oµno cold (dative) nµann1c× (+ nom. singular) ... like(s) (¹ obfect),
nece¬o happy 1en¬o warm (dative) nµan×1c× (+ nom. plural) (subfect) please(s) ...
µenymxa girl xa¬innx boy
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Activity Twenty - ±na(na1oe sa(anne
Listening Listen to the recording in which members of the Petrov family talk about
which drinks they like and dislike and complete the table below. Some of the items are
already filled in. (All the drinks are given in alphabetical order at the foot of the page,
together with other essential vocabulary.)
Name Likes a lot Quite likes Dislikes
Ivan Coffee
Mariya Beer
Yuri Tea
Igor
Alya
Yekaterina
Note: 1o»e - also (used when the obfect is the same but the subfect is different); (a) 1ax»e - also, likewise (broader
usage - can be used when the subfect is the same). See Chapter Thirteen, p. 241.
Activity Twenty-One - ±na(na1t nepnoe sa(anne
Speaking Now agree upon the choice of six drinks with your partner, but do not tell
each other your order of preference. You should ensure that there is one drink which you like
a great deal, another four which you like to varying degrees (to be listed in declining order of
preference) and a sixth which you positively dislike. Your objective is to try to establish in
the least number of goes possible each other`s order of preference, by asking the ques-
tion Te6e nµann1c× ...' or Bax nµann1c× ...', if you wish to be more formal. If you
very much like the drink mentioned you should reply ,a, xne 6o·ime nceio nµann1c×
... or ,a, xne oneni nµann1c× ... and if you strongly dislike the drink mentioned you
reply He1, xne concex ne nµann1c× ... . Otherwise, you reply in every case ,a,
xne nµann1c× ..., no xne 6o·ime nµann1c× ... and you name the drink which is
next highest on your list. This activity can, of course, be repeated with other subjects such as
different football teams.
Activity Twenty-Two - ±na(na1t n1opoe sa(anne
Speaking/Writing Answer the following questions in writing, then use the questions
as the basis for interviewing your partner about his/her likes and dislikes.
1. Te6e (Bax) 6o¬ime nµann1c× nan n¬n xo]e'
2. Te6e (Bax) nµann1c× no¬n1nxa'
3. Te6e (Bax) 6o¬ime nµann1c× ieoiµa]n× n¬n nc1oµn×'
4. Te6e (Bax) nµann1c× x¬accnnecxa× xy:ixa'
5. Te6e (Bax) 6o¬ime nµann1c× non-xy:ixa n¬n µ»a:'
6. Te6e (Bax) nµann1c× ]y16o¬'
7. Te6e (Bax) nµann1c× Vn¬i×x mexcnnµ'
8. Kaxon ioµoµ 1e6e (nax) 6o¬ime nceio nµann1c×'
nnno wine xne 6o¬ime nceio nµann1c× ... I like ... most of all
xoxa-xo¬a coca-cola xne 6o¬ime nµann1c× ... I prefer ... (literally: I like ... more)
xoni×x cognac xne concex ne nµann1c× ... I do not like ... at all
¬nxonaµ lemonade nan tea
nnno beer
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Activity Twenty-Three - ±na(na1t 1pe1te sa(anne
Reading Logic exercise. Eive schoolchildren (Natasha, Boris, Lyena, Ivan and
Marina) were asked to place Russian, Maths, History, Latin and English in declining order of
preference. They all agreed that thay had one subject which they liked a great deal, one
which they strongly disliked and three which they liked to varying degrees. However ,
remarkably, none of them placed any of the subjects in exactly the same position as any of
the others. Below are the details of their preferences.
Now, by putting the appropriate subjects in the correct squares below, see if you can work
out the order of preference of each of the children. (No.1 represents the children` s favourite
subject, while No.5 is the subject which they liked least of all.)
Remember: strong dislike is expressed by the phrase ... concex ne nµann1c× ..., while
strong liking is expressed either by ... 6o·ime nceio nµann1c× ... or by ... oneni
nµann1c× ... Note that since none of the children placed a single subject in the same
position as any of the others you should have different subjects in each column, both horizontally
and vertically.
µyccxnn ×:ix Russian (language) ¬a1nncxnn ×:ix Latin n ... n both ... and
xa1exa1nxa mathematics ani¬nncxnn ×:ix English nex than
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Ha1ame nµann1c× ani·nncxnn ×:ix, no 6o·ime nµann1c× xa1exa1nxa.
Ioµncy nµann1c× nc1oµn×, no 6o·ime nµann1c× ani·nncxnn ×:ix. ¹ene
nµann1c× ·a1nncxnn ×:ix n oneni nµann1c× xa1exa1nxa. Hnany concex
ne nµann1c× xa1exa1nxa, no exy nµann1c× ·a1nncxnn ×:ix. Hnany
1ax»e oneni nµann1c× nc1oµn×. Maµnne nµann1c× n nc1oµn×, n
xa1exa1nxa, no en concex ne nµann1c× µyccxnn ×:ix. Ioµncy 6o·ime
nµann1c× ani·nncxnn ×:ix, nex Ha1ame. Ha1ame 6o·ime nµann1c×
ani·nncxnn ×:ix, nex Hnany. ¹ene concex ne nµann1c× ani·nncxnn
×:ix. Hnany 6o·ime nµann1c× µyccxnn ×:ix, nex ·a1nncxnn ×:ix n
6o·ime nµann1c× ·a1nncxnn ×:ix, nex ani·nncxnn ×:ix. ¹ene 6o·ime
nµann1c× µyccxnn ×:ix, nex nc1oµn×. Ha1ame 1o»e 6o·ime nµann1c×
µyccxnn ×:ix, nex nc1oµn×. Maµnne 6o·ime nµann1c× nc1oµn×, nex
xa1exa1nxa, n en nµann1c× xa1exa1nxa 6o·ime, nex ·a1nncxnn ×:ix.
¹ene 6o·ime nµann1c× ·a1nncxnn ×:ix, nex Hnany. Ioµncy 6o·ime
nceio nµann1c× µyccxnn ×:ix.
Ha1ama Hnan Ioµnc Maµnna ¹ena
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Activity Twenty-Four - ±na(na1t ue1nëp1oe sa(anne
Listening/Reading/Speaking Read and listen to the following text about shopping
for clothes and then take it in turn to play the parts of the speakers.
Hµoµanen - 3µµanc1nyn1e! ¹ex × xoiy nax noxoni'
Hoxyna1e·i - Hoxa»n1e, no»a¬ync1a, xexonyn manxy.
Hµoµanen - Ho»a¬ync1a.
Hoxyna1e·i - Cxo¬ixo ona c1on1'
Hµoµanen - 580 (n×1ico1 nocexiµec×1) µy6¬en. Hµnxeµi1e.
Hoxyna1e·i - Ona xne ne¬nxa. A xenime y nac ec1i'
Hµoµanen - He1, y nac 1o¬ixo 6o¬imne µa:xeµi.
Hoxyna1e·i - A neµnie xo»anie neµna1xn y nac ec1i'
Hµoµanen - Bo1, no»a¬ync1a. Hocxo1µn1e.
Hoxyna1e·i - Onn xne xa¬i. Io¬imne no µa:xeµy ec1i y nac'
Hµoµanen - Lc1i. Hµnxeµi1e.
Hoxyna1e·i - 51o xaxon µa:xeµ'
Hµoµanen - Ceµixon*.
Hoxyna1e·i - Xoµomo, onn xne xax µa:. Cxo¬ixo onn c1o×1'
Hµoµanen - 320 (1µnc1a µnaµna1i) µy6¬en.
Hoxyna1e·i - ,an1e, no»a¬ync1a, µne naµi.
Hµoµanen - 51o 640 (mec1ico1 coµox) µy6¬en
Hoxyna1e·i - Cnacn6o. ,o cnnµann×!
* Ceµixon (Seventh) ÷ Size 7. Russian sometimes uses ordinal numbers where English uses cardinal numbers.
Activity Twenty-Five - ±na(na1t nn1oe sa(anne
Speaking You are in a Russian shoe shop and you have seen a pair of black shoes
which you really like. You play the part of the customer and your partner the role of shop
assistant. Reverse roles when you have completed the scene.
Customer Sales assistant
Say hello. Say hello and ask how you may help.
Ask the assistant to show you the black leather Ask the customer what size he/she is.
shoes (1y]¬n) and say how much you like them.
Say that you are size 37. Say that you only have size 38 and ask the
customer to try them on.
Say that they are big on you. Tell the customer that you have some very
nice shoes in brown (oneni xµacnnie
xoµnnnenie 1y]¬n), size 37.
Say thank you and ask how much they cost. Say that they cost 980 roubles.
Tell the assistant that you will take them. Say thank you and goodbye.
nµoµanen (nµoµanmnna) shop assistant xo»anin leather
noxyna1e¬i(nnna) customer, shopper neµna1xn (sing. neµna1xa) gloves
nex × xoiy nax noxoni' (how) can I help you? nocxo1µn1e (imperative) have a look
noxa»n1e (imperative) show (me) on(-o, -a, -n) xne it`s (they are) small
xexonon fur xa¬ (-o, -a , -i) on me
manxa hat 6o¬imnn (-a×, -ee, -ne) bigger size (literally:
nµnxeµi1e (imperative) try (it/them) on no µa:xeµy according to si:e)
on(-o, -a, -n) xne it`s (they are) big ec1i y nac' = y nac ec1i' do you have?
ne¬nx (-o, -a, -n) on me on (-o, -a, -n) xne it is (they are) just
xenime smaller, less xax µa: right on me
1o¬ixo only, just µan1e µne naµi I`ll have two pairs
6o¬imon µa:xeµ large size xoµnnnenin brown
neµnin black 1y]¬n (sing. 1y]¬×) shoes
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GRAMMAR
EXPRESSING POSSESSION (TO HAVE`)
You have now met the majority of the forms used for expressing possession. As you will have noticed,
there is no verb to have` in Russian. Instead, Russians say y xen× (ec1i) ... in my possession (is)
...` (etc.). The full forms are as follows:
y xen× (ec1i) I have
y 1e6× ( e c 1i) (informal) you have
(pronounced y ne@o) y neio ( e c 1i) (m & n) he/it has
y nee ( e c 1i) she/it has
y nac ( e c 1i) we have
y nac ( e c 1i) (formal/plural) you have
y nnx ( e c 1i) they have
Use of the word ec1i to denote existence
1) V xoio ec1i x×n' V xen× ec1i. 2) V xoio :x4'* V xen×.
Who has a ball? I do. Who has the ball? I have.
In the first example, the question aims to establish the existence of the ball. In the second example, the
existence is not in doubt - the question seeks merely to identify the location of the ball.
Omission of ec1i with adjectives
The word ec1i is therefore usually omitted in statements where the noun is qualified by an adjective,
since in such cases we tend to be more concerned with the quality of an object than with its existence.
1) V xen× ec1i x×n. 2) V xen× auszn x×n.
I have a ball. I have a new ball.
Use of ec1i with adjectives to provide supplementary information
The word ec1i is, however, used with adjectives when their function is merely to provide supplemen-
tary information about an object, (in cases where the existence of the object is already established). By
extension, therefore, ec1i is used when the adjective is seen more or less as an integral part of the
noun.
1) V xen× ec1i 0..zn :x4. 2) V xen× ec1i :.aan.azn :x4.
I have got a white ball. I have got a tennis ball.
In the first example, the adjective white` merely serves to give us a clearer idea of what the ball looks
like. In the second example, tennis ball` is virtually a single entity.
Use of ec1i in questions
Hence, ec1i is commonly used in questions (even when the noun is qualified by an adjective), since
questions frequently seek to establish the existence, rather than the quality, of an object.
1) V 1e6× J? nonin x×n' ,a, J?. 2) V 1e6× auszn x×n' ,a, auszn.
Do you have a new ball? Yes, I do. Do you have the new ball? Yes, the new one.
S U M M A R Y O F U S E S
Use ec1i for: Do not use ec1i for:
1) Existence 1) Quality (÷adjectives)
2) Existence & supplementary information 2) Location
* All italicized words are stressed. We are indebted to Robert L. Baker, who provides a useful summary
of the main points listed here in Russian for Everybody, Sixth Edition, pp. 165 - 166.
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THE DATIVE CASE
SINGULAR ENDINGS OF NOUNS
There are four basic endings for nouns in the Dative case, which are illustrated below by the use of the
preposition x (towards`, to |someone`s place]`) The endings are -y, -m (masculine & neuter) and -e, -n
(feminine).
MASCULINE
nµan (doctor) ¡x] nµany (|to] the doctor|`s] )
1µaxnan (tram) ¡x] 1µaxnan (|towards] the tram)
nµenoµana1e·i (lecturer) ¡x] nµenoµana1e·n (|to] the lecturer)
NEUTER
oxno (window) ¡x] oxny (|to] the window)
xoµe (sea) ¡x] xoµn (|towards] the sea)
:µanne (building) ¡x] :µannn (|towards] the building)
EEMININE
xeµcec1µa (nurse) ¡x] xeµcec1µe (|to] the nurse)
Tan× (Tanya) ¡x] Tane (|to] Tanya|`s])
Ani·n× (England) ¡x] Ani·nn (|towards] England)
n·omaµi (square) ¡x] n·omaµn (|towards] the square)
Note: masculine nouns ending in -a or -n (e.g. nana or Ko·×) are treated the same as feminine
nouns.
Pronouns
Nominative Dative Dative (with prepositions)
x1o( ') xoxy( ') (to/for |etc.] whom?) ¡x/no] xoxy( ')
n1o( ') nexy( ') (to/for |etc.] what?) ¡x/no] nexy( ')
× xne (to/for |etc.] me) ¡xo/no] xne
1i 1e 6e (to/for |etc.] you) ¡x/no] 1e 6e
on e xy (to/for |etc.] him) ¡x/no] nexy
ona e n (to/for |etc.] her) ¡x/no] nen
xi nax (to/for |etc.] us) ¡x/no] nax
ni n a x (to/for |etc.] you) ¡x/no] n a x
onn nx (to/for |etc.] them) ¡x/no] nnx
Activity Twenty-Six - ,naµna1i mec1oe :aµanne
Writing Translate the following phrases into Russian.
1. I am going to the doctor `s. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
2. He is going towards the building. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
3. We are going to Ivan`s place. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
4. She is going towards the park. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
5. They are going to Anna Petrovna`s. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
6. Are you |1i] going to Boris Petrov`s? ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
7. I am going to (see) the nurse. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
8. Are you |ni] going to Natalya Ivanovna`s? ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
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MAIN USES OF THE DATIVE CASE
1. Impersonal constructions
Sensations and feelings
xne (etc.) ... xoµomo, n¬oxo, ¬ynme, xy»e, nece¬o, iµyc1no, nn1eµecno, cxynno, 1en¬o, »aµxo,
µymno, xo¬oµno, yµo6no, c1µamno, 1omno
I feel/am (etc.) ... fine, poorly, better, worse, happy, sad, interested, bored, warm, hot, suffocated, cold,
comfortable, terrified, sick
Age
xne (etc.) oµnn ioµ (µnaµna1i oµnn ioµ, 1µnµna1i oµnn ioµ)
µna/1µn/ne1iµe ioµa (µnaµna1i µna/1µn/ne1iµe ioµa)
n×1i ~ µnaµna1i ·e1 (µnaµna1i n×1i/mec1i/cexi/nocexi/µen×1i ·e1)
Note: the form ioµ is used only when the number actually ends in oµnn (e.g. 21, 31, 41, 81, 101) and the form
ioµa is used only when the number actually ends in µna/1µn/ne1iµe (e.g. 22, 32, 43, 73, 104). Hence, I am
eleven` = xne oµnnnaµna1i ·e1 and I am twelve` ÷ xne µnenaµna1i ·e1
Likes and dislikes
xne (etc.) (ne) nµann1c× ... (¹ singular subfect - Nominative case) I (do not) like ...
xne (etc.) (ne) nµan×1c× ... (¹ plural subfect - Nominative case) I (do not) like ...
xne (etc.) 6o¬ime nceio nµann1c× ... / nµan×1c× ... I like ... most of all
xne (etc.) 6o¬ime nµann1c× ... / nµan×1c× ... , nex ... I like ... more than ...
xne (etc.) concex ne nµann1c× ... / nµan×1c× ... I do not like ... at all
Expressions containing verbs
xne (etc.) ne neµn1c× (, n1o ...) I do not believe it; I cannot believe that ...
xne (etc.) xa»e1c×, n1o ... it seems to me that ...
xne (etc.) nµeµc1on1 (¹ infinitive) ... I have to ..., I am to ... (i.e. the necessitv awaits me)
xne (etc.) nµnxoµn1c× (¹ infinitive) ... I must ..., I have to ...
xne (etc.) c¬eµye1 (¹ infinitive) ... I ought to ...
xne (etc.) xone1c× (¹ infinitive) ... I want to ...
Set phrases
xne (etc.) »a¬i, n1o ... I`m sorry that...
xne (etc.) naµo (¹ infinitive) ... I must ..., I have to ...
xne (etc.) ny»no (¹ infinitive) ... I must ..., I have to ...
xne (etc.) ny»en (¹ m. sing. noun - nom.) I need ...
xne (etc.) ny»no (¹ n. sing. noun - nom.) I need ...
xne (etc.) ny»na (¹ f. sing. noun - nom.) I need ...
xne (etc.) ny»ni (¹ pl. noun - nom.) I need ...
xne (etc.) noµa (¹ infinitive) ... it is time for me to ...
xne (etc.) nce µanno I don`t mind (literally: its all the same to me)
Idiomatic usage (relating to clothes)
on (-o -a,) xne (etc.) nµe1 it suits me
onn xne (etc.) nµy1 they suit me
on (-a, -o, -n) xne (etc.) ne¬nx (-a, -o, -n ) it is (they are) big on me
on (-a, -o, -n) xne (etc.) xa¬ (-a, -o, -i) it is (they are) small on me
on (-a, -o, -n) xne (etc.) xax µa: it is (they are) just right on me
on (-a, -o) xne (etc.) noµonµe1 it will suit me (i.e. meet my requirements)
onn xne (etc.) noµonµy1 they will suit me (i.e. meet my requirements)
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2. To express the indirect object (to` or for`)
The Dative case is used to express to` or for` (with living objects), after verbs such as to give`, to say/
speak`, to write`, to show`, to buy` etc. In these examples the Dative form is known as the Indirect
object.
µan1e xne (etc.), no»a¬ync1a, µynxy please give the pen to me; please give me the pen
ona xne (etc.) nceiµa ionoµn1 «ne1» she always says 'no¨ to me; she always tells me 'no¨
on nnme1 xne (etc.) no-µyccxn he writes to me in Russian
noxa»n1e xne (etc.), no»a¬ync1a, x×n please show the ball to me; please show me the ball
on xne (etc.) nac1o noxynae1 µo:i he often buys roses for me; he often buys me roses
There are many other verbs (which you will meet in later chapters) that also take the Dative case. These
include: neµn1i (to believe), :nonn1i (to ring), noxoia1i (to help), no:no·×1i (to permit, allow),
µa:µema1i (to allow), µaccxa:ina1i (to relate, narrate, tell) and cone1ona1i (to advise).
3. After the prepositions x, no and nonpexn
The prepositions x (to |someone`s place], towards), no (along, according to, by etc.) and, less com-
monly, nonµexn (in spite of) are also followed by the Dative case. Several examples of x are given in
the section on singular endings and you have also met no in several set phrases.
× nµy x nµany I am going to the doctor `s
on nµe1 xo xne he is coming to my place
xi nµex (no nanµan¬ennn) x naµxy we are going towards the park
onn nµy1 x 6a6ymxe they are going to grandmother `s
x1o on/a no nµo]eccnn' what is his/her job? (lit.: who is he/she bv profession?)
x1o on/a no nannona¬inoc1n' what is his/her nationality (lit.: who is he/she bv
nationalitv?)
on (-a, -o, -n) no µa:xeµy it is (they are) the right size (lit.: it is/thev are according
to si:e)
no:nonn1e no noxeµy ... ring (number) ..., call (number) ...
+x:axen no ]n:nxe an exam in physics
no µaµno/1e¬enn:oµy on the radio/television
nµn1e no y¬nne go along the street
no xoexy xnennn in my opinion
nonµexn cone1y in spite of advice, despite the advice
Activity Twenty-Seven - ±na(na1t ce(tuoe sa(anne
Writing Write out the Russian for the following ages, paying particular attention to
the Dative case and the forms ro(, ro(a and ue1.
1. Ivan is 67 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
2. She is 35 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
3. Petya is 2 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
4. I am 44 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
5. Marina Pavlovna is 28 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
6. Eyodor Petrovich Karamzin is 31 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
7. He is 53 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
8. They are 12 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
9. Sergei Alexandrovich is 59 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
10. Grandmother is 91 years (old) ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
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THE ACCUSATIVE OF AD1ECTIVES
You have already been introduced to the Accusative case of nouns in Chapter Eour and you learnt about the
Nominative forms of adjectives in the previous chapter.
In this chapter you have come across several adjectives in the Accusative case. Masculine and neuter
Accusative adjective endings are usually the same as in the nominative case, but the feminine forms -an and
-nn change to -ym and -mm, respectively.
MASCULINE (no change)
Bo1 xpacnmn n cnnnn nnµ»ax. Here is the red and (dark) blue jacket.
Maxa xne noxynae1 xpacnmn n cnnnn nnµ»ax. Mum is buying me the red and (dark) blue jacket.
Bo1 rouyõon ia¬c1yx. Here is the (light) blue tie.
× noxynan exy rouyõon ia¬c1yx. I am buying him the (light) blue tie.
NEUTER (no change)
Bo1 seuënoe n cnnee na¬i1o. Here is the green and (dark) blue coat.
Hana xne noxynae1 seuënoe n cnnee na¬i1o. Dad is buying me the green and (dark) blue coat.
Bo1 aëu1oe n¬a1ie. Here is the yellow dress.
× en noxynan aëu1oe n¬a1ie. I am buying her the yellow dress.
FEMININE (-an changes to -ym; -nn changes to -mm)
Bo1 uëpnan manxa. Here is the black hat.
× 1e6e noxynan uëpnym manxy. I am buying you the black hat.
Bo1 cnnnn n6xa. Here is the (dark) blue skirt.
Ti xne noxynaemi cnnmm n6xy' Are you buying me the (dark) blue skirt?
PLURAL (no change)
Bo1 xopnunenme 1y]¬n. Here are the brown shoes.
Mon 6µa1 xne noxynae1 xopnunenme 1y]¬n. My brother is buying me the brown shoes.
Bo1 cepme neµna1xn. Here are the grey gloves.
× noxynan cec1µe cepme neµna1xn. I am buying my sister the grey gloves.
Activity Twenty-Eight - ±na(na1t noctuoe sa(anne
Writing Write out the Russian for the following, paying particular attention to the adjective
endings.
1. Mum is buying me a black jacket. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
2. I am buying her a (light) blue coat. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
3. He is buying me a red dress. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
4. I am buying mum grey shoes. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
5. Dad is buying me a green hat. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
6. I am buying you a red tie. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
7. My brother is buying me the yellow gloves. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
8. My sister is buying me a new brown coat. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
9. I am buying him a (dark) blue jacket. ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
10. Are you buying me a (dark) blue skirt? ¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸
116

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