who might not other

-
wise consider educa-
tion past high school.
The library helps by providing places
for students to work on schoolwork
with the help of a tutor assigned by
the program, as well as providing
librarian-led instruction sessions and
tours. These help introduce Upward
Bound students to information litera-
cy, a core concept used in ECU gen-
eral education, as well as in higher
education around the country.
The tours proved very popular,
enough that some tours ran over the
time allotted. Student questions
ranged from “do you have these
books by my favorite authors?”,
to “I’m a Reformation dork, so
how did you get a replica Guten-
berg Bible? ” and “would you
answer questions at the Refer-
ence Desk that make it sound
suspiciously like I’ve committed a
crime?”.
Find out more about Upward
Bound and Upward Bound Math
& Science on the ECU website.
Discover how you can get library
tours & instruction on infor-
mation literacy on our instruction
page.
& present day of the institution. It
also adds some intrigue to the aver-
age visit. People passing by may won-
der what Danley Hall or the oblong
sculpture from the rear of the library
are doing on the right side of the
mural—they represent the old loca-
tion and old logo, respectively, of the
library.
Feedback has been nothing but posi-
tive, Brown says, and he is humbled
by being chosen to leave such a lega-
cy behind.
See the finished product yourself by
visiting the library’s second floor, and
keep an eye out for an image of the
mural on the front page of the library
site.
windows, they are not
as warm and welcom-
ing as they could be.
This summer, the
library recruited re-
cent ECU graduate
Chance Brown, who
currently works in the
Chickasaw Nation
Division of Arts &
Humanities, to change
the lounge’s image.
His new mural debuts this July on
the East wall of the lounge.
Brown said that he went through
many drafts of the mural before
presenting the final image to Adri-
anna Lancaster, Dean of the library,
but feels that the final image cap-
tures something about the history
This summer, a hundred or so high-
schoolers have made the library their
study home-away-from-home. In spite
of the stereotype that teenagers and
libraries don’t mix well, library employ-
ees have welcomed these students with
open arms. These are, after all, the
college students of tomorrow.
These are the students of Upward
Bound and Upward Bound Math &
Science, two federal grant programs
that bring in high school students for a
taste of university life. Students live on
campus for up to six weeks at a time
and take classes aimed at showing them
more about what awaits them in col-
lege. The programs focus on students
Since its grand renovation in 2012,
the Tommy Wayne Quaid Memorial
Student Lounge on the library’s
second floor has had a new look,
with comfy furniture and plush rugs.
However, the walls have remained
bare white—while excellent for
catching the light streaming in the
Spotlight: Upward Bound
LIBRARY NEWS
L I N S C H E I D L I B R A R Y J U L Y 2 0 1 4
READ ALL
ABOUT:
 Student
Lounge Mural
 Upward
Bound Tours
& Instruction
 Resources for
Physics
 American
Indian
Histories and
Cultures
 Upcoming
Attractions
 From the
Mouths of
Patrons
 Art Among
the Stacks
 Your Liaison
Librarians
Students
from Upward
Bound pose
on one of their
field trips
New Mural Spices Up Student Lounge
Chance Brown, ECU alum 2013, putting the
finishing touches on the mural
P A G E 2

You don’t have
to be this guy to
discover library
physics sources

Photo from Wikimedia Commons. Image is in
public domain.
Resources for: Physics
Get a quantum of solace in
your schoolwork by using
library resources for your
physics study needs.
For general information, use
the reference books on the
third floor. Find out what
that term really means in
dictionaries, look up quick
facts in a science encyclope-
dia, or get an overview with
handbooks. Find general
science resources here, as
well as ones specifically
about physics.
If you want to bring things
home for a more in-depth
look, try going to the second
floor. Find materials on every-
thing from the science of bub-
bles, questions on the nature
of reality and the universe, and
protection from radiation in
call numbers starting with QC.
For items about wormholes,
accurately steering satellites,
and stardust, look in QB from
460—540. If you’re more
interested in lasers, supercon-
ductors, and quantum compu-
ting, look in call numbers
starting with TK 7800 and
above.
Our electronic resources are
especially useful for late-night
study sessions. Try using the
American Chemical Society
journal search or Computers
and Applied Sciences Com-
plete for the latest in physics
research. Or just use the
front page of the library web-
site: click on the “Articles”
tab of the gray search box,
and select “Physics” from the
drop-down menu to search
every article the library can
access on the topic.
For more information or
guidance, visit us in-person
whenever the library’s open,
or check out the physics sub-
ject guide online.
available online.
If you want to get a general over-
view of Native American history,
the interactive timelines & maps
illustrate key points. For those
who are more interested in old
art, see maps from the 1500s,
paintings from the 1700s, and pho-
tographs from the 1800s,
all featuring prominent
Native American cities or
people from those times.
The cornerstone of this
resource, though, is the
Coming Soon
collection of scanned original docu-
ments, perfect for using as primary
sources in history research. These can
be sorted by different tribes or nations
and year, as well as the type of docu-
ment you’re looking for.
Find out more about this extensive new
resource on our e-resources page.
History & Native American Stud-
ies students have another re-
source to add to their bag of
tricks with the addition of Ameri-
can Indian Histories and Cultures.
This electronic resource pulls
from the Edward E. Ayer collec-
tion, one of the most complete
Native American history collec-
tions in the world. Picking
through the collection is no easy
feat with over 150,000 items to
choose from, but now the best
interesting & pertinent items are
L I B R A R Y N E W S
Digital Resource: American Indian Histories and Cultures
the library. Learn about Lincoln
through both the interactive ex-
hibit and educational lectures by
ECU faculty.
In October, the library celebrates
its 100-year anniversary of being a
federal government document
depository with special speakers
and an unveiling of a historic com-
memoration.
This isn’t all—several other events
are in the works. To add your
own event to the list, contact the
Outreach Department by asking
in-person or online through their
webpage.
Exciting things are happening this
fall at the library. Watch this
space, and the library homepage,
for information as these develop.
This September, a temporary
exhibit about Abraham Lincoln,
the Civil War, and the Constitu-
tion arrives on the second floor of
Explore history with AIHC
What People are Saying About the Library
P A G E 3 L I N S C H E I D L I B R A R Y

Office art
created by
Student
Assistants in
the
Collection
Services (left)
and
Circulation
(right)
departments
In honor of the new mural, here’s
some other art you may not know
about. Walk around the library
sometime and see if you can spot
them all!

I could not navigate the system to locate the answers
for my assignment. [The librarians] have always
helped me feel I could get the assignment done. They
were excellent, pleasant, and really helped me find
what I needed. I was very impressed with them.
This space is reserved for what your
peers—students, faculty, staff, and the
public alike—are saying about our
reference services. These are actual
quotes from library patrons.
Find out for yourself how our
reference rates—stop by the library
and talk to the person at the Reference
Desk, call 580.559.5371, or email
refdesk@ecok.edu for fast help.
Other Library Art
Bronzes by Al
Crawford, best
known for creating
the tiger sculpture
in the Science
Building fountain
Painting and
bronzes by
Enoch Kelly
Haney,
creator of
the sculpture
on top of the
Oklahoma
State Capitol
building
Prints by Leon Polk
Smith, renowned &
influential ECU
alumnus
 Patrick Baumann, Media Services
Librarian
 Cartography/Geography
 Environmental Health Science
 Family & Consumer Sciences
 Human Resources

 Katherine Sleyko, Public Services
Librarian
 Art
 Biology
 Communication
 History
 Political Science & Legal Studies

 Joni Stine, Technical Services Librarian
 Education
 Kinesiology
 Music
 Psychology

Contact your liaison librarian for one-on-
one help if you’re a student. If you’re
faculty, talk to your liaison librarian about
classes and materials you’d like. The
librarians are your guide to the best
resources, so make sure that you use
them!
Did you know that all departments have a
librarian assigned to them? Liaison
librarians can help faculty and students find
information best suited to their area of
study. Find your librarian below, or go to
our student page for more.

 Dana Belcher, Assistant Director &
Collection Services Librarian
 Accounting
 Business Administration
 Computer Science
 Mathematics
 Nursing

 Chelsea Baker, Instructional Services
Librarian
 Chemistry
 English & Languages
 Physics
 Sociology


East Central University, in compliance with Title
VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as
amended), Executive Order 11246 (as amended),
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,
Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 (as amended), the Americans With Disabili-
ties Act of 1990, the Civil Rights Act of 1991, and
other federal and state laws, does not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race, color, national origin,
sex, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation or
status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices
or procedures. This includes, but is not limited
to, admissions, employment, financial aid, and
education services. This publication is issued by
East Central University as authorized by Title 70
OS 1981, Section 3903.
Connect With Your Librarian
East Central University’s mission
is to foster a learning environment
in which students, faculty, staff,
and community interact to
educate students for life in a
rapidly changing and culturally
diverse society. Within its service
area, East Central University
provides leadership for economic
and cultural enhancement.
East Central University’s
Linscheid Library
Though libraries have
classic style, we’re more
than just books. Find out
more about our e-resources
and digital library services
at library.ecok.edu.
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