-

'II TE R WIl YS : "PQ~try tn i'he Ma(V1sty-~ar"r\

'.,

]

WIITER WAYS .

1980 MAGAZINE SCHEDULE FEBRUAffiY

W 0 r ks h 0 Q S : New 'lor R & New J e r s e y 'NY Rublic Heaeirng

'. AP~IL

New Jersey Workshsp

NYPublie Readings

JUNE

Poetry f ( om the Populist Rea din gs at Seuth Street Seaport Museum

'. JULY· 2 - iss 1I e s

Fair at South Street Seaport Museum Fair. Coney Island Boardwalk

.. AUGWST. 4-issues

Faili at Greenwich Village River

Fair. on Fite Island -

Fair in Albany

r;: air 'i n B w t fa I e

OCTOBER

. Workshops

DECEMBER

. Public Reading & Workshop

) .

@ 19 B 0, Ten P e (it n v P' I a y er s , Inc. 799 GREENWICtf Sf .. 'N,Y10014

If1\UfEIIIAV& .Poetry In the .Mainstream

June, 1980

Volume 1

Number 1

WA'l'ERWAY5 is pUbHshed By the W.aterways Project. of 'I1en Penny p!layers, an educational .. literary notfor-profit NY5 corporation. WATERWAYS is published :l!lt:.imes a year in l:imi ted, edd!i:ions and is sold by subs cri!ptioD or at Waterwa_y:s Book Fa:irs.

Co-Eili·tors: Ba.rbara Fisher Ii Richaril Spiegel

CONTENl'S

Pi,:ges 2-9
PI.'gas 4-5
Pages 6-1 AliIe·rican EopuiJ.'ist Poe·try Series ftfchard Sgieqel

Ma'rch 2.: Herman Mel.vill.!lle Harxy Sqri! th

March

Pages 8-9 March

Pages lJO-illl AprB.2'T: "'dab !['saacs Z'lenken Enj,d Dame

P![lges 12-13 May lL: Pau.l_!;ne Johnson Maurice Kenny

Pages 'lJ4-l!S July 6: Wal.t Whitman

Richard Davidson

l'ag,es 16-'1.17 Jul1{ 20 :,Ali.ce Caq

E1,len 'Mari.e B1isse.rt

Pages IB-'l!9 Auqlis't 3: Edg-ar ~lan Roa Donald Lev

, Vi:rqinia Scott Pages 22-2.3 ;:dgar Arlington Robinson Ii Barbara A .• Hol,l:and

Bag.e 24 Ack.nowledgements .10 ~ubscr.:i!ption In'forma'tion

repr-im,ted '",ritten

'poe,es

1

American F,?OJJAst Poetry- Series Rictilard Alan spieQei

In the prin'her's shop on Wat:er Stl:eet: the audiences assembled to hea~ the poe~s. The shop has high wooden beams, long wooden counters, and tall s~a€ks of type cases' in the back wae~e the old printing pli"esses stand.

The South S~reet Seapor~ Museum and Bowne & Co. have preserved the space as a museum of printing as well as a working shOBo Abbie Poeter is a pEinter as well as the manager of the museum.

The shop has been built' on landfill that has ex~ended the original shoreline ef Manhat.tan. We have been told there is a sunken Dutch boat buried beneath Water Street. Outside the museum

is a small green lighthouse with a plaque recalli~g the s Lnkf.nq of the Titanic.

AD audience that filled the house arrived fair the first ];leading on a Simday early in March. We had asked Richard DaviGisen, a poet and actor, to read selections frem Herma.Yl Melville IS peetry. After that, Harry Smith read from his Gown work, whillle I provided oackground informat:ion for bo:th peets.

In what wars can we compare poets who are separa€ed by a oentury? ]I chose to look at the writers' a't1!empts to rea:ch an audience with their poet:r:y, style, tnernes, and whatever oEfier affinit1es our contemporanr poets had :Eor t:heir predecessors.

Herman .Melville published a Lonq epic and th~ee collections during his lifetime.' Two of Ehe co l Le ctd.ens were llimLted t.o edit;j.ons of t.wenty five copies. Emiiy Dickinson. was published rarely in.

2

,

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jou~nals and an anonymous anthol?gy during her lifetime. Squabbles among those in possession of her estate delayed the publication of her complete works until mid-20th century. Paul Laurence Dunbar financed the publication of

his first two 90llections and then contracted with nodd, Mead & Co. Adah Isaacs Menken was pub LLshed consistently in the journals of her day, but her only volume of collected verse did not appear until after ber dea.th in her midthirties in 1868.

The contemporary poets we invited to read are all active in the alternative press. community and have all had collections published. The alternative press community preserves the l~th c.entury spirit of independence and dedication to poetry. The alternative .publisher will pub~ish editions limited to twentyfiye copies, will take chances on the unknown·poet and will issue volumes of their own works.·

Th~ change in our ·language over the

past hundred years can be felt·ih the contrast of styles. In the contrast of style~ we sense the poets' approaches to the words atthei.r command and the tempos of their speech. Changes

in the language and cultural awakenings demand the continual search for a new poetics.

Themes over the century have been restated and when appropriate we compared or contrasted them.

We called the series American Populist Foetry. Like the 19th century political party we are calling for new standards and new ways to spread the wealth that is our literary heritage.

3

I

,lilly in t ~ t II u r bit 1i

_r-rmut1 !ltlttillt

Good of the Chaplain to enter Lone Bay

And down -on hi. marrow-bones here and pray

For tile lit .. 0'. me, Billy Budd.--But, look:, -

Through port cope. the .00B-.hhle adra,,!

It tiPs the ,uard I!I eutlat! and lilverll thi. nook, But twill die in the d •• Din, 01 ,ill,.'.-lll"st :~dA"J. A i~wel-"~loek they'n mate of me tomo.rrow, Penaa'nt pearl ·fro-. th. :r'rJ~arm-'eDd

-~ the ear-drop I ,ave to Bristol )lon~-- 0, . ti. m.~ Eot th ••• ~t.nc. they n suape nd, Ay, AJ, a:d ta uPt ~na 1 ~u.t U *00

. Eady in' the Di.Ornlft~, aloft fro •• low.

On ·"a"ll2-e.pty r.tomac ·Jrcnr-;- •• ~.r. It- would do.

They 11 ,lve me a nib )e-"'bi1l 0 lthcult ere I '0.

:S-u:re, -il meelm:ate will reaellme~ the last' Pltrtbil cup, llu,t turn:in.1 heade a".y fro. the ~o ~t" ~nd the ).l,y, H.~v.n knowe who ,..ill halfe'the r1\llnin, of me up! . No pipe to. tli4 .. h.l,..rd ........ But area t It aU .1tam?

A 11ur~e In mY eyel!lr His dre:amill, that 1 am. :A---hatchet to my ha waer? All "adrift to ,0-'

The drum roll to ,ro., and 111111 never know?

lIut Donald he has promiaedto stand by the plank,

'So r'n ahake a.friendly hf.D.d ere 1 dnk. .

'BIlt~-not It is dead tlien I 11 be, come to think.-'1 remember'Ta'ff the: W.l.h •• n wh.n he .aRk. And hi. ehe.) it .... like the buddih, phl:k •.

But me they lllallh 1IHt"~in-h-."JltDt~--drop me--deepFatholne downi fathom. ·down, how III dream 1.1t asleep. 1 feel it ste.I.«-nolr."Rentry,- .1'"6 you there?'" "~ Ju.t ease these darbies 'at the wrist,

and rolline over lair,

1. am sleepy, and the oozy weeds about me twist.

4

Storm Longings

Harry Smith

Another shere; another atarturn, AUld the dawns ea in my heart ••• Da.wn js' cold, and waves are gray And wilildrushao1 longings start.

And arrowed on wind the s e adr awn birds Cry b[ackwinged and swift abov

L.ongings from a winter storm

That lure my heart near love.,

5

,tEutiiy'lirhius!tu

v

I know some lonely houses off the Road A Rohberd like the look- of -

Wooden barred,

and Windows hanging low, Inviting to -

A portico,.

Where two could creep - On8 - 'hand the Toola - Th other pe.p -

To make lure Alfs Asleep - Old fashioned eyes -

Not eUy to surprise!

How orderly the kitchen'd look, by night, VVith just'. Clock-

" But they could. gag the Tic1e - And !liea won t bart' - ,

And so the Walls - don t tell - None'" will-

A Pair of S~ectacleB ajar just stir ... An Almanac 8 aware -.

"Wee 'it the Mat,. winked; Or a Nervous Star? . The MOOD ,- ,_ alidea. down the .tab

To Bee who'., there!

There's p lunder > where - Tankard, or Spoon - - Earring - or Stone -

A-'Watch'-Some Ancient Brooch To match Grandmama - Staid 8leeping - there -

Day - rattle8 - too Stealth' 8 - slow - The Sun has got as far

As the third Sycamore - Screams Chanticleer

"Who' a there?"

And 'Echoes'" Traina away, Sneer > "Where!" While the old Couple, just astir,

Fancy the Sunrise - left the door ajar!

. ~:,.'

6

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1

I

Cautionary .JoanLarkin

'Be quick,

W.atch QUi ter tha mJncu:----

,WIU,- ttDe botd r of tin fruU8~ Wa.tch ou.3-. for .the, WOIUlI_.8P.o..O.U1S

_ k:~ot r.:1.~ t~at~~:u::I!:y(Jr.

IfIl" thej woo~efl Planer-' I r has:. us. for youoj-,

~"Pl4 aillk,"Wm' tll''Y--to- aeduce you", Th . ctoc~ tho clock,

I ¥fIB" try: tp~., •• r' yo~:.w.ay,; ..

The ·b.d ~wm, not let :yo~ fest will' nOf-let-you wake up.'

Y9~ ar. In- ~a~g.r

of" a· 111uOdy. ra'g

·8 don: With -.0"'.1111"" m~.8ins an 'unftushed toll.I.:

The pr.fnest .veryday things

ara darr,- ... c:ua: . ----:----

the- c.eat drip of the.faucet ttl,,: ffr.- undor the kat·tll;'

the hum ~f the refr~l.r.torn·

Tak-e· what you need

but hurrlt.: .

Do-not.tOp to listen Dn the hallway.

.There have been many before YOQJ", Few have come back,

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A ~ 'l

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7

-

lamn"

Jaul liuurutttt"'lIuuhat"

An angel, robed in" spotlolswhite,

, Bent" down 'and- Jdssed""the"'sl.Clping Night.

'N;ight"woke 'to' blush; the sprite' was gone. Men saw' the "blush" and' called "it' Dawn.

, ~ . . ,

f.

" I,

8

\

Nommo

Zizwe Ngafua

Hoar this my clarion calL life lurks _' watcfling as Dua

Ellipian child

grizzlja warrior· -from dust to dust

smUes' ~t you from shadows Is shadowa~

My; palms outstretched In the face 0"

tha.

sun

( say to the birds of the wilderness

Take what i have ttl my

hands

9

Anpirutintt

J\bu11 Jaunt's iJIltru ktu

Poor impious Soul! that fbes its high hopes In the dim distance_, on a throne of clouds,

And from the morning"s mist would make the ropes To draw it up amid acclaim of crowds -

Beware! That soaring path h lined with shroudsj And he who braves it, though of' sturdy breath" May meet, half way, the avalanche and cle.~hJ

0, poor young Soul! - whose year-devouring ,lance Fixea in ecata'sy upon a star,

Whose feverish brilliance looks a part of earth, Yet quivers where the feet of angels are, And'seems the future crown in realms afar-' Beware! A spark thou art, and dost but see Thine own reflection in Eternity!

10

Lilith at the Abortion Clinic Enid Dame

~'m ngv~r pr epar ed, This has

. be en happening for centurjos [!jut eV$ry Ume

is the first.

I

It might

take after. its. father

. (whoever he was). Ot certainBy would be a damon.

This· clinic ~,

is pfeas.tl!l.t.,· They"ve gotten more civiHzed· afierBBi:

the Chine:se doctor .

with his up-ta-date vacuum cleaner, the West Indian woman

who holds my hand

and says. UDon't be. s c ar e d, honey. m

Later

they give us applejuice. We bleed v.e~y quietly., The black

teenager in the next bed

quietly cries •.

j I

I

I've done what

I have to do. The universe clicks back Into piece.

Somebody's god

is satisfied.

11

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" .;\tt ~ 3;3 2t .... IA ft'

..n. u IIIP~ .8uib. 31 ig.Jtt wtt '

(Tennyson)'

ilLt ku4inttuutkt ,EMILY PAULINE JOHNSON

Time and its ally, nark Di .. rmam.nt, Have eompaaaed me about,

Have mused th.ir armi.l, and on battle b.at My forc.s put to rout.;

But though I fi.ht alon.~, and, faU,:,and dio, Talk t.rms of Peae.? Not I.

Thoy war upon my fortrell~ 'and' th.ir pns Are sha tt.rin. its .an1i

My army plays the coward," I part, and runl, Pierced by a th,uland balllj ,

They call for my 8urr.nd.r~ I r.ply,

"G" b

" rve quarter now? Not I.

They've shot my fla, to ribbons, but in rents It floats abevethe ,hei.htr

Their ,ensign shall not crown

, ,Wliile ,I .atand . and ,filht~

I fling, defiance, at, them as, I cry, "Capitulate? Not I."

1-2

T

In the Flow

Maurice' Kenny·

13

rJ Ii 11

For are, Benet

I learn water

In th, sky cloude! lurf.e.·

'over aycamores minnows' nttrbt.-

• drowned butterfly

I. ' •• rn rlv.rs

by sitting stili watoh th.- creY'ce

o.f my brow

hear wInd ripple

breakrefloctions

learn water

in the summer fox trek down to drink autumn whispers

Eye catches'

the hawk

in the winter sky

;

.. ~

.. OOlU~$li-.8tlf 11 ~1Ug IlfttU .~Unnuur

One's:-self I sing, a simple· sll]j)!il'ate person,

Yet utter the word Democratic; the word Enn·Masse.

Of physiology from top ,to toe 1 sing,

Not physiognomy alone nor bruin al?ne is'.worthy for the Mu~, !say the Form. complete is worthier"far,

The Female equally with' the, Male I ~~

Of Life ImmenaeIn passion, pulse, and power,

Cheerful, for freest aebion form'd' under··the Iawsdivine, The Modern Man I sinl.

14

Charlie for All' Times 'Richard Davidson

for Charles Chaplin. April 16. 1889 -, December 259 1977

He danced on ~he pathwavs of the world, Every city, everY-~iillager

And now he is dead,

r heard the ra~ort on a Saturday night at one o'clock,

(What a time for Charlie. one o'clock,

saving the f at m i ll-lonaire '::!:'om drowning in lei ty Li.gh"ts, I the tramc embraced as a o a L ~

The morning after Charlie was barred from the door, Unrecognized. )

His ~ame on the tips of millions of tongues, Children skipped rope to his rhythm,

~~d old men held 'their sides in im~olite laughter at his endless predicaments.

[I can remember seeing him as a boy --

A lonely, disturbed boy living in a children'S home. From the u~stairs balcony in a theatre in Cleveland, ~'1atching 'Modern Times' and struggling with Charlie Against the instruments of fate and authorit~. Somehow! was there on the screen with him.

A.ll the los t ,aching children were ',,,i th me.

Smashing our fists against the iron of indif==rence. Charlie wore the rose of our deliverance in his lapel. ,;nd smiled our terror into the tins led teeth of

The enemy,)

He came flatfooted and ~roud. Down the long. long road.

A derby on his head.

The touch of crises in the air,

~~ ever readv smile of hooe on his lips. Tables in restaurants gave way

As he Juggled trays as a waiter,

But ever 50 gracefully, so gracefully,

The shock of machine in factor! drove him balmv,

And ~uts and bolts set his fingers curling -

Li~<.e disjoi'nted mice.

aut ever so gracefully, so aracefullv, Tucking in shirt with'that ~arvelous-grin.

And in his hands the clack Qf the universe quietly collapsed.

Oh shining Don Quixote,

Oh knight with the mismatched shoes,

~e loved you eating that shoe i~ the icy north,

With vou we waited in descerate pain ~or e~e blind ;1rl

Now sight restored, -

1'0 recogni ~e :_!OU or not.

r ~ecogn~ze yout always. '{:lU 'Here my army, :ny hero,

The hero of all t~e oowe~le55.

:'~e ;night of king3 sorely ':.rembl:c

3e£ore that sparkling KniSht wi~h 3 ~~oken ;love ~or 3 5word!

ha lie, ~ou are 5 :11 ~V hero

~(? ading as a. poe irlc~ che ~ir:l.s ~t ou r 1.reams. u~ ~ing ~orever ~ e hopes ~f che ~ill~ons.

15

,W~t ~tn-&i?at Graut

Al itt Qtury

"A bird uf the I.lir shall.carry the voice, "

ana tfiat WhICh hath wlIngs leHthe matter.

At the dead of night by the side of the Sen Lmet my gray-haired enemy,-,

The, glittering light, of, his, '1lliont eye, , Was, aIll had to see hi., by.,

At the dead- of qht; and' atormy weather,We went into ,8' .;~ve' togeth.r~-'

Into' a' cave by the aide of the Sea;

'And' -he never came out' with me! .

'Th~_ f1Qwe~ .. -that up through the April mould CQmes)ik~ a miser dragging' his gold" Never made a_pot of earth' 10 bri,Iit

As was tlie rrol11id'ln the cave -that nirh~

-.Dead of nilhtt and stOl:'lDY weatherl

,Who should see us loi~g t~get~er

<Under the blaek and drippmg stone

Of 'the cave from whence _I caMe alone!

Next day as my boy sat on my knee He picked the, gray, hairs off from mc, And told with eyes brimful of fear How a bird in- the meadow near,

Over her day-built nest had spread Sticks..and leaves all bloody red,

Brought 'from a cave by the side of the Bea Where some murdered man must be •

16

Ode to My True Nature Ellen Marie Bissert

•.. , it is conceivable that the forceful suppression

of wome n t s inordinate sexual demands was a o r a r eq u i.s i, te to the dawn of ever] modern c i v i Li.z a t i on and almost

every living cul t ur e , P r i rn i ti ve woman ' s sexual d r i ve

~as too strong. teo susceptible to the fluctuating extremes of an impelling, aggressi'le eroticism to 'IIi thstand the disci~lined requirements of a settled fam~ly life ... ' nary Jane Sherfev' 5 The ::-.rature and EVolution of .E'emale

Sexualitv, p. 138* -- -- -

1 can't get anything done on time i have 10 love=s

i am wri ting 3 'novels

& a treatise on orgies in medieval convents 50 lazy

i sleep & dream on anything that transports me trucks that haul thousands of my best-selling !=,oems

giant slides that slip me into caressing pools of bubbling water railroad cars that dump matriarchal sex rites into the Sistine Chapel

i. have a Iways known myself to be sacred

virgin

insatiable in satiation

capable of more than 50 orgasms in an hour like mermaids wanton in silvery caves

like qadishtu of Babylonia, Sumeria, Lydia

like the priestesses of Corinth, Crete. Le~bos, Egypt orgiastic in temples, baths" menstrual huts

~omen orgasmic in beauty p~rlcrs, ~ororities. & ladies' rooms isharitu

w i c ch

nun

lesbian shrew

infused with the brilliance of my bleeding fertility i drio with holy silken fluid

for myself for 'other women

a menace to civilization i cannot be trusted

i cannot be trusted with your children your tender nubile daughters

i cannot be trusted

to perpetuate your sons

your giant mushrooms in the sky

*3ee ,",slen Dl:l.2r'S :1oc:hers and Amaz cn s , Elizabeth Gould uavis I 5 The ~i=st Sex, and ~!erll.n S tone IS r,'men 30d Nas A NOInan for:-3. ~bala.nced v i ew , -- -- -- -

17

iiUUHUtrt'

tltgttt Allu11 'ot

I

1/

Roman.ce, who loves to nod and sing, With droVfsyhead and fo14ed Willi, Amonl the green leaves a~ t~ey shake Far down ,within o •• e 'sh_dowy lako,

~o me ,a" painte~ iP_~~oq~~~ i "

Hath been.-a most famJll.r b11"dTnaht me my aipAabet"~-aaJ-

To lisp my very ,earliest ,w'rOr~ .WhiIe--,in-the ,wi1l1-_o~ 14i4 Jje" A child -with a mOllt kno~j!l' ey ••

,Of late,eternal"CoDdo~ _y.-rs

,So shake the ve~y ,!feaven :on higih With tumult as the)" thuBcle~ by,

I have no time Cor l41e cah_

Through gazing OB -*he , uni;luitt 8~J'. And when an hour with •• J •• r· WiD,S Hs down upon my spirit flings-

That little time ,with .lyre ,:and rhyme .To,while away,-forbidden:thinls! My. heart would feel .te be la -, crime Unleas it trembled with the .strings.

I

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18

Populist Poem Donald Lev

. kick

that big. fruit open holl r

p cpl.

acr aam

t.hey c n't seal very thing in anymore they can't

drop cocoanuts on yo.ur head any more and say how could you know what we mean. stupid? you weren't at yale harvard princeton

19

114uI t4t 1iulitl &ttug 11ft! lJart

o joy ·of creation . ·'To·bel o rapture iCl fly'

And ~be 'freel

. Bj3 thebjl,ttle lOlt or'won Thoulhit!ii'omoke'shaU"hlde the "Bun, 1. 'shall find my lovo,-the one .

Born for·.a! .

I shall know him where he 8tand8~

. All alone,'

WIth' the' p~we:r; in' his' hands

. Not·· 0 erthrown;.

~ ·shall know him 'by his' face, By his' godlike front aud'grace; 1 'shall'hotel him lor' a' Ipsee,

AII' my own!

It is''bCl-O my" love!

So boldf' 'It· is I-all thy 'love"

··Foretold! '

it"is I. 0 love!' . what· biis!)1 Dost·thou answor' to' my·J;.j..s? O' 8weetheart!"'what is' tlb.u·

Lieththere"so' cold?

20

Sonnet

Virginia ScOtt

, cling by your hands to the cliff edge . dar.e to change the, handhold'

to pul( your,.1f b.~k' up ,

by' your own', arma grown sott from lack of use, Ignore'the ptln or if It gets'too lnt.nse

scr.am ouflOud. '

tn.re ar. nO,r •• cu.rs

onl)"! you and; y~ _itn.ss

to pul( youraelf' along this cliff face corfC:;."trate on' t,,8" pa-jiige'

,~cro.s the open. rQ9k_, ,pody, pr.~~~d tight ag.rnst' the oliff wall' sUgs of h_'

head -at foot: produce a mort'" fall _ perhaps ft'a wiser not to cUm'b atone

21

:. ill' 4t.: Qtlff.kJi

'£btuiu Arliugtnu Inbittsnu

.. I' did not .think .that 1 should. find ihemihere' Wh·e.·1 .came 'b~ck :allain:bui ·there thoy.toad,

. A s . hi :111e :daYIl.they .dream.d of when young :blood . ·W .. in ·their cheek. and women callod them fair. Belur.,the,· met 7"-e with an ancient afr,-

.A.n~ ,Ii, ·.there ~a8 a Ihap-worll brotherhood .b~u1; 1;h •. _: hut the mIn were j~.t .S· j'ood,

And JUlt a" hu •••• , th.y ever w.re.

A •• yOll that ache .10 much to he sublime,

And you that feed youn.lv.s with your descent, .What com.s of an your vi.ione ·.alld your fears? PO.tl and kiD III ar6 but the clerka of .Tim., .Tlerin .• the same .dull webs of discontent,

Clip pi., .the .ame . sad .alDage .of .the years.

22

'A ~eoorsed Message Barbara A.lmolla!ld

y;eUJ; with 'yoar

t.he wind.;

your i'n~tGl wit:h year

as

message.

Ackmowliedgements

1895

& Plioebe Caxy .•

Lesbia.

Out .. Out

1950

Sl!JbSeliiptiQA P.itct.'i

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The W ate r .w a y s Pro j e c tis _ ay e a f"'"" r O\U n d s e r i e s 0 f

- Book Fairs & Poetry Reading,s. It is a cooperative effor·t of Publish,ers & Poets to'mai,nstream Poetry an d to de v e.Iop audiences for poe-tliY aned. Uteratur ••

Waterways is a program of Ten Perlny P-I'ayers. a not~for-profit NYS cbar-ter e.d educati'onal &. literary corporation.

ISSN 0197-4777

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